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Sentence Starters: Ultimate List to Improve Your Essays and Writing

Ashley Shaw

Ashley Shaw

How to start a sentence

This blog post is going to be about … No. Too boring.

Today, I am going to talk to you about ... No. Too specific.

This is a blog post for all writers ... Nope. Too generic.

Has this ever been you while writing? I get it. Writing a good sentence can be hard, and when you have to string a whole lot of them together, the task can become daunting. So what do you do?

From the first sentence you write to the very last, you want each one to show your style and motivate your reader to keep reading. In this post, we are going to think about how you start your sentences.

sentence starter tip

What Is a Good Sentence Starter for an Essay Introduction?

What is a good sentence starter for a body paragraph, 25 useful transitions, can i repeat a sentence starter, how can i rephrase "in conclusion".

The first paragraph of a paper can make or break your grade. It is what gets your audience into the topic and sets the whole stage. Because of this, it is important to get your readers hooked early.

The first sentence of a paper is often called the hook. It shouldn’t be anything ordinary. It should have strong language and be a little surprising, with an interesting fact, story, statistic, or quote on the topic.

Because it is designed to pull the reader in and surprise them a little, it is often good to avoid pre-written sentence starter examples when writing your hook. Just get into it here, and worry about the flow later.

Here are some examples:

Spider webs were once used as bandages.

I taught myself to read when I was three. At least, that’s the story my parents tell.

Recent studies suggest that the average person lies at least once in every conversation.

“The world is bleeding and humans wield the knife,” or so says environmental scientist So Andso.

(P.S. Except for example 1, which is true, I just made all of these up to demonstrate my point. So, please don’t quote me on these!)

Once you jump right in with your hook, it is time to start working on ways to move sentences along. Here is where you may need some sentence starter examples.

In your first paragraph, you basically want to connect your hook to your thesis. You’ll do this with a few sentences setting up the stage for your topic and the claim you will make about it. To do that, follow the tips found in the next section on body paragraphs and general sentence starter tips.

Many of the tips I am about to discuss can be used anywhere in a paper, but they are especially helpful when writing body paragraphs.

Let’s start with one of the most important types of sentence starter in essay writing: transition words.

How Do I Use Transitions in an Essay?

Definition of Transitions

If you want to start writing terrific sentences (and improve your essay structure ), the first thing you should do is start using transition words.

Transition words are those words or phrases that help connect thoughts and ideas. They move one sentence or paragraph into another, and they make things feel less abrupt.

The good thing about transition words is that you probably know a lot of them already and currently use them in your speech. Now, you just need to transition them into your writing. (See what I did there?)

Before we get into examples of what a good transition word is, let’s look at a paragraph without any transitions:

I went to the store. I bought bacon and eggs. I saw someone I knew. I said hello. I went to the cashier. They checked me out. I paid. I got my groceries. I went to my car. I returned home.

Yikes! That is some boring writing. It was painful to write, and I am sure it is even worse to read. There are two reasons for this:

  • I start every sentence with the same word (more on this later)
  • There are no signposts showing me how the ideas in the paragraph connect.

In an essay, you need to show how each of your ideas relate to each other to build your argument. If you just make a series of statements one after the other, you’re not showing your instructor that you actually understand those statements, or your topic.

How do we fix this? Transition words. Roughly 25% of your sentences should start with a transition word. If you can hit that number in your essay, you’ll know that you’ve made meaningful steps towards demonstrating your understanding.

Of course, hitting that number isn’t enough—those transitions need to be meaningful. Let’s look at the different types of transitions and how you can use them.

What Are Words Like First , Next , and Last Called?

You probably already use some transitions in your essays. For example, if you start a paragraph with firstly , you’ve used a transition word. But transitions can do so much more!

Here are 25 common transitional words and phrases that you could use in your essay:

  • Additionally / In Addition
  • Alternatively / Conversely
  • As a result of
  • At this time
  • Consequently
  • Contrary to
  • First(ly), Second(ly), etc.
  • In contrast
  • Nonetheless
  • On the other hand
  • Particularly / In particular
  • In other words

Common Transitional Words

This list isn’t exhaustive, but it is a good start.

These words show different types of relationships between ideas. These relationships fall into four main categories: Emphasis , Contrast , Addition , and Order .

What Are Emphasis Transition Words?

These phrases are used when you want to highlight a point. Examples from my above list include clearly , particularly , and indeed . Want to see some more? Follow my bolded transitions: Undoubtedly , you understand now. It should be noted that you don’t need to worry.

How Do You Use Addition Transitions?

These words add on to what you just said. These are words like along with , moreover , and also . Here are some more: Not only are you going to be great at transitions after this, but you will also be good at writing sentences. Furthermore , everyone is excited to see what you have to say.

How Can I Use Transitions to Contrast Ideas?

This is the opposite of addition, and you use it when you want to show an alternative view or to compare things. Examples from my list include words like nonetheless , contrary to , and besides .

Here are some more: Unlike people who haven’t read this article, you are going to be really prepared to write great sentences. Even so , there is still a lot more about writing to learn.

How Do I Order Ideas in My Essay?

A good first step is using order transition words.

This set of transitions helps mark the passage of time or gives an order to events. From the list, think of things like first and finally . Now for some extras: At this time yesterday , you were worried about starting sentences. Following this , though, you will be an expert.

The four types of transitions

Now that you get the concept of transitions, let’s go back to that poorly written paragraph above and add some in to see what happens:

This morning , I went to the store. While I was there, I bought bacon and eggs. Then I saw someone I knew. So I said hello. After that , I went to the cashier. At that time , they checked me out. First , I paid. Next , I got my groceries. Following that , I went to my car. Finally , I returned home.

(Notice the use of commas after most of these transitions!)

This isn’t the best paragraph I’ve ever written. It still needs a lot of work. However, notice what a difference just adding transitions makes. This is something simple but effective you can start doing to make your sentences better today.

If you want to check your transition usage, try ProWritingAid’s Transitions report . You’ll see how many of each type of transition word you've used so you can pin-point where you might be losing your reader.

prowritingaid transitions report for essay

Sign up for a free ProWritingAid account to try it out.

What Are Some Linking Phrases I Can Use in My Essay?

As well as individual words, you can also use short phrases at the beginning of your sentences to transition between ideas. I just did it there— "As well as individual words" shows you how this section of the article is related to the last.

Here are some more phrases like this:

As shown in the example,

As a result of this,

After the meeting,

While this may be true,

Though researchers suggest X,

Before the war began,

Until we answer this question,

Since we cannot assume this to be true,

While some may claim Y,

Because we know that Z is true,

These short phrases are called dependent clauses . See how they all end with a comma? That's because they need you to add more information to make them into complete sentences.

  • While some may claim that chocolate is bad for you, data from a recent study suggests that it may have untapped health benefits .
  • Since we cannot assume that test conditions were consistent, it is impossible to reach a solid conclusion via this experiment .
  • As a result of this, critics disagree as to the symbolism of the yellow car in The Great Gatsby .

The bolded text in each example could stand on its own as a complete sentence. However, if we take away the first part of each sentence, we lose our connection to the other ideas in the essay.

These phrases are called dependent clauses : they depend on you adding another statement to the sentence to complete them. When you use a sentence starter phrase like the ones above in your writing, you signal that the new idea you have introduced completes (or disrupts) the idea before it.

Note: While some very short dependent clauses don’t need a comma, most do. Since it is not wrong to use one on even short ones (depending on the style guide being used), it is a good idea to include one every time.

Definition of a dependent clause

Along with missing transitions and repeating sentence structure, another thing that stops sentences from being great is too much repetition. Keep your sentences sharp and poignant by mixing up word choices to start your sentences.

You might start your sentence with a great word, but then you use that same word 17 sentences in a row. After the first couple, your sentences don’t sound as great. So, whether it is varying the transitional phrases you use or just mixing up the sentence openers in general, putting in some variety will only improve your sentences.

ProWritingAid lets you know if you’ve used the same word repeatedly at the start of your sentences so you can change it.

ProWritingAid's Repetition Report

The Repeats Report also shows you all of the repeats in your document. If you've used a sentence starter and then repeated it a couple of paragraphs down, the report will highlight it for you.

Try the Repeats Report with a free ProWritingAid account.

Now that you have your introduction sentences and body sentences taken care of, let’s talk a little about conclusion sentences. While you will still use transitions and clauses as in the body, there are some special considerations here.

Your conclusion is what people will remember most after they finish reading your paper. So, you want to make it stand out. Don’t just repeat yourself; tell them what they should do with what you just told them!

Use the tips from above, but also remember the following:

Be unique. Not only should you vary the words you use to start different sentences, but you should also think outside of the box. If you use the same conclusion sentence starter everyone else is using, your ideas will blend in too.

Be natural. Some of the best writing out there is writing that sounds natural. This goes for academic writing, too. While you won’t use phrases like "at the end of the day" in essay writing, stilted phrases like "in conclusion" can disrupt the flow you’ve created earlier on.

Here are some alternatives to "in conclusion" you could use in an essay:

  • To review, ... (best for scientific papers where you need to restate your key points before making your final statement)
  • As has been shown, ...
  • In the final analysis, ...
  • Taking everything into account, ...
  • On the whole, ...
  • Generally speaking, ...

If you’re looking for more ways to rephrase "in conclusion," take a look at our complete list of synonyms you can use.

in conclusion alternatives

There may not be a set word or words that you can use to make your sentences perfect. However, when you start using these tips, you’ll start to see noticeable improvement in your writing.

If you’ve ever heard people talk about pacing and flow in academic writing, and you have no idea what they mean or how to improve yours, then this is your answer. These tips will help your writing sound more natural, which is how you help your ideas flow.

Take your writing to the next level:

20 Editing Tips From Professional Writers

20 Editing Tips from Professional Writers

Whether you are writing a novel, essay, article, or email, good writing is an essential part of communicating your ideas., this guide contains the 20 most important writing tips and techniques from a wide range of professional writers..

what is a good sentence starter for an essay

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Ashley Shaw is a former editor and marketer/current PhD student and teacher. When she isn't studying con artists for her dissertation, she's thinking of new ways to help college students better understand and love the writing process.

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How to Start an Essay: 7 Tips for a Knockout Essay Introduction

Lindsay Kramer

Sometimes, the most difficult part of writing an essay is getting started. You might have an outline already and know what you want to write, but struggle to find the right words to get it going. Don’t worry; you aren’t the first person to grapple with starting an essay, and you certainly won’t be the last. 

Writing an essay isn’t the same as writing a book. Or writing a poem. Or writing a scientific research paper. Essay writing is a unique process that involves clear sequencing, backing up your positions with quality sources, and engaging language. But it’s also got one important thing in common with every other type of writing: You need to hook your reader’s attention within the first few sentences. 

Give your essays extra polish Grammarly helps you write with confidence Write with Grammarly

Intriguing ways to start an essay

There are many different ways to write an essay introduction. Each has its benefits and potential drawbacks, and each is best suited for certain kinds of essays . Although these essay introductions use different rhetorical devices and prime the reader in different ways, they all achieve the same goal: hooking the reader and enticing them to keep reading.

To “hook” a reader simply means to capture their attention and make them want to continue reading your work. An essay introduction that successfully hooks readers in one essay won’t necessarily hook readers in another essay, which is why it’s so important for you to understand why different types of essay openings are effective. 

Take a look at these common ways to start an essay:

Share a shocking or amusing fact

One way to start your essay is with a shocking, unexpected, or amusing fact about the topic you’re covering. This grabs the reader’s attention and makes them want to read further, expecting explanation, context, and/or elaboration on the fact you presented. 

Check out these essay introduction examples that use relevant, engaging facts to capture the reader’s attention:

“More than half of Iceland’s population believe that elves exist or that they possibly can exist. Although this might sound strange to foreigners, many of us have similar beliefs that would sound just as strange to those outside our cultures.”

“Undergraduate students involved in federal work-study programs earn an average of just $1,794 per year. That’s just slightly more than the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in our city.”

Relevance is key here. Make sure the fact you choose directly relates to the topic you’re covering in your essay. Otherwise, it will feel random, confusing, or at best, shoehorned into the essay. In any case, it will undermine your essay as a whole by making it seem like you don’t have a full grasp on your topic. 

If you’re writing an expository or persuasive essay , including a shocking or amusing fact in your introduction can be a great way to pique your reader’s curiosity. The fact you present can be one that supports the position you argue in the essay or it can be part of the body of data your expository essay explains. 

Ask a question

By asking a question in your essay opening, you’re directly inviting the reader to interact with your work. They don’t get to be a passive consumer; they’re now part of the conversation. This can be a very engaging way to start an essay. 

Take a look at these examples of essay openings that use questions to hook readers:

“How many times have you been late to class because you couldn’t find parking? You’re not alone—our campus is in desperate need of a new parking deck.”

“How frequently do you shop at fast fashion retailers? These retailers include H&M, Zara, Uniqlo and other brands that specialize in inexpensive clothing meant for short-term use.” 

Asking a question is an effective choice for a persuasive essay because it asks the reader to insert themselves into the topic or even pick a side. While it can also work in other kinds of essays, it really shines in any essay that directly addresses the reader and puts them in a position to reflect on what you’re asking. 

Dramatize a scene

Another effective way to write an essay introduction is to dramatize a scene related to your essay. Generally, this approach is best used with creative essays, like personal statements and literary essays. Here are a few examples of essay introductions that immerse readers in the action through dramatized scenes:

“The rain pounded against the roof, loudly drowning out any conversations we attempted to have. I’d promised them I’d play the latest song I wrote for guitar, but Mother Earth prevented any concert from happening that night.”

“Imagine you’ve just gotten off an airplane. You’re hot, you’re tired, you’re uncomfortable, and suddenly, you’re under arrest.”

Beyond creative essays, this kind of opening can work when you’re using emotional appeal to underscore your position in a persuasive essay. It’s also a great tool for a dramatic essay, and could be just the first of multiple dramatized scenes throughout the piece. 

Kick it off with a quote

When you’re wondering how to write an essay introduction, remember that you can always borrow wisdom from other writers. This is a powerful way to kick off any kind of essay. Take a look at these examples:

“‘The past is never dead. It’s not even past.’ —William Faulkner. In his novel Requiem for a Nun , our changing perspective of the past is a primary theme.”

“‘It always seems impossible until it’s done.’ —Nelson Mandela. Before I joined the military, boot camp seemed impossible. But now, it’s done.”

Just as in choosing a fact or statistic to open your essay, any quote you choose needs to be relevant to your essay’s topic . If your reader has to perform a web search for your quote to figure out how it relates to the rest of your essay, it’s not relevant enough to use. Go with another quote that your text can easily explain. 

State your thesis directly

The most straightforward kind of essay introduction is one where you simply state your thesis. Take a look at these examples:

“Fraternity culture is dangerous and contrary to campus values. Banning it is in the campus community’s best interest.”

“We can’t afford to ignore the evidence any longer; we need climate action now.”

How to write an essay introduction

Pick the right tone for your essay.

You probably shouldn’t use a funny quote to start a persuasive essay on a serious subject. Similarly, a statistic that can evoke strong emotions in the reader might not be the right choice for an expository essay because it could potentially be construed as your attempt to argue for a certain viewpoint, rather than state facts. 

Read your essay’s first paragraph aloud and listen to your writing’s tone. Does the opening line’s tone match the rest of the paragraph, or is there a noticeable tone shift from the first line or two to the rest? In many cases, you can hear whether your tone is appropriate for your essay. Beyond listening for the right tone, use Grammarly’s tone detector to ensure that your essay introduction—as well as the rest of your essay—maintains the right tone for the subject you’re covering.   

When you’re stuck, work backwards

Starting an essay can be difficult. If you find yourself so caught up on how to write an essay introduction that you’re staring at a blank screen as the clock ticks closer to your deadline, skip the introduction and move onto your essay’s body paragraphs . Once you have some text on the page, it can be easier to go back and write an introduction that leads into that content. 

You may even want to start from the very end of your essay. If you know where your essay is going, but not necessarily how it will get there, write your conclusion first. Then, write the paragraph that comes right before your conclusion. Next, write the paragraph before that, working your way backwards until you’re in your introduction paragraph. By then, writing an effective essay introduction should be easy because you already have the content you need to introduce. 

Polish your essays until they shine

Got a draft of a great essay? Awesome! But don’t hit “submit” just yet—you’re only halfway to the finish line. Make sure you’re always submitting your best work by using Grammarly to catch misspelled words, grammar mistakes, and places where you can swap in different words to improve your writing’s clarity. 

what is a good sentence starter for an essay

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Sentence Starters: Definition, Rules and Remarkable Examples

Sentence starters, also known as transition words or phrases, are vital tools for essay writing. They play a key role in formulating an interesting and well-written introduction, providing smooth transitions between sentences and paragraphs, and writing a proper conclusion that summarizes the main points covered. Sentence starters are one of the essential tools of a skilled writer.

Table of Contents

What Are Sentence Starters and Why Are They So Important?

The main function of sentence starters is to tie together words, sentences, and paragraphs in an essay so that the writing flows logically. The sentence starters will help the readers comprehend the content more easily and absorb the meaning. The writing will be well-organized and cohesive.

Reading an essay containing well-placed and thoughtful sentence starters will be much easier, more interesting, and far less tedious. Most readers will be comfortable reading the material and will understand the writer’s intent. Students who use sentence starters expertly can expect to receive higher grades on their essays and exams.

What Are Some Examples of Sentence Starters?

Sentence starters for introductions.

  • This essay discusses…
  • The definition of…
  • In my opinion…
  • A popular subject of debate lately has been…
  • Until now, I believed…, then I found out that…
  • Most people assume that…
  • The most recent data suggests that…
  • A popular topic for discussion recently has been…
  • Recent headlines have shown…

Sentence Starters for Transitioning Between Sentences and Paragraphs

  • In contrast,
  • Furthermore,
  • In addition,
  • On the other hand ,
  • Consequently,
  • As a result,
  • Additionally,
  • Even though,

Examples of Sentence Starters Used in Sentences

In contrast , Representative Smith supported the new bill enthusiastically.

Moreover , data from a follow-up study found an even better outcome for patients who used this treatment.

Furthermore , other researchers had similar promising results.

Similarly , Dr. John Blake, Professor of Political Science at Stanford University, agreed with Dr. Johnson’s findings.

While the news was positive, experts were cautious about becoming overly optimistic at this point.

On the other hand , the lead engineer, Edward Boswell, disagreed with the proposed remodeling plans.

Although Rachel Turner was against the tentative schedule, she compromised with the rest of the committee .

Whereas Fairfield amended its town ordinance, Weston decided to postpone the action indefinitely.

Sentence Starters for Conclusions

  • In summary,
  • In closing,
  • Ultimately,
  • In the final analysis,
  • In essence,
  • All in all,

Examples of Sentence Starters in Conclusions

  • In summary , this analysis shows promising possibilities for new treatments and better outcomes.
  • In closing , there are substantive arguments on both sides of the issue. However, I believe that passing this legislation would be the best course of action.
  • To sum up , there needs to be more extensive research on these proposals in order to make a sound decision.
  • Ultimately , the voters will decide whether the downtown transformation is in the best interests of the city.
  • In the final analysis , I believe that Morgan’s proposal is the most promising.
  • In essence , Dr. Jackson is advocating for increased spending now which will compromise the town’s future goals.
  • All in all , it seems that the proponents of the project have more evidence than does the opposition.

Sentence Starters | Infographic

Sentence Starters: Definition, Rules and Remarkable Examples

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what is a good sentence starter for an essay

Crafting Compelling Sentence Starters for Essays

Embarking on the journey of essay writing can often feel like standing at the edge of a cliff, especially when it comes to crafting that perfect opening line. The initial words of your essay set the tone and can either captivate your reader or lose their interest. In this article, we'll explore various strategies and examples of sentence starters that can elevate your essays, making them not just informative but also engaging and thought-provoking.

The Art of the Opening Sentence

The opening sentence is your first impression, your chance to grab the reader's attention. It's the gateway to your thoughts and arguments, setting the stage for what's to come.

Why Are Good Sentence Starters Important?

  • Engagement: A compelling starter draws the reader in, piquing their curiosity.
  • Direction: It sets the tone and direction of your essay.
  • Context: A well-crafted opening provides a glimpse into the essay's context.

Examples of Effective Sentence Starters

  • "In the realm of X, it is often debated that..."
  • "Imagine a world where X is the norm..."
  • "X is a phenomenon that has captured the attention of many..."

Types of Sentence Starters

Depending on your essay's tone and subject, different types of sentence starters can be employed.

Question Starters

  • "Have you ever wondered what it would be like to X?"
  • "Why is X considered essential in the field of Y?"

Statement Starters

  • "The concept of X has evolved significantly over the years."
  • "X is a testament to the power of Y."

Quotation Starters

  • "As X once said, '...'"
  • "The words of X resonate deeply in the context of Y."

Tailoring Starters to Your Essay

The key to choosing the right starter is understanding the purpose and tone of your essay. Is it argumentative, descriptive, or narrative? Each type demands a different approach to engaging your reader.

Tips for Crafting Your Own Starters

  • Know Your Audience: Tailor your language to resonate with your readers.
  • Be Concise: Keep it clear and to the point.
  • Be Original: Avoid clichés to make your essay stand out.

Summary and Key Insights

Mastering the art of the opening sentence can transform your essays from mundane to memorable. It's about making a connection with your reader and setting the stage for your ideas.

Frequently Asked Questions

What makes a sentence starter too cliché.

A cliché starter is one that's overused and predictable, lacking originality and failing to engage the reader.

Can I start an essay with a quote?

Absolutely! A relevant and thought-provoking quote can be an excellent way to start an essay.

How long should a sentence starter be?

It should be concise enough to be impactful but long enough to set the context.

Is it okay to start an essay with a question?

Yes, starting with a question can be a great way to engage the reader's curiosity.

Can humor be used in essay sentence starters?

If appropriate for the topic and audience, humor can be an effective tool.

The right sentence starter can be the difference between an essay that resonates and one that falls flat. It's your first step in a dialogue with your reader, so make it count.

Looking for more than just tips? Our expert content writing agency offers professional writing services, SEO content, and unlimited revisions to ensure your essays and content not only start strong but also leave a lasting impression.

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what is a good sentence starter for an essay

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Useful Sentence Starters For Academic Writing

what is a good sentence starter for an essay

In academic writing, sentence starters play a vital role in organizing your ideas, conveying your arguments effectively, and maintaining a flow throughout your research paper. In this blog post, we will explore various sentence starters that can elevate the quality of your academic writing and provide examples tailored to research-based essays.

Why are sentence starters useful

Sentence starters are particularly helpful in introductions to grab the reader’s attention and provide a clear roadmap for the research essay. They can be employed when introducing a new argument or point, creating a smooth transition between paragraphs, or when emphasizing key ideas. Additionally, sentence starters are beneficial in conclusions to summarize key findings, restate the thesis, and leave a lasting impression on the reader.

Moreover, sentence starters are valuable in comparisons to highlight similarities or differences, in sequences or lists to provide a structured flow of ideas, and in elaboration to expand on points or introduce new evidence. They can also be used to express uncertainty or doubt when discussing conflicting perspectives or limitations in the research. Overall, sentence starters add coherence, clarity, and sophistication to academic writing, making it more compelling and engaging for the reader .

Introduction sentence starters for essays

These sentence starters introduce what the paragraph or entire text is about so the readers know what to expect. 

  • “This study aims to…”

Example: This study aims to investigate the correlation between social media usage and mental health among teenagers.

  • “In recent years, research has shown…”

Example: In recent years, research has shown a growing interest in the potential therapeutic benefits of mindfulness practices.

  • “The purpose of this research is to…”

Example: The purpose of this research is to examine the impact of climate change on biodiversity in tropical rainforests.

Conclusion sentence starters

These sentence starters are helpful to hint at the reader that you’re about to wrap things up so they don’t expect any new points or evidence. 

  • “In conclusion, it is evident that…”

Example: In conclusion, it is evident that the implementation of renewable energy sources is crucial for mitigating the effects of global warming.

  • “Based on the findings, it can be concluded that…”

Example: Based on the findings, it can be concluded that regular exercise contributes to improved cognitive function in older adults.

  • “Overall, this research sheds light on…”

Example: Overall, this research sheds light on the importance of early intervention programs for children with learning disabilities.

Good sentence starters for comparisons

These sentence starters show that two things are related or alike. 

  • “Similarly,…”

Example: Similarly, both studies observed a significant decrease in cholesterol levels among participants who followed a Mediterranean diet.

  • “In contrast to…”

Example: In contrast to previous research, this study found no significant relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep disturbances.

  • “Like X, Y also…”

Example: Like previous studies, this research also highlights the impact of air pollution on respiratory health.

Good sentence starters for sequences or lists

Sentence starters for sequences are used to begin or relate lists of instructions or explaining a series of events. 

  • “ Firstly, …”

Example: Firstly, the survey gathered demographic information from participants.

  • “ Secondly, …”

Example: Secondly, the data analysis involved statistical techniques to identify patterns and trends.

  • “Finally, …”

Example: Finally, the study proposed recommendations for future research in this field.

Good sentence starters for elaboration or adding new points

These sentence starters ease the transition from explaining the larger picture to showing examples of minute details. 

  • “ Moreover, …”

Example: Moreover, this research emphasizes the importance of incorporating ethical considerations in clinical trials.

  • “Additionally, …”

Example: Additionally, previous studies have identified socioeconomic factors as influential determinants of educational attainment.

  • “Furthermore, …”

Example: Furthermore, the research findings highlight the need for more extensive sample sizes to draw generalizable conclusions.

Good sentence starters to show uncertainty or doubt

These sentence starters help in explaining to the reader that there is an upcoming contrasting idea or thought.

  • “ Although the results suggest…”

Example: Although the results suggest a positive correlation, further investigation is warranted to establish a causal relationship.

  • “It is plausible that…”

Example: It is plausible that the observed variations in results could be attributed to differences in sample demographics.

  • “It remains unclear whether…”

Example: It remains unclear whether the observed changes in behavior are transient or long-lasting.

In conclusion, sentence starters serve as valuable tools in academic writing, enabling you to structure your thoughts, enhance clarity, and guide readers through your research essays. Use them in abundance yet carefully, as they can enhance your quality of writing significantly.

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Get Talking with These Sentence Starters: The Ultimate Guide

Sentence starters are an essential tool for anyone who wants to improve their writing skills. They are words or phrases that help to introduce the rest of the sentence, typically set apart by commas. The words that start a sentence are some of the most important in writing: They introduce what the sentence is about so the reader knows what to expect.

In this article, we will explore the benefits of using sentence starters in your writing. We will provide you with examples of sentence starters that you can use in your own writing, and we will explain how to use them effectively. Whether you are a student looking to improve your essay writing skills, or a professional looking to enhance your communication skills, this article will provide you with the tools you need to succeed.

Sentence Starters

Sentence Starters

What are sentence starters.

As the name would suggest, sentence starters are any words or phrases that can be used to perfectly start a sentence. Every sentence is different, so every sentence requires a different starter to really convey a meaning. A common sentence starter like “however” has a very specific purpose. You wouldn’t just be able to throw the word “however” into the first sentence of an essay, for example, because it wouldn’t be compared against anything.

However, it is a good idea to figure out when is the best time to use certain sentence starters to really add something extra to your writing. It will be what separates you from the rest of the crowd when you get a better understanding of how it should all work.

The Importance of Variety in Sentence Starters

When it comes to writing, sentence starters play a crucial role in grabbing the reader’s attention and conveying the message effectively. However, using the same sentence starters repeatedly can make the writing monotonous and dull, leading to a loss of interest from the reader. This is where the importance of variety in sentence starters comes into play.

Using a mixture of different sentence starters can keep the reader engaged and interested in the content. It also adds emphasis to important points in the text and makes the writing more lively and enjoyable to read.

Additionally, using a variety of sentence starters can help the writer to convey different emotions and tones in their writing. For example, using a rhetorical question as a sentence starter can create a sense of curiosity and make the reader think deeply about the topic. On the other hand, using a declarative sentence as a starter can convey a sense of confidence and authority.

To achieve variety in sentence starters, writers can use a combination of techniques such as varying the length and structure of sentences, using different types of phrases, and incorporating transitional words. By doing so, the writing becomes more dynamic and engaging, making the reader want to keep reading.

Types of Sentence Starters

When it comes to writing, it’s important to have a variety of sentence starters in your arsenal. Different types of sentence starters can help you achieve different effects in your writing. In this section, we’ll cover three types of sentence starters: conjunction starters, adverb starters, and prepositional phrase starters.

Conjunction Starters

Conjunction starters are words that are used to connect two ideas or thoughts. They can be used to show contrast, addition, or cause and effect. Some common conjunction starters include:

Adverb Starters

Adverb starters are words that modify the verb in a sentence. They can be used to describe how, when, where, or to what extent something is happening. Some common adverb starters include:

  • Nevertheless
  • Furthermore
  • Additionally

Here are some examples of adverb starters in use:

  • “However, he didn’t let that stop him from pursuing his dreams.”
  • “Nevertheless, she persisted in her efforts to make a change.”
  • “Furthermore, the study found that the results were consistent across all age groups.”
  • “Therefore, it is important to take precautions to prevent the spread of the virus.”
  • “Additionally, the report showed that there was a significant increase in sales.”

Prepositional Phrase Starters

Prepositional phrase starters are words that are used to describe the relationship between two things in a sentence. They can be used to show location, time, or direction. Some common prepositional phrase starters include:

Here are some examples of prepositional phrase starters in use:

  • “In the morning, she always enjoyed a cup of coffee.”
  • “On the way to work, he listened to his favorite podcast .”
  • “At the party, she met some new friends.”
  • “With a little practice, he became an expert at playing the guitar.”
  • “By the end of the day, she was exhausted from all the work.”

Examples of Sentence Starters

When it comes to writing, sentence starters can be incredibly useful. They can help writers get their thoughts flowing, organize their ideas, and make their writing more engaging. In this section, we’ll take a look at some examples of sentence starters that can be used for different types of writing.

For Storytelling

When telling a story, it’s important to hook your readers from the very beginning. Here are some sentence starters that can be used to do just that:

  • Once upon a time…
  • It all started when…
  • In a far-off land…
  • Long ago and far away…
  • Deep in the heart of…

These sentence starters can be used to set the scene and draw the reader in. Once you’ve hooked your reader, you can use the following sentence starters to move the story along:

  • Suddenly…
  • Just then…
  • Meanwhile…
  • Later that day…
  • The next morning…

When writing an essay, it’s important to clearly state your argument and support it with evidence. Here are some sentence starters that can help you do just that:

  • According to…
  • In contrast…
  • Similarly…
  • On the other hand …
  • For example …

These sentence starters can be used to introduce evidence and support your argument. Additionally, you can use the following sentence starters to transition between paragraphs:

  • Moving on to…
  • In conclusion …
  • Taking a closer look…
  • Another important point…
  • It’s worth noting that…

For Business Writing

When writing for business, it’s important to be clear and concise. Here are some sentence starters that can help you achieve that:

  • As previously mentioned…
  • To summarize…
  • In other words…
  • To put it simply…
  • The bottom line is…

These sentence starters can be used to summarize information and make your writing more concise. Additionally, you can use the following sentence starters to make requests or give instructions:

  • I would appreciate it if…
  • Please be advised that…
  • Kindly note that…
  • In order to…
  • It is imperative that…

By using these sentence starters, you can make your business writing more effective and efficient.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

When it comes to using sentence starters, there are some common mistakes that writers should avoid. Here are a few to keep in mind:

Overusing the Same Sentence Starter

One of the most common mistakes writers make is overusing the same sentence starter throughout their writing. While sentence starters can be helpful in guiding the reader through your writing, using the same one repeatedly can make your writing sound repetitive and monotonous. To avoid this, try using a variety of sentence starters throughout your writing.

Using Sentence Starters Incorrectly

Another mistake writers make is using sentence starters incorrectly. For example, beginning a sentence with “and” or “but” can be effective in some cases, but it’s important to use these words appropriately. Additionally, some sentence starters may not be appropriate for certain writing styles or contexts. Make sure to consider the tone and purpose of your writing before using a particular sentence starter.

Failing to Vary Sentence Structure

Using sentence starters can be a great way to vary sentence structure and keep your writing engaging. However, it’s important to also vary the structure of your sentences themselves. Using the same sentence structure repeatedly can make your writing sound dull and uninteresting. Try experimenting with different sentence structures to keep your writing fresh and engaging.

Neglecting Punctuation

Finally, it’s important to remember that sentence starters are just one aspect of good writing. Neglecting punctuation can make your writing difficult to understand and detract from its overall effectiveness. Make sure to use punctuation correctly and consistently throughout your writing.

By keeping these common mistakes in mind, writers can use sentence starters effectively to improve the flow and readability of their writing.

In conclusion, sentence starters are an essential tool that writers use to make their work more organized, coherent, and easy to read. They help to create a smooth flow of ideas and thoughts, making it easier for the reader to follow the writer’s argument or story.

Good sentence starters can be used in different types of writing, including essays, articles, research papers, and even fiction. They help to introduce new ideas, provide evidence, summarize key points, and make transitions between paragraphs and sections.

The use of sentence starters can also help to improve the quality of writing by making it more engaging and captivating. They can be used to create suspense, add emphasis, and convey emotions. Additionally, sentence starters can help to make writing more concise and clear, avoiding ambiguity and confusion.

Overall, using sentence starters is an effective way to improve the quality of writing and make it more organized, coherent, and engaging. Whether you are a student, a professional writer, or someone who enjoys writing for fun, incorporating sentence starters into your work can help you achieve your writing goals and captivate your audience.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some effective ways to start a sentence?

There are many effective ways to start a sentence, but it all depends on the context and purpose of your writing. Some common ways to start a sentence include using transitional words and phrases, such as “however,” “in addition,” or “meanwhile,” or starting with a strong subject or action verb. You can also use rhetorical questions, quotes, or interesting facts to grab the reader’s attention and set the tone for your writing.

How can sentence starters be used in persuasive writing?

Sentence starters can be very useful in persuasive writing because they can help you introduce your argument and provide evidence to support it. Some effective sentence starters for persuasive writing include “it is clear that,” “research shows that,” or “experts agree that.” These types of sentence starters can help you establish credibility and persuade your reader to agree with your point of view.

What are some common transition sentence starters?

Common transition sentence starters include “however,” “in addition,” “meanwhile,” “therefore,” and “consequently.” These words and phrases can help you connect ideas and create a smooth flow between sentences and paragraphs.

What are some sentence starters for creative writing?

Creative writing often requires more varied and imaginative sentence starters to create a unique and engaging story. Some examples of sentence starters for creative writing include “once upon a time,” “suddenly,” “in a far-off land,” or “the world was never the same again.” These types of sentence starters can help you set the scene, create suspense, or introduce a new character or plot twist.

How can sentence starters be used in speaking?

Sentence starters can be very useful in speaking because they can help you organize your thoughts and communicate your ideas more effectively. Some effective sentence starters for speaking include “I believe that,” “in my opinion,” or “from my experience.” These types of sentence starters can help you express your ideas clearly and confidently.

What are some sentence starters for providing evidence?

When providing evidence to support your argument, it’s important to use sentence starters that clearly indicate the source and relevance of your evidence. Some effective sentence starters for providing evidence include “according to,” “as demonstrated by,” or “for example.” These types of sentence starters can help you present your evidence in a clear and convincing way.

Last Updated on August 9, 2023

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  • 40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays

what is a good sentence starter for an essay

To be truly brilliant, an essay needs to utilise the right language. You could make a great point, but if it’s not intelligently articulated, you almost needn’t have bothered.

Developing the language skills to build an argument and to write persuasively is crucial if you’re to write outstanding essays every time. In this article, we’re going to equip you with the words and phrases you need to write a top-notch essay, along with examples of how to utilise them.

It’s by no means an exhaustive list, and there will often be other ways of using the words and phrases we describe that we won’t have room to include, but there should be more than enough below to help you make an instant improvement to your essay-writing skills.

If you’re interested in developing your language and persuasive skills, Oxford Royale offers summer courses at its Oxford Summer School , Cambridge Summer School , London Summer School , San Francisco Summer School and Yale Summer School . You can study courses to learn english , prepare for careers in law , medicine , business , engineering and leadership.

General explaining

Let’s start by looking at language for general explanations of complex points.

1. In order to

Usage: “In order to” can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument. Example: “In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y.”

2. In other words

Usage: Use “in other words” when you want to express something in a different way (more simply), to make it easier to understand, or to emphasise or expand on a point. Example: “Frogs are amphibians. In other words, they live on the land and in the water.”

3. To put it another way

Usage: This phrase is another way of saying “in other words”, and can be used in particularly complex points, when you feel that an alternative way of wording a problem may help the reader achieve a better understanding of its significance. Example: “Plants rely on photosynthesis. To put it another way, they will die without the sun.”

4. That is to say

Usage: “That is” and “that is to say” can be used to add further detail to your explanation, or to be more precise. Example: “Whales are mammals. That is to say, they must breathe air.”

5. To that end

Usage: Use “to that end” or “to this end” in a similar way to “in order to” or “so”. Example: “Zoologists have long sought to understand how animals communicate with each other. To that end, a new study has been launched that looks at elephant sounds and their possible meanings.”

Adding additional information to support a point

Students often make the mistake of using synonyms of “and” each time they want to add further information in support of a point they’re making, or to build an argument . Here are some cleverer ways of doing this.

6. Moreover

Usage: Employ “moreover” at the start of a sentence to add extra information in support of a point you’re making. Example: “Moreover, the results of a recent piece of research provide compelling evidence in support of…”

7. Furthermore

Usage:This is also generally used at the start of a sentence, to add extra information. Example: “Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that…”

8. What’s more

Usage: This is used in the same way as “moreover” and “furthermore”. Example: “What’s more, this isn’t the only evidence that supports this hypothesis.”

9. Likewise

Usage: Use “likewise” when you want to talk about something that agrees with what you’ve just mentioned. Example: “Scholar A believes X. Likewise, Scholar B argues compellingly in favour of this point of view.”

10. Similarly

Usage: Use “similarly” in the same way as “likewise”. Example: “Audiences at the time reacted with shock to Beethoven’s new work, because it was very different to what they were used to. Similarly, we have a tendency to react with surprise to the unfamiliar.”

11. Another key thing to remember

Usage: Use the phrase “another key point to remember” or “another key fact to remember” to introduce additional facts without using the word “also”. Example: “As a Romantic, Blake was a proponent of a closer relationship between humans and nature. Another key point to remember is that Blake was writing during the Industrial Revolution, which had a major impact on the world around him.”

12. As well as

Usage: Use “as well as” instead of “also” or “and”. Example: “Scholar A argued that this was due to X, as well as Y.”

13. Not only… but also

Usage: This wording is used to add an extra piece of information, often something that’s in some way more surprising or unexpected than the first piece of information. Example: “Not only did Edmund Hillary have the honour of being the first to reach the summit of Everest, but he was also appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.”

14. Coupled with

Usage: Used when considering two or more arguments at a time. Example: “Coupled with the literary evidence, the statistics paint a compelling view of…”

15. Firstly, secondly, thirdly…

Usage: This can be used to structure an argument, presenting facts clearly one after the other. Example: “There are many points in support of this view. Firstly, X. Secondly, Y. And thirdly, Z.

16. Not to mention/to say nothing of

Usage: “Not to mention” and “to say nothing of” can be used to add extra information with a bit of emphasis. Example: “The war caused unprecedented suffering to millions of people, not to mention its impact on the country’s economy.”

Words and phrases for demonstrating contrast

When you’re developing an argument, you will often need to present contrasting or opposing opinions or evidence – “it could show this, but it could also show this”, or “X says this, but Y disagrees”. This section covers words you can use instead of the “but” in these examples, to make your writing sound more intelligent and interesting.

17. However

Usage: Use “however” to introduce a point that disagrees with what you’ve just said. Example: “Scholar A thinks this. However, Scholar B reached a different conclusion.”

18. On the other hand

Usage: Usage of this phrase includes introducing a contrasting interpretation of the same piece of evidence, a different piece of evidence that suggests something else, or an opposing opinion. Example: “The historical evidence appears to suggest a clear-cut situation. On the other hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day.”

19. Having said that

Usage: Used in a similar manner to “on the other hand” or “but”. Example: “The historians are unanimous in telling us X, an agreement that suggests that this version of events must be an accurate account. Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story.”

20. By contrast/in comparison

Usage: Use “by contrast” or “in comparison” when you’re comparing and contrasting pieces of evidence. Example: “Scholar A’s opinion, then, is based on insufficient evidence. By contrast, Scholar B’s opinion seems more plausible.”

21. Then again

Usage: Use this to cast doubt on an assertion. Example: “Writer A asserts that this was the reason for what happened. Then again, it’s possible that he was being paid to say this.”

22. That said

Usage: This is used in the same way as “then again”. Example: “The evidence ostensibly appears to point to this conclusion. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best.”

Usage: Use this when you want to introduce a contrasting idea. Example: “Much of scholarship has focused on this evidence. Yet not everyone agrees that this is the most important aspect of the situation.”

Adding a proviso or acknowledging reservations

Sometimes, you may need to acknowledge a shortfalling in a piece of evidence, or add a proviso. Here are some ways of doing so.

24. Despite this

Usage: Use “despite this” or “in spite of this” when you want to outline a point that stands regardless of a shortfalling in the evidence. Example: “The sample size was small, but the results were important despite this.”

25. With this in mind

Usage: Use this when you want your reader to consider a point in the knowledge of something else. Example: “We’ve seen that the methods used in the 19th century study did not always live up to the rigorous standards expected in scientific research today, which makes it difficult to draw definite conclusions. With this in mind, let’s look at a more recent study to see how the results compare.”

26. Provided that

Usage: This means “on condition that”. You can also say “providing that” or just “providing” to mean the same thing. Example: “We may use this as evidence to support our argument, provided that we bear in mind the limitations of the methods used to obtain it.”

27. In view of/in light of

Usage: These phrases are used when something has shed light on something else. Example: “In light of the evidence from the 2013 study, we have a better understanding of…”

28. Nonetheless

Usage: This is similar to “despite this”. Example: “The study had its limitations, but it was nonetheless groundbreaking for its day.”

29. Nevertheless

Usage: This is the same as “nonetheless”. Example: “The study was flawed, but it was important nevertheless.”

30. Notwithstanding

Usage: This is another way of saying “nonetheless”. Example: “Notwithstanding the limitations of the methodology used, it was an important study in the development of how we view the workings of the human mind.”

Giving examples

Good essays always back up points with examples, but it’s going to get boring if you use the expression “for example” every time. Here are a couple of other ways of saying the same thing.

31. For instance

Example: “Some birds migrate to avoid harsher winter climates. Swallows, for instance, leave the UK in early winter and fly south…”

32. To give an illustration

Example: “To give an illustration of what I mean, let’s look at the case of…”

Signifying importance

When you want to demonstrate that a point is particularly important, there are several ways of highlighting it as such.

33. Significantly

Usage: Used to introduce a point that is loaded with meaning that might not be immediately apparent. Example: “Significantly, Tacitus omits to tell us the kind of gossip prevalent in Suetonius’ accounts of the same period.”

34. Notably

Usage: This can be used to mean “significantly” (as above), and it can also be used interchangeably with “in particular” (the example below demonstrates the first of these ways of using it). Example: “Actual figures are notably absent from Scholar A’s analysis.”

35. Importantly

Usage: Use “importantly” interchangeably with “significantly”. Example: “Importantly, Scholar A was being employed by X when he wrote this work, and was presumably therefore under pressure to portray the situation more favourably than he perhaps might otherwise have done.”

Summarising

You’ve almost made it to the end of the essay, but your work isn’t over yet. You need to end by wrapping up everything you’ve talked about, showing that you’ve considered the arguments on both sides and reached the most likely conclusion. Here are some words and phrases to help you.

36. In conclusion

Usage: Typically used to introduce the concluding paragraph or sentence of an essay, summarising what you’ve discussed in a broad overview. Example: “In conclusion, the evidence points almost exclusively to Argument A.”

37. Above all

Usage: Used to signify what you believe to be the most significant point, and the main takeaway from the essay. Example: “Above all, it seems pertinent to remember that…”

38. Persuasive

Usage: This is a useful word to use when summarising which argument you find most convincing. Example: “Scholar A’s point – that Constanze Mozart was motivated by financial gain – seems to me to be the most persuasive argument for her actions following Mozart’s death.”

39. Compelling

Usage: Use in the same way as “persuasive” above. Example: “The most compelling argument is presented by Scholar A.”

40. All things considered

Usage: This means “taking everything into account”. Example: “All things considered, it seems reasonable to assume that…”

How many of these words and phrases will you get into your next essay? And are any of your favourite essay terms missing from our list? Let us know in the comments below, or get in touch here to find out more about courses that can help you with your essays.

At Oxford Royale Academy, we offer a number of  summer school courses for young people who are keen to improve their essay writing skills. Click here to apply for one of our courses today, including law , business , medicine  and engineering .

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Starter Sentences for Essays: Examples and How to write them

Starter phrases

Starter Sentences for Essays

Starter sentences are very important when aiming to write an essay that will guarantee excellent grades. They help your essay to sound good and flow well since they make your work engage more with the writer while making it interesting to read. You might be wondering what I’m talking about.

Well, in simple terms, sentence starters or starter sentences are phrases that are placed at the beginning of a sentence to introduce the content or information that is contained within the sentence. They can also be placed at the start of a paragraph to introduce the paragraph’s content.

While there are various combinations of starter sentences that can be used, it is important to avoid repeating the same combination of words or phrases while starting every sentence. Your essay will be interesting instead of sounding repetitive. 

what is a good sentence starter for an essay

Need Help with your Homework or Essays?

Importance of good essay starters, 1. they bring out richer ideas.

One of the major importance of good essay starters is helping you come up with richer and more nuanced ideas. Without them, you will find that your essays will have a regular habit of containing simple subject-verb sentence structures that are not only uninteresting but also unstimulating to the creative mind. 

Good essay starters can stimulate your mind in such a way that you come up with better ideas to support your claims in your academic essays. They also ensure that your work is more refined.

2. Starter sentences Link Ideas 

importance of linking clauses

When good essay starters are used, they can help in linking ideas from one paragraph to the other.

They can also aid in transitioning from one section of your essay, let’s say the introduction, to the body paragraphs, and finally to the conclusion. 

Good essay starters can act as transitions and sentence-starting phrases that transition from one idea to the next smoothly.

They are capable of linking ideas in such a way that the reader will effortlessly flow with the essay from the start to the end.

3. They increase Credibility and Professionalism

As aforementioned, sentence or essay starters are made up of words that introduce the ideas that will be presented within a sentence, a paragraph, or an entire essay.

As such, those words should be carefully selected so that they can effectively serve their intended purpose of introducing, transitioning, and making the essay more interesting and flowing.

Therefore, if you carefully select the appropriate words to act as essay starters, then your academic paper will sound more professional and credible. If such phrases achieve their intended use, the reader will automatically notice and appreciate your essay.

4. Arouse the Reader’s Attention and Anticipation

Good essay starters will ensure that the reader is attentive throughout the essay. Since you will be using different essay starters in different sections or paragraphs of your essay, it means that their attention will be renewed every time they start reading the next paragraph or section. They will anticipate the information that has been introduced by the essay/sentence starter. 

Your readers will be curious and engaged concerning your next claim or argument. Your essay will not be plain and predictable as in the case of essays that lack essay starters.

5. They make Essays Stand Out

When good essay starters are appropriately used, they make your essay stand out from the rest. This is because they make your essay interesting, flowing, professional, and well-researched.

When you are about to make an important point, it is good to use linking and transitional words to start your essay. Your concepts and ideas will be better understood when essay starters are used. 

6. Understanding the Content

For those who are reading an essay, good essay starters will help you understand the type of content you are about to read and think about. You can be told to write an essay based on some specific reading.

Essay starters will help you understand the content better so that you can be able to come up with your essay. 

7. Helps Simplify Linguistically Complex Ideas

Some essays will require you to tackle complex linguistic ideas. Good essay starters can help simplify such ideas in such a way that you, as a writer, can produce a coherent essay, and the readers can comprehend your claims and arguments.

As such, good essay starters are very instrumental when writing persuasive essays, argumentative essays, analytical essays, and contrast essays. They can be used to analyze/predict, explain, and demonstrate cause and effect. 

Tips when Starting Essays

When starting essays, it is important to consider the topic or the subject of your essay and your audience. In writing good essays , one step is starting with an interesting piece that grabs the reader’s read.

ideas to begin an essay

As such, you should first pose a specific question concerning the topic and suggest a correct answer in anticipation of what your audience or readers might respond to.

A strong thesis statement should follow so that you can base your claims and arguments on them.

Your entire essay will be based on the question/answer and the strong thesis statement.

To effectively start an essay, take note of the tips below to deliver a perfect essay introduction.

1. Start with Something Interesting

If you wish to start an essay well, ensure that you share some interesting or shocking facts concerning your topic. Here, you will have to consider your audience’s perspective towards the interesting or shocking fact.

Ensure that the fact is appropriate and relevant to your topic or subject. In our guide on how to write a good paragraph , we explained the importance of such interesting starts because they grab the reader’s attention.

2. Asking a Relevant Question

You can also start your essay by posing a relevant question and immediately answering it. Such a question should be posed in such a way that the readers would want to answer it while still anticipating your answer.

When you immediately answer the question, you invite your audience to consider your response.

3. The Thesis Statement

It is very important to have a strong thesis statement while starting your essay. In most cases, academic papers should have a strong thesis statement in the introduction paragraph.

Some instructors can downgrade you if your essay does not contain a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph.

Once you have identified the thesis statement, place it in the last sentence of the introduction paragraph because the rest of the essay will be based on it. Credible arguments within the body paragraphs will support the claims stated by the thesis statement. 

4. Be Descriptive

When starting your essay, dedicate a few sentences to describe things. You can use anecdotes, quotes, and other relevant rhetorical features to make your readers understand what your essay will be discussing. 

While doing all this, make sure that you have selected the most intriguing topic. Evaluate all the options given to you by your instructor so that you can define the key purpose of your essay.

Once this is done, study the most appropriate literature and conduct thorough research. Come up with a proper outline. Outlines will help you organize your ideas and thoughts into categories to make your writing process easier. 

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36 Examples of Starter Sentences for Different Essays

The section below will give a number of examples that we think will help you get a direction of what to do. To do that, we have divided these examples into 4 categories; persuasive essays, argumentative, analytical, and contrast essays.

9 Good Examples of Starter Sentences for Persuasive Essays

  • In my opinion…
  • I’m sure of…
  • We all know…
  • I feel that…
  • We all agree…
  • While I agree…
  • You must agree that…

Nine Good Starter Sentences for Argumentative Essays

starter phrases

  • In addition to…
  • For example…
  • As well as…
  • Furthermore…
  • Coupled with…
  • Correspondingly…
  • One other thing is that…

9 Good Starter Sentences for Analytical Essays

  • As a result…
  • Accordingly…
  • Consequently…
  • For this reason….
  • This is why…
  • As you can see/notice…
  • For all of this…
  • For all of those reasons…
  • Because of/due to the reason that…

9 Good Starter Sentences for Contrast Essays

  • In contrast to…
  • Nevertheless…
  • On the one hand…
  • On the contrary…
  • Even though this is the case…
  • Conversely,
  • On the other end,

Josh Jasen working

Josh Jasen or JJ as we fondly call him, is a senior academic editor at Grade Bees in charge of the writing department. When not managing complex essays and academic writing tasks, Josh is busy advising students on how to pass assignments. In his spare time, he loves playing football or walking with his dog around the park.

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ThoughtCo / Hugo Lin

  • Ph.D., Rhetoric and English, University of Georgia
  • M.A., Modern English and American Literature, University of Leicester
  • B.A., English, State University of New York

An effective introductory paragraph both informs and motivates. It lets readers know what your essay is about and it encourages them to keep reading.

There are countless ways to begin an essay effectively. As a start, here are 13 introductory strategies accompanied by examples from a wide range of professional writers.

State Your Thesis Briefly and Directly

But avoid making your thesis a bald announcement, such as "This essay is about...". 

"It is time, at last, to speak the truth about Thanksgiving, and the truth is this. Thanksgiving is really not such a terrific holiday...." (Michael J. Arlen, "Ode to Thanksgiving." The Camera Age: Essays on Television . Penguin, 1982)

Pose a Question Related to Your Subject

Follow up the question with an answer, or an invitation for your readers to answer the question.

"What is the charm of necklaces? Why would anyone put something extra around their neck and then invest it with special significance? A necklace doesn't afford warmth in cold weather, like a scarf, or protection in combat, like chain mail; it only decorates. We might say, it borrows meaning from what it surrounds and sets off, the head with its supremely important material contents, and the face, that register of the soul. When photographers discuss the way in which a photograph reduces the reality it represents, they mention not only the passage from three dimensions to two, but also the selection of a point de vue that favors the top of the body rather than the bottom, and the front rather than the back. The face is the jewel in the crown of the body, and so we give it a setting." (Emily R. Grosholz, "On Necklaces." Prairie Schooner , Summer 2007)

State an Interesting Fact About Your Subject

" The peregrine falcon was brought back from the brink of extinction by a ban on DDT, but also by a peregrine falcon mating hat invented by an ornithologist at Cornell University. If you cannot buy this, Google it. Female falcons had grown dangerously scarce. A few wistful males nevertheless maintained a sort of sexual loitering ground. The hat was imagined, constructed, and then forthrightly worn by the ornithologist as he patrolled this loitering ground, singing, Chee-up! Chee-up! and bowing like an overpolite Japanese Buddhist trying to tell somebody goodbye...." (David James Duncan, "Cherish This Ecstasy." The Sun , July 2008)

Present Your Thesis as a Recent Discovery or Revelation

"I've finally figured out the difference between neat people and sloppy people. The distinction is, as always, moral. Neat people are lazier and meaner than sloppy people." (Suzanne Britt Jordan, "Neat People vs. Sloppy People." Show and Tell . Morning Owl Press, 1983)

Briefly Describe the Primary Setting of Your Essay

"It was in Burma, a sodden morning of the rains. A sickly light, like yellow tinfoil, was slanting over the high walls into the jail yard. We were waiting outside the condemned cells, a row of sheds fronted with double bars, like small animal cages. Each cell measured about ten feet by ten and was quite bare within except for a plank bed and a pot of drinking water. In some of them brown silent men were squatting at the inner bars, with their blankets draped round them. These were the condemned men, due to be hanged within the next week or two." (George Orwell, "A Hanging," 1931)

Recount an Incident That Dramatizes Your Subject

"One October afternoon three years ago while I was visiting my parents, my mother made a request I dreaded and longed to fulfill. She had just poured me a cup of Earl Grey from her Japanese iron teapot, shaped like a little pumpkin; outside, two cardinals splashed in the birdbath in the weak Connecticut sunlight. Her white hair was gathered at the nape of her neck, and her voice was low. “Please help me get Jeff’s pacemaker turned off,” she said, using my father’s first name. I nodded, and my heart knocked." (Katy Butler, "What Broke My Father's Heart." The New York Times Magazine , June 18, 2010)

Use the Narrative Strategy of Delay

The narrative strategy of delay allows you to put off identifying your subject just long enough to pique your readers' interest without frustrating them. 

"They woof. Though I have photographed them before, I have never heard them speak, for they are mostly silent birds. Lacking a syrinx, the avian equivalent of the human larynx, they are incapable of song. According to field guides the only sounds they make are grunts and hisses, though the Hawk Conservancy in the United Kingdom reports that adults may utter a croaking coo and that young black vultures, when annoyed, emit a kind of immature snarl...." (Lee Zacharias, "Buzzards." Southern Humanities Review , 2007)

Use the Historical Present Tense

An effective method of beginning an essay is to use historical present tense to relate an incident from the past as if it were happening now. 

"Ben and I are sitting side by side in the very back of his mother’s station wagon. We face glowing white headlights of cars following us, our sneakers pressed against the back hatch door. This is our joy—his and mine—to sit turned away from our moms and dads in this place that feels like a secret, as though they are not even in the car with us. They have just taken us out to dinner, and now we are driving home. Years from this evening, I won’t actually be sure that this boy sitting beside me is named Ben. But that doesn’t matter tonight. What I know for certain right now is that I love him, and I need to tell him this fact before we return to our separate houses, next door to each other. We are both five." (Ryan Van Meter, "First." The Gettysburg Review , Winter 2008)

Briefly Describe a Process That Leads Into Your Subject

"I like to take my time when I pronounce someone dead. The bare-minimum requirement is one minute with a stethoscope pressed to someone’s chest, listening for a sound that is not there; with my fingers bearing down on the side of someone’s neck, feeling for an absent pulse; with a flashlight beamed into someone’s fixed and dilated pupils, waiting for the constriction that will not come. If I’m in a hurry, I can do all of these in sixty seconds, but when I have the time, I like to take a minute with each task." (Jane Churchon, "The Dead Book." The Sun , February 2009)

Reveal a Secret or Make a Candid Observation

"I spy on my patients. Ought not a doctor to observe his patients by any means and from any stance, that he might the more fully assemble evidence? So I stand in doorways of hospital rooms and gaze. Oh, it is not all that furtive an act. Those in bed need only look up to discover me. But they never do." ( Richard Selzer , "The Discus Thrower." Confessions of a Knife . Simon & Schuster, 1979)

Open with a Riddle, Joke, or Humorous Quotation

You can use a riddle , joke, or humorous quotation to reveal something about your subject. 

" Q: What did Eve say to Adam on being expelled from the Garden of Eden? A: 'I think we're in a time of transition.' The irony of this joke is not lost as we begin a new century and anxieties about social change seem rife. The implication of this message, covering the first of many periods of transition, is that change is normal; there is, in fact, no era or society in which change is not a permanent feature of the social landscape...." (Betty G. Farrell, Family: The Making of an Idea, an Institution, and a Controversy in American Culture . Westview Press, 1999)

Offer a Contrast Between Past and Present

"As a child, I was made to look out the window of a moving car and appreciate the beautiful scenery, with the result that now I don't care much for nature. I prefer parks, ones with radios going chuckawaka chuckawaka and the delicious whiff of bratwurst and cigarette smoke." (Garrison Keillor, "Walking Down The Canyon." Time , July 31, 2000)

Offer a Contrast Between Image and Reality

A compelling essay can begin with a contrast between a common misconception and the opposing truth. 

"They aren’t what most people think they are. Human eyes, touted as ethereal objects by poets and novelists throughout history, are nothing more than white spheres, somewhat larger than your average marble, covered by a leather-like tissue known as sclera and filled with nature’s facsimile of Jell-O. Your beloved’s eyes may pierce your heart, but in all likelihood they closely resemble the eyes of every other person on the planet. At least I hope they do, for otherwise he or she suffers from severe myopia (near-sightedness), hyperopia (far-sightedness), or worse...." (John Gamel, "The Elegant Eye." Alaska Quarterly Review , 2009)

  • 'Whack at Your Reader at Once': Eight Great Opening Lines
  • What Is a Compelling Introduction?
  • How to Structure an Essay
  • Development in Composition: Building an Essay
  • Hookers vs. Chasers: How Not to Begin an Essay
  • How To Write an Essay
  • Examples of Great Introductory Paragraphs
  • How to Write a Good Thesis Statement
  • How to Write a Great Essay for the TOEFL or TOEIC
  • Write an Attention-Grabbing Opening Sentence for an Essay
  • How to Develop and Organize a Classification Essay
  • 6 Steps to Writing the Perfect Personal Essay
  • A Guide to Using Quotations in Essays
  • What Is Expository Writing?
  • The Introductory Paragraph: Start Your Paper Off Right
  • English Grammar
  • Sentence Starters

Sentence Starters - How to Use with Examples

Have you been finding it difficult to find good sentence starters? Do you think you have ideas but have some starting trouble? There is nothing to worry about if you do. All that you need to do is learn how to do it and apply them when penning down or voicing out your thoughts and ideas. This article will introduce you to what sentence starters are, how to use them effectively to form well-structured and coherent sentences in a paragraph along with examples for you to analyse and comprehend how it works.

Table of Contents

What is a sentence starter, where and how to use a sentence starter – points to remember, list of commonly used sentence starters, frequently asked questions on sentence starters.

Words and phrases that start off a sentence or introduce a thought can be referred to as sentence starters. Sentence starters make your writing more connected and meaningful. When you are writing about a topic, it is not necessary that you mention your ideas that support it; there definitely will be points that you think are mention-worthy but contradictory. We use sentence starters to make the transition and flow from one point to another smooth. This is not just the case with sentences; the same technique can also be used to connect paragraphs as well.

When you sit down to write a speech, an essay or a report on a particular topic, you normally start by jotting down the points from the top of your head. To add to what you know, you might also research a little. It is only then that you put everything together. When you do this, it is very important that you compare and contrast your thoughts as well as all the points that you have collected as part of your research and put them together in a way that all of it makes complete sense. This is where sentence starters play a role.

Sentence starters prepare your target audience for what’s coming next. It lets you bridge the gap between a thought, its justification, its contradiction, its examples, affirming evidence and so on. Now, knowing a number of sentence starters alone will not help. You have to learn how and where to use them in order to make your writing or speech meaningful.

To help you make proper and effective use of sentence starters, here is a list of the kind of situations where the usage of a sentence starter will definitely prove beneficial.

  • The first instance would be when you are introducing a new thought or idea; for example, the very first sentence that is used to begin a paragraph, an essay, a report or a story.
  • Be it fiction or nonfiction, whatever you are writing about has to have an interesting beginning. A catchy thought and the way you use your words creatively is what will hook your readers.
  • When backing a thought with some data or when providing information that support/justify your finding, you will need a sentence starter to make a connection to whatever you have spoken about previously.
  • When you have two contrasting ideas placed next to each other, you will have to use a sentence starter.
  • A sentence starter can also help you emphasise on whichever idea you think is important.
  • A sentence starter is further used to transition from one paragraph to another.
  • Finally, to conclude a writeup, you can use a sentence starter so that your audience knows that it is the end of your piece.
  • As long as the punctuation of a sentence with a sentence starter is concerned, the only thing you will have to keep in mind is that a comma is usually placed after the sentence starter in case the sentence starter is a preposition, an adverb or a phrase.

Examples of Sentence Starters

Going through some examples of sentence starters can give you a deeper understanding of what they are and where all you can use them, so go through the following section and make use of the examples provided in your writing as and when required.

Take a look at the following examples of sentence starters that can be used in the various situations mentioned.

What is a sentence starter?

Words and phrases that start off a sentence or introduce a thought can be referred to as sentence starters.

What are sentence starters used for?

Sentence starters make your writing more connected and meaningful. Sentence starters prepare your target audience for what’s coming next. It lets you bridge the gap between a thought, its justification, its contradiction, its examples, affirming evidence and so on.

Give some sentence starters for an essay.

Here are some examples of essay starters that you can use to begin your essay.

  • The essay discusses
  • In this essay
  • This essay focuses on
  • The essay will introduce you to

Give some examples of sentence starters to start a paragraph.

Given below are a few examples of sentence starters to start a paragraph.

  • Studies show that
  • In the era of
  • There are more than
  • The research emphasises
  • With reference to

Give some examples of sentence starters to conclude your writing.

Here are a few examples of sentence starters to help you conclude your piece of writing.

  • In conclusion
  • To put it in a nutshell
  • To summarise

what is a good sentence starter for an essay

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Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

Posted on Last updated: October 24, 2023

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

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Sentence Starters! Here you will find a useful list of common sentence starters that you can use in a discussion as well as in essay writing. Learn these sentence starters to improve your English speaking and writing skills.

Table of Contents

Sentence Starters

Sentence starters | common phrases.

  • (The topic) has fostered a debate on …
  • A sensible idea would be to…
  • We all know that…
  • It is said that…
  • It is believed that…
  • People assumed that…
  • There is growing support for the notion that …
  • The data gathered in the study strongly suggests that …
  • The supposition drawn from this being that…
  • Leading to the supposition that…
  • This can be argued that..
  • The source suggest…
  • My own feeling on the subject is that …
  • Generally speaking…
  • As far as I know…
  • As far as I am concerned…
  • I believe that…
  • The focus of discussion in this paper is …
  • The premise of (the topic) seems to be based on …
  • Latest research corroborates the view that …
  • Most people would agree that…
  • It is estimated…
  • The reader supposed that…
  • It is clear that…
  • Everybody knows that…
  • Surely you would agree that…
  • This clearly shows that…
  • I discovered…
  • We always…
  • This indicates…
  • Demonstrating that…
  • It is vital that…
  • It wouldn’t be very difficult to…
  • The real truth is that…
  • Are we expected that…
  • The fact is that…
  • I felt as…
  • I think/ I believe that…
  • It seems to me that…
  • We concluded that…
  • My perspective is…
  • I agree with…
  • Have you thought about…
  • In other words…
  • I see what you mean but…
  • I share your point of view on…
  • In my opinion…

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

Transition Words Used as Sentence Starters

Words to add an idea

  • In addition to
  • For instance
  • For example
  • As an example
  • Additionally
  • Furthermore
  • Another reason
  • Coupled with
  • Correspondingly
  • In addition
  • Identically
  • One other thing

Words that show cause

  • Accordingly
  • As a result
  • Consequently
  • For this reason
  • For this purpose
  • Subsequently
  • This is why
  • Following this
  • As you can see
  • For all of those reasons

Words that show contrast

  • Comparatively
  • Different from
  • Even though
  • However ( however synonyms )
  • In comparison
  • Nevertheless
  • In contrast
  • On the one hand…
  • On the other hand
  • On the contrary

Words that add emphasis

  • Generally speaking
  • For the most part
  • In this situation
  • No doubt (undoubtedly)
  • Particularly
  • Unquestionably

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

Sentence Starters | Infographic

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

ALIYI Ahmad

Sunday 30th of April 2023

This great gift thank you forever

Wednesday 7th of December 2022

thank that helped m out alot

Thursday 1st of December 2022

Amazing list. It helps change up how you start your sentence, and it helps for writers to keep readers engaged.

Friday 27th of May 2022

so i think that there should be more expansion so we can tell the reader a bit more about what is happening

Wednesday 6th of April 2022

i like his book

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Sentence Starters for Essays: A Complete Guide on Its Use and Tips

How to Use Apt Sentence Starters for Essay

Table Of Contents

What is a sentence starter, importance of sentence starters for essay, are transition words and sentence starters the same, tips on how to start a sentence in an essay, how to find a good opening sentence for essay, different types of sentence starters to match different requirements, need help with sentence starters hire our experts.

Studying in high school or college is surely one of the best phases of everyone's life. But even this beautiful phase has its own challenges. Writing essays for school and different academic writing tasks is a bit challenging for students.

It has been loudly declared by most high school students that pick suitable sentence starters for essays . This is the toughest moment they face whenever they think about writing something.

The jinx is over now. This blog will introduce many wonderful ideas about how and what sentence starter for essay to pick to start with. We have segregated the whole blog into different subcategories so that you don't miss anything important when it comes to the wise use of good essay sentence starters .

Even if this guide is not enough for you and you are still struggling hard to compose your essays, hiring a professional service can save you time and your grades. Such services are deliberately kept affordable to help out a large number of students. When you are ready to pay for essay , contacting us is best because their work ethics are unparalleled. Now, let's begin and learn what university essay sentence starters are.

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Generally, a essay writing sentence starters can be defined as a set of words or phrases that we put at the beginning of a sentence. A sentence starter gives a strong indication of what your essay/paragraph is going to focus on and what type of essay it is.

Essay sentence openers are not at all necessary to be always sensational. It is best to keep it relevant and interesting to grab the attention of the reader. Now you know what it is, move on to the next section to learn the importance of sentence starters essay .

An essay should always have a vision and clarity as it explains or introduces something to the readers. How you open the door for them to your article plays a critical role in keeping their interest intact till the end.

A set of good essay sentence starters comes under the most crucial components of any write-up. They help the writer to set the stage for readers with a clue about what to expect next. Essay sentence openers hold the power to bring cohesion to lengthy pieces of writing, especially academic essays.

You can also put essay opening sentence/phrases to good use by using them to make a smooth transition from one paragraph to another. If you put the essay introduction sentence starters at a paragraph's beginning, it often the sharp shifts within your article.

The importance of sentence starters in any sort of writing cannot be overlooked. Getting help from essay writing service providers can assist students in making the best of it out of them. But, before that, you must know whether transition words and sentence starters for essays are the same or not.

Wondering What Sentence Starters to Use in an Essay?

Reach out to Our Experts and Let them Resolve All Your Doubts and Queries

If we put it simply, transition words are the group of words or phrases that helps the writer to connect the thoughts or ideas between two sentences or paragraphs. This makes things less abrupt and more fluid.

Transition words can be used as good sentence starters for essays and vice versa. But not all transition words can fit the category of sentence starters.

If you choose professional writing help to make your essay outstanding, the service providers usually assign that task to an efficient UK essays writer. Such writers know exactly how to blend the right amount of transitional words and sentence starters. 

A Few Useful Transition Words as University Essay Sentence Starters

To help you in making writing more creative yet tightly knitted pieces, here is a list of some useful transition words:

  • Alternatively
  • At this time
  • Consequently
  • In effect of
  • In contrast
  • In other words

These transition words are quite simple to try as an opening sentence for essay or paragraph. They don't take much of your effort to improve your writing style.

Till now, you just get familiar with sentence starters for essays . In the upcoming section, you will know some tips to use it properly in essays.

Also Read:  A Guide to Double Spaced Essay (Process, Significance, Tips)

Writing an essay is not just jotting down your ideas and expressing them in words. There is more to it, particularly when you are writing something related to your academics. Be careful with the words to use in an essay . The most difficult part remains the introductory part. So, take a look at the following tips before you start the essay:

  • Make a rough draft of your thoughts, ideas and how you want to execute that in writing.
  • Choose an interesting title for your essay.
  • List down a few good essay introduction sentence starters. Read carefully through your essay requirements to understand what is expected from your essay
  • Organise your points in a logical order
  • Keep sentences together that make sense with each other in a paragraph
  • Think about a way to grab the attention of the reader
  • Your introduction paragraph should say what the article is going to be about
  • Never skip the conclusion part
  • You can use previously written essay examples as reference

The quality of your essay's first paragraph heavily determines the whole writing's success. You must start the first paragraph interestingly so that reader gets hooked. A good opening sentence for essay can do that for you.

Here is how to pick a stimulating essay opening sentence:

  • Your language should be clear and strong
  • You can add some element of surprise
  • Find something that can help you to pop up the main topic
  • Don't use phrases like "I think" or "It may be". Instead, you may write "I believe" or "I am sure that", etc.

You can take the help of a professional essay writer to process essay for you. Such services are quite affordable.

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In this section, we have categorised a hoard of sentence starters for essays to serve different purposes. We hope these categories will help everyone, including students, to write more powerful essays.

different types of sentence starters

Starters for Writing Essay Topic Sentence

A topic sentence sets the stage for the reader by stating the subject of the essay in the upcoming paragraphs. Here is the list of topic sentences to give you a clue about how to start a sentence in an essay introduction.

  • This paper aims to…
  • Today's topic covered in the paper includes…
  • This write-up focuses on…
  • One reason why…
  • The first thing to note is…

Sentence Starter Ideas for Closing Sentences

Just like a captivating introduction, it is equally crucial to close your essay with the right tone. You can choose from the following phrases to draft the final sentence while looking for sentence starters for university essays.

  • In light of what we have discussed…
  • Put simply…
  • Pieces of evidence and facts suggest that…
  • As conclusion…
  • To conclude…
  • To sum it up…
  • Taking everything into account…
  • In the final analysis…
  • On the whole…

Starters for Hooks

To grab the attention of readers, you can use anything you like from the below list of essay sentence starters:

  • Just as… [for an analogy]
  • Do you know that…[for a fact]
  • As per… [for a statistic]

Starters for Denoting Orders/List

Here comes the group of starters for listing ideas:

  • The second…

Also Read:  Report Vs Essay - All the Major Differences You Need to Know!

Starters for Elaborating

Looking for an essay sentence starter to elaborate on an idea? Take a look at the below-mentioned phrases:

  • In other words…
  • For example,
  • To elaborate…
  • Another way to put it would be…
  • In simple words...

Starters for Contrasting/Comparing

If you need sentence starters for writing essays for contrasting and comparing two or more things, here are some good ideas:

  • The flip side is…
  • Rather than…
  • Apart from…
  • In contrast to…
  • Compared to…
  • On the other hand…
  • Even though…

Starters for Cause and Effect Essays

Here are some wonderful ways to start a sentence in an essay to describe the reason or effect of something:

  • That's why…
  • In that case…
  • This being the scenario…
  • So that's why…
  • Subsequently…

Starters for Sharing Background Info

Following are the good sentence starters for essays for giving brief background information in the paper:

  • As everyone knows…
  • In this age of…
  • As mentioned previously…

Writing a good essay is not just about conveying your thoughts. You should make it intriguing to keep the reader glued to the last word. The sentence starters for essays are great tools for making the article more engaging. For any kind of professional help with writing academic essays, Assignment Desk is always ready to assist you.

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101 Good Sentence Starters Writers Love To Use

If you’re looking for good sentence starters, you’ve landed in the right place.

Producing a piece of content is not always an easy task because there’s the challenge of finding the perfect words or phrases to help your writing flow.

That’s where good sentence starters come in.

Why Use Good Sentence Starters?

Sentence starters are words or phrases that serve to guide readers in understanding your purpose for writing. They help the writing flow.

They signal to readers various messages such as introducing an idea, comparing concepts, concluding, or emphasizing a point.

Good sentence starters are also beneficial because they…

  • Help to clarify your ideas by conveying emphasis, importance, contrast, similarities, etc.
  • Link ideas within a piece of writing effectively so that it flows more nicely.
  • Make your writing appear more polished, academic, and credible. Readers are more likely to understand your point of view.
  • Keep readers engaged and anticipating what ideas will be presented next. Maintaining the curiosity of readers is important.
  • Make the ideas and concepts in your writing more coherent. In turn, this makes the main idea of your paper stronger.

How To Use Good Sentence Starters

To use sentence starters, think about what type of paper you’re going to write and its purpose.

That will dictate the type of sentence starters you use.

Sentence starters are generally divided into three categories: introduction, body, and conclusion.

There are sentence starters that will help you to have a good introduction, strong body, and great conclusion so be sure to choose starters that fit accordingly.

You’ll ideally use a variety of sentence starters within each section of your paper.

Good Sentence Starters

Following you will find a collection of good sentence starter ideas that you can use for many types of writing pieces including essays.

Sentence Starters for Introduction

  • I will argue…
  • The only truth is that…
  • My claim is…
  • Despite the fact that the evidence shows…

Sentence Starters for Body

  • First of all…
  • My opinion is…
  • One reason my claim is true…
  • At the present time…
  • Another reason I believe my claim is true…
  • One reason my claim is true…
  • First, my claim is correct because…
  • Second, my claim is correct because…
  • Third, my claim is correct because…
  • Lastly, my claim is true because…

Related Content:

60+ Sentence Starters for Narrative Writing

  • In reality…
  • Notwithstanding…
  • Another reason my claim is true…
  • Furthermore…
  • Nevertheless…
  • The text states…
  • My reason is correct because…
  • One piece of evidence that proves my reason is…
  • This means…
  • In other words…
  • This relates to my claim because…
  • This is important because…
  • On the contrary…
  • Although this may be true…
  • Conversely…
  • Even more important…
  • Just as important…
  • As much as…
  • This relates to my reason because…
  • In spite of…
  • At the same time…
  • Regardless…
  • Because of…
  • In the event that…
  • Even though…
  • With this in mind…
  • Specifically, 
  • In view of…
  • To emphasize…
  • To put it differently…
  • As an illustration…
  • On the condition that…
  • In contrast…
  • Given that…
  • Of course…, but…
  • Be that as it may…
  • Surprisingly, 
  • In particular…
  • To clarify…
  • Then again…
  • On the other hand…
  • A point often overlooked…
  • Nonetheless…
  • For this reason…
  • That is to say…
  • Comparatively…
  • Chiefly…
  • By all means…
  • Another key point…
  • Most compelling evidence suggests that…
  • Consequently…

Sentence Starters Conclusion

  • As can be seen…
  • Rounding up
  • To summarize…
  • All things considered…
  • As expressed…
  • In conclusion…
  • Given those points…
  • In any event…
  • To restate my claim…
  • As I have noted…
  • Without a doubt…
  • In summary…

Final Thoughts On Good Sentence Starters

Make your paper flow naturally using these really good sentence starters. To make your paper even better, see these tips for writing the perfect essay .

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Improve Your Essay Writing with These Examples of Sentence Starters For Essays

Feb 21, 2024 | 0 comments

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Feb 21, 2024 | Blog | 0 comments

 Are you looking to improve your essay-writing skills? One way to elevate your writing is by incorporating sentence starters into your essays. These simple phrases can be a hook to grab the reader’s attention and connect your ideas seamlessly. By using sentence starters, you can share your thoughts effectively and make your writing more engaging for your audience. In this article, we will explore sentence starter tips and examples of how to start a sentence in different contexts, such as fiction writing or academic essays. Transition words are also key in guiding the flow of your sentences, and sentence starters make it easier to transition smoothly between ideas. So, look at our curated list of sentence starters for essays to see how they can enhance your writing and grab the reader’s attention from the first sentence.

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Why Sentence Starters Are Important in Essays 

Let’s talk about why sentence starters are crucial in essays.

  • Capturing the Reader’s Attention: Have you ever wondered how to hook your reader? Sentence starters are your secret weapon. They kickstart your essay with intrigue and set the tone for what’s to come. Instead of a dull opening, a sentence starter like “In today’s fast-paced world” or “Picture this scenario” instantly grabs attention.
  • Creating a Cohesive and Flowing Essay: You’ve got all these brilliant ideas, but how do you string them together in a way that makes sense? That’s where sentence starters come in. They are the glue that holds your essay together, guiding the reader smoothly from one point to the next. Whether introducing a new concept, providing evidence, or drawing a conclusion, sentence starters ensure your ideas flow seamlessly.

Picture this scenario: You’re writing an essay on climate change. Instead of jumping straight into the science, you could start with a thought-provoking question like,

“Have you ever stopped to consider the impact of your daily choices on the planet?”

This grabs your reader’s attention and sets the stage for a discussion on the importance of environmental responsibility.

Now, imagine you’re transitioning to your next point about the consequences of climate change. Instead of abruptly shifting gears, you could use a transitional phrase like “Furthermore” or “As a result” to connect your ideas smoothly. This keeps your essay cohesive and prevents your reader from feeling lost or confused.

When, Where, and How to Use a Sentence Starter?

Ever wondered when, where, and how to use a sentence starter? It’s simpler than you think! Let’s dive into it.

  • Start a Sentence: The most common place to use a sentence starter is at the beginning of a sentence. This helps your writing flow smoothly and grabs the reader’s attention. For example, instead of saying, “I went to the store,” you could start your sentence with, “Upon arriving at the store…”
  • In Transitional Phrases: Sentence starters are perfect for transitional phrases, helping to connect ideas smoothly. For instance, if you’re transitioning from one paragraph to another, you could use a starter like “Furthermore,” or “In addition,” to link them together seamlessly.
  • To Spice Up Repetition: Sentence starters can be a lifesaver when repeating the same sentence structure. Instead of starting every sentence with the subject, try mixing it up with starters like “Located in,” “Notably,” or “Despite this.”
  • In Nonfiction Writing: Whether you’re working on an essay, article, or report, sentence starters can elevate your writing. They help your ideas flow logically and make complex topics more understandable. For example, if you’re writing about a historical event, you could start a sentence with “During the event,” or “According to historical records,” to provide context.
  • To Help Your Writing Stand Out: To impress your teacher, professor, or editor, using varied sentence starters can help your writing stand out. Avoiding repetitive structures keeps your reader engaged and shows off your writing skills.
  • In Your Thesis Statement: Your thesis is the backbone of your essay, so starting it off strong is crucial. Sentence starters can help you craft a clear and concise thesis that grabs the reader’s attention. For example, “In today’s society,” or “Through a careful analysis of…”

What are Paragraph Starters?

Paragraph starters are phrases or words used at the beginning of a paragraph to introduce a new idea or transition from the previous one. They serve as a bridge between paragraphs, aiding in the organization and coherence of written work.

Types of Paragraph Starters

  • Introduction Paragraph Starters: These immediately kick off your essay and grab the reader’s attention. Examples include asking a thought-provoking question, sharing an interesting fact, or providing a relevant quote. Introduction sentence starters for essays set the tone for your essay and establish the main idea you’ll be discussing.
  • Transition Paragraph Starters: Transition starters help smoothly move from one idea to the next within your essay. They ensure a cohesive flow by connecting paragraphs and guiding the reader through your argument or narrative. Common transition starters include phrases like “Moreover,” “On the other hand,” and “In contrast.”
  • Supporting Paragraph Starters: These starters introduce the main points or evidence that support your thesis statement . They provide structure to your essay by organizing your arguments logically. Examples of supporting paragraph starters include “Firstly,” “Additionally,” and “Furthermore.”
  • Conclusion Paragraph Starters: Conclusion starters wrap up your essay by summarizing your main points and restating your thesis concisely and impactfully. They leave a lasting impression on the reader and reinforce the significance of your argument. Conclusion starters may include phrases like “In conclusion,” “To sum up,” or “Overall.” Explore our blog article on how to write a captivating essay conclusion paragraph for valuable tips and techniques!
  • Transition to Next Paragraph Starters: These starters bridge the gap between the current paragraph and the next one, ensuring a smooth transition of ideas. They can hint at what’s to come or provide a segue into the next topic. Examples of transition to next paragraph starters include “Moving forward,” “Now let’s consider,” and “Turning to the next point.”

Examples of Sentence Starters for Essays 

We’ll explore a variety of sentence starters for essays tailored for different types of essays, including argumentative, persuasive, descriptive, and more. These examples will serve as valuable tools to enhance the clarity and effectiveness of your writing.

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Argumentative sentence starters

Argumentative sentence starters for essays are essential for presenting your stance persuasively and logically. They lay the groundwork for your argument, setting the tone for the rest of your essay.

These sentence starters are the backbone of your argument, guiding the reader through your reasoning and evidence. By using them effectively, you can strengthen your position and compel your audience to consider your perspective.

  • It is evident that,
  • One cannot deny that,
  • To begin with,
  • It is clear that,
  • It is well known that,
  • In light of this,
  • A compelling argument is,
  • In support of this,
  • Another key point is,
  • Equally important is,
  • Furthermore,
  • Additionally,
  • Not only…but also,
  • On the contrary,
  • Conversely,
  • In contrast,
  • Nevertheless,
  • Despite this,
  • Nonetheless,
  • While it may be true that,
  • Even though,
  • In summary,
  • To summarize,
  • In conclusion.

Make sure to explore our Environmental Argumentative Essay Topics selection for some thought-provoking ideas and inspiration.

Persuasive sentence starters

Persuasive sentence starters are indispensable for convincing your audience to adopt your viewpoint or take action. They are crafted to evoke emotion, build credibility, and inspire change. By employing persuasive sentence starters effectively, you can compel your readers to embrace your perspective and act upon your recommendations.

  • Imagine a world where…
  • Picture yourself…
  • Consider the impact of…
  • Have you ever thought about…
  • What if I told you…
  • It’s time to take a stand and…
  • Join us in…
  • Together, we can…
  • Let’s work together to…
  • Take a moment to reflect on…
  • Can you envision a future where…
  • I urge you to…
  • Let me paint a picture for you…
  • Take a step back and think about…
  • Now is the time to act and…
  • Together, we have the power to…
  • It’s our responsibility to…
  • I implore you to consider…
  • Let’s make a difference by…
  • Will you join me in…

Don’t miss out on exploring our selection of Fun Persuasive Speech Topics for some entertaining and engaging ideas!

Descriptive sentence starters

Descriptive sentence starters are essential for painting vivid pictures in the minds of your readers. They help create immersive experiences by engaging the senses and providing rich details. By incorporating descriptive sentence starters, you can bring your writing to life and captivate your audience with compelling imagery.

  • The air was thick with…
  • As I gazed out upon…
  • The scent of… filled the room.
  • In the distance, I could see…
  • The sun cast a warm glow over…
  • Shadows danced across…
  • The sound of… echoed through…
  • Colors burst forth from…
  • I felt a sense of… as I…
  • The texture of… was rough/smooth/soft.
  • From the corner of my eye, I noticed…
  • The taste of… lingered on my tongue.
  • My fingers brushed against…
  • A sense of tranquility enveloped me…
  • The scene was reminiscent of…
  • As I listened closely, I could hear…
  • The sight of… took my breath away.
  • I was enveloped in a sea of…
  • The atmosphere was charged with…
  • Every detail seemed to…

Compare and contrast sentence starters.

 Compare and contrast sentence starters are indispensable for highlighting similarities and differences between two or more subjects. They facilitate clear and structured comparisons, aiding readers in understanding complex relationships. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively analyze and discuss various aspects of your subjects side by side.

  • In contrast…
  • On the one hand… On the other hand…
  • In comparison…
  • On a similar note…
  • Whereas some may argue…, others contend…
  • While it is true that…, it is also true that…
  • Both share similarities in terms of…
  • Although they differ from in…, they both…
  • When examining side by side, it becomes apparent that…
  • Contrary to popular belief,…
  • Despite their apparent differences, they have commonalities in…
  • Just as exhibits…, demonstrates…

Good sentence starters for contrasts and abrupt transitions

Good sentence starters for contrasts and abrupt transitions are essential for smoothly shifting between ideas or perspectives in your writing. They provide a seamless way to introduce opposing viewpoints or highlight sudden changes in direction. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can maintain clarity and coherence in your writing, keeping your readers engaged and informed.

  • Alternatively,
  • While it may seem,
  • Notwithstanding.

Good sentence starters for introducing examples

Good sentence starters for introducing examples are essential for providing evidence and supporting your arguments clearly and concisely. They help to illustrate your points and make your writing more persuasive. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively showcase your ideas and strengthen your overall argument.

  • For instance,
  • For example,
  • To illustrate,
  • Specifically,
  • In particular,
  • As an example,
  • One example is,
  • As evidence,
  • A case in point,
  • Take, for instance,
  • In this case,
  • As shown by,
  • Take, for example.

Conclusion sentence starters for essays

Conclusion sentence starters for essays are crucial for wrapping up your argument and leaving a lasting impression on your reader. They summarize your main points and reinforce the significance of your thesis statement. Using these sentence starters, you can effectively conclude your essay and leave your reader with closure.

  • In conclusion,
  • Ultimately,
  • To conclude,
  • In closing,
  • All in all,
  • In the final analysis,
  • Consequently,
  • As a result,
  • In essence,
  • As discussed,
  • Considering all of these factors,
  • Given these points.

Topic sentence starters for essays

Topic sentence starters for essays are essential for introducing the main idea of each paragraph and providing a roadmap for the reader. They set the tone for the paragraph and help maintain coherence throughout your essay. Using these sentence starters, you can effectively guide your reader through your argument and ensure clarity in your writing.

  • The main idea of this paragraph is…
  • This paragraph will discuss…
  • One key point to consider is…
  • To begin with…
  • A significant aspect of this topic is…
  • Let’s delve into…
  • This section focuses on…
  • The purpose of this paragraph is to…
  • An important factor to remember is…
  • Now, let’s explore…
  • Another aspect worth noting is…
  • It’s important to understand that…
  • This paragraph aims to…
  • Let’s examine…
  • In this section, we will…
  • To address this point…
  • This paragraph highlights…
  • The focus of this paragraph is…
  • Let’s take a closer look at…
  • This paragraph centers on…

Good sentence starters for emphasis

Good sentence starters for emphasis are crucial for drawing attention to key points or ideas in your writing. They help to highlight important information and make your arguments more persuasive and impactful. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively emphasize your main arguments and ensure they resonate with your reader.

  • Undoubtedly,
  • Absolutely,
  • Without a doubt,
  • Remarkably,
  • Unquestionably,
  • Without question,
  • Definitely,
  • Positively,
  • It is important to note that,
  • Without reservation,
  • Needless to say,
  • It goes without saying.

Good sentence starters for elaboration or adding new points

Good sentence starters for elaboration or adding new points are essential for expanding upon your ideas and providing additional details or examples. They help to enrich your writing and make your arguments more thorough and convincing. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively develop your thoughts and ensure your reader fully understands your perspective.

  • In addition,
  • Not only that,
  • What’s more,
  • Additionally.

What Is a Good Sentence Starter for an Essay Introduction?

A good sentence starter for an essay introduction is crucial for capturing the reader’s attention and setting the tone for your entire piece. It should be engaging, thought-provoking, and relevant to your topic. Using an effective sentence starter, you can hook your readers from the beginning and make them eager to continue reading.

  • Have you ever wondered…
  • Picture this scenario…
  • In today’s society…
  • It is undeniable that…
  • Consider the following…
  • From the dawn of time…
  • In recent years…
  • Throughout history…
  • As technology advances…
  • Amidst the chaos of…
  • Against the backdrop of…
  • With the rise of…
  • In the age of information…
  • Now more than ever…
  • As we navigate through…
  • In light of recent events…
  • As society grapples with…
  • As we strive for…
  • With the ever-growing concern over…

Good sentence starters for sequences or lists

Good sentence starters for sequences or lists are essential for organizing information clearly and structure. They help to signal the beginning of a series of items or ideas, making it easier for the reader to follow along. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively present your information logically and coherently.

  • After that,
  • Furthermore.

Good sentence starters to establish cause and effect

Good sentence starters to establish cause and effect are essential for explaining the relationship between events or phenomena in your writing. They help to clarify the reasons behind certain outcomes and demonstrate the connections between different elements. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively convey causation and enhance the coherence of your argument.

  • As a result of,
  • Accordingly,
  • For this reason,
  • On account of this,
  • Resulting in,
  • Leading to,
  • Triggered by,
  • Stemming from,
  • Provoked by,
  • Bringing about.

Don’t forget to look at our Cause and Effect Essay Topics for some thought-provoking ideas to explore!

Good sentence starters for references

Good sentence starters for references are essential for acknowledging the sources of information or ideas used in your writing. They help you give credit to the original authors and provide credibility to your arguments. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively cite your sources and demonstrate academic integrity in your writing.

  • According to recent studies…
  • Research conducted by experts in the field…
  • Studies have shown that…
  • Statistics from reputable sources indicate…
  • Scholars in the field argue that…
  • The findings of various researchers suggest…
  • Experts in the field emphasize…
  • In a study published in [Journal Name]…
  • According to data collected by…
  • The results of previous research indicate…
  • The consensus among experts is that…
  • According to recent surveys…
  • In academic literature, it is widely accepted that…
  • Studies conducted by [Research Institution] suggest…
  • According to the [Organization/Institution]…
  • Researchers have found that…
  • Recent reports from [Organization/Institution] show…
  • Experts agree that…
  • Findings from [Research Institution] demonstrate…
  • The literature on the subject suggests that…

Good sentence starters for historical or generally accepted concepts

Good sentence starters for historical or generally accepted concepts are essential for introducing well-established ideas or events in your writing. They help to provide context and background information, allowing readers to understand the significance of these concepts within your argument. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively convey certain ideas’ historical or widely accepted nature.

  • Throughout history,
  • Historically,
  • Traditionally,
  • For centuries,
  • Since ancient times,
  • Throughout the ages,
  • Historians agree that,
  • It is widely accepted that,
  • It is a common belief that,
  • It has long been understood that,
  • Scholars have recognized that,
  • It is universally acknowledged that,
  • Society has long held the view that,
  • It is a fundamental principle that,
  • It is a fact that,
  • From ancient civilizations to modern times,
  • Since the dawn of civilization,
  • From time immemorial.

Good sentence starters to show uncertainty or doubt

Good sentence starters to show uncertainty or doubt are crucial for acknowledging ambiguity or skepticism in your writing. They help to convey a sense of caution or reservation when discussing uncertain ideas or conclusions. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively acknowledge uncertainty and encourage critical thinking in your readers.

  • It is possible that…
  • It remains uncertain whether…
  • There is some doubt as to whether…
  • It is unclear whether…
  • There is a degree of uncertainty regarding…
  • It is not entirely clear whether…
  • There is some ambiguity surrounding…
  • It is difficult to determine whether…
  • It is open to debate whether…
  • It is unclear to what extent…
  • It is uncertain whether…
  • There is reason to doubt that…
  • It is questionable whether…
  • There is some skepticism about…
  • It is not entirely certain whether…
  • It is hard to say whether…
  • It is debatable whether…
  • There is some hesitation to conclude that…
  • There is a lack of consensus on whether…

Good sentence starters To show relationships or outcome 

Good sentence starters to show relationships or outcomes are crucial for indicating connections between different ideas or events in your writing. They help to demonstrate cause-and-effect relationships, illustrate correlations, or highlight the consequences of certain actions. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively convey the relationships between various elements and enhance the coherence of your argument.

  • Due to this,
  • As a consequence,
  • As a result of this,
  • Henceforth,
  • Consequently.

Good sentence starters To present uncommon or rare ideas 

Good sentence starters to present uncommon or rare ideas are essential for introducing unique or unconventional concepts in your writing. They help to pique the reader’s curiosity and encourage them to explore novel perspectives or insights. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively intrigue your audience and spark their interest in your ideas.

  • It may seem unusual, but…
  • Contrary to common belief…
  • Against conventional wisdom…
  • In a departure from tradition…
  • Uncommonly,
  • Surprisingly,
  • Unexpectedly,
  • Strangely enough,
  • Interestingly,
  • Oddly enough,
  • Peculiarly,
  • Astonishingly,
  • Atypically,
  • Unorthodoxly.

Good sentence starters To present widespread ideas

Good sentence starters to present widespread ideas are essential for introducing commonly accepted beliefs or widely held notions in your writing. They help to establish common ground with your audience and provide a foundation for further discussion. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively frame your arguments within the context of widely shared perspectives.

  • It is widely believed that…
  • It is commonly accepted that…
  • It is universally acknowledged that…
  • It is widely recognized that…
  • It is generally agreed that…
  • It is widely understood that…
  • It is widely accepted that…
  • It is commonly understood that…
  • It is a well-known fact that…
  • It is widely known that…
  • It is widely regarded as…
  • It is generally believed that…
  • It is widely assumed that…
  • It is widely agreed that…
  • It is commonly acknowledged that…
  • It is generally recognized that…
  • It is widely perceived that…
  • It is universally accepted that…
  • It is widely held that…
  • It is commonly believed that…

For more ideas on critical thinking essay topics , don’t forget to check out our blog article for additional inspiration!

Good sentence starters To present inconclusive ideas 

Good sentence starters to present inconclusive ideas are essential for acknowledging uncertainty or ambiguity in your writing. They help to convey a sense of open-mindedness or lack of definitive conclusions, allowing for nuanced exploration of complex topics. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively navigate uncertain terrain and encourage critical thinking in your readers.

  • It is difficult to say whether…
  • It remains unclear whether…
  • It is inconclusive whether…
  • It is open to question whether…
  • It is up for debate whether…
  • It is ambiguous whether…
  • It is undecided whether…
  • It is still unresolved whether…
  • It is a matter of contention whether…
  • It is indeterminate whether…
  • It is undetermined whether…
  • It is unsettled whether…
  • It is left open whether…
  • It is up in the air whether…
  • It is up for discussion whether…
  • It is open to interpretation whether…

Don’t miss out on exploring our Controversial Debate Topics for thought-provoking discussions on a wide range of contentious issues.

Good sentence starters To present prior or background ideas

Good sentence starters to present prior or background ideas are crucial for providing context and setting the stage for your main argument. They help establish the historical or conceptual groundwork upon which your argument is built, ensuring that readers understand the background information relevant to your topic. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively lay the foundation for your argument and enhance the coherence of your writing.

  • Before delving into the main topic,
  • Before discussing the current issue,
  • To understand the present situation,
  • To provide context,
  • Before proceeding further,
  • It is important first to consider,
  • In light of previous research,
  • Given the historical context,
  • Against the backdrop of,
  • Concerning earlier studies,
  • In the context of past events,
  • Considering the historical background,
  • In light of prior developments,
  • In the context of earlier findings,
  • Concerning previous research,
  • Against the historical backdrop,
  • In light of past experiences,
  • Taking into account earlier discussions,
  • About earlier debates.

Good sentence starters To present others’ ideas

Good sentence starters to present others’ ideas are essential for incorporating external sources and attributing credit to the original authors or sources. They help distinguish between your ideas and those of others, ensuring academic integrity and proper citation in your writing. By incorporating these sentence starters, you can effectively introduce and discuss the ideas of other scholars or experts in your field.

  • According to recent studies,
  • Research suggests that…
  • It has been proposed that…
  • The prevailing view is that…
  • Academic consensus holds that…
  • The prevailing theory suggests that…
  • Many experts assert that…
  • The scholarly community agrees that…
  • Current research indicates that…
  • The consensus among scholars is that…
  • Experts in the field contend that…
  • The prevailing opinion is that…
  • Scholars widely acknowledge that…
  • Many researchers assert that…
  • Studies have consistently demonstrated that…

Good sentence starters To keep the ‘I’ out of academic writing 

In academic writing, it’s often preferred to minimize the use of first-person pronouns like “I” to maintain objectivity and focus on the content rather than the author. Good sentence starters to keep the ‘I’ out of academic writing help achieve this goal by offering alternative ways to express ideas without relying on personal pronouns. By using these sentence starters, you can ensure a more formal and objective tone in your writing.

  • This essay will examine…
  • This paper aims to…
  • The focus of this study is…
  • The research conducted suggests…
  • According to the evidence presented…
  • The findings of this investigation indicate…
  • It is important to consider…
  • This analysis reveals…
  • The results suggest…
  • The literature on this topic indicates…
  • The evidence suggests that…
  • The data collected demonstrates…
  • This study explores…
  • The argument presented here is…
  • The theory posited here suggests…
  • This paper argues that…
  • The hypothesis put forward suggests…
  • The observations made indicate…
  • The conclusion drawn from this is…

Common Mistakes to Avoid 

When using sentence starters, it’s easy to fall into some common traps that can detract from the effectiveness of your writing. Let’s explore some of these pitfalls and how to steer clear of them:

1. Overusing the Same Sentence Starters: 

One common mistake is relying too heavily on a limited set of sentence starters. While certain starters may be effective in specific contexts, using them repeatedly can make your writing monotonous and predictable. For instance, beginning every paragraph with “Furthermore” or “Moreover” can become tiresome for readers.

Instead, vary your sentence starters to keep your writing engaging and dynamic. Experiment with different options to find the most suitable starter for each situation. By diversifying your sentence starters, you can maintain reader interest and enhance the flow of your writing.

2. Using Sentence Starters Inappropriately: 

Another pitfall is using sentence starters that are not suitable for the context or purpose of your writing. For example, beginning an essay introduction with “However” or “On the other hand” may confuse readers, as these starters typically introduce contrasting ideas rather than setting the stage for the main argument.

To avoid this mistake, carefully consider the function of each sentence starter and how it contributes to the overall structure and coherence of your writing. Choose starters that align with the intended message and help guide readers through your ideas logically.

3. Failing to Transition Smoothly: 

Transitioning between sentence starters and ideas is essential for maintaining coherence and clarity in your writing. A common error is abruptly shifting from one idea to another without providing adequate context or transition. This can leave readers feeling disjointed and confused, detracting from the effectiveness of your argument.

Use sentence starters to facilitate logical progression between ideas to ensure smooth transitions. Incorporate transitional phrases such as “In addition,” “Similarly,” or “Consequently” to connect sentences and guide readers through your argument seamlessly. By establishing clear relationships between ideas, you can enhance the flow and readability of your writing.

4. Neglecting to Tailor Sentence Starters to Audience: 

Finally, overlooking the preferences and expectations of your audience when choosing sentence starters can hinder communication and engagement. What resonates with one audience may not necessarily appeal to another, so it’s essential to consider the needs and preferences of your readers when crafting your writing.

To address this, take time to understand your audience’s background, interests, and level of expertise. Tailor your sentence starters to align with their expectations and communication style, ensuring your writing effectively resonates with them. You can enhance comprehension and foster deeper engagement with your ideas by adapting your sentence starters to suit your audience.

FAQs on Sentence Starters For Essays

How can essay sentence starters enhance my writing.

Using essay sentence starters can help you to begin your sentences in a more engaging and structured manner. They provide a strong foundation for your ideas and contribute to the overall flow of your essay.

What is the importance of transition sentences for essays?

Transition sentences for essays are crucial for maintaining coherence and logical progression in your writing. They help to connect ideas, shift between topics, and ensure a smooth transition between paragraphs.

How many sentences are in an essay?

An essay can vary in length and structure, but typically, a standard essay consists of an introduction, several body paragraphs, and a conclusion. The number of sentences in an essay depends on the essay’s overall length and the complexity of your ideas.

How can sentence starters help me organize my thoughts and ideas?

Sentence starters can provide a structured framework for organizing your thoughts and ideas. They offer a starting point for each sentence, guiding you in cohesively presenting your arguments and analysis.

Why are introduction sentences important in essays?

Introduction sentences serve as the opening statements of your essay, capturing the reader’s attention and setting the tone for the rest of the piece. They introduce the topic and provide a roadmap for the reader’s expectations.

How can I effectively bridge the gap between ideas in my essay?

Using words or phrases as bridges can help you seamlessly connect diverse ideas and arguments in your essay. These transitional elements ensure a logical progression and maintain the coherence of your writing.

ElainaFerrell

With a deep understanding of the student experience, I craft blog content that resonates with young learners. My articles offer practical advice and actionable strategies to help students achieve a healthy and successful academic life.

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Sentence Starters Made Easy for Better Essays

Table of Contents

The first sentence of an essay is a sentence starter. They must intrigue the reader enough to read further into the paper without being too wordy.

Generally, they should introduce the topic and give the reader the main idea of the paper at a glance. It also helps establish the tone and direction of the essay.

Without them, writing can become fragmented and disjointed, making reading difficult. However, it is not always clear which ones to include and when.

In this article, we provide sentence starters that you can use in your writing, separated into categories for simple references. Let’s get started!

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What Is a Sentence Starter?

Sentence starters are the words or phrases that introduce the remainder of the sentence and are generally separated by commas. Sentence-beginning words are crucial in writing. They introduce the subject of the sentence so that the reader knows what to anticipate.

The first sentence of an essay are vital to the cohesion of lengthy academic writing works. Because each sentence effectively has its own theme, these compositions frequently and sometimes abruptly move from point to point.

Sentence starters facilitate the reader’s comprehension by softening abrupt transitions and introducing the next topic.

This rule also applies to paragraphs that bounce from subject to subject. Paragraph starters provide an organizational signpost via introductory sentence starters to bridge the gap between themes.

Although prevalent in fiction, sentence starters are most effective when writing nonfiction, especially essays.

In contrast to fiction, nonfiction employs a range of facts that serve as sentence starters for the reader. In other words, if you believe nonfiction to be dull, imagine if it were simply a list of facts!

When Should You Employ Sentence Starters?

Sentence starters aren’t required for all sentences. In fact, their overuse can be distracting. These are some instances where a sentence starter is most effective:

  • When it’s hard to see how one sentence fits with the others.
  • You’re bringing up a new idea, like at the start of an essay or a paragraph.
  • Giving a summary or conclusion, like at the end of an essay.
  • Want to put more attention on a certain sentence or point.
  • You need to write a hook to get people interested.
  • The sentence needs some background information or context to make sense.

There is no hard and fast rule for when to utilize and when to avoid sentence starters. If you are having difficulty deciding, consider revisiting your past few paragraphs and evaluating their flow.

There is no need for sentence starters if your sentence flows well. If something feels odd, out of place, or absent, try adding one to see if it helps.

Below you will discover samples of context-appropriate phrase beginnings.

First Sentence of an Essay (Topic Sentences)

Topic sentences introduce the topic of the paragraph or the entire content to enable readers know what to expect.

  • This paper discusses …
  • In this paper . . .
  • Here, we discuss . . .
  • Below, you will find . . .

Sequences or Lists: Sentence Starters

Sentence starters come particularly handy when writing sets of instructions or explaining a succession of events. These components aren’t always related in obvious ways. Sentence openers connect them and put them in the proper order, so your reader can organize them in their thoughts.

  • First . . ., Second . . ., Third . . ., etc. 
  • Subsequently . . .
  • After that . . .

Comparisons: Sentence Starters

To show that two items are similar or linked, use sentence starters.

  • Similarly . . .
  • I n the same way . . .
  • Likewise . . .
  • Again . . .

Elaboration or Adding New Points

When a single sentence is insufficient to properly express your idea, including sentence starters to subsequent sentences can connect them.

  • Additionally . . .
  • Moreover . . .
  • Furthermore . . .
  • Also .  . .

Introducing Examples

For essays, you should support your claims with proof. Sentence openers facilitate the shift from describing the large picture to illustrating the application of these principles in the real world.

  • For example . . .
  • For instance . . .
  • This is evidenced by . . .
  • Consider the [case/example] of . . .

Contrasts and Abrupt Transitions

Sentence starters are most effective when switching topics abruptly. The writing seems abrupt and disjointed without them, so utilize them to keep your reader on track, especially when comparing topics.

  • Although . . .
  • On the other hand . . .
  • In contrast . . .
  • Despite that . . ..

To Establish Cause and Effect

Commonly, two sentences are used to describe a cause-and-effect relationship, such as something causing something else to occur. This link can be clarified by using sentence starters to show the distinction between the cause and effect.

  • As a result . . .
  • Accordingly . . .
  • Therefore . . . .
  • That is why . . .

Emphasis: Sentence Starters

In other instances, sentence beginnings are not required, but they serve to emphasize a point. Reserve these for the sentences that you want your audience to remember most.

  • Above all . . .
  • As usual . . .
  • Certainly . . .
  • Generally speaking . . .

Starters for References

If you are crediting someone else’s concept, such as in a research paper, include the attribution in the first words of the phrase. Use these phrase openers before quoting or discussing an idea from another source.

  • According to . . .
  • Based on the findings of . . .
  • As explained by . . .
  • With regards to . . .

Generally Accepted Concepts (Historicals)

Some sentences lack meaning when removed from their context. This could be a popular, mainstream notion that is unknown to the reader, or some historical context that is not well known. Sentence starters can provide background in these cases without veering off topic. 

  • Traditionally . . .
  • Historically . . .
  • Initially . . .
  • Until now . . .

To Show Uncertainty or Doubt

If you are writing about facts, your audience will assume that everything you write is true. In circumstances where something is unproven or unknown, tell your readers that doubt exists so as not to mislead them.

  • Perhaps . . .
  • Although not proven . . .
  • Arguably . . .
  • While debatable . . .

Conclusion and Summaries

Because they do not convey fresh information, conclusions and summaries always behave differently than other phrases and paragraphs.

Sentence starters can signal to the reader that you’re about to “close things up,” so they don’t expect any fresh points or proof.

  • In summary . . .
  • To summarize . . . 
  • In conclusion . . .
  • To wrap things up . . .

A sentence starter is a brief word or phrase to help the reader transition . Sentence starters are commonly used in written texts, blog posts, reports, and essays.

If you want your sentence starters to stand out from the crowd, avoid common words. Common words such as “I,” “am,” and “this” should be avoided. Always use sentences that are familiar to most readers.

Sentence Starters Made Easy for Better Essays

Abir Ghenaiet

Abir is a data analyst and researcher. Among her interests are artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing. As a humanitarian and educator, she actively supports women in tech and promotes diversity.

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10 Good Paragraph Starters for All Your Writing Needs

It is very important to start a paragraph well. You need to try to summarize what you are about to say whilst also setting the reader up for what’s to come.

Mixing up your paragraph starters is quite essential as well. Figuring out how to start a paragraph can also be complicated, though. Everyone from newbie writers to more experienced ones will face difficulty in this regard.

Learning some phrases to start a paragraph can be quite useful. They can help you to diversify your writing. Following the same format, all the time can make your writing a little boring. The correct use of paragraph openers and sentence starters can help you form a coherent narrative in your writing. This is a great way to connect the various ideas you are trying to portray as well.

Types of Paragraph Starters

  • Introductory

This sets the stage for your writing. Commonly used in academic and essay writing. The purpose of introductory paragraph starters is to introduce some of the ideas that will be discussed in the essay or paper. An important part of introductory paragraph starters is to help you avoid using “I” in your writing. Academic writing in particular does not view “I” statements favorably. You should opt for more generalized language in your paragraph starters to indicate the objective nature of your research. Here are some examples of introductory essay paragraph starters.

Here are some examples of introductory paragraph starters:

  • In this essay
  • Views on (example) are
  • The central theme of

As you can see, all of these paragraph starters can help you lay out your ideas in an easy-to-read manner. But these are only the very beginnings of your sentences. Continuing and completing the sentence is important too. Here is an example of a complete introduction to a paragraph:

“Views on advances in artificial intelligence range from positive to negative. In this essay, the impact of artificial intelligence is explored.”

Your concluding paragraph matters. No matter how good your writing is, if you don’t wrap your essay up properly people might not absorb all of the information you have presented. People need a good closing paragraph to contextualize their essay. An abrupt ending can get in the way of that. The purpose of these types of paragraph starters is to transition into the conclusion of your essay or piece of writing.

While your concluding paragraph should tie back to your thesis statement, you should avoid repeating too much of it. Diversifying your concluding statement is useful because repetitive statements can take away from the veracity of your claims. Here are some examples of statements you can use to start a concluding paragraph:

  • In conclusion

The last sentence of your concluding paragraph should offer users some closure. It should have an air of finality to it. A proper concluding paragraph can help the information sink in. As well as helping readers to think about the ideas and information that you have discussed.

  • Comparative

A big part of presenting information is to compare it to something. This can be previously available information. Overarching narratives surrounding your field can be addressed as well. In this case, you will either be displaying similarities or differences. These paragraphs help to connect your essay to the background that you are drawing from. Not everyone will be familiar with this information. So it’s important that you use comparative paragraph starters to fill them in. Otherwise, they won’t have any information to compare what you are saying to.

Here are some examples of comparative paragraph starters:

  • In comparison
  • Nevertheless
  • On the other hand
  • Having said that

 Creating comparisons is a very effective way of getting your message across. The bulk of your writing will consist of comparative paragraphs. This means that you will need as many comparative paragraph starters as you can find. Refuting or confirming preexisting information is a big part of academic writing and essays.

Simply presenting information will make your writing really dry. Examples can help illustrate what you are talking about. Much of your essay will involve you repeating the same point. This is usually considered a sign of bad writing. But it is unavoidable in academic writing. So you need to use examples to convey your point without getting repetitive. Examples can demonstrate your ideas in real-world scenarios. People need them to draw their own conclusions about what you are trying to say. You don’t want them just repeating your words after all. Rather, you would want them to obtain a deeper understanding of your work.

Example paragraph starters might seem easy. A simple “for example” will work. But you have to provide lots of examples in your writing. Using “for example” repeatedly will make your writing seem unprofessional. It also ruins a reader’s ability to immerse themselves in your writing.

Here are some alternatives to “for example” that you can use as paragraph starters:

  • To illustrate
  • For instance

You can also add exampling statements in the middle of your opening sentence. Here are some examples:

  • …as shown by
  • …as can be observed
  • …which can be seen in

Mixing your statements up can help you provide examples without wearing the reader down. You need to keep offering something new. Otherwise, the reader might lose interest. Diverse exampling statements can keep your readers invested in what you have written. Your main priority should be getting them to the end of your essay after all.

  • Idea Adding

We stated previously that comparative statements will form the bulk of your paragraph starters. This holds true, but adding ideas that you can compare is essential as well. Transitioning from one idea to the next can help create a smooth narrative. So many of your ideas will come in the middle of a paragraph. But you would still need to provide start certain paragraphs off with ideas as well. These examples can help you introduce ideas in your writing:

  • Here we will discuss
  • In this paper
  • To elaborate

Sometimes you would want to refer to an idea halfway through your sentence. This is done in a comparative manner. These paragraph and sentence starters can help you with this:

  • As a result

Over time you will learn to use these statements to connect your ideas. Developing a theme in your essay makes the ideas more pronounced. Make sure that you use these statements carefully. 

  • Time Connective

You should try writing as if you are constructing a timeline. Ideas should be presented sequentially. The sequence can be pieced together slowly through the use of time connective paragraph starters. Presenting an idea or a comparison at the start of a paragraph won’t always work. Sometimes you need to remind readers of where they are on the timeline you have constructed. These sentence starters also help provide context regarding the history of your field or discipline.

These paragraph starters are fairly simple. “Firstly”, “secondly” and so on can all work well here. You can also use words like “before” and “afterwards” as well as “eventually”.

Tips to Help You Write Better Paragraphs

The types of paragraph starters we have provided above will help you improve your writing. But you will also need a few general tips that you can follow. It would be best if you didn’t look at these tips as rules. Instead, see them as a general guideline. You can choose which tips you want to implement based on your preferences. As you develop experience you will start to get an idea of what you should use where.

  • Avoid Using “However”

This is a very versatile word. But its versatility often leads to it being overused. There are plenty of alternative words that you can use instead. “That said”, “conversely”, “although” and “regardless” can all be used to substitute however. This adds some variety to your writing. Comparative paragraphs can become a chore if you have to avoid using “however”. But overusing this word will do a lot more harm than good. This is why you should try some of the examples that we have given.

  • Try Starting With Adverbs

Adverbs are great for connecting your ideas. They often don’t do much good in the middle of a sentence. You should try starting your sentences out with them. This helps you avoid some of the pitfalls of starting sentences. Using adverbs as paragraphs starters might make your writing a little informal. So you should be careful about where and when you use them. But sprinkling them in sparingly works really well. Some examples of adverbs are “similarly” and “fortunately. Modifying any adjective and adding verb-like attributes to it will turn it into an adverb.

You can also use these words to transition from one paragraph to the next. Transitory paragraph starters are vital for connecting your ideas. Adverbs are the most effective way to make this transition as smooth as possible.

  • Avoid Coordinating Conjunctions (Sometimes)

The oldest rule of writing that we all tend to learn in school is to never start a sentence with a coordinating conjunction, let alone a paragraph. Starting a sentence with “but” or “and” can often make your writing seem amateurish.

That said, this rule is not as hard and fast as you might expect. Teachers only teach children to avoid starting sentences with “and” and “but” because this can help children to learn how to write differently from how they speak. It’s more of a mindset tool and a training exercise rather than a strict rule that should always be followed.

You can use coordinating conjunctions in certain situations. “But” can be a reasonable replacement for “however” for example. Similarly, you can use “and” as a replacement for “additionally” which is another really overused sentence starter.

There are lots of other coordinating conjunctions as well such as “yet” and “so”. These conjunctions are perfectly acceptable to start a sentence with. Most rules surrounding starting sentences with coordinating conjunctions focus on “but” and “and”. We have shown you how these words can be used without breaking any writing rules.

  • Use Dependent Clauses Where Applicable

Dependent clauses can deliver a softer entry into a paragraph. Starting every paragraph with a noun can become tiresome. Clauses like “while” and “as” are perfect for these types of uses. “Because” is a dependent clause that we are often taught not to use. But this is just another example of a childhood rule that’s not as important as you might think.

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54 Best Paragraph Starters for Argumentative Essays

Searching for an effective guide for “paragraph starters for an argumentative essay?”. Want to have the best one but can’t find one? Deadline approaching but short of information? Wondering what to do? Fly away your worries (Stop stressing) because we are here to answer all your queries about how to start an argumentative essay. Read this out!

Unlike a narrative essay and other personal essay type, argumentative essays are comparatively tricky and require special treatment. One has to be very careful about making argumentative essay topics for paragraphs. A single mistake in the starter paragraph for such an essay can make the entire argument worthless. Hence, care must be taken when writing paragraphs for such essays. That is why there is most advanced  AI essay writer  available to help you in any way possible.

Let’s jump into the writing guide for good body paragraph starters. Or, you can simply call it argumentative essay starters.

Table of Contents

Argumentative essay

An argumentative essay is a form of essay writing in which essay writer for hire states his stance or argument regarding an

Issue, 

Event, 

Belief, and etc. 

The writer states his argument with strong evidence to persuade the audience of the point of view of what the writer holds. 

It is almost common now in academic writing that an instructor assigns such essay from tons of domains such as: 

Religion etc. 

You should know that your approach to each of these tasks matter a lot. Speaking of which, starting sentences for an argumentative essay plays an important role in the success of such academic activity . Let’s read about the features of such an essay before learn more on the sentence starters for argumentative essay.

Features of argumentative essay

Apart from good argument starters, such essay also has the following features that make  word choice  even better:

Introduce the topic in a manner to engage the readers

Ensure subjectivity of the point of view while stating it

Add counter-arguments to get the audience in confidence 

Provide sufficient evidences to support the  proper style  of an argument

Now we will discuss some sentence starters for body paragraphs and then we will guide you how to write such kind of essay:

Paragraph starters for argumentative essay

Following is a sample of such phrases:

useful words and pharses

How to write an Argumentative essay Paragraph starter?

facts about starter for argumentative essays

Just follow these steps to learn writing argumentative essay sentence starters: 

Choosing a topic 

Stating strong thesis 

Structuring 

Drafting 

Let’s discuss these in details:

Choosing a topic

Well! Most of the time, an instructor assigns the students with a topic to make the roadway difficult for him. However, if there is an open choice to choose the topic, then choose whatever interests you. This is because when one chooses the topic of their interest, it is always going to contain more information because of the writer’s knowledge about the topic either due to personal experience or is involve in daily activities.

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One must be careful in stating information about such topics of interest because most of these topics help us to make a  claim in argumentative essay  and facts. After one has a strong basis for moving on with the topic, it is time to start now.

Stating strong thesis

Before stating a strong thesis statement, one should have the idea of what a thesis statement really is:

“A statement which is usually stated at the end of an introductory paragraph stating the entire summary or central message of the essay.”

This sentence is the brain of any essay or a piece of writing. Hence, it is important to structure this sentence in a way to attract the attention of the audience in a way to keep them reading. 

State a strong thesis which has the following features:

Reflect the argument the writer is going to talk about

Represent the stance of the writer either in a positive or a negative connotation

Is reflected in the entire essay, especially the topic sentences. 

Good research is the key to a successful essay. An essay or an introduction paragraph stands against every counter-argument only if it is written on a well-researched basis. Other forms of essay might not require researching because it requires recalling memories or some other sort of stuff. However, for the essay that we are talking about, there must be proper evidence, a main thesis sentence, research material to back up the arguments, and least but not last logic to cater counter arguments. So, to cover the main part which is thesis sentence a  thesis statement generator  can play a crucial role. It will easy out lot of stress and help you in boosting your quality. Moreover, good research is very important because we are stating an argument, so we should have strong evidence to back up that argument, and this requires research.

Use following sources for researching:

Published and unpublished sources

Documentaries

YouTube etc. 

Also make sure the following:

“A good reader is a good leader”. This is specially the case here. One has to “read” to write good and lead the audience. Read through the sources, have a good idea of the topic, arguments and counter-arguments.

Ensure subjectivity in your thoughts while reading and writing too. This not only state the argument from the perspective of the writer, but also from the perspective of the critics. Stating the views of such people into the writing as well, will make the essay well versed and buffered it.

Ensure uniqueness by looking at the existing pieces of writing on such topics. Cover the issue(s) that the writer has not highlighted so far or get help from the best essay writing service .

When it is felt that enough research has been made, whatever was required, one should move on to the next step but if at any position it is felt that more research is required, one should go for it. The process of research never stops at any stage. 

Structuring

After collection of information on the topic, it should be shaped in a proper way. The standard is the introduction, then the body, and finally the conclusion. At least the essay should contain these standards to be called as properly structured. 

Drafting and structuring occurs simultaneously. Structuring is when one give structure to the essay while writing and drafting is that writing actually. The written document is a draft. So, draft the essay in a structured manner. It is advisable to rough draft if there is enough time to do so.

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Structure of an Argumentative Essay paragraph starter

Following is the structure for such essay:

Introduction

The introduction of the essay is the building block for the rest of the write-up. At the very beginning of the introductory paragraph, a hook should be stated. It is a statement that grab the attention of the audience suddenly.

After the hook, we state a slight background knowledge of the topic to give the readers a know-how of the topic.

Lastly, we state a strong thesis statement to sum up the introductory paragraph. Such statement reflects the entire crux of the essay.

The body paragraph of an argumentative essay contain at least three standard paragraphs, but can vary depending on the argument.

The starting sentence of each paragraph is a topic sentence, which represent the paragraph following it. The rest of the paragraph states the main argument/stance of the writer, with the ending sentence giving idea of the next paragraph.

The second paragraph of such essay contain the topic sentence and the counter-claims to the stance of the writer usually.

The Conclusion

A conclusion summarizes the whole discussion of the essay. It restates the main argument and closes it. We do not state a new argument or idea into the conclusion part to leave the audience with ambiguity. Finally, we close the conclusion paragraph with a clincher, leaving the audience craving more. I hope this guides you a lot; contact our experts if you need any argumentative essay help.

Good paragraph starters for an essay are:

To be exact...

The piece of writing talks about…

This essay revolves around…

To view the essay…

In this piece of writing

To dive into the issue…

To analyze the issue…

Moving into this topic…

The introduction

3 body paragraphs including:

1st paragraph developing argument

2nd paragraph stating the claim & evidences

3rd paragraph mentioning counter-claim and rebuttal

Concluding paragraph

A good example of an introduction paragraph is the one with:

A nicely put hook

Sentences stating background knowledge

A strong thesis statement reflecting the whole essay 

Good sentence starters are:

Furthermore

In addition to

To start with

First of all

Finally 

To begin with

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Good Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs

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The way you end a work of writing is just as important as the hook you use to capture readers’ attention and the content in between. The concluding paragraph or section of your paper should begin with words telling readers that the content is drawing to a close. Review some examples of good conclusion sentence starters so you’ll be able to craft appropriate endings of your own.

Characteristics of Effective Conclusion Starters

When it’s time to bring your work to an end, it’s important to sum up the key points or concepts rather than simply stopping abruptly. Conclusion starters are transitional phrases that let readers know they have reached the final part of a document. Conclusion starters should:

  • be just a few words that introduce the first sentence of the final paragraph or brief concluding section
  • let readers know that they have reached the beginning of the final section
  • make readers aware that what they’re about to read won’t provide new information
  • set readers expectations for how the work will be drawn to a close (such as a summary of main points, statement of need for additional research, or call to action)

Conclusion Starter Ideas for Essays and Speeches

Whether you’re a student in college, high school or middle school, chances are that you will be assigned to write quite a few essays and deliver many speeches or presentations. When deciding how to end an essay or a speech, you’ll need to choose a conclusion starter that’s appropriate for the overall tone .

Examples of conclusion paragraph starter words and phrases include:

  • all things considered
  • given these points
  • I feel we have no choice but to conclude
  • in conclusion
  • in drawing to a close
  • in light of this information
  • in my opinion
  • in the final analysis
  • nevertheless
  • now that you know
  • the logical conclusion seems to be
  • to summarize
  • upon considering all the facts
  • upon exploring the situation from multiple perspectives
  • what else can we conclude but that
  • what other conclusion can we draw from
  • when considered from the perspective of
  • when faced with the question of
  • with all this in mind

Sample Conclusion Starters for Research Papers

Since a research paper’s focus is on presenting the findings of a particular study, the conclusion usually focuses on major findings and their implications. For academic research papers , it is generally expected that the paper will end with a call for additional research in the form of further study of a similar topic or to explore a related research question . The tone should be formal, taking into account the extent to which readers would be expected to have advanced knowledge of the subject matter.

Phrases you might use to start your research paper conclusion include:

  • as a result
  • as expected, the results indicate
  • as indicated by the data
  • based on the evidence presented
  • based on the results of this study, it seems
  • based on what is known at this point in time
  • data seem to indicate
  • in light of these results
  • in the context of x , it seems that
  • surprisingly, the data revealed
  • the data clearly indicate
  • the data reveal
  • the major revelation from this study is
  • the results of this study demonstrate
  • the results of this study seem to indicate
  • to extrapolate from the data
  • upon analyzing the data
  • upon review of these findings
  • what this study reveals is
  • what we now know is
  • while additional research is needed
  • while further study is warranted
  • while these results seem to indicate
  • with results like these, it seems

Less Formal Conclusion Starter Examples

Some writing is much less formal than a research paper or school assignment, or you may even get assigned to write an informal essay that calls for more of a personal touch than an academic tone. In such cases, you may want to opt for a conclusion starter with a more laid-back, conversational tone like these examples.

  • after all has been said and done
  • as I see things
  • at the end of the day
  • beyond a shadow of a doubt
  • in a nutshell
  • in case you’ve wondered
  • in simple terms
  • my personal take on
  • on the whole
  • the time has come
  • to cut a long story short
  • to cut to the chase
  • to get to the heart of the matter
  • to plainly state the facts
  • to wrap this up
  • what are we to think about
  • what I believe to be true
  • what it boils down to
  • what I think is
  • when all is said and done
  • who knew that
  • without all the mumbo jumbo

Build Your Conclusion Writing Expertise

Writing good conclusions is certainly an important skill for all writers to have, from students to those who write or do public speaking for a living (and all writers in between). Now that you have some ideas of good conclusion starters, focus on how to write a conclusion in full. Begin by exploring some conclusion examples .

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  1. Here is a list of useful common sentence starters that you can use

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  2. 012 Good Sentence Starters For Essays Essay Example Learn English

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  3. Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence

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  5. Sentence starters for Key Stage 1

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  6. Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence

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  1. What Are Good Sentence Starters for Essays?

    Good sentence starters to establish cause and effect. It's common to use two different sentences to discuss a cause-and-effect relationship, as in something making something else happen. Sentence starters can make this relationship clear and show which sentence is the cause and which is the effect. As a result . . .

  2. Sentence Starters: Ultimate List to Improve Your Essays and Writing

    What Is a Good Sentence Starter for a Body Paragraph? Many of the tips I am about to discuss can be used anywhere in a paper, but they are especially helpful when writing body paragraphs. Let's start with one of the most important types of sentence starter in essay writing: transition words.

  3. Sentence Starters ⇒ Words and Phrases to Start Sentences

    A sentence starter is simply a word or a phrase that will help you to get your sentence going when you feel stuck, and it can be helpful in many different situations. A good sentence starter can help you better transition from one paragraph to another or connect two ideas. If not started correctly, your sentence will likely sound choppy, and ...

  4. How to Start an Essay: 7 Tips for a Knockout Essay Introduction

    Intriguing ways to start an essay. There are many different ways to write an essay introduction. Each has its benefits and potential drawbacks, and each is best suited for certain kinds of essays.Although these essay introductions use different rhetorical devices and prime the reader in different ways, they all achieve the same goal: hooking the reader and enticing them to keep reading.

  5. Sentence Starters: Definition, Rules and Remarkable Examples

    The main function of sentence starters is to tie together words, sentences, and paragraphs in an essay so that the writing flows logically. The sentence starters will help the readers comprehend the content more easily and absorb the meaning. The writing will be well-organized and cohesive. Reading an essay containing well-placed and thoughtful ...

  6. Crafting Compelling Sentence Starters for Essays

    Why Are Good Sentence Starters Important? Engagement: A compelling starter draws the reader in, piquing their curiosity. Direction: It sets the tone and direction of your essay. Context: A well-crafted opening provides a glimpse into the essay's context.

  7. Useful Sentence Starters For Academic Writing

    In conclusion, sentence starters serve as valuable tools in academic writing, enabling you to structure your thoughts, enhance clarity, and guide readers through your research essays. Use them in abundance yet carefully, as they can enhance your quality of writing significantly. Paperpal is a comprehensive AI writing toolkit that helps students ...

  8. Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases to Use As Sentence ...

    It will allow you to create a piece of writing which is coherent, interesting and above all, diverse. It will depend greatly on the type of sentence that you are writing as to which sentence starter you use and using a good variety within your essay will make it much more engaging for the reader. Once you have finished writing, it is a good ...

  9. Get Talking with These Sentence Starters: The Ultimate Guide

    Good sentence starters can be used in different types of writing, including essays, articles, research papers, and even fiction. They help to introduce new ideas, provide evidence, summarize key points, and make transitions between paragraphs and sections.

  10. Easy Words to Use as Sentence Starters to Write Better Essays

    Tips for Using Transition Words and Phrases. 1. Use a variety of transition words, not the same one. 2. Put a comma after the transition word. 3. Put the subject of the sentence after the comma.

  11. 40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays

    4. That is to say. Usage: "That is" and "that is to say" can be used to add further detail to your explanation, or to be more precise. Example: "Whales are mammals. That is to say, they must breathe air.". 5. To that end. Usage: Use "to that end" or "to this end" in a similar way to "in order to" or "so".

  12. Starter Sentences for Essays: Examples and How to write them

    Good essay starters can act as transitions and sentence-starting phrases that transition from one idea to the next smoothly. They are capable of linking ideas in such a way that the reader will effortlessly flow with the essay from the start to the end. 3. They increase Credibility and Professionalism.

  13. 13 Engaging Ways to Begin an Essay

    Use the Historical Present Tense. An effective method of beginning an essay is to use historical present tense to relate an incident from the past as if it were happening now. "Ben and I are sitting side by side in the very back of his mother's station wagon.

  14. Paragraph Starters for Essays

    A good sentence starter is one that easily indicates what the tone and layout of the paragraph is going to be. If the paragraph is going to be a compare and contrast style of content, then it ...

  15. Sentence Starters

    To help you make proper and effective use of sentence starters, here is a list of the kind of situations where the usage of a sentence starter will definitely prove beneficial. The first instance would be when you are introducing a new thought or idea; for example, the very first sentence that is used to begin a paragraph, an essay, a report or ...

  16. Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence

    so i think that there should be more expansion so we can tell the reader a bit more about what is happening. i like his book. Sentence Starters! Here you will find a useful list of common sentence starters that you can use in a discussion as well as in essay writing. Learn these.

  17. Sentence Starters for Essays: Complete Guide on Its Uses & Tips

    A set of good essay sentence starters comes under the most crucial components of any write-up. They help the writer to set the stage for readers with a clue about what to expect next. Essay sentence openers hold the power to bring cohesion to lengthy pieces of writing, especially academic essays. You can also put essay opening sentence/phrases ...

  18. 101 Good Sentence Starters Writers Love To Use

    Good sentence starters are also beneficial because they…. Help to clarify your ideas by conveying emphasis, importance, contrast, similarities, etc. Link ideas within a piece of writing effectively so that it flows more nicely. Make your writing appear more polished, academic, and credible. Readers are more likely to understand your point of ...

  19. Elevate Your Essay Writing With Sentence Starters For Essays

    What Is a Good Sentence Starter for an Essay Introduction? A good sentence starter for an essay introduction is crucial for capturing the reader's attention and setting the tone for your entire piece. It should be engaging, thought-provoking, and relevant to your topic. Using an effective sentence starter, you can hook your readers from the ...

  20. Sentence Starters Made Easy for Better Essays

    To Wrap Up. A sentence starter is a brief word or phrase to help the reader transition. Sentence starters are commonly used in written texts, blog posts, reports, and essays. If you want your sentence starters to stand out from the crowd, avoid common words. Common words such as "I," "am," and "this" should be avoided.

  21. 10 Good Paragraph Starters for All Your Writing Needs

    These paragraph starters are fairly simple. "Firstly", "secondly" and so on can all work well here. You can also use words like "before" and "afterwards" as well as "eventually". Tips to Help You Write Better Paragraphs. The types of paragraph starters we have provided above will help you improve your writing.

  22. 54 Best Paragraph Starters For Argumentative Essays

    The body paragraph of an argumentative essay contain at least three standard paragraphs, but can vary depending on the argument. The starting sentence of each paragraph is a topic sentence, which represent the paragraph following it. The rest of the paragraph states the main argument/stance of the writer, with the ending sentence giving idea of ...

  23. Good Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs

    If you're looking for good conclusion starters to finish your piece strongly, look no further. ... Essays; Good Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs By Mary Gormandy White, M.A. , Staff ... Review some examples of good conclusion sentence starters so you'll be able to craft appropriate endings of your own.