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A Complete List of C. S. Lewis Books in Chronological Order

When you hear the name C. S. Lewis, the first thing to pop into your head will probably be 'Narnia!'. Yes, he is the famous author of this much-loved series of books and movies. This Penlighten article provides a list of all the books by C. S. Lewis in chronological order.

A Complete List of C. S. Lewis Books in Chronological Order

When you hear the name C. S. Lewis, the first thing to pop into your head will probably be ‘Narnia!’. Yes, he is the famous author of this much-loved series of books and movies. This Penlighten article provides a list of all the books by C. S. Lewis in chronological order.

Quiet Goodbye …

Despite being such a renowned author, C. S. Lewis’s death was not a very publicized event because the day he died, i.e., on November 22, 1963, was also the day President Kennedy was assassinated.

Born Clive Staple Lewis and known as Jack to his near and dear ones, C. S. Lewis is a world renowned author, especially popular for his fantasy-fiction book series, The Chronicles of Narnia. Some of the books in the series have since been turned into very successful movies that have been loved by grown-ups and kids alike. Apart from this, Mr. Lewis wrote many more fictional and non-fictional books. He was also an academician, poet, and essayist. The following paragraphs provide a list of all his books, divided into fiction and non-fiction, along with their publishing year.

The Pilgrim’s Regress

Year of Publishing – 1933

This is Lewis’s first work of prose to ever be published. The story is about a man named John, who starts out in search of an island that he greatly desires. He has just had a glimpse of this island, which he has been unable to forget. The story is about his desire that makes him undertake the journey, and about the journey itself.

The Space Trilogy

This is Lewis’s very first fictional series. As you can see, there is quite a gap between the publishing dates of all three books.

Out of the Silent Planet

Year of Publishing – 1938

Most of the action in this book takes place on Mars. The story’s hero, Elwin Ransom, takes a trip to Mars when he realizes that the earth has been shunned from the solar system. He soon finds out that the Earth’s Oyarsa (planet ruler) has turned evil. Hence, to prevent this from adversely affecting the rest of the solar system, the Earth has now been made a ‘silent planet’.

Year of Publishing – 1943

This book is also known as Voyage to Venus, which makes it quite evident that it is set on Venus (Perelandra). Here, Elwin Ransom goes to Venus on the orders of the Mars Oyarsa seen in Out of the Silent Planet, to save the Venusian humanoids from an attack by the Earth’s Oyarsa. It tells us all about Ransom’s adventures on Venus and his consequent return to earth.

That Hideous Strength

Year of Publishing – 1946

In this book, Elwin Ransom is not the main hero. This book is set on earth, where the National Institute of Coordinated Experiments (N.I.C.E.), a huge organization known for its advanced scientific work, is in search of the body of the famous wizard, Merlin. It is collaborating with demons from another planet to take control of the Earth.

The Screwtape Letters

Year of Publishing – 1942

These are a series of letters written by a demon called Screwtape, to his demon nephew Wormwood, who is a novice put in charge of a person, who is referred to as ‘the patient’. Wormwood is supposed to tempt this human and make him err, thus bringing him closer to Hell (Satan) and away from Heaven (God). It aptly describes the human nature. The patient has been shown to convert to Christianity, and the book also describes various areas of temptation such as gluttony, sex, and pride, with which Wormwood is supposed to sway him. The book ends with the patient going to Heaven and Wormwood being destroyed by other demons.

The Great Divorce

Year of Publishing – 1945

The person who is telling this story has mysteriously found himself in a very ominous and gloomy place known as the “gray town”. Wanting to leave, he boards a crowded bus to another town. This new town is beautiful, but none of the new arrivals are able to enjoy it, because everything is too heavy for them to lift, even a leaf. They are soon welcomed by spirits who tell them that this is the path to heaven, and that they need to forsake some things to get there. It shows how the human mind works, and how we are not willing to let go of something for something better. A unique concept indeed.

The Chronicles of Narnia

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Year of Publishing – 1950

This book was the first of the series that introduced us to the enchanting world of Narnia. The four Pevensie children, Lucy, Edmund, Susan, and Peter, are living with an old professor after having to leave London due to World War II. At his house, they come across a wardrobe that leads to another world called Narnia. The book revolves around the children helping Aslan the lion save the land from the evil witch. The witch is defeated, and the four children become the rulers of Narnia.

Prince Caspian

Year of Publishing – 1951

In this book, the children return to Narnia because a prince named Caspian calls to them for help. More than a millennium has passed since they left, and they are shocked to find Narnia ravaged, and the evil Miraz sitting on the throne. Miraz is Caspian’s uncle, who has betrayed his parents and become king. Caspian wants to defeat him, for which he needs help from the Pevensies.

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Year of Publishing -1952

This book has only Lucy and Edmund, and a new character named Eustace Scrubb, who is their cousin. They join prince Caspian aboard the Dawn Treader, and set sail to find those lords who Miraz got rid of once he came to power. The book follows their adventures aboard the ship, and all the interesting people and creatures that they meet on their journey.

The Silver Chair

Year of Publishing – 1953

The Silver Chair stars Eustace and his friend Jill Pole, who are called to Narnia by Aslan to find prince Rilian, prince Caspian’s son. Rilian has left over a decade ago to find those who killed his mother and avenge her death. But he has not returned. This book shows the trouble and adventure the two children go through in their journey. The Pevensies do not appear in this book as main characters.

The Horse and His Boy

Year of Publishing – 1954

As with The Silver Chair, the main protagonists of this book are not the Pevensie children, though the book is set during their reign over Narnia. The story involves two people and two talking horses, who are separately held captive in another country, and plan their individual escapes to Narnia. They meet each other on the way and make the journey together.

The Magician’s Nephew

Year of Publishing – 1955

The book revolves around two friends, Digory Kirk and Polly Plummer. Digory’s uncle has created two magic rings, which the children put on one day, enabling them to enter many different worlds. They also get to witness how Aslan creates Narnia. The 12-year-old Digory is the same professor who houses the Pevensie children 4 decades later, and in whose house they find the entrance to Narnia.

The Last Battle

Year of Publishing – 1956

The Last Battle is about a foolish donkey who makes a great deal of trouble by pretending to be Aslan, which causes a battle between the other rulers of the land, in turn leading to the ruin and end of Narnia.

Till We Have Faces

This book is the story of Cupid and Psyche, retold by Lewis because he believed that some parts of the original were inconsistent. This story is narrated by Orual, Psyche’s sister. When Psyche is commanded to be married to the God of the Mountain, Orual is hurt. As nobody has seen this God’s face, Orual convinces her sister to do so, which results in the marriage breaking up. Everyone believes that Orual did this to Psyche out of jealousy, which is why she decides to tell everyone the truth. This two-part book is her side of the story.

Ministering Angels

Year of Publishing – 1958

This book is set entirely on Mars. A group of men explore the planet, when another group of people from earth land there. There are two women in this new group who are sent to woo and have carnal relationships with these men, because they have been alone on Mars for a long time. The book revolves around the events that happen from this point forward, and gives readers a message that there is more to humans than just physical relationships. An interesting concept!

Screwtape Proposes a Toast

Year of Publishing – 1961

This is an essay that is usually attached with The Screwtape Letters. It is a toast made by the demon Screwtape during dinner one night at the Tempters’ Training College for demons. He criticizes the current system of public education, and all the faults in it that have brought it down. It is set in the backdrop of World War II and compares the educational methods of the West and the Communists. It has a strong political theme.

Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer

Year of Publishing – 1964

Malcolm is an imaginary person to whom the author addresses the letters in this book. It is mainly about the author’s take on prayer. He says that prayer is a medium for a person to communicate with God. He also gets into the details of prayer, such as when and how it must be done. Other aspects that the author elaborates on are the various types of prayer, and their importance and effects. He also talks about rebirth.

The Dark Tower

Year of Publishing – 1977

The Dark Tower is an unfinished story that is believed to be the original sequel to Out of the Silent Planet. Once, an academician developed a device, a chronoscope, to see into the parallel universe called “Othertime”. The villain of the story is a semi-human with a horn on his head, known as the Unicorn, who is the ruler of “Othertime”. He wishes to build a prestigious university there, stinging and turning people into slaves to do his bidding. The story revolves around time travel, the adventures of entering into another universe, and one very mean unicorn.

Year of Publishing – 1985

This book has been written together by Lewis and his brother Warnie, in their childhood. It is about an entirely different world having only animals in it, called Animal-Land. It is complete with the architecture, politics, and different residents of this place, all explained in detail.

Non-fiction

The allegory of love: a study in medieval tradition.

Year of Publishing – 1936

An allegory means using a medium such as art or song to depict a particular idea. This book talks about using allegory in love, in the form of ‘courtly love’. Courtly love meant that which was full of chivalry. For example, a knight performing heroic acts to win over a lady love. The book traces the growth of courtly love through its various stages. The first two chapters cover this aspect, while the rest consist of poems about the same.

Rehabilitations and Other Essays

Year of Publishing – 1939

No synopsis available.

The Personal Heresy: A Controversy (with E. M. W. Tillyard)

This book contains six essays. It has been co-authored by C. S. Lewis and Eustace Mandeville Wetenhall Tillyard, with each having written three essays. The main topic is about the authors’ differing points of view about poetry. Tillyard believed that poetry comes from within the poet, and that the poet is superior to other people. Lewis believed that poetry could be created by anyone, and believed in writing poems that could be understood by everyone.

The Problem of Pain

Year of Publishing – 1940

C. S. Lewis was a complete Christian at heart, and this book deals with the aspect of suffering explained from a Christian point of view. Questions such as why God allows evil to manifest the earth are raised in this book. It beautifully tries to combine the concepts of suffering with the Christian belief that God is kind and fair to all. A wonderfully written piece of literature.

A Preface to Paradise Lost

This immensely popular book is a take on John Milton’s famous – Paradise Lost. This piece of writing has Lewis questioning why only ‘great poets’ can give their judgment about Paradise Lost, and also why there is a need to write poetry in a way that brings out a typical response in all the readers, instead of just being direct. These and many more amusing things are included in A Preface to Paradise Lost, making it an enjoyable read.

The Abolition of Man

The Abolition of Man deals with the subject of education, and lists the importance of not doing away with or forgetting its natural value, along with the unpleasant consequences lest that occurs. Under the title, you will find the words “Reflections on education with special reference to the teaching of English in the upper forms of schools”. The book was read for the very first time as a three-part lecture at King’s College, Newcastle.

Year of Publishing – 1947

This book was written in 1947 and then revised in 1960. Here, Lewis addresses the possibility of miracles actually taking place. He blames modern thinkers for making people believe that miracles are not real and cannot happen. He says that we must first confirm whether miracles can really take place, and the practical possibility of it.

Arthurian Torso

Year of Publishing – 1948

The sub-title of this book is “Containing the Posthumous Fragment of the ‘Figure of Arthur'”. It is written by Charles Williams, and contains a commentary by Lewis about the Arthurian poems composed by Williams.

Mere Christianity

Year of Publishing – 1952

This book has been inspired by radio talk shows conducted by BBC between 1942-44. It has been divided into three sections: The Case for Christianity (1942), Christian Behavior (1943), and Beyond Personality (1944). It is based on theology, which is an analytical study about God and religion.

Major British Writers, Volume I

English literature in the sixteenth century excluding drama.

In this book, Lewis divides the literature of the sixteenth century into three separate periods, the Late Medieval, Drab, and Golden. It talks about the current and changing scenario in English literature. The first book deals with what is left of the Medieval period in the late Medieval. The second and third books deal with changes in literature in the Drab and Golden ages.

Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life

This is an autobiography written by C. S. Lewis, although it does not recount his entire life. The main theme of this book is Lewis’s discovery of Joy, and how he gives it his own meaning in his life. He also describes his journey from being an atheist to becoming a believer and converting to Christianity.

Reflections on the Psalms

This book is a discussion about the Psalms in the Bible. It will be easy to read for those who know the Bible very well, because otherwise a reader will have to keep referring to it from time to time. Although 150 Psalms are discussed in this book, not all are noted in it. The Coverdale Prayer Book has been the source for most of the Psalms quoted in this book.

The Four Loves

This book explores the concept of love and its true nature from a Christian point of view. Lewis says that there are three types of love: need love, gift love, and appreciative love. He also focuses on the four aspects of love, which are friendship, affection, unconditional love, and romance. The book was based on a 1958 radio talk show that was quite open about the issue of sex, being a little ahead of its time.

Studies in Words

Year of Publishing – 1960

This is a very interesting book because it deals with the study of words. In this book, Lewis traces the history of some commonly used words like sad, conscious, nature, sense, wit, etc., and traces their history right to their origins not only in English, but also in other ancient languages. It also studies the changes in meanings the words went through, and how there is a strong chance that the meaning today and the meaning before may be different.

The World’s Last Night and Other Essays

This is a collection of essays written by Lewis and published in 1960, three years before his death. The main essay in this book is about the return of Jesus Christ to earth, or his ‘second coming’. Some other topics covered in it revolve around prayer, religion, and belief.

An Experiment in Criticism

Here, a very interesting concept about the quality of a book is observed. Lewis says that a book must not be judged by just its content, but more emphasis must be given on the type of reader. He says that there are readers who will read a book just once or condemn a book that is not well-written, and then there are readers who will learn something new every time they re-read the same book, and will also try to gain more knowledge from a poorly written one. This is because they approach it without judgment and a preconceived notion about its ‘quality’.

A Grief Observed

This book is about the grief and trials the author deals with after the death of his wife, Joy Davidman. When the book was first published, Lewis used a pen name, N.W. Clerk. In the book, he refers to his wife as H (her first name was Helen). It is based on a set of notebooks that Lewis had kept, wherein he used to write about his deep sadness upon his bereavement. It was re-published under his name only in 1963, after his death.

They Asked for a Paper: Papers and Addresses

Year of Publishing – 1962

This book is a compilation of many essays that were written by Lewis. This was one of his last works before his death in 1963. The essays include various topics like literature, society, social sciences, theology, etc.

The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature

This book was published after Lewis’s death. It deals with many aspects, but primarily the model of the universe. Lewis describes how the universe was believed to be in the middle ages, and how it was a notion that it was not unending, but in fact definite, and the Medieval belief about the science and nature of the universe.

Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature

Year of Publishing – 1966

This book is a rather unique compilation of many essays, reviews, and articles written by Lewis. These are some articles that may be otherwise difficult to find, making this book a collector’s item. Lewis takes some works of Milton, Spenser, Dante, and other great writers as examples to explain the methods of criticism that were employed in olden times, giving the reader a proper understanding of these works.

Spenser’s Images of Life

This is a compilation of many notes written by C. S. Lewis, and was published by Alastair Fowler. It talks about God as being a ‘glad creator’ of the universe, and also talks about someone called the Faerie Queene as being a grand celebration of everything in this universe. It is one of the lengthiest books by this author.

Letters to an American Lady

Year of Publishing – 1967

This is a collection of a series of letters that Lewis wrote to an American woman, whom he strangely never met. It ranges across a vast array of topics, universal to downright trivial. It gives readers a look at the other side of Lewis that they never knew. His personal thoughts and views are present here for everyone to see, to know him as someone more than just a great writer, a human being.

Christian Reflections

This collection of 14 papers is all about Christianity. In this book, Lewis tries to make a point that though there are different parts in Christianity, it is still one religion and everyone is united under it. The book talks about Christianity and culture, music, literature, ethics, Psalms, and many more topics. Lewis tries to establish a common ground for everyone within the vastness of Christianity.

Selected Literary Essays

Year of Publishing – 1969

This book is a compilation of twenty essays that were written by Lewis between 1932 – 62. These essays are some of his most important literary works to date.

God in the Dock: Essays on Theology and Ethics

Year of Publishing – 1971

This book, as the title suggests, is a collection of essays about theology and ethics. It covers topics related to science and religion, Christianity, and the challenges that it faced during the transition of the world to the Modernist era.

Of Other Worlds

Year of Publishing – 1982

This book is divided into two parts: essays and stories. The essay section consists of those written on science fiction, fairies, criticism, and some more. The story section contains short stories that have been written by Lewis.

The Business Of Heaven:Daily Readings From the Writings of C. S. Lewis

Year of Publishing – 1984

This book contains one piece of Lewis’s writing for each day. The writings are inspiring and comforting, and prove to be a wonderful read. Some of the topics covered here are love, pain, and the impact that prayer can have on us. The excerpts are taken from some of his popular books.

Present Concerns

Year of Publishing – 1986

This is a collection of 19 essays that ranges in scope from values to literature to spirituality. Some topics included here are about chivalry, living in a world where everyone and everything is so different from what it used to be, and even about the English language and democratic education.

All My Road Before Me: The Diary of C. S. Lewis 1922 – 27

Year of Publishing – 1991

This is a diary written by the author when he was quite young, between the ages of 24 and 29. This book gives readers an insight into the working of the mind of a young Lewis, who was very different from the sensible and grown-up writer we see otherwise; how the dilemmas of his life then were very different from those a few years later.

Compelling Reason: Essays on Ethics and Theology

Year of Publishing – 1996

This book is also a compilation of essays on theology, religion, and science. Lewis said that using logic and reason when it comes to faith and beliefs is the way to go. He also believed that baseless and unscientific beliefs can cause more harm than good.

Essay Collection: Literature, Philosophy and Short Stories

Year of Publishing – 2000

This book contains a total of sixty essays written by Lewis on various subjects, and also some of his short stories. The essays range across a wide variety of topics, from literature to philosophy and history. The short stories included here are all pieces of fiction.

Essay Collection: Faith, Christianity and the Church

The essays included in this volume are all religious, and are to do with the church, prayer, faith, and God.

Collected Letters, Vol. I: Family Letters 1905 – 1931

This book is a collection of letters from Lewis’s childhood days, and the time he was called to war. They include letters to his friends, describing the war, and also Lewis’s thoughts about God and religion. They give the reader an insight into how these letters went on to influence many of his future writings.

Collected Letters, Vol. II: Books, Broadcasts and War 1931 – 1949

Year of Publishing – 2004

The second volume of collected letters include those written by Lewis to his new friends, known as the Inklings, which also included J. R. R. Tolkien. By this time, Lewis had written The Allegory of Love, which had become quite popular. It also includes his correspondence with his brother Warnie, who was off fighting during World War II.

Collected Letters, Vol. III: Narnia, Cambridge and Joy 1950 – 1963

Year of Publishing – 2007

The final volume includes more letters written by Lewis to his friends, and also talks about the topics he was interested in writing about. It also includes the story of his marriage, and the time he was writing his first book in the infamous Narnia series.

This was a list of all the books, essays, and letters written by Clive Staple Lewis , in the order of their publishing year. There are very few writers who can make you think for days about a single piece of writing or influence you to do something out of the ordinary, and Mr. Lewis is one of them.

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The 19 best C.S. Lewis books, from Narnia and beyond, according to Goodreads

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  • C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a British writer who wrote over 30 books in his lifetime.
  • He is best known for writing " The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe ."
  • We used reviews from Goodreads members to rate his most popular novels.

Insider Today

C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a British writer who is best known for his fantastical children's series " The Chronicles of Narnia ," but also wrote science fiction, moral fiction, and theological nonfiction works. His religious works and musings are often studied as thought exercises in morality, philosophy, and theology and his " Chronicles of Narnia " series has sold over 100 million copies, becoming a staple of classic children's fantasy. 

To rank the most popular C.S. Lewis novels, we turned to Goodreads members. On Goodreads , over 125 million readers rate, review, and recommend their favorite novels to their friends and the community.  So whether you're looking for your first C.S. Lewis novel or a new read from the author of your favorite children's book, here are the best C.S. Lewis books, according to Goodreads members.

The 19 best C.S. Lewis books, according to Goodreads members:

'the lion, the witch and the wardrobe'.

the books of cs lewis

" The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $7.64

With over 2.5 million ratings, " The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe " is the most popular C.S. Lewis book amongst Goodreads members. It's a fantastical children's story about the magical, wintry world young Lucy and her siblings discover hidden in the back of a wardrobe. In Narnia, the children find a noble lion, a White Witch, and the terrible spell under which all of Narnia is trapped.

'The Magician's Nephew'

the books of cs lewis

"The Magician's Nephew," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $8.27

Though published sixth, " The Magician's Nephew " is the prequel to " The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe ," detailing the creation of Narnia by Aslan, the lion. Set 1,000 years before the first magical tale, this story explains the fantastical elements of Narnia and the importance of different histories, and is an enjoyable story for anyone who loved the first classic novel.

'The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'

the books of cs lewis

"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $7.99

Lucy and Edmund are drawn back into Narnia along with their cousin, Eustace, to discover King Caspian is set to board the ship Dawn Treader in search of the seven lost Lords, banished by the previous evil king. The three children board the ship for a fantastical adventure in this third installment of the " Chronicles of Narnia " series.

'The Screwtape Letters'

the books of cs lewis

"The Screwtape Letters," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $10.27

" The Screwtape Letters " is a 1942 classic religious satire that uses the viewpoint of devils to portray the temptations and sins of humanity. Told through 31 letters from a demon named Screwtape, the story serves as a satirical mentorship from the demon to his nephew as he attempts to secure the eternal damnation of one British man.

'Prince Caspian'

the books of cs lewis

"Prince Caspian," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $8.27

In this second book in the " Chronicles of Narnia " series, the Pevensie siblings are pulled back to Narnia, where 1300 years have passed in the one English year since their last visit. The children learn that the magic is running out in Narnia, the animals are in hiding, and there's a prince who desperately needs their help.

'Mere Christianity'

the books of cs lewis

"Mere Christianity," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $13.69

" Mere Christianity " is a theological book by C.S. Lewis, a compilation of BBC radio talks that he gave between 1941 and 1944. First published as three separate books, the transcripts focus on mortality, Christian ethics, and the Christian idea of God. 

'The Horse and His Boy'

the books of cs lewis

"The Horse and His Boy," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $8.27

Set during the final chapter of " The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe ," this story is told as the Pevensie children reign as kings and queens in Narnia, though they appear as only minor characters in this tale. In the countries south of Narnia, two children and their two talking horses are each running away from home when they uncover a prince's plan to attack Archenland and set out to warn the king.

'The Silver Chair'

the books of cs lewis

"The Silver Chair," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $8.27

In this " Chronicles of Narnia " tale, Eustace Scrubb and Jill Pole are two children pulled into Narnia and recruited to help the elderly King Caspian X help find his missing son and heir to his throne. The lion, Aslan, gives Jill four Signs to guide them on their journey to find the missing prince. 

'The Last Battle'

the books of cs lewis

"The Last Battle," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $8.27

" The Last Battle " is the emotional and highly-anticipated conclusion to the " Chronicles of Narnia " series, where an evil ape named Shift has deceived the residents of Narnia with a naive donkey disguised as Aslan the lion, leading Narnians astray. Learning of the distress, King Tirian calls Eustace and Jill to Narnia, who are soon joined by the Pevensie siblings to defend Narnia and Aslan. 

'The Great Divorce'

the books of cs lewis

"The Great Divorce," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $8.99

" The Great Divorce " is a Christian allegorical tale about a bus ride from hell to heaven. As the narrator waits for the bus in a cold, grey, rainy town, he listens to the discussions of other passengers before boarding a bus that ascends beyond the rainy clouds into a clear sky in this story about grace, judgment, and redemption. 

'Out of the Silent Planet'

the books of cs lewis

"Out of the Silent Planet," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $11.19

This novel is the first in a science fiction trilogy where Dr. Ransom is kidnapped and taken aboard a spacecraft set for a planet called Malacandra, better known as Mars. When Dr. Ransom overhears his captors discussing their plans to offer him as a sacrifice, he attempts to escape and, in the process, learns about this new strange planet and the intergalactic history of his own.

'A Grief Observed'

the books of cs lewis

"A Grief Observed," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $13.49

" A Grief Observed " is a painful and raw collection of C.S. Lewis' grief-ridden journal entries following the death of his wife in 1960. As Lewis mourned his wife, he contemplated profound questions about the role of faith and religion in life and death, exploring the human processes of grief in a candid conversation. 

'Till We Have Faces'

the books of cs lewis

"Till We Have Faces," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $14.49

In this mythological retelling of the story of Cupid and Psyche, possessive Orual is accusatory and suspicious of her younger sister Psyche's, new love: Cupid. Determined to pull Psyche away from Cupid, Orual begins a journey of moral development in this vivid retelling.

'Surprised by Joy'

the books of cs lewis

"Surprised by Joy," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $14.49

" Surprised by Joy " is an autobiographical depiction of C.S. Lewis' conversion to Christianity in 1931. Though the memoir does not continue beyond that year, the book focuses on Lewis' search to find joy and how that search guided his path from atheism to Christianity.

'The Problem of Pain'

the books of cs lewis

"The Problem of Pain," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $9.79

In this short philosophical read, C.S. Lewis sets out to answer a huge theological question: If God is all-powerful and good, why does he allow people to suffer? C.S. Lewis argues that the existence of pain is not evidence that God isn't good through this exploration of theology, morality, and paradoxes.

'The Four Loves'

the books of cs lewis

"The Four Loves," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $13.99

Published in 1963, " The Four Loves " is a compilation of radio talks C.S. Lewis gave in 1958 about love through a religious and philosophical perspective. Lewis explores the four types of human love — affection, friendship, erotic love, and love of God — through thoughtful problems and conversations. 

'Perelandra'

the books of cs lewis

"Perelandra," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $9.99

This second novel of C.S. Lewis' science fiction trilogy is set on the planet Perelandra, or Venus, where Dr. Ransom must travel to stop the dark force that threatens to invade the peaceful planet. In this rich novel that mirrors a retelling of the biblical "Adam and Eve" story, Ransom struggles against the forces of evil in a paradise land.

'That Hideous Strength'

the books of cs lewis

"That Hideous Strength," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $14.99

" That Hideous Strength " is the final novel in C.S. Lewis' space trilogy. Set on Earth, this novel follows Mark Studdock who is enticed to join a sinister organization called N.I.C.E., which aims to control all of humanity. As his wife Jane continues to have strange and eerie dreams, Mark uncovers the meaning behind them in this fascinating science fiction conclusion.

'The Abolition of Man'

the books of cs lewis

"The Abolition of Man," available at Amazon and Bookshop , from $11.99

" The Abolition of Man " is a thought-provoking philosophical work that explores the values from the texts taught in schools, objective and natural values, and reflections upon a future where a select group of people decides the morality of humanity. Divided into three sections which were once a series of lectures given by C.S. Lewis, this 1943 philosophical book is one that encourages readers to challenge their own beliefs.

the books of cs lewis

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C.S. Lewis

About C.S. LEWIS

Find out all you need to know about the author.

Image credit: The Wade Center

Clive Staples Lewis (1898–1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement.

Lewis wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. C. S. Lewis’s most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Mere Christianity , Out of the Silent Planet , The Great Divorce , The Screwtape Letters , and the universally acknowledged classics in The Chronicles of Narnia . To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and been transformed into three major motion pictures.

EXPLORE THE C.S. LEWIS TIMELINE

Clive Staple Lewis born in Belfast, Ireland.

Lewis’s mother, Florence Augusta (‘Flora’) Hamilton Lewis, dies.

Sent to the Wynyard School in Watford, Hertfordshire, England.

Enrolls as boarding student at Campbell College, Belfast, Ireland; leaves in December due to respiratory problems.

Enrolls at Cherboug House near Malvern College, England; abandons his Christian faith.

Meets Arthur Greeves, who becomes a lifelong friend.

Is privately tutored by W. T. "The Great Knock" Kirkpatrick.

Receives a scholarship to University College, Oxford.

Enlists in British Army.

Lewis’s close friend Paddy Moore reported killed in battle.

Wounded in Battle of Arras.

Discharged from British Army.

Moves in with Moore’s mother, Mrs Janie King Moore, and sister, Maureen.

Spirits in Bondage

Publishes Spirits in Bondage under the pseudonym Clive Hamilton. Buy this book -->

Appointed English Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, where he tutors English Language and Literature.

Meets friend and colleague J.R.R. Tolkien.

Dymer under the pseudonym Clive Hamilton.

Publishes Dymer under the pseudonym Clive Hamilton. Buy this book -->

Lewis’s father, Albert Lewis, dies in Belfast.

Abandons atheism and converts to theism.

Lewis, the Moores, and later Warren, Lewis's brother, move into "The Kilns".

Converts to Christianity.

The Pilgrim’s Regress

Publishes The Pilgrim’s Regress .

Allegory of Love

Publishes The Allegory of Love . Buy this book

Out of the Silent Planet.

Publishes the first novel in the Space Trilogy series, Out of the Silent Planet. Buy this book

Weekly meetings of the "Inklings" begin.

The Problem of Pain

Publishes The Problem of Pain. Buy this book

Mere Christianity

Begins war-time broadcast talks on Christianity, later collected as Mere Christianity. Buy this book

Attends the first meeting of Oxford University's Socratic Club.

The Screwtape Letters

Publishes The Screwtape Letters. Buy this book

broadcast Talks

Publishes Broadcast Talks , based on BBC recordings.

Paradise Lost

Publishes A Preface to Paradise Lost .

The Abolition of Man

Publishes The Abolition of Man . Buy this book

Christian Behavior

Publishes Christian Behaviour , based on BBC recordings.

Perelandra

Publishes the second novel in the Space Trilogy series, Perelandra. Buy this book

Beyond Personality

Publishes Beyond Personality , based on BBC recordings.

That Hideous Strength

Publishes the third novel in the Space Trilogy series, That Hideous Strength. Buy this book

The Great Divorce

Publishes The Great Divorce. Buy this book

Awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity by the University of St. Andrews.

Miracles

Publishes Miracles. Buy this book

Appears on the cover of Time magazine.

Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses.

Publishes The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses. Buy this book

The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe

Publishes the first novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. Buy this book

Mrs. Moore dies.

Prince Casbian

Publishes the second novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series, Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia. Buy this book

Publishes Mere Christianity , which combines previously published Broadcast Talks (1942), Christian Behavior (1943), and Beyond Personality (1944). Buy this book

in the Chronicles of Narnia series, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Publishes the third novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Buy this book

The Silver Chair

Publishes the fourth novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series, The Silver Chair. Buy this book

Becomes chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge.

The Horse and His Boy

Publishes the fifth novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series, The Horse and His Boy . Buy this book

English Literature in the Sixteenth Century.

Publishes English Literature in the Sixteenth Century .

The Magician's Nephew

Publishes the sixth novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series, The Magician’s Nephew. Buy this book

Surprised By Joy

Publishes Surprised By Joy. Buy this book

The Last Battle

Publishes the seventh, and final, novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series, The Last Battle. Buy this book

Marries Joy Davidman Gresham.

Till We Have faces

Publishes Till We Have Faces. Buy this book

Reflections on the psalms

Publishes Reflections on the Psalms. Buy this book

Becomes, with T. S. Eliot, a member of the Commission to Revise the Psalter.

Publishes The Four Loves

Publishes The Four Loves. Buy this book

Lewis’s wife dies.

Studies in Words

Publishes Studies in Words. Buy this book

Diagnosed with kidney inflammation.

A Grief Observed

Publishes A Grief Observed under the pseudonym N. W. Clerk. Buy this book

An Experiment in Criticism

Publishes An Experiment in Criticism. Buy this book

Letters to Malcolm

Posthumously publishes Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer. Buy this book

The Discarded image

Posthumously publishes The Discarded Image. Buy this book

Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature

Posthumously publishes Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. Buy this book

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the books of cs lewis

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5 Books by C.S. Lewis that Everyone Should Read

  • Ryan Duncan
  • Updated Aug 22, 2022

5 Books by C.S. Lewis that Everyone Should Read

SPECIAL OFFER : Enroll in this free online course on C.S. Lewis today!

It has been over fifty years since the death of C.S. Lewis. On November 22, 1963, the Christian author and scholar passed away quietly in his home, his absence largely overlooked by the rest of the world. Yet Lewis’ writings went on to inspire generations of Christians and challenged the world with new notions about faith and God. Today, I would like to commemorate his work with a list of five books by C.S. Lewis that everyone should read. But first, let's look into his life and what inspired his great works of literature.

The Life of C.S. Lewis

Born in Belfast Ireland on Nov. 29, 1898, Clive Staples Lewis (nicknamed Jack) grew up with a deep love for reading books. Some of his favorites were Beatrix Potter stories; he had a fascination for writing and illustrating his own animal stories.

Losing his mother at an early age had a deep impact on Lewis’ spiritual life. Without her wisdom and godly influence, under agnostic and atheistic education later as a teen, he eventually walked away from his faith becoming an atheist.

Through the years, he faced hardship and pain after being injured in World War One and continued his search for meaning in life. Lewis finally came back to God at age 32, greatly influenced by the inspiring writings of George McDonald and other colleagues and friends, such as J. R. R. Tolkien, and G. K Chesterton.

Excerpt from 25 Inspiring C. S. Lewis Quotes by Debbie McDaniel

Books by C.S. Lewis, The Lion, the witch, and the wardrobe

Books by C.S. Lewis Everyone Should Read

Mere christianity.

“If I find in myself desires which nothing in this world can satisfy, the only logical explanation is that I was made for another world.”

Mere Christianity is one of Lewis’ most insightful books as well as one of his most difficult. A frank discussion on Christian beliefs, Mere Christianity  urges the reader to ask tough questions while examining the Bible from new perspectives. At moments, some may find the material hard to digest, but Lewis’ determined narrations help to pull the reader slowly forward. Even 70 years after it was written, this book continues to inspire Christians in the midst of their walk with God.

The Great Divorce

“Every natural love will rise again and live forever in this country: but none will rise again until it has been buried.”

Drawing inspiration from the works of St. Augustine, Lewis Carroll, and George MacDonald, The Great Divorce takes its readers on a journey to the slopes of Heaven and Hell. Lewis imagines a grim and joyless city known as “The Grey Town”, filled with inhabitants seeking a better place. When the narrator of the story joins a bus tour on an excursion elsewhere, he makes some startling discoveries about himself and what awaits him at the end of the road. Filled with vivid imagery and some poignant discussions on joy and redemption , The Great Divorce  asks us to consider the ultimate destination of every soul.

The Screwtape Letters

“It is funny how mortals always picture us as putting things into their minds: in reality our best work is done by keeping things out.”

Wickedly charming and brilliantly clever, The Screwtape Letters is Lewis at his finest. The book is comprised of thirty-one written letters from the demon Screwtape to his nephew, Wormwood, a younger and less experienced tempter. Together, the two schemes for ways to lead a human man toward “ Our Father Below” (Satan) while dreading the strength of “the Enemy” (God). The unorthodox perspective, combined with Lewis tactful writing, makes The Screwtape Letters a riveting story that should not go overlooked.

A Grief Observed

“No one ever told me that grief felt so like fear.”

The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe

“And so for a time it looked as if all the adventures were coming to an end; but that was not to be.”

The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe  will forever remain the most beloved of Lewis’ written works. It’s here that readers were first introduced to the magical realm of Narnia and the immortal character of Aslan, the lion. It’s here that the wonder and the beauty of Jesus death was rendered in stunning metaphor. And it’s hear where Lewis began the seven-book saga which would capture the imagination of children everywhere. The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe  has been read and re-read, and will no doubt open again in the years to come.

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the books of cs lewis

Interesting Literature

10 of the Best Books by C. S. Lewis

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

Although Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) – known as ‘Jack’ to his friends and family – is best-known for his seven children’s fantasy novels set in the land of Narnia, C. S. Lewis wrote a number of other works – fiction and non-fiction, science fiction and literary criticism – which have become classics in their field.

Below, we introduce ten of the very best works of C. S. Lewis, which any Lewis fan should seek out. They are not arranged in any preferential order.

Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate, we get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

1. The Allegory of Love .

Lewis’s most famous book, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe , is often described as Christian allegory – although Lewis himself denied that it was an allegory .

Nevertheless, over a decade before he published that first Narnia book, Lewis had already made his name as a literary critic with this 1936 book which argues that medieval courtly love poetry did more to revolutionise our conception of romantic love than the Renaissance.

the books of cs lewis

2. The Magician’s Nephew .

Although it was the sixth published Narnia novel, in 1955, this novel was a prequel, set before the events of the earlier published novels, and so is often named as the ‘first’ book in the Chronicles of Narnia (Lewis took the name Narnia from an old map which included Narni, a region of Italy).

One of Lewis’s inspirations for writing a prequel was a query from a friend about the lantern which stands in the middle of Narnia, in the place where Lucy meets the faun Mr Tumnus in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe .

This novel, then, is a kind of Old Testament creation story, telling how Aslan created the world of Narnia 1,000 years before the events of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe , thanks in part to a lantern taken from our world (London in the year 1900, to be precise).

the books of cs lewis

3. The Screwtape Letters .

This 1942 novel is a work of Christian apologetics, and takes the form of a series of letters written by Screwtape, a demon, to his nephew, Wormwood. The novel is, first and foremost, about temptation and the Christian’s responsibility to resist it. It’s witty and satirical while Lewis also raises some interesting theological questions through the epistolary form.

the books of cs lewis

4. Out of the Silent Planet .

The first in a loose trilogy of science-fiction novels Lewis wrote, whose protagonist (a philologist) was based on Lewis’s friend and fellow Inkling, J. R. R. Tolkien. Published in 1938, it’s Lewis’s earliest great work of fiction and a planetary romance influenced by David Lindsay’s (odd) 1920 novel A Voyage to Arcturus .

Although its pacing leaves a lot to be desired and it isn’t exactly action-packed, it’s a noteworthy early work of British science fiction.

the books of cs lewis

5. The Problem of Pain .

Published two years before The Screwtape Letters , in 1940, this book takes another theological issue – in this case, the problem of pain and suffering and why a loving God would allow it to exist in the world – and explores it, but this time in a non-fiction work.

the books of cs lewis

6. The Discarded Image.

Another work of non-fiction, this was his last book, published posthumously in 1964 following Lewis’ death in November the previous year (famously, he died on the same day that JFK was assassinated – the same day on which Aldous Huxley also died).

It’s an accessible and highly readable introduction to the various philosophical and scientific belief systems underpinning medieval and Renaissance literature, shot through with Lewis’s strong opinions on the literature of both periods.

the books of cs lewis

7. The Silver Chair .

Along with The Horse and His Boy , this is probably the most neglected of the seven Chronicles of Narnia , although it’s less easy to see why in the case of The Silver Chair . It doesn’t feature any of the core Pevensie children, instead focusing on Eustace Scrubb (from The Voyage of the Dawn Treader ) and his schoolmate Jill Pole, who escape school bullies by entering the world of Narnia.

A cast of some of Lewis’s best characters, including Puddleglum the Marsh-Wiggle and the villainous Lady of the Green Kirtle, make this one of Lewis’s best Narnia novels.

the books of cs lewis

8. Prince Caspian .

The second published novel in the Chronicles of Narnia , Prince Caspian was published in 1951 and sees the four Pevensie children who appeared in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe return to Narnia to help the titular prince to win the crown. There are some nice references to events and objects which featured in the first novel, which was set some 1,300 years earlier in Narnian history.

the books of cs lewis

9. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader .

This is the ‘sea story’ in the seven-part Chronicles of Narnia : this time, it is not a wardrobe but a painting of a ship that acts as the portal through to Narnia. Lucy and Edmund, the two youngest Pevensie children, are transported back into Narnia along with their cousin, the unpopular Eustance Clarence Scrubb, a boy so objectionable that he ‘almost deserved’ his name.

The third Narnia book to be published and the fifth in terms of the series’ internal chronology, it’s one of the most exciting adventures in the whole heptalogy.

the books of cs lewis

10. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe .

As mentioned above, this 1950 novel, the first published book in the Chronicles of Narnia , is viewed by most as an allegory for the New Testament story of Jesus’ Crucifixion and Resurrection.

Four siblings, staying at an eccentric professor’s house to escape the air raids of the Second World War, discover a portal at the back of a wardrobe, which leads through to the snow-covered land of Narnia where it is ‘always winter but never Christmas’.  The book, published in 1950, launched the fantasy series for which Lewis is now best-known. We have analysed this classic novel in depth here .

the books of cs lewis

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the books of cs lewis

C.S. Lewis Books In Order

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Clive Staples Lewis was a British poet, author, academic, and a lot more. Born in Belfast in 1898, he was a bright, imaginative young boy with a knack for story-telling. He was stubborn as well, as was seen when his dog Jacksie was hit by a car. At the time, the young author was a mere four years old. Following the incident, he refused to answer to any name but that of his dog. In fact, those close to him referred to as him ‘Jack’ for the rest of his life!

Being fascinated by tales of Beatrix Potter, the budding author soon penned down a couple of his own stories with the help of his older brother. Creating the world of ‘Boxen’, they reveled in a universe ruled by animals. However, with time, he soon took to various other forms of literary expression as well, incorporating them into his works. These helped him emote better. For example, he felt that his love for Celtic legends and Norse mythology was best expressed in Opera and epic poetry instead – born in Belfast, a part of his heart always belonged to Ireland.

However, a defining factor in Lewis’ life was religion. Instilled into him at a young age from his dear mother, he soon turned atheistic. His mother, who was the daughter of an Anglican priest, tried to enrich him with the principles of her religion. But even as atheistic beliefs began to fester, the advent of the first World War only reaffirmed them. Moreover, her death in 1908 left a void within him that was not easily filled. This only served to accelerate the atheistic outlook. As the young man enrolled into army training, he shared a room with another cadet fondly referred to as ‘Paddy’. It is said the two made a pact that if either died during war, the other would take care of both the families. As it so happened, Paddy lost his life and Lewis stuck to his word. This is how the void left by his mother was finally filled by Mrs. Jane Moore. Paddy’s mother became the mother-figure that Lewis always wished for. With a distant and dominating father that he was never close to, he looked to Mrs. Moore for support. It was especially necessary following the horrors of trench warfare as he battled depression and physical injuries. Their bond remained close and lasted until her dying days. In fact, they also lived together along with Mrs. Moore’s daughter, Maureen, until the 1940s when the older woman had to be hospitalized. As she succumbed to dementia, she needed to be admitted into a nursing home. Even there, Lewis visited her every day until her death.

In later life, he married Joy Davidman – an American author. Viewing her as a close friend and his only intellectual equal, the marriage was one of convenience meant to allow her a continued stay in England. However, the relationship began to develop and the two soon sought a proper Christian marriage even as Davidman was diagnosed with terminal bone cancer. The ceremony was performed in 1957, and she finally succumbed to the disease in 1960. Following this, Lewis raised both her sons as his own.

Despite his predominantly atheistic outlook in earlier life, in 1931 (perhaps following the persuasion of his close friend – the legendary J. R. R. Tolkien) Lewis reverted to the Anglican Church once more. But even in his conversion to theism, he was perhaps the most unwilling devotee there could be. Following this, the curious man grew ever interested in Christian myths, and this is evident in one of his best-known works, ‘The Chronicles of Narnia’.

Writings: While Lewis has written a commendable list of works, ‘The Chronicles of Narnia’ remain the most popular. Set in the magical realm of the same name, it tells the tale of mythical beasts, talking animals, and various children. Each of these is central to the unfolding of the plot, and yet none are constant through all 7 of the books. Apart from drawing inspiration from Christianity, the books also freely borrow characters from Greek and Roman mythology along with English and Irish fairy tales.

Many of the books in this series have also been adapted into TV shows and animated movies. One of the most popular books in the series, and also the first in chronological order, ‘The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe’ is among those adapted into a popular feature film as well. Beginning in the midst of the second world war, this book follows the evacuation of the four Pevensie siblings into the countryside. There they accidentally manage to cross over into the fantastical world of Narnia through a magic closet, and that’s where the adventure begins. As Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy make friends, fight foes, and engage in battle, the tale is an adventure woven into words. Throughout the novel Aslan the lion, who is also the rightful ruler of the land, becomes their friend and guide. He has a special bond with the youngest of the four, Lucy, who can also be considered the primary narrator of the tale. Her loyalty, innocence, and bravery are what eventually earn her the title of ‘Lucy the Valiant’.

Here, Lewis uses the concept of parallel worlds as the Pevensie siblings switch between the war-torn Earth and Narnia. As it so happens, time also moves at a much slower pace in the latter than in the former. Therefore all their adventures in the magical realm amount to only minutes passed in their countryside escape.

This disparity in time is what sets the tone for the second novel in the series. Whisked away into the magical realm after merely a year, centuries have passed in Narnia. As the stage is set for a battle for the rightful heir, the Pevensie siblings take up their positions once more to fight the evil that has taken over. With the return of Aslan, the four young rulers of the land jump into the new adventure to set things right. Thus, ‘Prince Caspian’ results in another fantastical tale of excitement. With this novel being adapted into a popular feature film as well as television show, these wonderful tales have proven to be a big hit with the audience.

Therefore, as Lewis was laid to rest in 1963 – a week before his 65th birthday – the unforgettable author has left behind a treasure trove of works guaranteed to inspire people for generations to come!

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C.S. Lewis

(1898-1963)

Who Was C.S. Lewis?

Writer and scholar C.S. Lewis taught at Oxford University and became a renowned Christian apologist writer, using logic and philosophy to support the tenets of his faith. He is also known throughout the world as the author of The Chronicles of Narnia fantasy series, which have been adapted into various films for the big and small screens.

Clive Staples Lewis was born in Belfast, Ireland, on November 29, 1898, to Flora August Hamilton Lewis and Albert J. Lewis. As a toddler, Clive declared that his name was Jack, which is what he was called by family and friends. He was close to his older brother Warren and the two spent much time together as children.

Lewis was enraptured by fantastic animals and tales of gallantry, and hence the brothers created the imaginary land of Boxen, complete with an intricate history that served them for years. Lewis' mother died when he was 10, and he went on to receive his pre-college education at boarding schools and from a tutor. During WWI, he served with the British army and was sent home after being wounded by shrapnel. He then chose to live as a surrogate son with Janie Moore, the mother of a friend of Lewis' who was killed in the war.

Teaching Career at Oxford and Wartime Broadcasts

Lewis began publishing work including Spirits in Bondage in 1919 and the satirical Dymer in 1926. After penning other titles — including The Allegory of Love (1936), for which he won the Hawthornden Prize — he released in 1938 his first sci-fi work, Out of the Silent Planet , the first of a space trilogy which dealt sub-textually with concepts of sin and desire. Later, during WWII, Lewis gave highly popular radio broadcasts on Christianity which won many converts; his speeches were collected in the work Mere Christianity .

Books and Film Legacy

Lewis was a prolific author of fiction and nonfiction who wrote dozens of books over the course of his career. His faith-based arguments as seen in texts like The Great Divorce (1946) and Miracles (1947) are held in high regard by many theologians, scholars and general readers. His satirical fiction novel The Screwtape Letters (1942) is also a beloved classic. Lewis also continued his love affair with classic mythology and narratives during his later years: His book Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold (1956) featured the story of Psyche and Cupid. He also penned an autobiography, Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life (1955).

Lewis' landmark series, The Chronicles of Narnia , has seen a number of on-screen iterations, including a cartoon version of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe that was released in 1979 and a 1989 film series. Additionally, in 2005, a big-screen adaptation of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe hit movie theaters, starring Tilda Swinton as the witch Jadis and Liam Neeson as the voice of Aslan. Two more Narnia films were brought to theaters as well: Prince Caspian (2008) and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010). A movie version of The Silver Chair was slated to hit theaters in the near future, with filming starting in the winter of 2018.

Lewis' relationship with his wife, Joy, has also been depicted in Shadowlands , presented as a play and two films; one of the film versions was directed by Richard Attenborough and starred Anthony Hopkins as Lewis.

'The Chronicles of Narnia'

During the 1940s, Lewis began writing the seven books that would comprise The Chronicles of Narnia children's series, with The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe (1950) being the first release. The story focused on four siblings who, during wartime, walk through an armoire to enter the magical world of Narnia, a land resplendent with mythical creatures and talking animals. Throughout the series, a variety of Biblical themes are presented; one prominent character is Aslan, a lion and the ruler of Narnia, who has been interpreted as a Jesus Christ figure. (Lewis would assert that his Narnia stories weren't a direct allegory to the real world.)

Though the book received some negative reviews, it was generally well-received by readers, and the series retained its international popularity over the following decades.

In 1954, Lewis joined the faculty of Cambridge University as a literature professor, and in 1956 he married an American English teacher, Joy Gresham, with whom he had been in correspondence. Lewis was full of happiness during the years of their marriage, though Gresham died of cancer in 1960. Lewis grieved deeply for his wife and shared his thoughts in the book A Grief Observed , using a pen name.

In 1963, Lewis resigned from his Cambridge position after experiencing heart trouble. He died on November 22, 1963, in Headington, Oxford.

QUICK FACTS

  • Name: C.S. Lewis
  • Birth Year: 1898
  • Birth date: November 29, 1898
  • Birth City: Belfast
  • Birth Country: Ireland
  • Gender: Male
  • Best Known For: C.S. Lewis was a prolific Irish writer and scholar best known for his 'Chronicles of Narnia' fantasy series and his pro-Christian texts.
  • Fiction and Poetry
  • Journalism and Nonfiction
  • Astrological Sign: Sagittarius
  • University College, Oxford
  • Death Year: 1963
  • Death date: November 22, 1963
  • Death City: Oxford
  • Death Country: England

We strive for accuracy and fairness.If you see something that doesn't look right, contact us !

CITATION INFORMATION

  • Article Title: C.S. Lewis Biography
  • Author: Biography.com Editors
  • Website Name: The Biography.com website
  • Url: https://www.biography.com/authors-writers/cs-lewis
  • Access Date:
  • Publisher: A&E; Television Networks
  • Last Updated: April 20, 2021
  • Original Published Date: April 2, 2014
  • I did not say to myself, 'Let us represent Jesus as he really is in our world by a lion in Narnia.' I said, 'Let us suppose that there were a land like Narnia and that the Son of God, as he became a man in our world, became a lion there, and then imagine what would happen.'

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C.S. Lewis Profile Picture

C.S. Lewis (b. November 29th, 1898 in Belfast, Ireland--d. November 22nd, 1963) was an Irish academic, novelist, and poet. His novels generally have Christian themes, and his best known work includes the The Chronicles of Narnia series (including The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe) and the Space Trilogy novels, a science fiction series. He was also a prolific academic writer and focused on the literature of the Middle Ages.

  • Books By C.S. Lewis

#2 in Christian Books & Bibles

#2 in Spirituality

#2 in Foreign Language Study & Reference

#6 in Religion & Spirituality

#9 in Education & Reference

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Mere Christianity

The Screwtape Letters

The Chronicles of Narnia

The Magician’s Nephew

  • The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronological Order)
  • The Chronicles of Narnia (Publication Order)
  • Philip Yancey
  • George MacDonald
  • Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • J.I. Packer
  • Donald Miller
  • R.C. Sproul
  • John Bunyan
  • G.K. Chesterton
  • Ravi Zacharias
  • Charles W. Colson
  • Augustine of Hippo
  • Timothy J. Keller
  • Elizabeth Yates
  • Francis A. Schaeffer
  • Marguerite de Angeli
  • Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • Jean Lee Latham
  • Ralph Cosham

Books by C.S. Lewis

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 0140301321 Book Cover

$ 3.59 - $ 60.19

Mere Christianity 0020868308 Book Cover

$ 6.09 - $ 263.89

The Screwtape Letters B0007EUHHK Book Cover

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The Chronicles of Narnia 0060765453 Book Cover

$ 4.29 - $ 96.91

The Magician’s Nephew 0064405052 Book Cover

$ 3.59 - $ 51.09

A Grief Observed 0553235397 Book Cover

A Grief Observed

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Prince Caspian 0064405001 Book Cover

Prince Caspian

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The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 0020442602 Book Cover

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

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The Horse and His Boy 0060764872 Book Cover

The Horse and His Boy

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The Four Loves 0156329301 Book Cover

The Four Loves

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Out of the Silent Planet B005E2Y8P2 Book Cover

Out of the Silent Planet

$ 6.39 - $ 30.79

The Problem of Pain 0684823837 Book Cover

The Problem of Pain

$ 7.99 - $ 37.89

The Last Battle 0590254812 Book Cover

The Last Battle

The Silver Chair 0020442505 Book Cover

The Silver Chair

$ 3.59 - $ 53.39

Till We Have Faces 000625277X Book Cover

Till We Have Faces

$ 11.59 - $ 37.29

Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life 0006238157 Book Cover

Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life

$ 5.29 - $ 26.09

The Complete C.S. Lewis Signature Classics 0062572547 Book Cover

The Complete C.S. Lewis Signature Classics

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Perelandra 0330021710 Book Cover

$ 4.99 - $ 47.59

The Abolition of Man 0060652942 Book Cover

The Abolition of Man

$ 8.99 - $ 76.29

That Hideous Strength 0020869606 Book Cover

That Hideous Strength

$ 10.59 - $ 30.29

The Screwtape Letters / Screwtape Proposes a Toast 0805420401 Book Cover

The Screwtape Letters / Screwtape Proposes a Toast

$ 7.69 - $ 23.89

Miracles: A Preliminary Study 0020867603 Book Cover

Miracles: A Preliminary Study

$ 3.99 - $ 71.39

The Joyful Christian 0020869304 Book Cover

The Joyful Christian

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Reflections on the Psalms 0062565486 Book Cover

Reflections on the Psalms

$ 14.47 - $ 28.19

The Weight of Glory 002095980X Book Cover

The Weight of Glory

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A Year with C. S. Lewis: Daily Readings from His Classic Works 0060566167 Book Cover

A Year with C. S. Lewis: Daily Readings from His Classic Works

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Watch for the Light: Readings for Advent and Christmas 1570755418 Book Cover

Watch for the Light: Readings for Advent and Christmas

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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 0060556501 Book Cover

$ 5.99 - $ 18.76

The Pilgrim's Regress: An Allegorical Apology for Christianity Reason and Romanticism 0553260634 Book Cover

The Pilgrim's Regress: An Allegorical Apology for Christianity Reason and Romanticism

$ 7.99 - $ 59.79

God in the Dock 0802814565 Book Cover

God in the Dock

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C.S. Lewis died 60 years ago. Here are 10 of his best works

In honor of the 60th anniversary of the author’s death, here’s a list of some of his most famous works.

A box set of “Chronicles of Narnia” novels by C.S. Lewis.

A box set of “Chronicles of Narnia” novels by C.S. Lewis.

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C.S. Lewis died on Nov. 22, 1963, at 64 years old.

During his lifetime, he published 37 books and many more essays, taught English literature at Oxford University and served as chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, per the C.S. Lewis website . He is widely regarded as one of the most influential authors of the 20th century.

In honor of his life, here’s a list of 10 of his best works.

  • What the last day of C.S. Lewis’s life was like, 60 years ago today

1. ‘Learning in War-Time’ (sermon)

Published in: 1939.

“Learning in War-Time” is a sermon Lewis gave at St. Mary the Virgin Church, Oxford, near the beginning of World War II. It discusses the purpose of education amid the horrors of war.

He poses the questions:

  • “What is the use of beginning a task to which we have so little chance of finishing?
  • “If we ourselves should happen not to be interrupted by death or military service, why should we — indeed how can we — continue to take an interest in these placid occupations when the lives of our friends and the liberties of Europe are in the balance? Is it not like fiddling while Rome burns?”

The sermon argues that if education is delayed because of conflict, it will never happen. Lewis also refutes the claim that culture makes someone more spiritual. He believes that closeness to God comes from the attitude you adopt.

Notable quotations: “To be ignorant and simple now — not to be able to meet the enemies on their own ground — would be to throw down our weapons, and to betray our uneducated brethren who have, under God, no defense but us against the intellectual attacks of the heathen.”

“Good philosophy must exist, if for no other reason, because bad philosophy needs to be answered.”

2. ‘Mere Christianity’

Published in: 1952.

Lewis’ book “Mere Christianity” got its start on a BBC radio show during which Lewis gave 15-minute talks under the title of “Right and Wrong: A Clue to the Meaning of the Universe.”

Lewis did four series for BBC from 1941 to 1944 and, in total, spoke for nearly six hours on air, according to the Gospel Coalition . His remarks turned out to be extremely popular and one broadcast brought in 1.5 million listeners.

The radio segments were compiled into “Mere Christianity,” which has three sections titled, “Right and Wong as a Clue to the meaning of the Universe,” “What Christians Believe” and “Christian Morality.” In them, Lewis discusses the existence of God and why God matters to the human experience.

He explores faith and virtues from a Christian perspective and discusses what it really means to be “born again.”

Notable quotation: “You must ask for God’s help. Even when you have done so, it may seem to you for a long time that no help, or less help than you need, is being given. Never mind. After each failure, ask forgiveness, pick yourself up, and try again. Very often what God first helps us towards is not the virtue itself but just this power of always trying again.”

  • Happy (almost) Thanksgiving! Here are 5 short stories to help you re-center on gratitude

3. ‘The Great Divorce’

Published in: 1945.

Lewis wrote “The Great Divorce” in response to William Blake’s “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell,” which argues for the necessity of both good and evil in the world. “The Great Divorce” explores what the afterlife will be like for people who lived good lives and for those who didn’t.

The story begins at a bus stop in Hell. Nearly everyone but the narrator is angry, and they shove their way onto a bus headed to heaven. “Solid People” plead with the ghosts from Hell to stay in Heaven, and the narrator observes nearly everyone unwilling to let go of their pride and stay. Lewis proposes that going to Heaven or Hell is a choice ultimately made by the individual.

Notable quotation: “There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, ‘Thy will be done,’ and those to whom God says, in the end, ‘Thy will be done.’ All that are in Hell, choose it. Without that self-choice there could be no Hell. No soul that seriously and constantly desires joy will ever miss it. Those who seek find. Those who knock it is opened.”

4. ‘The Screwtape Letters’

Published in: 1942.

This book is a series of letters between a senior demon, Screwtape, and a novice, Wormwood, as they try to lead a human toward Hell. Lewis explores various aspects of morality and spirituality through the lens of a demon trying to get a human to sin.

Like “Mere Christianity,” this book is less of a story driven by plot and more of an exploration of what it means to be human.

Notable quotation: “Indeed the safest road to Hell is the gradual one—the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts, ... Your affectionate uncle, Screwtape.”

5. ‘The Problem With Pain’

Published in: 1940.

This book explores “why a good and all-powerful God allows pain in the world,” per Emerging Scholars Network . He challenges the argument that, if God were good, He would make sure all of his creations were happy and would solve all of the heartache in the world.

Lewis splits his arguments into chapters discussing various aspects of pain and concludes they are a result of people’s free will. Though humanity consistently misuses free will, Lewis asserts that it’s only through free will that love can genuinely exist.

Notable quotation: “We can ignore even pleasure. But pain insists upon being attended to. God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts in our pains: it is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.”

  • 10 uplifting books to add to your TBR list

6. ‘Perelandra’

Published in: 1943.

“Perelandra” is the second book in Lewis’ sci-fi space trilogy and references the Bible’s creation story. In this book, the protagonist Elwin Ransom is largely based off of Lewis’ close friend, J.R.R. Tolkien, and works as a philologist at Cambridge University.

Ransom is sent to a world of floating islands and meets the planet’s version of Eve, a green-skinned woman called “the Lady.” Evil Professor Weston arrives on the planet after Ransom and introduces evil into the world for the first time.

Notable quotation: “The world is so much larger than I thought. I thought we went along paths — but it seems there are no paths. The going itself is the path.”

7. ‘Till We Have Faces’

Published in: 1956.

“Till We Have Faces” is Lewis’ rendition of the myth of Cupid and Psyche. Psyche’s older sister Orual narrates. Psyche is known for her beauty, while Orual is known for her ugliness.

The girls’ father decides to sacrifice Psyche to appease the god of the Mountain. Orual finds out that Psyche isn’t actually dead.

Carnegie Library describes the book like this: “In Lewis’ version, the story is narrated from the perspective of Orual, Psyche’s older sister, who is known as much for her ugliness as Psyche is for her beauty. What starts with Orual’s bold accusations against the gods and demand for answers turns into a self-revelatory journey for her as she wrestles with her understanding of love and truth and justice and the question of whether we can discern anything correctly until we remove our ‘veils.’”

Notable quotation: “Holy places are dark places. It is life and strength, not knowledge and words, that we get in them. Holy wisdom is not clear and thin like water, but thick and dark like blood.”

8. ‘Narnia’

Published in: 1950 to 1956.

There are seven books in the Narnia series, and each one tells a slightly different story involving the magical land of Narnia, where animals talk and magic exists.

The first book, “The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe,” introduces Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy Pevensie, who had to leave their home due to air raids during World War II. While the four children are staying with a professor in the English countryside, Lucy finds a magical wardrobe that acts as a portal to the fantastical realm of Narnia. At first, she ventures in alone and befriends Mr. Tumnus. She brings her siblings back with her, and they find out they are destined to end the evil White Witch’s reign.

Notable quotation: “But very quickly they all became grave again: for, as you know, there is a kind of happiness and wonder that makes you serious. It is too good to waste on jokes.”

9. ‘A Grief Observed’

Published in: 1961.

This book is Lewis’ reflective account of his grief after his wife, Joy Davidman, passed away. Through his journal entries, readers see Lewis’ journey through the initial shock and intense pain, as well as his questioning of faith and eventual acceptance.

Notable quotations: “No one ever told me that grief felt so like fear. I am not afraid, but the sensation is like being afraid. The same fluttering in the stomach, the same restlessness, the yawning. I keep on swallowing.

“At other times it feels like being mildly drunk, or concussed. There is a sort of invisible blanket between the world and me. I find it hard to take in what anyone says. Or perhaps, hard to want to take it in. It is so uninteresting. Yet I want the others to be about me. I dread the moments when the house is empty. If only they would talk to one another and not to me.”

10. ‘Miracles’

Published in: 1947.

Books at a Glance describes the book like this: “This book explores the philosophical and theological issues that surround the subject of miracles. Lewis looks at the relationship between worldviews, probability, history, science, and theology. He examines different conceptions of “Nature” and reveals how our assumptions have created misunderstandings about the miraculous. He also points out numerous missteps, logical fallacies, and unwarranted presuppositions that keep people from believing in miracles.”

To Lewis, miracles do not defy the laws of nature, because God made nature and miracles. He concludes that miracles are possible, plausible, probable and fitting; they are part of the way that the universe works.

Notable quotation: “Nothing can seem extraordinary until you have discovered what is ordinary. Belief in miracles, far from depending on an ignorance of the laws of nature, is only possible in so far as those laws are known.”

the books of cs lewis

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Preparing for Easter: Fifty Devotional Readings from C. S. Lewis

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C.S. Lewis

Preparing for Easter: Fifty Devotional Readings from C. S. Lewis Hardcover – February 14, 2017

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  • Book Description
  • Editorial Reviews

Together in one special volume, selections from the best of beloved bestselling author C. S. Lewis’s classic works for readers contemplating the "grand miracle" of Jesus’s resurrection.

Preparing for Easter is a concise, handy companion for the faithful of all Christian traditions and the curious to help them deepen their knowledge and consideration of this holy season—a time of reflection as we consider Jesus’s sacrifice and his joyous rise from the dead.

Carefully curated, each selection in Preparing for Easter draws on a major theme in Lewis’s writings on the Christian life, as well as others that consider why we can have confident faith in what happened on the cross.

About the Author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Out of the Silent Planet , The Great Divorce , The Screwtape Letters , and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and have been transformed into three major motion pictures.

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeñó hasta que se jubiló. Sus contribuciones a la crítica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantástica y teología popular le trajeron fama y aclamación a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribió más de treinta libros, lo cual le permitió alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aún atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada año. Sus más distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las Crónicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo .

  • Print length 224 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher HarperOne
  • Publication date February 14, 2017
  • Dimensions 5 x 0.81 x 7.12 inches
  • ISBN-10 0062641646
  • ISBN-13 978-0062641649
  • See all details

the books of cs lewis

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  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ HarperOne; Reissue edition (February 14, 2017)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 224 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0062641646
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0062641649
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 8.4 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 5 x 0.81 x 7.12 inches
  • #6 in Ritual Religious Practices
  • #42 in Easter Holiday
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the books of cs lewis

CLIVE STAPLES LEWIS (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a fellow and tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Mere Christianity, Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics, the Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and been transformed into three major motion pictures.

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World Book Day 2024: The IndyBest team share their favourite childhood reads

Ahead of the literary event, we look back at some of our most-loved children’s books, article bookmarked.

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From heartfelt tales to fantasy novels, these are the stories every child should know

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World Book Day 2024 is almost upon us (this year it falls on Thursday 7 March), so, in celebration of the literary event, we thought we’d take a trip down memory lane by asking the team to share some of the much-loved stories that inspired their love of reading as children.

Some of the most formative books you will read in your lifetime are experienced during childhood, whether they were read out loud by a parent or guardian, covertly under the covers at bedtime or assigned at school. While there’s a vast array of children’s books to be enjoyed, there are just a select few that make such an impact, they continue to hold very special places in our hearts as adults.

Choosing a book for your child can be tricky – while some will love scary stories, others prefer funny tales, and many want to lean into their interests, be that science, superheroes or football. There is no one correct type of reading material but if you’re struggling for some inspiration, we’ve put together a list of our most memorable reads from childhood.

From heartfelt tales of familial love and magic medicine to the classic creations of CS Lewis, each one is a tried and tested recommendation that we believe will be just as cherished by little readers today.

Sarah Young (Assistant eCommerce editor)

‘George’s Marvellous Medicine’ by Roald Dahl, published by Puffin: £5.89, Amazon.co.uk

One for those with a mischievous streak, this Roald Dahl tale is as unique as it is wonderful but should absolutely come with a “do not try at home” warning. First published in 1981, it is one of the author’s shorter children’s books and follows the misadventures of eight-year-old George Kranky who attempts to create a medicine, using a brew of questionable ingredients, that will make his mean and bossy grandma a nicer person. What’s the worst that could happen? A must-read for children and adults alike, the book, like most of Dahl’s creations, tickles your funny bone while tugging on the heartstrings, and is sure to excite little minds.

Annabel Grossman (Global travel editor and executive eCommerce editor)

‘Goodnight Mister Tom’ by Michelle Magorian, published by Penguin Random House Children’s: £7.99, Waterstones.com

It’s always impressive when a children’s author can take dark issues such as abuse, depression and grief and weave them into a book for young readers. Michelle Magorian does this beautifully in Goodnight Mister Tom , telling the story of the timid and lonely William Beech, who is evacuated from London before the start of the Second World War to live with Tom Oakley, a bereaved and embittered widower. I adored this book when my older sister read it to me as a child and I think I probably love it just as much now. Set against the backdrop of war and uncertainty, it’s ultimately a story of kindness and friendship, but with plenty of adventure thrown in as the reader is taken from the safety of the English countryside to the cruel streets of wartime London. Gripping yet moving, this is a book you’ll love reading to your children as much as they’ll enjoy hearing it.

Alex Lee (Tech writer)

‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ 13 book collection by Lemony Snicket, published by Egmont: £35.99, Amazon.co.uk

Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events is really just as glum as it sounds. The extremely unlucky Baudelaire children are left orphaned after their parents perish in a fire and are carted from hapless guardian to guardian, all the while being chased by a count set on stealing their inheritance. It’s set in Victorian times with three unusually intelligent children at its core, who are good at inventing, reading and biting things. The literary playfulness on display in A Series of Unfortunate Events arguably kickstarted my obsession with words, making me the bookworm I am today. And just for reference, “bookworm” is a phrase that here means “likely to have my nose stuck in a book during breaktime”, and not a wriggly invertebrate that slithers out of a novel.

Daisy Lester (Senior eCommerce writer)

‘The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe’ by CS Lewis, published by HarperCollins: £3.11, Amazon.co.uk

The first instalment of the seven-book fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis, this tome captured my imagination when I first read it after watching the 2005 film adaptation. Set during the Second World War, it tells the story of four siblings evacuated from London to the countryside. There, they stumble upon a magic wardrobe that leads to Narnia – a parallel land inhabited by talking animals and mythical creatures, all ruled by the evil White Witch. It’s a fantastical land that’s rich in wonder, and perfect for young readers to lose themselves in.

Steve Hogarty (Tech writer)

‘The Bromeliad Trilogy’ by Terry Pratchett, published by Corgi Childrens: £4.95, Amazon.co.uk

Truckers, Diggers and Wings (also called the Nome Trilogy or The Bromeliad ) is about a secret civilisation of tiny gnome people whose universe is contained within the four walls of a shopping centre. When they learn of the great outdoors it sends their parochial society into chaos and sets them off on an epic, silly survival adventure. Notionally about dogma, faith, politics and science, the trilogy of books is just incredibly good fun, and a great entry point for young readers yet to discover the legendary author.

Niki Cottrell (Social media assistant)

‘Love You Forever’ by Robert Munsch, published by Firefly Books: £4.95, Amazon.co.uk

This is an endearing story about the forever bond between a mother and her child. The story follows the journey of a mother who lovingly sings to her son as he grows from infancy to adulthood, always assuring him of her unwavering affection. As the roles reverse and the son becomes the caretaker in his mother’s old age, the sentiment of unconditional love remains unchanged. It’s a poignant narrative that beautifully captures the essence of familial love and the circle of life.

Lois Borny (Production journalist)

‘Sleepovers’ by Jacqueline Wilson, published by Young Corgi: £7.07, Amazon.co.uk

Jacqueline Wilson’s books are much-loved by younger readers for a reason. Next to some of her more hard-hitting stories, such as The Illustrated Mum (£7.27, Amazon.co.uk ) and Girls Under Pressure (£7.09, Amazon.co.uk ), a book that became one of my favourites as a child was Sleepovers , which looks at nervousness around navigating new friendships and the desire to belong. We join protagonist Daisy as she tries to find her place among a group of girls she meets at her new school – one of whom is particularly nasty to her, and seems set on making her feel excluded. The girls all host sleepovers when their birthdays arrive, while Daisy also thinks about her own birthday, and how the group will respond to her sister Lily, who has a learning disability. Ultimately an uplifting read that captures the excitement, nervousness and novelty of childhood sleepovers, this could be a new favourite for the young reader in your household.

Angharad Moran (Senior production journalist)

‘My Family and Other Animals’ by Gerald Durrell, published by Puffin: £7.35, Amazon.co.uk

First published in 1956, this book provides an insight into the (somewhat chaotic) early years of naturalist and author Gerald Durrell. After his family move from cold, rain-sodden Bournemouth to sunny Corfu (to escape the “gloom of the English summer”), we follow a young Durrell as he explores his new surroundings, encountering eccentric characters and an abundance of wildlife along the way. The story is as warm as its setting, the descriptions are transportive, and there are some brilliant laugh-out-loud moments, as the budding naturalist inflicts his passion upon the rest of his family. What parent wouldn’t want their child to release scorpions into their house? Although the main protagonist is 10 years old, this is a book adults will enjoy just as much as younger readers.

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Why The Chronicles of Narnia Franchise Ended Prematurely

  • The Chronicles of Narnia franchise failed due to shrinking box office returns and budgetary conflicts with studios.
  • The narrative structure of the source material made it challenging to create a consistent film franchise.
  • The later books in the series became heavy-handed with religious allegory and contained strange elements that were difficult to adapt for the screen.

In the early-2000s, as the Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings films elevated the fantasy genre to new heights on screen, the Walt Disney Company was eager to get in on the action. Thus, Disney partnered with Walden Media, who owned the film rights to C.S. Lewis ' The Chronicles of Narnia books. Together, the two studios planned to adapt the beloved young-adult fantasy series into movies. The source material totaled seven books, and after Disney and Walden made over $745 million on their inaugural adaptation of The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe , it seemed promising that the entire series would come to life on-screen and become a bankable franchise for both companies. However, as the subsequent films earned less and less at the box office, and the books became increasingly challenging to adapt, The Chronicles of Narnia movies seemingly came to a premature end, with only three of the seven books ever making it to the screen.

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

During the World War II bombings of London, four English siblings are sent to a country house where they will be safe. One day Lucy (Georgie Henley) finds a wardrobe that transports her to a magical world called Narnia. After coming back, she soon returns to Narnia with her brothers, Peter (William Moseley) and Edmund (Skandar Keynes), and her sister, Susan (Anna Popplewell). There they join the magical lion, Aslan (Liam Neeson), in the fight against the evil White Witch, Jadis (Tilda Swinton).

Release Date 2005-12-07

Director Andrew Adamson

Cast Anna Popplewell, Tilda Swinton, Skandar Keynes, Georgie Henley, James McAvoy, William Moseley

Main Genre Adventure

Shrinking Box Office Returns Halted 'The Chronicles of Narnia' Franchise

After the success of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe in 2005, Disney and Walden adapted Lewis' second The Chronicles of Narnia book, Prince Caspian , in 2008. While the sequel fared decently with critics, it only earned $419 million at the box office. That may not seem like an immense drop from Wardrobe 's performance, but considering that Caspian was made on a purported $225 million budget against Wardrobe 's $180 million, it did not bode well for The Chronicles of Narnia franchise. Prince Caspian 's underwhelming returns along with other budgetary conflicts led Disney to cease involvement with The Chronicles of Narnia franchise in 2008, prompting Walden to shop for a new Narnia studio partner.

Luckily, Walden found that new partner in 20th Century Fox , which was fresh off the success of Avatar at the time and eager to release another blockbuster hit. Fox thus helped produce The Chronicles of Narnia 's third film, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader . Along with the studio swap, the third installment also saw a change in directors, as Michael Apted took the reins from Andrew Adamson , who had helmed both Wardrobe and Caspian . The film opened in December 2010, and earned $415 million at the box office — $4 million less than Caspian . Although Treader reverted to a more modest $145 million budget, it still secured a trend of diminishing returns for The Chronicles of Narnia movies, despite the worldwide box office numbers steadily rising.

Following Treader , Walden's president told The Christian Post that the fourth The Chronicles of Narnia film would be The Magician's Nephew , the chronological first story in the series that explores Narnia's origins. However, in 2011, Walden's contract with the C.S. Lewis estate expired , and it lost the rights to The Chronicles of Narnia franchise. Given that Walden was the pioneer of the film series, and the only studio involved in all three movies, this severance put the prospect of future The Chronicles of Narnia adaptations in limbo. No word of a different studio acquiring the rights or producing more films came about until 2016 , when Sony and The Mark Gordon company considered a rebooted franchise, beginning with Lewis' fourth novel, The Silver Chair . Despite this plan seemingly moving forward for a while and Sony even naming Joe Johnston as The Silver Chair 's director , it never came to be, and in 2018, Netflix entered a deal to develop their own The Chronicles of Narnia reboot. Recently, Barbie director Greta Gerwig was announced as the director for the first two films.

10 Movie Franchises That Never Finished Their Story

'the chronicles of narnia' books were not easy to adapt.

All matters of money and studio conflicts aside, though, there are even more fundamental reasons why The Chronicles of Narnia never made it past the third film. These reasons have their roots in the source material's narrative structure, and they could have been foreseen from the very beginning.

Essentially, unlike Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings , The Chronicles of Narnia books are not the most conducive to a consistent film franchise . Most notably, C.S. Lewis wrote the books out of chronological order . It makes sense that Walden released Wardrobe , Caspian , and Treader in succession, as those are the first three books that Lewis wrote, and they follow the most consistent protagonists in the form of the Pevensie children. Even Treader , however, only had two of the original four Pevensies, and come his fourth book, Lewis shifted attention to Eustace Scrubb ( Will Poulter ), the Pevensies' cousin who did not even appear in Wardrobe or Caspian .

On top of this stark shift in main characters, Lewis then started bouncing around in the universe's timeline. The fifth book, The Horse and His Boy , takes place between Wardrobe and Caspian , and only depicts the Pevensies as grown-up kings and queens of Narnia while focusing on yet another new character as the primary protagonist. For the sixth book, Lewis went back an entire generation to share Narnia's genesis in The Magician's Nephew before jumping to the very end of the timeline for the seventh and final book, The Last Battle . It's a time warp that could make even X-Men fans scratch their heads.

With so many different heroes and vaguely connected storylines, The Chronicles of Narnia did not have the same consistent focus or narrative arc that other fantasy adaptations possessed. Lewis' books are more like an anthology series , highlighting an array of stories taking place in the same fantastical universe. There is no single character that fans follow throughout all seven books, except perhaps the divine lion-king, Aslan ( Liam Neeson ), but even then, he is never the protagonist, but rather an omnipresent entity. For the most part, every story and character arc is contained to its specific book .

C.S. Lewis' Religious Allegory Got Heavier In Later Books

This fable-like structure is appropriate for Lewis' initial vision for The Chronicles of Narnia books. A devout Christian and religious philosopher, Lewis made the Narnia books as direct allegories to Bible stories. Each one is meant to share a specific Christian moral . While this was subdued enough in Wardrobe , Caspian , and Treader to make them into universally appealing movies, some of the later books can become heavy-handed or didactic in their religious overtones. In Magician's Nephew , the temptation of an apple plays a significant role in Narnia's creation. The Last Battle is a transparent retelling of Revelations, and literally shows Narnia's apocalypse before all the characters reunite in a heaven-like parallel version of the country. Least palatable, though, The Horse and His Boy and even Prince Caspian have slight hints of Islamophobia , with the villains coming from an Arab-like, desert country to Narnia's south.

Of course, almost all Western fiction — and especially Western fantasy — takes some amount of influence from Christianity. Nevertheless, Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia books are not so much influenced by the Bible as they are directly translated from its text . While an audience for Christian content certainly exists, a blockbuster franchise backed by global studios must cater to a wider breadth of moviegoers.

Some 'The Chronicles of Narnia' Books Are Just Too Strange for the Screen

Even apart from the Christian allegory, though, some fans might forget that a number of The Chronicles of Narnia books outside the first three are rather strange , and not exactly conducive to film adaptation. Wardrobe was an easy starting point, as it contained iconic characters and scenes, and followed a straightforward plot that culminated in a climactic battle. Caspian was similarly cinematic, but even then, the filmmakers had to write in an additional battle for the movie. Come Treader , the story was very episodic, and it already felt like a dubious structure for a movie.

Later books get even less conventional, not just in their structures, but in their details as well. In The Horse and His Boy , the second most significant character is a talking horse . The Silver Chair contains a species of subterranean gnomes, and one of the main characters is a fictional scarecrow-like "Marsh-wiggle" named Puddleglum. Even The Last Battle , despite living up to its name with an epic final fight, spends most of the plot focusing on a corrupt monkey and a donkey that disguises himself as Aslan (a.k.a. a false Messiah). All of these stories make for endearing reads, but one can imagine that some of their on-screen incarnations would be hard to take seriously.

Make no mistake, all three of Walden's The Chronicles of Narnia movies are pleasant, fun, family-friendly adventures that hold up quite nicely in today's fantasy market. The visuals are spectacular; the action is exciting; and the world is rich. However, when one considers C.S. Lewis' books as a whole, it becomes easy to see why the series lost its footing after the third film. Beyond Wardrobe , Caspian , and Treader , the stories lose their central focus to explore different, only loosely-tied corners of Narnia's world. Some of these corners are weird, some are esoteric in their Christian inspiration, and some would simply be difficult to adapt for the screen. Embarking on a seven-film franchise is no small feat, and without a consistent character, plot, or message, it becomes nearly impossible to maintain interest from audiences or creators.

Watch The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe on Disney+ in the U.S.

Watch on Disney+

Why The Chronicles of Narnia Franchise Ended Prematurely

CultureWatch

Bill Muehlenberg’s commentary on issues of the day…

the books of cs lewis

C. S. Lewis on Books and Reading

Reading, literature, and books according to c. s. lewis:.

It will come as no surprise that I like to read. Nor would it be surprising to state that I love reading C. S. Lewis. It also goes without saying that Lewis was a great reader. As such, he often commented on books and reading. Some of the things he has said about these matters have now become quite familiar and famous.

Here I simply feature some of these quotes for those of you who cannot get enough of Lewis, of reading, and of literature. We of course find so much on these things throughout his corpus. That makes sense given that he was a specialist in English, and especially medieval, literature. I arrange these quotes simply in order of what book they appeared in. Only in a few cases have I not got the full, specific source of the quote.

“The more up to date the Book is, the sooner it will be dated.” Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer

“It is usual to speak in a playful apologetic tone about one’s adult enjoyment of what are called “children’s books”. I think the convention a silly one. No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally (and often far more) worth reading at the age of fifty… The only imaginative works we ought to grow out of are those which it would have been better not to have read at all. A mature palate will probably not much be for crème de menthe : but it ought still to enjoy bread and butter and honey.” Of Other Worlds , “On Stories”

“I am almost inclined to set it up as a canon that a children’s story which is enjoyed only by children is a bad children’s story. The good ones last. A waltz which you can like only when you are waltzing is a bad waltz.” Of Other Worlds , “On Three Ways of Writing for Children”

“The majority never read anything twice. The sure mark of an unliterary man is that he considers ‘I’ve read it already’ to be a conclusive argument against reading a work.” An Experiment in Criticism

“Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom fully realise the enormous extension of our being which we owe to authors. We realise it best when we talk with an unliterary friend. He may be full of goodness and good sense but he inhabits a tiny world. In it, we should be suffocated. The man who is contented to be only himself, and therefore less a self, is in prison. My own eyes are not enough for me, I will see through those of others. Reality, even seen through the eyes of many, is not enough. I will see what others have invented.” An Experiment in Criticism

“It is a very silly idea that in reading a book you must never ‘skip’. All sensible people skip freely when they come to a Chapter which they find is going to be no use to them.” Mere Christianity , Book 4, Ch. 3

“The State exists simply to promote and to protect the ordinary happiness of human beings in this life. A husband and wife chatting over a fire, a couple of friends having a game of darts in a pub, a man reading a book in his own room or digging in his own garden—that is what the State is there for. And unless they are helping to increase and prolong and protect such moments, all the laws, parliaments, armies, courts, police, economics, etc., are simply a waste of time.” Mere Christianity , Book 4, Ch. 3

“What can be better than to get out a book on Saturday afternoon and thrust all mundane considerations away till next week?” The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis

“Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton are certainties whatever shortened course or ordinary course you take. Next to these in importance come Malory, Spenser, Donne, Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wordsworth. After that it becomes more a matter of taste. The great thing is to be always reading but not to get bored–treat it not like work, more as a vice! Your book bill ought to be your biggest extravagance.” An April 1941 letter to a student

“I can’t imagine a man really enjoying a book and reading it only once.” The Letters of C. S. Lewis to Arthur Greeves , Feb. 1932

“Clearly one must read every good book at least once every ten years.” The Letters of C. S. Lewis to Arthur Greeves , 17 August 1933

“When one has read a book, I think there is nothing so nice as discussing it with some one else – even though it sometimes produces rather fierce arguments.” The Letters of C. S. Lewis to Arthur Greeves , 14 March, 1916

“If only one had time to read a little more: we either get shallow & broad or narrow and deep.” The Letters of C. S. Lewis to Arthur Greeves , 2 March, 1919

“By having a great many friends I do not prove that I have a wide appreciation of human excellence. You might as well say I prove the width of my literary taste by being able to enjoy all the books in my own study. The answer is the same in both cases–“You chose those books. You chose those friends. Of course they suit you.” The truly wide taste in reading is that which enables a man to find something for his needs on the sixpenny tray outside any secondhand bookshop. The truly wide taste in humanity will similarly find something to appreciate in the cross-section of humanity whom one has to meet every day.” The Four Loves

Image of The Reading Life: The Joy of Seeing New Worlds Through Others’ Eyes

“Many will think it reasonable to examine children in Geography or (Heaven help us!) in Divinity, yet not in English, on the ground that Geography and Divinity were never intended to entertain, whereas Literature was. The teaching of English Literature, in fact, is conceived simply as an aid to ‘appreciation’. And appreciation is, to be sure, a sine qua non. To have laughed at the jokes, shuddered at the tragedy, wept at the pathos—this is as necessary as to have learned grammar. But neither grammar nor appreciation is the ultimate End.

“The true aim of literary studies is to lift the student out of his provincialism by making him ‘the spectator’, if not of all, yet of much, ‘time and existence’. The student, or even the schoolboy, who has been brought by good (and therefore mutually disagreeing) teachers to meet the past where alone the past still lives, is taken out of the narrowness of his own age and class into a more public world.” Present Concerns , “The Death of English”

“There is a strange idea abroad that in every subject the ancient books should be read only by the professionals, and that the amateur should content himself with the modern books. Thus I have found as a tutor in English Literature that if the average student wants to find out something about Platonism, the very last thing he thinks of doing is to take a translation of Plato off the library shelf and read the Symposium. He would rather read some dreary modern book ten times as long, all about ‘isms’ and influences and only once in twelve pages telling him what Plato actually said. The error is rather an amiable one, for it springs from humility. The student is half afraid to meet one of the great philosophers face to face. He feels himself inadequate and thinks he will not understand him. But if he only knew, the great man, just because of his greatness, is much more intelligible than his modern commentator. The simplest student will be able to understand, if not all, yet a very great deal of what Plato said; but hardly anyone can understand some modern books on Platonism. It has always therefore been one of my main endeavours as a teacher to persuade the young that firsthand knowledge is not only more worth acquiring than secondhand knowledge, but is usually much easier and more delightful to acquire.

“This mistaken preference for the modern books and this shyness of the old ones is nowhere more rampant than in theology. Wherever you find a little study circle of Christian laity you can be almost certain that they are studying not St. Luke or St. Paul or St. Augustine or Thomas Aquinas or Hooker or Butler, but M. Berdyaev or M. Maritain or M. Niebuhr or Miss Sayers or even myself.

“Now this seems to me topsy-turvy. Naturally, since I myself am a writer, I do not wish the ordinary reader to read no modern books. But if he must read only the new or only the old, I would advise him to read the old. And I would give him this advice precisely because he is an amateur and therefore much less protected than the expert against the dangers of an exclusive contemporary diet. A new book is still on its trial and the amateur is not in a position to judge it. It has to be tested against the great body of Christian thought down the ages, and all its hidden implications (often unsuspected by the author himself) have to be brought to light….

“It is a good rule, after reading a new book, never to allow oneself another new one until you have read an old one in between.” Excerpt from the Introduction to Athanasius’  On the Incarnation – also in God in the Dock , “On the Reading of Old Books”

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.” ?

There would be many more such quotes I could have offered here. Indeed, as I neared the end of writing this piece, I realised that I had a book that is all about these matters. So I pulled it off my shelf and will now bring it to your attention. It is The Reading Life edited by David Downing and Michael Mauldin (William Collins, 2020). It contains many of the great things Lewis said about books and reading. It is well worth adding to your collection.

[1703 words]

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IMAGES

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  2. Good Books: C.S. Lewis, A Life

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  3. The Best C.S. Lewis Books of All Time

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  5. C S Lewis

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  6. The Chronicles of Narnia (Adult): 7 Books in 1 Hardcover by C.S. Lewis

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COMMENTS

  1. A Complete List of C. S. Lewis Books in Chronological Order

    Born Clive Staple Lewis and known as Jack to his near and dear ones, C. S. Lewis is a world renowned author, especially popular for his fantasy-fiction book series, The Chronicles of Narnia. Some of the books in the series have since been turned into very successful movies that have been loved by grown-ups and kids alike.

  2. Books

    The official website for C. S. Lewis. Browse a complete collection of his books, sign up for a monthly enewsletter, find additional resources, and more.

  3. C. S. Lewis

    The official website for C. S. Lewis. Browse a complete collection of his books, sign up for a monthly enewsletter, find additional resources, and more.

  4. Chronological Reading of C.S. Lewis (67 books)

    Listopia Chronological Reading of C.S. Lewis This is the order in which C.S. Lewis wrote his books. flag All Votes Add Books To This List 67 books · 16 voters · list created March 7th, 2013 by Lynnette (votes) .

  5. The 19 Best C.S. Lewis Books, According to Goodreads Members

    C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a British writer who is best known for his fantastical children's series " The Chronicles of Narnia ," but also wrote science fiction, moral fiction, and theological...

  6. Books by C.S. Lewis

    C.S. Lewis has 1328 books on Goodreads with 12985382 ratings. C.S. Lewis's most popular book is The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narni...

  7. C. S. Lewis

    He is best known as the author of The Chronicles of Narnia, but he is also noted for his other works of fiction, such as The Screwtape Letters and The Space Trilogy, and for his non-fiction Christian apologetics, including Mere Christianity, Miracles, and The Problem of Pain.

  8. About C.S. Lewis

    SEARCH BOOKS The official website for C. S. Lewis. Browse a complete collection of his books, sign up for a monthly enewsletter, find additional resources, and more.

  9. C.S. Lewis

    C.S. Lewis Irish-born author and scholar External Websites Also known as: Clive Staples Lewis Written by Peter Schakel Peter J. Schakel received his B.A. from Central College in Iowa and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 1969 he began teaching at Hope College, where he is the Peter C. and Emajean Cook... Peter Schakel

  10. 5 Best C.S. Lewis Books that Everyone Should Read

    Mere Christianity "If I find in myself desires which nothing in this world can satisfy, the only logical explanation is that I was made for another world." Mere Christianity is one of Lewis' most...

  11. 10 of the Best Books by C. S. Lewis

    By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University) Although Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) - known as 'Jack' to his friends and family - is best-known for his seven children's fantasy novels set in the land of Narnia, C. S. Lewis wrote a number of other works - fiction and non-fiction, science fiction and literary criticism - which have become classics in their field.

  12. C.S. Lewis

    C.S. Lewis - Book Series In Order C.S. Lewis Books In Order Publication Order of Cosmic Trilogy Books Publication Order of The Chronicles Of Narnia Books Chronological Order of The Chronicles Of Narnia Books Publication Order of The Chronicles Of Narnia Companion Books A Book of Narnians (1950) Description / Buy at Amazon

  13. The Complete C.S. Lewis Signature Classics

    The Complete C.S. Lewis Signature Classics contains seven essential volumes by C.S. Lewis, including Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain, Miracles, A Grief Observed and Lewis's prophetic examination of universal values, The Abolition of Man. Beautiful and timeless, this is a vital collection by one of...

  14. C. S. Lewis bibliography

    Transposition, and Other Addresses (1949) Mere Christianity: A Revised and Amplified Edition, with a New Introduction, of the Three Books, Broadcast Talks, Christian Behaviour, and Beyond Personality (1952; based on radio talks of 1941-1944) English Literature in the Sixteenth Century Excluding Drama. Oxford University Press. 1954; 1975.

  15. C.S. Lewis

    (1898-1963) Who Was C.S. Lewis? Writer and scholar C.S. Lewis taught at Oxford University and became a renowned Christian apologist writer, using logic and philosophy to support the tenets of...

  16. C.S. Lewis Books

    C.S. Lewis (b. November 29th, 1898 in Belfast, Ireland--d. November 22nd, 1963) was an Irish academic, novelist, and poet. His novels generally have Christian themes, and his best known work includes the The Chronicles of Narnia series (including The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe) and the Space Trilogy novels, a science fiction series.

  17. CS Lewis best books: Of the over 37 he wrote, here are the best ten

    1. 'Learning in War-Time' (sermon) Published in: 1939. "Learning in War-Time" is a sermon Lewis gave at St. Mary the Virgin Church, Oxford, near the beginning of World War II. It discusses the purpose of education amid the horrors of war. He poses the questions: "What is the use of beginning a task to which we have so little chance of finishing?

  18. A Recommended Reading List

    Over at the blog A Pilgrim in Narnia, Brenton Dickieson has done something kind of cool.. He has taken C.S. Lewis' book An Experiment in Criticism —in which Lewis attempts to answer the question "what makes a great book?"—and listed in chronological order all of the great books that Lewis references.. The list serves not only as a window into the knowledge-base of one of the great ...

  19. The Great Divorce: Lewis, C. S.: 9780060652951: Amazon.com: Books

    To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and have been transformed into three major motion pictures. Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo.

  20. Preparing for Easter: Fifty Devotional Readings from C. S. Lewis

    This thoughtful collection serves as a nice overview of CS Lewis' writings and Christian philosophy, for those not familiar with his work. It also makes a thought-provoking and enlightening devotional on a Christian's journey to Easter. An easy read with a comfortable tone that only very skilled writers can manage so easily, like a kind, wise ...

  21. Chronicles Of Narnia In Order (Books & Movies)

    Author C.S. Lewis published the first Narnia book in 1950, ... Netflix is rebooting CS Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia with a series of films that will need to learn from the mistakes of the ...

  22. Free C.S. Lewis Course Dives Into How The Author Ties ...

    C live Staples Lewis is better known as the beloved author C.S. Lewis. Although his life spanned from 1898 to 1963, generations will remember him through his iconic life works. Lewis was a ...

  23. 10 Christian Books That Everyone Should Read at Least Once

    C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia is a must-read collection for anyone interested in the Christian faith or for Christians looking to introduce their children to God through more entertaining means.

  24. World Book Day 2024: IndyBest's favourite childhood books

    The first instalment of the seven-book fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis, this tome captured my imagination when I first read it after watching the 2005 film adaptation. Set ...

  25. Karla Marksa Street, 51, Elektrostal

    Get directions to Karla Marksa Street, 51 and view details like the building's postal code, description, photos, and reviews on each business in the building

  26. Why The Chronicles of Narnia Franchise Ended Prematurely

    Thus, Disney partnered with Walden Media, who owned the film rights to C.S. Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia books. Together, the two studios planned to adapt the beloved young-adult fantasy series ...

  27. C. S. Lewis on Books and Reading

    Reading, literature, and books according to C. S. Lewis: It will come as no surprise that I like to read. Nor would it be surprising to state that I love reading C. S. Lewis. It also goes without saying that Lewis was a great reader. As such, he often commented on books and reading. Some of the things he has said about these matters have now ...

  28. What Russians Are Reading

    The Raw Youth by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. "It's the second Dostoyevsky book I've read. The first was Crime And Punishment. I actually didn't like it, but it gave me this urge to get to grips ...

  29. Elektrostal

    History. It was known as Zatishye (Зати́шье) until 1928. [citation needed] In 1938, it was granted town status.[citation needed]Administrative and municipal status. Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts.