Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base

Methodology

  • Population vs. Sample | Definitions, Differences & Examples

Population vs. Sample | Definitions, Differences & Examples

Published on May 14, 2020 by Pritha Bhandari . Revised on June 21, 2023.

Population vs sample

A population is the entire group that you want to draw conclusions about.

A sample is the specific group that you will collect data from. The size of the sample is always less than the total size of the population.

In research, a population doesn’t always refer to people. It can mean a group containing elements of anything you want to study, such as objects, events, organizations, countries, species, organisms, etc.

Table of contents

Collecting data from a population, collecting data from a sample, population parameter vs. sample statistic, practice questions : populations vs. samples, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about samples and populations.

Populations are used when your research question requires, or when you have access to, data from every member of the population.

Usually, it is only straightforward to collect data from a whole population when it is small, accessible and cooperative.

For larger and more dispersed populations, it is often difficult or impossible to collect data from every individual. For example, every 10 years, the federal US government aims to count every person living in the country using the US Census. This data is used to distribute funding across the nation.

However, historically, marginalized and low-income groups have been difficult to contact, locate and encourage participation from. Because of non-responses, the population count is incomplete and biased towards some groups, which results in disproportionate funding across the country.

In cases like this, sampling can be used to make more precise inferences about the population.

Receive feedback on language, structure, and formatting

Professional editors proofread and edit your paper by focusing on:

  • Academic style
  • Vague sentences
  • Style consistency

See an example

population and sampling in research proposal example

When your population is large in size, geographically dispersed, or difficult to contact, it’s necessary to use a sample. With statistical analysis , you can use sample data to make estimates or test hypotheses about population data.

Ideally, a sample should be randomly selected and representative of the population. Using probability sampling methods (such as simple random sampling or stratified sampling ) reduces the risk of sampling bias and enhances both internal and external validity .

For practical reasons, researchers often use non-probability sampling methods. Non-probability samples are chosen for specific criteria; they may be more convenient or cheaper to access. Because of non-random selection methods, any statistical inferences about the broader population will be weaker than with a probability sample.

Reasons for sampling

  • Necessity : Sometimes it’s simply not possible to study the whole population due to its size or inaccessibility.
  • Practicality : It’s easier and more efficient to collect data from a sample.
  • Cost-effectiveness : There are fewer participant, laboratory, equipment, and researcher costs involved.
  • Manageability : Storing and running statistical analyses on smaller datasets is easier and reliable.

When you collect data from a population or a sample, there are various measurements and numbers you can calculate from the data. A parameter is a measure that describes the whole population. A statistic is a measure that describes the sample.

You can use estimation or hypothesis testing to estimate how likely it is that a sample statistic differs from the population parameter.

Sampling error

A sampling error is the difference between a population parameter and a sample statistic. In your study, the sampling error is the difference between the mean political attitude rating of your sample and the true mean political attitude rating of all undergraduate students in the Netherlands.

Sampling errors happen even when you use a randomly selected sample. This is because random samples are not identical to the population in terms of numerical measures like means and standard deviations .

Because the aim of scientific research is to generalize findings from the sample to the population, you want the sampling error to be low. You can reduce sampling error by increasing the sample size.

If you want to know more about statistics , methodology , or research bias , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

  • Student’s  t -distribution
  • Normal distribution
  • Null and Alternative Hypotheses
  • Chi square tests
  • Confidence interval
  • Cluster sampling
  • Stratified sampling
  • Data cleansing
  • Reproducibility vs Replicability
  • Peer review
  • Likert scale

Research bias

  • Implicit bias
  • Framing effect
  • Cognitive bias
  • Placebo effect
  • Hawthorne effect
  • Hindsight bias
  • Affect heuristic

Samples are used to make inferences about populations . Samples are easier to collect data from because they are practical, cost-effective, convenient, and manageable.

Populations are used when a research question requires data from every member of the population. This is usually only feasible when the population is small and easily accessible.

A statistic refers to measures about the sample , while a parameter refers to measures about the population .

A sampling error is the difference between a population parameter and a sample statistic .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Bhandari, P. (2023, June 21). Population vs. Sample | Definitions, Differences & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved April 9, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/methodology/population-vs-sample/

Is this article helpful?

Pritha Bhandari

Pritha Bhandari

Other students also liked, simple random sampling | definition, steps & examples, sampling bias and how to avoid it | types & examples, parameter vs statistic | definitions, differences & examples, "i thought ai proofreading was useless but..".

I've been using Scribbr for years now and I know it's a service that won't disappoint. It does a good job spotting mistakes”

Introduction to Research Methods

7 samples and populations.

So you’ve developed your research question, figured out how you’re going to measure whatever you want to study, and have your survey or interviews ready to go. Now all your need is other people to become your data.

You might say ‘easy!’, there’s people all around you. You have a big family tree and surely them and their friends would have happy to take your survey. And then there’s your friends and people you’re in class with. Finding people is way easier than writing the interview questions or developing the survey. That reaction might be a strawman, maybe you’ve come to the conclusion none of this is easy. For your data to be valuable, you not only have to ask the right questions, you have to ask the right people. The “right people” aren’t the best or the smartest people, the right people are driven by what your study is trying to answer and the method you’re using to answer it.

Remember way back in chapter 2 when we looked at this chart and discussed the differences between qualitative and quantitative data.

One of the biggest differences between quantitative and qualitative data was whether we wanted to be able to explain something for a lot of people (what percentage of residents in Oklahoma support legalizing marijuana?) versus explaining the reasons for those opinions (why do some people support legalizing marijuana and others not?). The underlying differences there is whether our goal is explain something about everyone, or whether we’re content to explain it about just our respondents.

‘Everyone’ is called the population . The population in research is whatever group the research is trying to answer questions about. The population could be everyone on planet Earth, everyone in the United States, everyone in rural counties of Iowa, everyone at your university, and on and on. It is simply everyone within the unit you are intending to study.

In order to study the population, we typically take a sample or a subset. A sample is simply a smaller number of people from the population that are studied, which we can use to then understand the characteristics of the population based on that subset. That’s why a poll of 1300 likely voters can be used to guess at who will win your states Governor race. It isn’t perfect, and we’ll talk about the math behind all of it in a later chapter, but for now we’ll just focus on the different types of samples you might use to study a population with a survey.

If correctly sampled, we can use the sample to generalize information we get to the population. Generalizability , which we defined earlier, means we can assume the responses of people to our study match the responses everyone would have given us. We can only do that if the sample is representative of the population, meaning that they are alike on important characteristics such as race, gender, age, education. If something makes a large difference in people’s views on a topic in your research and your sample is not balanced, you’ll get inaccurate results.

Generalizability is more of a concern with surveys than with interviews. The goal of a survey is to explain something about people beyond the sample you get responses from. You’ll never see a news headline saying that “53% of 1250 Americans that responded to a poll approve of the President”. It’s only worth asking those 1250 people if we can assume the rest of the United States feels the same way overall. With interviews though we’re looking for depth from their responses, and so we are less hopefully that the 15 people we talk to will exactly match the American population. That doesn’t mean the data we collect from interviews doesn’t have value, it just has different uses.

There are two broad types of samples, with several different techniques clustered below those. Probability sampling is associated with surveys, and non-probability sampling is often used when conducting interviews. We’ll first describe probability samples, before discussing the non-probability options.

The type of sampling you’ll use will be based on the type of research you’re intending to do. There’s no sample that’s right or wrong, they can just be more or less appropriate for the question you’re trying to answer. And if you use a less appropriate sampling strategy, the answer you get through your research is less likely to be accurate.

7.1 Types of Probability Samples

So we just hinted at the idea that depending on the sample you use, you can generalize the data you collect from the sample to the population. That will depend though on whether your sample represents the population. To ensure that your sample is representative of the population, you will want to use a probability sample. A representative sample refers to whether the characteristics (race, age, income, education, etc) of the sample are the same as the population. Probability sampling is a sampling technique in which every individual in the population has an equal chance of being selected as a subject for the research.

There are several different types of probability samples you can use, depending on the resources you have available.

Let’s start with a simple random sample . In order to use a simple random sample all you have to do is take everyone in your population, throw them in a hat (not literally, you can just throw their names in a hat), and choose the number of names you want to use for your sample. By drawing blindly, you can eliminate human bias in constructing the sample and your sample should represent the population from which it is being taken.

However, a simple random sample isn’t quite that easy to build. The biggest issue is that you have to know who everyone is in order to randomly select them. What that requires is a sampling frame , a list of all residents in the population. But we don’t always have that. There is no list of residents of New York City (or any other city). Organizations that do have such a list wont just give it away. Try to ask your university for a list and contact information of everyone at your school so you can do a survey? They wont give it to you, for privacy reasons. It’s actually harder to think of popultions you could easily develop a sample frame for than those you can’t. If you can get or build a sampling frame, the work of a simple random sample is fairly simple, but that’s the biggest challenge.

Most of the time a true sampling frame is impossible to acquire, so researcher have to settle for something approximating a complete list. Earlier generations of researchers could use the random dial method to contact a random sample of Americans, because every household had a single phone. To use it you just pick up the phone and dial random numbers. Assuming the numbers are actually random, anyone might be called. That method actually worked somewhat well, until people stopped having home phone numbers and eventually stopped answering the phone. It’s a fun mental exercise to think about how you would go about creating a sampling frame for different groups though; think through where you would look to find a list of everyone in these groups:

Plumbers Recent first-time fathers Members of gyms

The best way to get an actual sampling frame is likely to purchase one from a private company that buys data on people from all the different websites we use.

Let’s say you do have a sampling frame though. For instance, you might be hired to do a survey of members of the Republican Party in the state of Utah to understand their political priorities this year, and the organization could give you a list of their members because they’ve hired you to do the reserach. One method of constructing a simple random sample would be to assign each name on the list a number, and then produce a list of random numbers. Once you’ve matched the random numbers to the list, you’ve got your sample. See the example using the list of 20 names below

population and sampling in research proposal example

and the list of 5 random numbers.

population and sampling in research proposal example

Systematic sampling is similar to simple random sampling in that it begins with a list of the population, but instead of choosing random numbers one would select every kth name on the list. What the heck is a kth? K just refers to how far apart the names are on the list you’re selecting. So if you want to sample one-tenth of the population, you’d select every tenth name. In order to know the k for your study you need to know your sample size (say 1000) and the size of the population (75000). You can divide the size of the population by the sample (75000/1000), which will produce your k (750). As long as the list does not contain any hidden order, this sampling method is as good as the random sampling method, but its only advantage over the random sampling technique is simplicity. If we used the same list as above and wanted to survey 1/5th of the population, we’d include 4 of the names on the list. It’s important with systematic samples to randomize the starting point in the list, otherwise people with A names will be oversampled. If we started with the 3rd name, we’d select Annabelle Frye, Cristobal Padilla, Jennie Vang, and Virginia Guzman, as shown below. So in order to use a systematic sample, we need three things, the population size (denoted as N ), the sample size we want ( n ) and k , which we calculate by dividing the population by the sample).

N= 20 (Population Size) n= 4 (Sample Size) k= 5 {20/4 (kth element) selection interval}

population and sampling in research proposal example

We can also use a stratified sample , but that requires knowing more about the population than just their names. A stratified sample divides the study population into relevant subgroups, and then draws a sample from each subgroup. Stratified sampling can be used if you’re very concerned about ensuring balance in the sample or there may be a problem of underrepresentation among certain groups when responses are received. Not everyone in your sample is equally likely to answer a survey. Say for instance we’re trying to predict who will win an election in a county with three cities. In city A there are 1 million college students, in city B there are 2 million families, and in City C there are 3 million retirees. You know that retirees are more likely than busy college students or parents to respond to a poll. So you break the sample into three parts, ensuring that you get 100 responses from City A, 200 from City B, and 300 from City C, so the three cities would match the population. A stratified sample provides the researcher control over the subgroups that are included in the sample, whereas simple random sampling does not guarantee that any one type of person will be included in the final sample. A disadvantage is that it is more complex to organize and analyze the results compared to simple random sampling.

Cluster sampling is an approach that begins by sampling groups (or clusters) of population elements and then selects elements from within those groups. A researcher would use cluster sampling if getting access to elements in an entrie population is too challenging. For instance, a study on students in schools would probably benefit from randomly selecting from all students at the 36 elementary schools in a fictional city. But getting contact information for all students would be very difficult. So the researcher might work with principals at several schools and survey those students. The researcher would need to ensure that the students surveyed at the schools are similar to students throughout the entire city, and greater access and participation within each cluster may make that possible.

The image below shows how this can work, although the example is oversimplified. Say we have 12 students that are in 6 classrooms. The school is in total 1/4th green (3/12), 1/4th yellow (3/12), and half blue (6/12). By selecting the right clusters from within the school our sample can be representative of the entire school, assuming these colors are the only significant difference between the students. In the real world, you’d want to match the clusters and population based on race, gender, age, income, etc. And I should point out that this is an overly simplified example. What if 5/12s of the school was yellow and 1/12th was green, how would I get the right proportions? I couldn’t, but you’d do the best you could. You still wouldn’t want 4 yellows in the sample, you’d just try to approximiate the population characteristics as best you can.

population and sampling in research proposal example

7.2 Actually Doing a Survey

All of that probably sounds pretty complicated. Identifying your population shouldn’t be too difficult, but how would you ever get a sampling frame? And then actually identifying who to include… It’s probably a bit overwhelming and makes doing a good survey sound impossible.

Researchers using surveys aren’t superhuman though. Often times, they use a little help. Because surveys are really valuable, and because researchers rely on them pretty often, there has been substantial growth in companies that can help to get one’s survey to its intended audience.

One popular resource is Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (more commonly known as MTurk). MTurk is at its most basic a website where workers look for jobs (called hits) to be listed by employers, and choose whether to do the task or not for a set reward. MTurk has grown over the last decade to be a common source of survey participants in the social sciences, in part because hiring workers costs very little (you can get some surveys completed for penny’s). That means you can get your survey completed with a small grant ($1-2k at the low end) and get the data back in a few hours. Really, it’s a quick and easy way to run a survey.

However, the workers aren’t perfectly representative of the average American. For instance, researchers have found that MTurk respondents are younger, better educated, and earn less than the average American.

One way to get around that issue, which can be used with MTurk or any survey, is to weight the responses. Because with MTurk you’ll get fewer responses from older, less educated, and richer Americans, those responses you do give you want to count for more to make your sample more representative of the population. Oversimplified example incoming!

Imagine you’re setting up a pizza party for your class. There are 9 people in your class, 4 men and 5 women. You only got 4 responses from the men, and 3 from the women. All 4 men wanted peperoni pizza, while the 3 women want a combination. Pepperoni wins right, 4 to 3? Not if you assume that the people that didn’t respond are the same as the ones that did. If you weight the responses to match the population (the full class of 9), a combination pizza is the winner.

population and sampling in research proposal example

Because you know the population of women is 5, you can weight the 3 responses from women by 5/3 = 1.6667. If we weight (or multiply) each vote we did receive from a woman by 1.6667, each vote for a combination now equals 1.6667, meaning that the 3 votes for combination total 5. Because we received a vote from every man in the class, we just weight their votes by 1. The big assumption we have to make is that the people we didn’t hear from (the 2 women that didn’t vote) are similar to the ones we did hear from. And if we don’t get any responses from a group we don’t have anything to infer their preferences or views from.

Let’s go through a slightly more complex example, still just considering one quality about people in the class. Let’s say your class actually has 100 students, but you only received votes from 50. And, what type of pizza people voted for is mixed, but men still prefer peperoni overall, and women still prefer combination. The class is 60% female and 40% male.

We received 21 votes from women out of the 60, so we can weight their responses by 60/21 to represent the population. We got 29 votes out of the 40 for men, so their responses can be weighted by 40/29. See the math below.

population and sampling in research proposal example

53.8 votes for combination? That might seem a little odd, but weighting isn’t a perfect science. We can’t identify what a non-respondent would have said exactly, all we can do is use the responses of other similar people to make a good guess. That issue often comes up in polling, where pollsters have to guess who is going to vote in a given election in order to project who will win. And we can weight on any characteristic of a person we think will be important, alone or in combination. Modern polls weight on age, gender, voting habits, education, and more to make the results as generalizable as possible.

There’s an appendix later in this book where I walk through the actual steps of creating weights for a sample in R, if anyone actually does a survey. I intended this section to show that doing a good survey might be simpler than it seemed, but now it might sound even more difficult. A good lesson to take though is that there’s always another door to go through, another hurdle to improve your methods. Being good at research just means being constantly prepared to be given a new challenge, and being able to find another solution.

7.3 Non-Probability Sampling

Qualitative researchers’ main objective is to gain an in-depth understanding on the subject matter they are studying, rather than attempting to generalize results to the population. As such, non-probability sampling is more common because of the researchers desire to gain information not from random elements of the population, but rather from specific individuals.

Random selection is not used in nonprobability sampling. Instead, the personal judgment of the researcher determines who will be included in the sample. Typically, researchers may base their selection on availability, quotas, or other criteria. However, not all members of the population are given an equal chance to be included in the sample. This nonrandom approach results in not knowing whether the sample represents the entire population. Consequently, researchers are not able to make valid generalizations about the population.

As with probability sampling, there are several types of non-probability samples. Convenience sampling , also known as accidental or opportunity sampling, is a process of choosing a sample that is easily accessible and readily available to the researcher. Researchers tend to collect samples from convenient locations such as their place of employment, a location, school, or other close affiliation. Although this technique allows for quick and easy access to available participants, a large part of the population is excluded from the sample.

For example, researchers (particularly in psychology) often rely on research subjects that are at their universities. That is highly convenient, students are cheap to hire and readily available on campuses. However, it means the results of the study may have limited ability to predict motivations or behaviors of people that aren’t included in the sample, i.e., people outside the age of 18-22 that are going to college.

If I ask you to get find out whether people approve of the mayor or not, and tell you I want 500 people’s opinions, should you go stand in front of the local grocery store? That would be convinient, and the people coming will be random, right? Not really. If you stand outside a rural Piggly Wiggly or an urban Whole Foods, do you think you’ll see the same people? Probably not, people’s chracteristics make the more or less likely to be in those locations. This technique runs the high risk of over- or under-representation, biased results, as well as an inability to make generalizations about the larger population. As the name implies though, it is convenient.

Purposive sampling , also known as judgmental or selective sampling, refers to a method in which the researcher decides who will be selected for the sample based on who or what is relevant to the study’s purpose. The researcher must first identify a specific characteristic of the population that can best help answer the research question. Then, they can deliberately select a sample that meets that particular criterion. Typically, the sample is small with very specific experiences and perspectives. For instance, if I wanted to understand the experiences of prominent foreign-born politicians in the United States, I would purposefully build a sample of… prominent foreign-born politicians in the United States. That would exclude anyone that was born in the United States or and that wasn’t a politician, and I’d have to define what I meant by prominent. Purposive sampling is susceptible to errors in judgment by the researcher and selection bias due to a lack of random sampling, but when attempting to research small communities it can be effective.

When dealing with small and difficult to reach communities researchers sometimes use snowball samples , also known as chain referral sampling. Snowball sampling is a process in which the researcher selects an initial participant for the sample, then asks that participant to recruit or refer additional participants who have similar traits as them. The cycle continues until the needed sample size is obtained.

This technique is used when the study calls for participants who are hard to find because of a unique or rare quality or when a participant does not want to be found because they are part of a stigmatized group or behavior. Examples may include people with rare diseases, sex workers, or a child sex offenders. It would be impossible to find an accurate list of sex workers anywhere, and surveying the general population about whether that is their job will produce false responses as people will be unwilling to identify themselves. As such, a common method is to gain the trust of one individual within the community, who can then introduce you to others. It is important that the researcher builds rapport and gains trust so that participants can be comfortable contributing to the study, but that must also be balanced by mainting objectivity in the research.

Snowball sampling is a useful method for locating hard to reach populations but cannot guarantee a representative sample because each contact will be based upon your last. For instance, let’s say you’re studying illegal fight clubs in your state. Some fight clubs allow weapons in the fights, while others completely ban them; those two types of clubs never interreact because of their disagreement about whether weapons should be allowed, and there’s no overlap between them (no members in both type of club). If your initial contact is with a club that uses weapons, all of your subsequent contacts will be within that community and so you’ll never understand the differences. If you didn’t know there were two types of clubs when you started, you’ll never even know you’re only researching half of the community. As such, snowball sampling can be a necessary technique when there are no other options, but it does have limitations.

Quota Sampling is a process in which the researcher must first divide a population into mutually exclusive subgroups, similar to stratified sampling. Depending on what is relevant to the study, subgroups can be based on a known characteristic such as age, race, gender, etc. Secondly, the researcher must select a sample from each subgroup to fit their predefined quotas. Quota sampling is used for the same reason as stratified sampling, to ensure that your sample has representation of certain groups. For instance, let’s say that you’re studying sexual harassment in the workplace, and men are much more willing to discuss their experiences than women. You might choose to decide that half of your final sample will be women, and stop requesting interviews with men once you fill your quota. The core difference is that while stratified sampling chooses randomly from within the different groups, quota sampling does not. A quota sample can either be proportional or non-proportional . Proportional quota sampling refers to ensuring that the quotas in the sample match the population (if 35% of the company is female, 35% of the sample should be female). Non-proportional sampling allows you to select your own quota sizes. If you think the experiences of females with sexual harassment are more important to your research, you can include whatever percentage of females you desire.

7.4 Dangers in sampling

Now that we’ve described all the different ways that one could create a sample, we can talk more about the pitfalls of sampling. Ensuring a quality sample means asking yourself some basic questions:

  • Who is in the sample?
  • How were they sampled?
  • Why were they sampled?

A meal is often only as good as the ingredients you use, and your data will only be as good as the sample. If you collect data from the wrong people, you’ll get the wrong answer. You’ll still get an answer, it’ll just be inaccurate. And I want to reemphasize here wrong people just refers to inappropriate for your study. If I want to study bullying in middle schools, but I only talk to people that live in a retirement home, how accurate or relevant will the information I gather be? Sure, they might have grandchildren in middle school, and they may remember their experiences. But wouldn’t my information be more relevant if I talked to students in middle school, or perhaps a mix of teachers, parents, and students? I’ll get an answer from retirees, but it wont be the one I need. The sample has to be appropriate to the research question.

Is a bigger sample always better? Not necessarily. A larger sample can be useful, but a more representative one of the population is better. That was made painfully clear when the magazine Literary Digest ran a poll to predict who would win the 1936 presidential election between Alf Landon and incumbent Franklin Roosevelt. Literary Digest had run the poll since 1916, and had been correct in predicting the outcome every time. It was the largest poll ever, and they received responses for 2.27 million people. They essentially received responses from 1 percent of the American population, while many modern polls use only 1000 responses for a much more populous country. What did they predict? They showed that Alf Landon would be the overwhelming winner, yet when the election was held Roosevelt won every state except Maine and Vermont. It was one of the most decisive victories in Presidential history.

So what went wrong for the Literary Digest? Their poll was large (gigantic!), but it wasn’t representative of likely voters. They polled their own readership, which tended to be more educated and wealthy on average, along with people on a list of those with registered automobiles and telephone users (both of which tended to be owned by the wealthy at that time). Thus, the poll largely ignored the majority of Americans, who ended up voting for Roosevelt. The Literary Digest poll is famous for being wrong, but led to significant improvements in the science of polling to avoid similar mistakes in the future. Researchers have learned a lot in the century since that mistake, even if polling and surveys still aren’t (and can’t be) perfect.

What kind of sampling strategy did Literary Digest use? Convenience, they relied on lists they had available, rather than try to ensure every American was included on their list. A representative poll of 2 million people will give you more accurate results than a representative poll of 2 thousand, but I’ll take the smaller more representative poll than a larger one that uses convenience sampling any day.

7.5 Summary

Picking the right type of sample is critical to getting an accurate answer to your reserach question. There are a lot of differnet options in how you can select the people to participate in your research, but typically only one that is both correct and possible depending on the research you’re doing. In the next chapter we’ll talk about a few other methods for conducting reseach, some that don’t include any sampling by you.

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

Target Population and Sampling

An introduction to sampling [1].

All research projects involve gathering specific data from specific sources in specific places at specific times (Palys & Atchison, 2014).  Also known as sampling, the necessity of sampling occurs because we simply cannot gather all data, from all sources, from all places and at all times. In other words, we must make choices when we design our research projects.  This section will focus on sampling techniques as another level of choices to be made as you draft your research proposal.

Sampling  is the process of selecting observations that will be analyzed for research purposes. To put it another way, sampling has to do with selecting some subset of one’s group of interest and drawing conclusions from that subset.  Sampling is an integral part of any research project. The question is not  if  you will sample, but  how  you will sample. The answer to that question usually is dependent on the methods you use and what the objectives of the study are. Sampling can apply to people or objects and is most important when these people or objects (your units of analysis) are heterogeneous (different characteristics).  If people (or objects) are  homogeneous  or the same in terms of a specific characteristic of study, any sample will do since everyone you sampled would be the same on that characteristic.  However, when there is diversity or  heterogeneity , sampling becomes highly relevant to the study since a researcher will want to ensure that his/her sample reflects that variability in the population. How we sample and who we sample shapes what sorts of conclusions we are able to draw.

Population Versus Sampling

If you had all the money and resources in the world, you could potentially “sample” the whole population. But because money and resources usually limit this, and furthermore all members of a population may not actually be able to be identified in a way that allows you to “sample” them, this is generally not practical. As a result, researchers take a sample, or a subgroup of people (or objects) from the population and study that instead of the population.  In social scientific research the  population is the cluster of people, events, things, or other phenomena that you are most interested in.  It is often the “who” or “what” that you want to be able to say something about at the end of your study. Populations in research may be rather large, such as “the Canadian people,” but they are more typically a little less vague than that. For example, a large study for which the population of interest really is the Canadian people will likely specify which Canadian people, such as adults over the age of 18 or citizens or legal residents.

One of the most surprising and often frustrating lessons students of research methods learn is that there is a difference between one’s population of interest and one’s study sample. While there are certainly exceptions, more often than not, a researcher’s population and the sample are not the same.  A  sample is the cluster of people or events, for example, from or about which you will actually gather data. Some sampling strategies allow researchers to make claims about populations that are much larger than their actual sample with a fair amount of confidence. Other sampling strategies are designed to allow researchers to make theoretical contributions rather than to make sweeping claims about large populations.

As mentioned previously, it is quite rare for a researcher to gather data from their entire population of interest. This might sound surprising or disappointing until you think about the kinds of research questions that sociologists typically ask. For example, suppose we wish to answer the following research question: “How do men’s and women’s college experiences differ, and how are they similar?” Would you expect to be able to collect data from all college students across all nations from all historical time periods? Unless you plan to make answering this research question your entire life’s work (and then some), the answer is probably “no.” So then, what is a researcher to do? Does not having the time or resources to gather data from every single person of interest mean having to give up your research interest? Absolutely not. It just means having to make some hard choices about sampling, and then being honest with yourself and your readers about the limitations of your study based on the sample from whom you were able to actually collect data. Click on this link to help you better understand how to get from the theoretical population (who you want to generalize to) to your sample (who will actually be in your study):  Sampling Terminology .

Sampling Techniques

What constitutes an appropriate sample depends upon the research question(s), the research objectives, the researchers understanding of the phenomenon under study (developed through the literature review), and practical constraints (Palys & Atchison, 2014).  These considerations will influence whether the researcher chooses to employ probabilistic or non-probabilistic sampling techniques.  Probabilistic sampling  techniques are employed to generate a formal or statistically representative sample.  This technique is utilized when the researcher has a well-defined population to draw a sample from, as is often the case in quantitative research.  This fact enables the researcher to generalize back to the broader population (Palys & Atchison, 2014).

On the other hand, a  non-probabilistic sampling  technique is the method of choice when the population is not created equal and some participants are more desirable in advancing the research project´s objectives.  Non-probability sampling techniques are the best approach for qualitative research. Because the researcher seeks a strategically chosen sample, generalizability is more of a theoretical or conceptual issue, and it is not possible to generalize back to the population (Palys & Atchison, 2014).  In the following sections we will look at the types of sampling methods utilized with non-probabilistic and probabilistic samples.

Probabilistic sampling techniques

As previously mentioned, probability sampling refers to sampling techniques for which a person’s (or event’s) likelihood of being selected for membership in the sample is known. You might ask yourself why we should care about a study element’s likelihood of being selected for membership in a researcher’s sample. The reason is that, in most cases, researchers who use probability sampling techniques are aiming to identify a representative sample from which to collect data. A  representative sample  is one that resembles the population from which it was drawn in all the ways that are important for the research being conducted. If, for example, you wish to be able to say something about differences between men and women at the end of your study, you better make sure that your sample doesn’t contain only women. That is a bit of an oversimplification, but the point with representativeness is that if your population varies in some way that is important to your study, your sample should contain the same sorts of variation.

Obtaining a representative sample is important in probability sampling because a key goal of studies that rely on probability samples is  generalizability.  In fact, generalizability is perhaps the key feature that distinguishes probability samples from nonprobability samples. Generalizability refers to the idea that a study’s results will tell us something about a group larger than the sample from which the findings were generated. In order to achieve generalizability, a core principle of probability sampling is that all elements in the researcher’s target population have an equal chance of being selected for inclusion in the study. In research, this is the principle of random selection.  Random selection is a mathematical process that must meet two criteria.  The first criterium is that chance governs the section process.  The second is that every sampling element has an equal probability of being selected (Palys & Atchison, 2014). The core principal of probability sampling is random selection. If a researcher uses random selection techniques to draw a sample, he or she will be able to estimate how closely the sample represents the larger population from which it was drawn by estimating the sampling error.

The use of the right techniques for sampling gives researchers the best chances at minimizing sampling error and thus the strongest ability to say their results are reflective of the population. Research is done to benefit society, in some way, so this is important that research results be reflective of what we might expect to see in society. Sample size also impacts sampling error. Generally, the bigger the sample is, the smaller the error. However, there is a point of diminishing returns where only small reductions in error are given for increases in size. Cost and resources usually also prohibit very large samples, so ultimately the sample size is dependent upon a variety of factors of which sampling error is only one.

Probability Sampling Techniques

There are a variety of probability samples that researchers may use. For our purposes we will focus on four: simple random samples, systematic samples, stratified samples, and cluster samples (see the table below for a summary of these four techniques). Simple random  samples are the most basic type of probability sample, but their use is not particularly common. Part of the reason for this may be the work involved in generating a simple random sample. To draw a simple random sample, a researcher starts with a list of every single member, or element, of his or her population of interest. This list is sometimes referred to as a  sampling frame . Once that list has been created, the researcher numbers each element sequentially and then randomly selects the elements from which he or she will collect data. To randomly select elements, researchers use a table of numbers that have been generated randomly. There are several possible sources for obtaining a random number table. Some statistics and research methods textbooks offer such tables as appendices to the text. Perhaps a more accessible source is one of the many free random number generators available on the Internet. A good online source is the website  Stat Trek , which contains a random number generator that you can use to create a random number table of whatever size you might need.

As you might have guessed, drawing a simple random sample can be quite tedious. S ystematic sampling techniques  are somewhat less tedious but offer the benefits of a random sample. As with simple random samples, you must be able to produce a list of every one of your population elements. Once you have done that, to draw a systematic sample you would simply select every kth element on your list. But what is k, and where on the list of population elements does one begin the selection process? k is your selection interval or the distance between the elements you select for inclusion in your study. To begin the selection process, you would need to figure out how many elements you wish to include in your sample.

Let us say you want to interview 25 students from the law program at your college or university.  You do some research and discover that there are 150 students currently registered in the program. In this case, your selection interval, or k, is 6. To arrive at 6, simply divide the total number of population elements by your desired sample size.  To determine where on your list of population elements to begin selecting the names of the 25 students you will interview, select a random number between 1 and k, and begin there. If we randomly select 3 as our starting point, we would begin by selecting the third student on the list and then select every fourth student from there.

There is one clear instance in which systematic sampling should not be employed. If your sampling frame has any pattern to it, you could inadvertently introduce bias into your sample by using a systemic sampling strategy. This is sometimes referred to as the problem of periodicity.  Periodicity  refers to the tendency for a pattern to occur at regular intervals.  For example, suppose you wanted to observe how people use the outdoor public spaces in your city or town and you need to have your observations completed within 28 days.  During this time, you wish to conduct four observations on randomly chosen days. To determine which days you will conduct your observations, you will need to determine a selection interval. As you will recall from the preceding paragraphs, to do so you must divide your population size – in this case 28 days – by your desired sample size, in this case 4 days. This formula leads you to a selection interval of 7. If you randomly select 2 as your starting point and select every seventh day after that, you will wind up with a total of 4 days on which to conduct your observations. But what happens is that you are now observing on the second day of the week, being Tuesdays.  As you have probably figured out, that is not such a good plan if you really wish to understand how public spaces in your city or town are used. Weekend use probably differs from weekday use, and that use may even vary during the week.

In cases such as this, where the sampling frame is cyclical, it would be better to use a  stratified sampling technique . In stratified sampling, a researcher will divide the study population into relevant subgroups and then draw a sample from each subgroup. In this example, you might wish to first divide your sampling frame into two lists: weekend days and weekdays. Once you have your two lists, you can then apply either simple random or systematic sampling techniques to each subgroup.

Stratified sampling is a good technique to use when, as in the example, a subgroup of interest makes up a relatively small proportion of the overall sample. In the example of a study of use of public space in your city or town, you want to be sure to include weekdays and weekends in your sample.  However, because weekends make up less than a third of an entire week, there is a chance that a simple random or systematic strategy would not yield sufficient weekend observation days. As you might imagine, stratified sampling is even more useful in cases where a subgroup makes up an even smaller proportion of the study population, say, for example, if you want to be sure to include both male and female perspectives in a study, but males make up only a small percentage of the population. There is a chance simple random or systematic sampling strategy might not yield any male participants, but by using stratified sampling, you could ensure that your sample contained the proportion of males that is reflective of the larger population.  Let us look at another example to help clarify things.

Example #1 Choosing a sampling technique

Suppose a researcher wanted to talk to police officers in Canada about their views on illegal drugs use in general population. A researcher could find a list of all police officers (a sampling frame) and do a  simple random sample  or a  systematic sample with random start  from that list. But what if the researcher wanted to ensure that female and male officers were included in the same proportions they are in the population of officers? Ot if they wanted to ensure that urban and rural officers are represented as they are in the population of police? In these cases,  stratified random sampling   might be more appropriate. If the goal is to have the subgroups reflect the proportions in the population then  proportional stratification  should be used. With proportional stratification, the sample size of each subgroup is proportionate to the population size of the group.In other words, each subgroup has the same  sampling fraction.  The sampling fraction is the proportion of the population that the researcher wants included in the sample. It is equal to the sample size, divided by the population size (n/N) (see Palys & Atchison, 2014).

However, if the researcher wanted to be able to compare male and female officer or rural and urban officers (or more complicated: male and female officers within the rural and urban areas), a  disproportional stratification  may be used instead to ensure that the researcher had enough members of the subgroups to allow between group comparisons. With a disproportional sample, the size of the each sample subgroup does not need to be proportionate to the population size of the group. In other words, two or more stratum will have different sampling fractions (see Palys & Atchison, 2014)

Up to this point in our discussion of probability samples, we have assumed that researchers will be able to access a list of population elements in order to create a sampling frame. This, as you might imagine, is not always the case. Let us say, for example, that you wish to conduct a study of bullying in high schools across Canada. Just imagine trying to create a list of every single high school student in the country. Basically, we are talking about a list of every high school student in the country. Even if you could find a way to generate such a list, attempting to do so might not be the most practical use of your time or resources. When this is the case, researchers turn to cluster sampling.  Cluster sampling  occurs when a researcher begins by sampling groups (or clusters) of population elements and then selects elements from within those groups.  Here is an example of when a cluster sampling technique would be suitable.

Example #2 Cluster sampling

Perhaps you are interested in the workplace experiences of college instructors. Chances are good that obtaining a list of all instructors that work for Canadian colleges would be rather difficult. It would be more likely that you can come up with a list of all colleges inCanada without too much hassle. Consequently, you could dram a random sample of Canadian colleges (your cluster) and then draw another random sample of elements (in this case, instructors) from within the colleges you initially selected. Cluster sampling works in stages. In this sample, we sampled in two stages. As you might have guessed, sampling in multiple stages does introduce the possibility of greater error (each stage is subjected to its own sampling error), but it is nevertheless a highly efficient method.

Now suppose college across the country were not willing to share their instructor lists? How might you sample then? Is it important that the instructors in you study are representative of all instructors? What happens if you need a representative sample, but you do not have a sampling frame? In these cases,  multi-stage cluster sampling  may be appropriate. This complex form if cluster sampling involves dividing the population into groups (or  clusters ). The researcher chooses one or more clusters ar random and everyone within the chosen cluster is sampled (see Palys & Atchison, 2014)

Nonprobability Sampling Techniques

Nonprobability sampling refers to sampling techniques for which a person’s (or event’s or researcher’s focus’) likelihood of being selected for membership in the sample is unknown. Because we do not know the likelihood of selection, we do not know with nonprobability samples whether a sample represents a larger population or not. But that is okay, because representing the population is not the goal with nonprobability samples. That said, the fact that nonprobability samples do not represent a larger population does not mean that they are drawn arbitrarily or without any specific purpose in mind. In the following subsection, “Types of Nonprobability Samples,” we will take a closer look at the process of selecting research elements when drawing a nonprobability sample. But first, let us consider why a researcher might choose to use a nonprobability sample.

One instance might be when we are designing a research project. For example, if we are conducting survey research, we may want to administer our survey to a few people who seem to resemble the people we are interested in studying in order to help work out kinks in the survey. We might also use a nonprobability sample at the early stages of a research project, if we are conducting a pilot study or exploratory research.  Researchers also use nonprobability samples in full-blown research projects. These projects are usually qualitative in nature, where the researcher’s goal is in-depth, idiographic understanding rather than more general, nomothetic [1]  understanding. Evaluation researchers whose aim is to describe some very specific small group might use nonprobability sampling techniques. Researchers interested in contributing to our theoretical understanding of some phenomenon might also collect data from nonprobability samples. Researchers interested in contributing to social theories, by either expanding on them, modifying them, or poking holes in their propositions, may use nonprobability sampling techniques to seek out cases that seem anomalous in order to understand how theories can be improved.

In sum, there are a number and variety of instances in which the use of nonprobability samples makes sense. We will examine several specific types of nonprobability samples in the next subsection.

Types of Nonprobability Samples

There are several types of nonprobability samples that researchers use. These include purposive samples, snowball samples, quota samples, and convenience samples. While the latter two strategies may be used by quantitative researchers from time to time, they are more typically employed in qualitative research, and because they are both nonprobability methods, we include them in this section.

To draw a  purposive sample , researchers begin with specific perspectives in mind that they wish to examine and then seek out research participants who cover that full range of perspectives. For example, if you are studying students’ level of satisfaction with their college or university program of study, you will want to be sure to include students from all programs, males and females, students of different ages, students who are working and those who are not, students who are studying online and those who are taking classes face-to-face, as well as past and present students (which would allow you to compare past and present students’ level of satisfaction).  While purposive sampling is often used when one’s goal is to include participants who represent a broad range of perspectives, purposive sampling may also be used when a researcher wishes to include only people who meet very narrow or specific criteria.

Qualitative researchers sometimes rely on  snowball sampling techniques to identify study participants. In this case, a researcher might know of one or two people h would like to include in his study but then relies on those initial participants to help identify additional study participants. Thus, the researcher’s sample builds and becomes larger as the study continues, much as a snowball builds and becomes larger as it rolls through the snow. Snowball sampling is an especially useful strategy when a researcher wishes to study some stigmatized group or behavior. Having a previous participant vouch for the trustworthiness of the researcher may help new potential participants feel more comfortable about being included in the study. Snowball sampling is sometimes referred to as chain referral sampling. One research participant refers another, and that person refers another, and that person refers another—thus a chain of potential participants is identified. In addition to using this sampling strategy for potentially stigmatized populations, it is also a useful strategy to use when the researcher’s group of interest is likely to be difficult to find, not only because of some stigma associated with the group, but also because the group may be relatively rare.

When conducting  quota sampling , a researcher identifies categories that are important to the study and for which there is likely to be some variation. Subgroups are created based on each category and the researcher decides how many people (or documents or whatever element happens to be the focus of the research) to include from each subgroup and collects data from that number for each subgroup. While quota sampling offers the strength of helping the researcher account for potentially relevant variation across study elements, we must remember that such a strategy does not yield statistically representative findings. And while this is important to note, it is also often the case that we do not really care about a statistically representative sample, because we are only interested in a specific case.

Let us go back to the example we considered previously of student satisfaction with their college or university course of study to look at an example of how a quota sampling approach would work in such a study.

Imagine you want to understand how student satisfaction varies across two types programs: the Emergency Services Management (ESM) degree program and the ESM diploma program. Perhaps you have the time and resources to interview 40 ESM students. As you are interested in comparing the degree and the diploma program, you decide to interview 20 from each program. In your review of literature on the topic before you began the study, you learned that degree and diploma experiences can vary by age of the students. Consequently, you decide on four important subgroup: males who are 29 years of age or younger, females who are 29 years of age or younger, males who are 30 years of age and older, and females who are thirty years of age and older. Your findings would not be representative of all students who enrol in degree or diploma programs at the college, or at other institution; however, this is irrelevant to your purposes as are solely interested in finding out about the satisfaction level of ESM students who are enrolled in either the ESM degree or diploma program.

Finally,  convenience sampling  is another nonprobability sampling strategy that is employed by both qualitative and quantitative researchers. To draw a convenience sample, a researcher simply collects data from those people or other relevant elements to which he or she has most convenient access. This method, also sometimes referred to as haphazard sampling, is most useful in exploratory research. It is also often used by journalists who need quick and easy access to people from their population of interest. If you have ever seen brief interviews of people on the street on the news, you have probably seen a haphazard sample being interviewed. While convenience samples offer one major benefit—convenience—we should be cautious about generalizing from research that relies on convenience sample.

  • Adapted from Sheppard, V. (2020). An introduction to research methods in sociology: Sampling techniques. BCcampus. Retrieved from . Licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. ↵

PSY-250 Research Paper Guidelines and Resources Copyright © by David Adams. All Rights Reserved.

Share This Book

3. Populations and samples

Populations, unbiasedness and precision, randomisation, variation between samples, standard error of the mean.

population and sampling in research proposal example

Explore BMJ

  • Our company
  • BMJ Careers
  • BMJ Learning
  • BMJ Masterclasses
  • BMJ Journals
  • BMJ Student
  • Academic edition of The BMJ
  • BMJ Best Practice
  • The BMJ Awards
  • Email alerts
  • Activate subscription

Information

  • Cookies & Privacy
  • GETTING STARTED
  • Introduction
  • FUNDAMENTALS
  • Acknowledgements
  • Research questions & hypotheses
  • Concepts, constructs & variables
  • Research limitations
  • Getting started
  • Sampling Strategy
  • Research Quality
  • Research Ethics
  • Data Analysis

How to structure the Sampling Strategy section of your dissertation

The Sampling Strategy section of your Research Strategy chapter (usually Chapter Three: Research Strategy ) needs to be well structured. A good structure involves four steps : describing , explaining , stating and justifying . You need to: (1) describe what you are studying, including the units involved in your sample and the target population ; (2) explain the types of sampling technique available to you; (3) state and describe the sampling strategy you used; and (4) justify your choice of sampling strategy. In this article, we explain each of these four steps:

  • STEP ONE: Describe what you are studying
  • STEP TWO: Explain the types of sampling technique available to you
  • STEP THREE: State and describe the sampling strategy you used
  • STEP FOUR: Justify your choice of sampling strategy

STEP ONE Describe what you are studying

First, the reader needs to know what you studied. This should include details about the following:

The units you measured (or examined).

Your target population .

If you used a probability sampling technique to select your sample , you will also need to describe:

Your sampling frame .

If you are unsure what of any of these terms mean (i.e., unit , sampling frame , population ), you might want to read the article, Sampling: The basics , before reading on. If you feel comfortable with these terms, let's imagine we completed a dissertation on the career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England. Below we describe our units , target population and sampling frame (imagining that we used a probability sampling technique ).

Career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England We examined the career choices of all students at the University of Oxford, England. By all students we mean all undergraduate and postgraduate students, full-time and part-time, studying at the University of Oxford, England, enrolled as of 05 January 2011.

From this description , the reader learns the following:

Units: students Population: all undergraduate and postgraduate students, full-time and part-time, at the University of Oxford, England Sampling frame: all students enrolled at the University of Oxford, as of 05 January 2011 (i.e., according to Student Records, assuming this is the department that maintains a list of all students studying at the university)

Note the difference between the target population and the sampling frame, from which we select our sample (when using a probability sampling technique). They are the same in all respects apart from the fact that the sampling frame tells the reader that only those students enrolled in the university according to Student Records on a particular date (i.e., 05 January 2011) are being studied. If the list of students kept by Student Records is very different from the population of all students studying at the university, this should be made clear [see the article, Sampling: The basics, to understand more about sampling frames and potential sampling bias].

By the time you come to write up the Sampling Strategy section of your Research Strategy chapter, you should know whether the sampling frame is the same as the population. If it is not, you should highlight the difference between the two. This completes the first part of the Sampling Strategy section of your Research Strategy chapter.

STEP TWO Explain the types of sampling technique available to you

Once you know what units you are studying, as well as your population and sampling frame , the reader will often want to know what types of sampling technique you could use . We say could use rather than should use because whilst there are certain ideal choices of sampling technique, there is seldom a right or wrong answer. Instead, researchers choose sampling techniques that they feel are most appropriate to their study, based on theoretical and practical reasons.

Broadly speaking, you could choose to select your sample from (a) your sampling frame using either a probability sampling technique (e.g., simple random sampling, systematic random sampling, stratified random sampling) or (b) from your population using a non-probability sampling technique (e.g., quota sampling, purposive sampling, convenience sampling, snowball sampling). To understand the differences between these techniques, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, you may want to start by reading the articles: Probability sampling and Non-probability sampling .

When explaining the types of sampling technique that were available to you in this part of your Sampling Strategy section, you should take into account: (a) the research strategy guiding your dissertation; and (b) theoretical and practical sampling issues.

The research strategy guiding your dissertation

Theoretically , the ideal sampling technique for a piece of research (i.e., probability or non-probability sampling) differs depending on whether you are using a quantitative , qualitative or mixed methods research design .

Theoretical and practical sampling issues

Whilst there are theoretical ideals when it comes to choosing a sampling technique to use for your dissertation (i.e., probability or non-probability sampling), it is often practical issues that determine not only whether you choose one type of sampling technique over another (e.g., non-probability sampling over probability sampling ), but also the specific technique that you use (e.g., purposive sampling over quota sampling ; i.e., both are non-probability sampling techniques). Such practical issues range from whether your target population is known (i.e., whether you can get access to a list of the population) to whether you have the time and money to get access to such a list [click on the relevant article to understand the advantages and disadvantages (i.e., theoretical and practical considerations ) of the different probability sampling (e.g., simple random sampling , systematic random sampling , stratified random sampling ) and non-probability sampling techniques (e.g., quota sampling , purposive sampling , self-selection sampling , convenience sampling , snowball sampling )].

Assuming that you understand the differences between these sampling techniques, and their relative merits, let's consider what sampling choices are open to us using our example of career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England . The green text illustrates what we have already written above.

Career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England We examined the career choices of all students at the University of Oxford, England. By all students we mean all undergraduate and postgraduate students, full-time and part-time, studying at the University of Oxford, England, enrolled as of 05 January 2011. Since our research drew on a quantitative research design , the ideal would have been to use a probability sampling technique because this allows us to make statistical inferences (i.e., generalisations ) from our sample of students to all students at the university . Such a probability sampling technique would provide greater external validity for our findings. Since we wanted to compare the career choices of different strata (i.e., groups of students); more specifically, males and females , the appropriate choice of probability sampling technique would have been a stratified random sample . However, if it were not possible to use a probability sampling technique , we could have used a non-probability sampling technique . Since we wanted to compare different strata (i.e., groups of students) and achieve a sample that is as representative as possible of our population , we could have used a quota sample .

From this explanation , the reader learns the following:

Types of sampling strategy available: probability and non-probability sampling Ideal choice: probability sampling Preferred choice of probability sampling technique: stratified random sample Preferred choice of non-probability sampling technique: quota sample

When you are writing up this part of the Sampling Strategy section of your Research Strategy chapter, you may be expected to include a much more comprehensive list of reasons why you prefer one type of sampling strategy (i.e., probability or non-probability) and more specifically, a particular sampling technique (e.g., stratified random sampling over quota sampling). We provide information about the advantages and disadvantages of these different sampling strategies and sampling techniques in the following articles: for probability sampling , see simple random sampling , systematic random sampling , stratified random sampling ; for non-probability sampling techniques, see quota sampling , purposive sampling , self-selection sampling , convenience sampling , snowball sampling .

STEP THREE State and describe the sampling strategy you used

Third, you need to state what sampling strategy and sampling technique you used, describing what you did.

Again, let's consider this for our example of career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England . The green text illustrates what we have already written above.

Career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England We examined the career choices of all students at the University of Oxford, England. By all students we mean all undergraduate and postgraduate students, full-time and part-time, studying at the University of Oxford, England, enrolled as of 05 January 2011. Since our research drew on a quantitative research design , the ideal would have been to use a probability sampling technique because this allows us to make statistical inferences (i.e., generalisations ) from our sample of students to all students at the university. Such a probability sampling technique would provide greater external validity for our findings. Since we wanted to compare the career choices of different strata (i.e., groups of students), including males and females , the appropriate choice of probability sampling technique would have been a stratified random sample . However, if it were not possible to use a probability sampling technique , we could have used a non-probability sampling technique . Since we wanted to compare different strata (i.e., groups of students) and achieve a sample that is as representative as possible of our population , we could have used a quota sample . In the event, we used quota sampling to select the sample of students that would be invited to take part in our dissertation research. Student Records provided us with the appropriate quotas for male and female students, which showed a 53:47 male-female ration [ NOTE: this is a fictitious figure]. We selected a sample size of 200 students, which was based on subjective judgement and practicalities of cost and time. Therefore, we sampled 106 male students (i.e., 53% of our sample size of 200 students) and 94 female students (i.e., 47% of our sample size of 200 students). For convenience, we stood outside the main library where we felt the thoroughfare (i.e., number of students passing by) would be highest.

From this statement and description , the reader learns the following:

Sampling strategy chosen: non-probability sampling Specific sampling technique used: quota sampling

Details of quota sampling: strata (i.e., groups of students) of interest are males and females ratio of males-females at the university was 53:47 sample size selected was 200 students quota sample filled based on ease of access to students at the main university library.

Again, when you are writing up this part of the Sampling Strategy section of your Research Strategy chapter, it may be appropriate to include greater description of the sampling technique you used.

STEP FOUR Justify your choice of sampling strategy

Finally, you need to justify your choice of sampling strategy. When writing up the Sampling Strategy section of your Research Strategy chapter, you may find it easier to combine the third and fourth steps (i.e., stating and describing the sampling strategy you used, as well as justifying that choice). Taking our example of the career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England , we illustrate how the two steps can be integrated. As before, the green text illustrates what we have already written above.

Career choices of students at the University of Oxford, England We examined the career choices of all students at the University of Oxford, England. By all students we mean all undergraduate and postgraduate students, full-time and part-time, studying at the University of Oxford, England, enrolled as of 05 January 2011. Since our research drew on a quantitative research design , the ideal would have been to use a probability sampling technique because this allows us to make statistical inferences (i.e., generalisations ) from our sample of students to all students at the university. Such a probability sampling technique would provide greater external validity for our findings. Since we wanted to compare the career choices of different strata (i.e., groups of students), including males and females , the appropriate choice of probability sampling technique would have been a stratified random sample . However, if it were not possible to use a probability sampling technique , we could have used a non-probability sampling technique . Since we wanted to compare different strata (i.e., groups of students) and achieve a sample that is as representative as possible of our population , we could have used a quota sample . In the event, we used quota sampling to select the sample of students that would be invited to take part in our dissertation research. We were unable to use a stratified random sampling , our preferred choice, because we could not obtain permission from Student Records to access a complete list of all students at the university. Without any other way of attaining a list of all students, we had to use quota sampling . However, Student Records did provide us with the appropriate quotas for male and female students, which showed a 53:47 male-female ration [note: this is a fictitious figure]. We selected a sample size of 200 students, which was based on subjective judgement and practicalities of cost and time. Therefore, we sampled 106 male students (i.e., 53% of our sample size of 200 students) and 94 female students (i.e., 47% of our sample size of 200 students). For convenience, we stood outside the main library where we felt the thoroughfare (i.e., number of students passing by) would be highest.

From this justification , the reader learns the following:

Main reason for rejecting the ideal sampling strategy:

Access to a list of all students (i.e., the sampling frame needed for probability sampling ) was not granted by Student Records.

No other way of attaining a list of all students was available.

When you think about justifying your choice of sampling technique when writing up the Sampling Strategy section of your Research Strategy chapter, you should consider both practical reasons (e.g., what time you have available, what access you have, etc.) and theoretical reasons (i.e., those relating to the specific sampling technique , but also your choice of research paradigm , research design and research methods ).

Grad Coach

Research Proposal Example/Sample

Detailed Walkthrough + Free Proposal Template

If you’re getting started crafting your research proposal and are looking for a few examples of research proposals , you’ve come to the right place.

In this video, we walk you through two successful (approved) research proposals , one for a Master’s-level project, and one for a PhD-level dissertation. We also start off by unpacking our free research proposal template and discussing the four core sections of a research proposal, so that you have a clear understanding of the basics before diving into the actual proposals.

  • Research proposal example/sample – Master’s-level (PDF/Word)
  • Research proposal example/sample – PhD-level (PDF/Word)
  • Proposal template (Fully editable) 

If you’re working on a research proposal for a dissertation or thesis, you may also find the following useful:

  • Research Proposal Bootcamp : Learn how to write a research proposal as efficiently and effectively as possible
  • 1:1 Proposal Coaching : Get hands-on help with your research proposal

Free Webinar: How To Write A Research Proposal

FAQ: Research Proposal Example

Research proposal example: frequently asked questions, are the sample proposals real.

Yes. The proposals are real and were approved by the respective universities.

Can I copy one of these proposals for my own research?

As we discuss in the video, every research proposal will be slightly different, depending on the university’s unique requirements, as well as the nature of the research itself. Therefore, you’ll need to tailor your research proposal to suit your specific context.

You can learn more about the basics of writing a research proposal here .

How do I get the research proposal template?

You can access our free proposal template here .

Is the proposal template really free?

Yes. There is no cost for the proposal template and you are free to use it as a foundation for your research proposal.

Where can I learn more about proposal writing?

For self-directed learners, our Research Proposal Bootcamp is a great starting point.

For students that want hands-on guidance, our private coaching service is recommended.

Literature Review Course

Psst… there’s more!

This post is an extract from our bestselling Udemy Course, Research Proposal Bootcamp . If you want to work smart, you don't want to miss this .

You Might Also Like:

Example of a literature review

I am at the stage of writing my thesis proposal for a PhD in Management at Altantic International University. I checked on the coaching services, but it indicates that it’s not available in my area. I am in South Sudan. My proposed topic is: “Leadership Behavior in Local Government Governance Ecosystem and Service Delivery Effectiveness in Post Conflict Districts of Northern Uganda”. I will appreciate your guidance and support

MUHAMMAD SHAH

GRADCOCH is very grateful motivated and helpful for all students etc. it is very accorporated and provide easy access way strongly agree from GRADCOCH.

Tamasgen desta

Proposal research departemet management

Salim

I am at the stage of writing my thesis proposal for a masters in Analysis of w heat commercialisation by small holders householdrs at Hawassa International University. I will appreciate your guidance and support

Abrar Shouket

please provide a attractive proposal about foreign universities .It would be your highness.

habitamu abayneh

comparative constitutional law

Kabir Abubakar

Kindly guide me through writing a good proposal on the thesis topic; Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Financial Inclusion in Nigeria. Thank you

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Print Friendly

U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official. Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

The site is secure. The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

  • Publications
  • Account settings

Preview improvements coming to the PMC website in October 2024. Learn More or Try it out now .

  • Advanced Search
  • Journal List
  • An Bras Dermatol
  • v.91(3); May-Jun 2016

Sampling: how to select participants in my research study? *

Jeovany martínez-mesa.

1 Faculdade Meridional (IMED) - Passo Fundo (RS), Brazil.

David Alejandro González-Chica

2 University of Adelaide - Adelaide, Australia.

Rodrigo Pereira Duquia

3 Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA) - Porto Alegre (RS), Brazil.

Renan Rangel Bonamigo

João luiz bastos.

4 Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC) - Florianópolis (RS), Brazil.

In this paper, the basic elements related to the selection of participants for a health research are discussed. Sample representativeness, sample frame, types of sampling, as well as the impact that non-respondents may have on results of a study are described. The whole discussion is supported by practical examples to facilitate the reader's understanding.

To introduce readers to issues related to sampling.

INTRODUCTION

The essential topics related to the selection of participants for a health research are: 1) whether to work with samples or include the whole reference population in the study (census); 2) the sample basis; 3) the sampling process and 4) the potential effects nonrespondents might have on study results. We will refer to each of these aspects with theoretical and practical examples for better understanding in the sections that follow.

TO SAMPLE OR NOT TO SAMPLE

In a previous paper, we discussed the necessary parameters on which to estimate the sample size. 1 We define sample as a finite part or subset of participants drawn from the target population. In turn, the target population corresponds to the entire set of subjects whose characteristics are of interest to the research team. Based on results obtained from a sample, researchers may draw their conclusions about the target population with a certain level of confidence, following a process called statistical inference. When the sample contains fewer individuals than the minimum necessary, but the representativeness is preserved, statistical inference may be compromised in terms of precision (prevalence studies) and/or statistical power to detect the associations of interest. 1 On the other hand, samples without representativeness may not be a reliable source to draw conclusions about the reference population (i.e., statistical inference is not deemed possible), even if the sample size reaches the required number of participants. Lack of representativeness can occur as a result of flawed selection procedures (sampling bias) or when the probability of refusal/non-participation in the study is related to the object of research (nonresponse bias). 1 , 2

Although most studies are performed using samples, whether or not they represent any target population, census-based estimates should be preferred whenever possible. 3 , 4 For instance, if all cases of melanoma are available on a national or regional database, and information on the potential risk factors are also available, it would be preferable to conduct a census instead of investigating a sample.

However, there are several theoretical and practical reasons that prevent us from carrying out census-based surveys, including:

  • Ethical issues: it is unethical to include a greater number of individuals than that effectively required;
  • Budgetary limitations: the high costs of a census survey often limits its use as a strategy to select participants for a study;
  • Logistics: censuses often impose great challenges in terms of required staff, equipment, etc. to conduct the study;
  • Time restrictions: the amount of time needed to plan and conduct a census-based survey may be excessive; and,
  • Unknown target population size: if the study objective is to investigate the presence of premalignant skin lesions in illicit drugs users, lack of information on all existing users makes it impossible to conduct a census-based study.

All these reasons explain why samples are more frequently used. However, researchers must be aware that sample results can be affected by the random error (or sampling error). 3 To exemplify this concept, we will consider a research study aiming to estimate the prevalence of premalignant skin lesions (outcome) among individuals >18 years residing in a specific city (target population). The city has a total population of 4,000 adults, but the investigator decided to collect data on a representative sample of 400 participants, detecting an 8% prevalence of premalignant skin lesions. A week later, the researcher selects another sample of 400 participants from the same target population to confirm the results, but this time observes a 12% prevalence of premalignant skin lesions. Based on these findings, is it possible to assume that the prevalence of lesions increased from the first to the second week? The answer is probably not. Each time we select a new sample, it is very likely to obtain a different result. These fluctuations are attributed to the "random error." They occur because individuals composing different samples are not the same, even though they were selected from the same target population. Therefore, the parameters of interest may vary randomly from one sample to another. Despite this fluctuation, if it were possible to obtain 100 different samples of the same population, approximately 95 of them would provide prevalence estimates very close to the real estimate in the target population - the value that we would observe if we investigated all the 4,000 adults residing in the city. Thus, during the sample size estimation the investigator must specify in advance the highest or maximum acceptable random error value in the study. Most population-based studies use a random error ranging from 2 to 5 percentage points. Nevertheless, the researcher should be aware that the smaller the random error considered in the study, the larger the required sample size. 1

SAMPLE FRAME

The sample frame is the group of individuals that can be selected from the target population given the sampling process used in the study. For example, to identify cases of cutaneous melanoma the researcher may consider to utilize as sample frame the national cancer registry system or the anatomopathological records of skin biopsies. Given that the sample may represent only a portion of the target population, the researcher needs to examine carefully whether the selected sample frame fits the study objectives or hypotheses, and especially if there are strategies to overcome the sample frame limitations (see Chart 1 for examples and possible limitations).

Examples of sample frames and potential limitations as regards representativeness

Sampling can be defined as the process through which individuals or sampling units are selected from the sample frame. The sampling strategy needs to be specified in advance, given that the sampling method may affect the sample size estimation. 1 , 5 Without a rigorous sampling plan the estimates derived from the study may be biased (selection bias). 3

TYPES OF SAMPLING

In figure 1 , we depict a summary of the main sampling types. There are two major sampling types: probabilistic and nonprobabilistic.

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is abd-91-03-0326-g01.jpg

Sampling types used in scientific studies

NONPROBABILISTIC SAMPLING

In the context of nonprobabilistic sampling, the likelihood of selecting some individuals from the target population is null. This type of sampling does not render a representative sample; therefore, the observed results are usually not generalizable to the target population. Still, unrepresentative samples may be useful for some specific research objectives, and may help answer particular research questions, as well as contribute to the generation of new hypotheses. 4 The different types of nonprobabilistic sampling are detailed below.

Convenience sampling : the participants are consecutively selected in order of apperance according to their convenient accessibility (also known as consecutive sampling). The sampling process comes to an end when the total amount of participants (sample saturation) and/or the time limit (time saturation) are reached. Randomized clinical trials are usually based on convenience sampling. After sampling, participants are usually randomly allocated to the intervention or control group (randomization). 3 Although randomization is a probabilistic process to obtain two comparable groups (treatment and control), the samples used in these studies are generally not representative of the target population.

Purposive sampling: this is used when a diverse sample is necessary or the opinion of experts in a particular field is the topic of interest. This technique was used in the study by Roubille et al, in which recommendations for the treatment of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis were made based on the opinion of a group of experts. 6

Quota sampling: according to this sampling technique, the population is first classified by characteristics such as gender, age, etc. Subsequently, sampling units are selected to complete each quota. For example, in the study by Larkin et al., the combination of vemurafenib and cobimetinib versus placebo was tested in patients with locally-advanced melanoma, stage IIIC or IV, with BRAF mutation. 7 The study recruited 495 patients from 135 health centers located in several countries. In this type of study, each center has a "quota" of patients.

"Snowball" sampling : in this case, the researcher selects an initial group of individuals. Then, these participants indicate other potential members with similar characteristics to take part in the study. This is frequently used in studies investigating special populations, for example, those including illicit drugs users, as was the case of the study by Gonçalves et al, which assessed 27 users of cocaine and crack in combination with marijuana. 8

PROBABILISTIC SAMPLING

In the context of probabilistic sampling, all units of the target population have a nonzero probability to take part in the study. If all participants are equally likely to be selected in the study, equiprobabilistic sampling is being used, and the odds of being selected by the research team may be expressed by the formula: P=1/N, where P equals the probability of taking part in the study and N corresponds to the size of the target population. The main types of probabilistic sampling are described below.

Simple random sampling: in this case, we have a full list of sample units or participants (sample basis), and we randomly select individuals using a table of random numbers. An example is the study by Pimenta et al, in which the authors obtained a listing from the Health Department of all elderly enrolled in the Family Health Strategy and, by simple random sampling, selected a sample of 449 participants. 9

Systematic random sampling: in this case, participants are selected from fixed intervals previously defined from a ranked list of participants. For example, in the study of Kelbore et al, children who were assisted at the Pediatric Dermatology Service were selected to evaluate factors associated with atopic dermatitis, selecting always the second child by consulting order. 10

Stratified sampling: in this type of sampling, the target population is first divided into separate strata. Then, samples are selected within each stratum, either through simple or systematic sampling. The total number of individuals to be selected in each stratum can be fixed or proportional to the size of each stratum. Each individual may be equally likely to be selected to participate in the study. However, the fixed method usually involves the use of sampling weights in the statistical analysis (inverse of the probability of selection or 1/P). An example is the study conducted in South Australia to investigate factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in preschool children. Using the national census as the sample frame, households were randomly selected in each stratum and all children in the age group of interest identified in the selected houses were investigated. 11

Cluster sampling: in this type of probabilistic sampling, groups such as health facilities, schools, etc., are sampled. In the above-mentioned study, the selection of households is an example of cluster sampling. 11

Complex or multi-stage sampling: This probabilistic sampling method combines different strategies in the selection of the sample units. An example is the study of Duquia et al. to assess the prevalence and factors associated with the use of sunscreen in adults. The sampling process included two stages. 12 Using the 2000 Brazilian demographic census as sampling frame, all 404 census tracts from Pelotas (Southern Brazil) were listed in ascending order of family income. A sample of 120 tracts were systematically selected (first sampling stage units). In the second stage, 12 households in each of these census tract (second sampling stage units) were systematically drawn. All adult residents in these households were included in the study (third sampling stage units). All these stages have to be considered in the statistical analysis to provide correct estimates.

NONRESPONDENTS

Frequently, sample sizes are increased by 10% to compensate for potential nonresponses (refusals/losses). 1 Let us imagine that in a study to assess the prevalence of premalignant skin lesions there is a higher percentage of nonrespondents among men (10%) than among women (1%). If the highest percentage of nonresponse occurs because these men are not at home during the scheduled visits, and these participants are more likely to be exposed to the sun, the number of skin lesions will be underestimated. For this reason, it is strongly recommended to collect and describe some basic characteristics of nonrespondents (sex, age, etc.) so they can be compared to the respondents to evaluate whether the results may have been affected by this systematic error.

Often, in study protocols, refusal to participate or sign the informed consent is considered an "exclusion criteria". However, this is not correct, as these individuals are eligible for the study and need to be reported as "nonrespondents".

SAMPLING METHOD ACCORDING TO THE TYPE OF STUDY

In general, clinical trials aim to obtain a homogeneous sample which is not necessarily representative of any target population. Clinical trials often recruit those participants who are most likely to benefit from the intervention. 3 Thus, the more strict criteria for inclusion and exclusion of subjects in clinical trials often make it difficult to locate participants: after verification of the eligibility criteria, just one out of ten possible candidates will enter the study. Therefore, clinical trials usually show limitations to generalize the results to the entire population of patients with the disease, but only to those with similar characteristics to the sample included in the study. These peculiarities in clinical trials justify the necessity of conducting a multicenter and/or global studiesto accelerate the recruitment rate and to reach, in a shorter time, the number of patients required for the study. 13

In turn, in observational studies to build a solid sampling plan is important because of the great heterogeneity usually observed in the target population. Therefore, this heterogeneity has to be also reflected in the sample. A cross-sectional population-based study aiming to assess disease estimates or identify risk factors often uses complex probabilistic sampling, because the sample representativeness is crucial. However, in a case-control study, we face the challenge of selecting two different samples for the same study. One sample is formed by the cases, which are identified based on the diagnosis of the disease of interest. The other consists of controls, which need to be representative of the population that originated the cases. Improper selection of control individuals may introduce selection bias in the results. Thus, the concern with representativeness in this type of study is established based on the relationship between cases and controls (comparability).

In cohort studies, individuals are recruited based on the exposure (exposed and unexposed subjects), and they are followed over time to evaluate the occurrence of the outcome of interest. At baseline, the sample can be selected from a representative sample (population-based cohort studies) or a non-representative sample. However, in the successive follow-ups of the cohort member, study participants must be a representative sample of those included in the baseline. 14 , 15 In this type of study, losses over time may cause follow-up bias.

Researchers need to decide during the planning stage of the study if they will work with the entire target population or a sample. Working with a sample involves different steps, including sample size estimation, identification of the sample frame, and selection of the sampling method to be adopted.

Financial Support: None.

* Study performed at Faculdade Meridional - Escola de Medicina (IMED) - Passo Fundo (RS), Brazil.

IMAGES

  1. (PDF) CONCEPT OF POPULATION AND SAMPLE

    population and sampling in research proposal example

  2. Population vs Sample in Research

    population and sampling in research proposal example

  3. (PDF) A Synopsis on Population and Sample: Quantitative Research

    population and sampling in research proposal example

  4. Population vs. Sample

    population and sampling in research proposal example

  5. Population and Sample

    population and sampling in research proposal example

  6. SOLUTION: Population and sample research methodology

    population and sampling in research proposal example

VIDEO

  1. SAMPLING PROCEDURE AND SAMPLE (QUALITATIVE RESEARCH)

  2. 1.3 Populations, Samples, and Sampling Techniques (part 1)

  3. Probability Sampling

  4. population vs sample #sampling #psychology #research #ugcnet #researchprocess

  5. Research Method: Sampling Importance

  6. introduction to Population and Sampling

COMMENTS

  1. Population vs. Sample

    A population is the entire group that you want to draw conclusions about.. A sample is the specific group that you will collect data from. The size of the sample is always less than the total size of the population. In research, a population doesn't always refer to people. It can mean a group containing elements of anything you want to study, such as objects, events, organizations, countries ...

  2. PDF Describing Populations and Samples in Doctoral Student Research

    The sampling frame intersects the target population. The sam-ple and sampling frame described extends outside of the target population and population of interest as occa-sionally the sampling frame may include individuals not qualified for the study. Figure 1. The relationship between populations within research.

  3. PDF 84 CHAPTER 3 Research design, research method and population

    Non-probability sampling implies that not every element of the population has an opportunity for being included in the sample, such as convenience (accidental), quota, purposive and network sampling procedures (Burns & Grove 2001:804). The non-probability sampling procedure might have limited the generalisability of the findings. 3.5.2 Sample

  4. Research Fundamentals: Study Design, Population, and Sample Size

    design, population of interest, study setting, recruit ment, and sampling. Study Design. The study design is the use of e vidence-based. procedures, protocols, and guidelines that provide the ...

  5. PDF Research Proposal Format Example

    1. Research Proposal Format Example. Following is a general outline of the material that should be included in your project proposal. I. Title Page II. Introduction and Literature Review (Chapters 2 and 3) A. Identification of specific problem area (e.g., what is it, why it is important). B. Prevalence, scope of problem.

  6. 7 Samples and Populations

    So if you want to sample one-tenth of the population, you'd select every tenth name. In order to know the k for your study you need to know your sample size (say 1000) and the size of the population (75000). You can divide the size of the population by the sample (75000/1000), which will produce your k (750).

  7. Target Population and Sampling

    In order to achieve generalizability, a core principle of probability sampling is that all elements in the researcher's target population have an equal chance of being selected for inclusion in the study. In research, this is the principle of random selection. Random selection is a mathematical process that must meet two criteria.

  8. PDF Understanding Research Methods, Populations and Sampling

    Samples and Sampling in Research •In social science research, it is often the case that the entire population of the research is too big, and as a result beyond the scope of the researcher. •In such situations, the researcher clearly defines the population of the research, and then selects from that population a sample to study.

  9. Statistics without tears: Populations and samples

    A population is a complete set of people with a specialized set of characteristics, and a sample is a subset of the population. The usual criteria we use in defining population are geographic, for example, "the population of Uttar Pradesh". In medical research, the criteria for population may be clinical, demographic and time related.

  10. 3. Populations and samples

    Answers Chapter 3 Q3.pdf. Populations In statistics the term "population" has a slightly different meaning from the one given to it in ordinary speech. It need not refer only to people or to animate creatures - the population of Britain, for instance or the dog population of London. Statisticians also speak of a population.

  11. Population & Sample: Writing Your Participant Section (The ...

    This tutorial overviews the elements of a participants section for a quantitative research proposal.This video is part of A Guide for Developing a Quantitati...

  12. How to write a research proposal?

    A proposal needs to show how your work fits into what is already known about the topic and what new paradigm will it add to the literature, while specifying the question that the research will answer, establishing its significance, and the implications of the answer. [ 2] The proposal must be capable of convincing the evaluation committee about ...

  13. How to prepare a Research Proposal

    Sample size: The proposal should provide information and justification (basis on which the sample size is calculated) about sample size in the methodology section. 3 A larger sample size than needed to test the research hypothesis increases the cost and duration of the study and will be unethical if it exposes human subjects to any potential unnecessary risk without additional benefit.

  14. What Is the Big Deal About Populations in Research?

    A population is a complete set of people with specified characteristics, while a sample is a subset of the population. 1 In general, most people think of the defining characteristic of a population in terms of geographic location. However, in research, other characteristics will define a population.

  15. Research Population and Sampling in Quantitative Study

    Research Popula tion and Sampling in Quantitative Study. Dalowar Hossan 1*, Zuraina Dato' Mansor and Nor Siah Jaharuddin 1. 1 School of Business & Economics, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 ...

  16. How to structure the Sampling Strategy section

    A good structure involves four steps: describing, explaining, stating and justifying. You need to: (1) describe what you are studying, including the units involved in your sample and the target population; (2) explain the types of sampling technique available to you; (3) state and describe the sampling strategy you used; and (4) justify your ...

  17. PDF Understanding Population and Sample in Research: Key Concepts for Valid

    Population and sample are fundamental concepts in research that shape the validity and generalizability of study findings. In the realm of research, understanding the concepts of population and sample is paramount to unlocking a treasure trove of knowledge. The population represents the entire group of , , 5. , .

  18. (PDF) CONCEPT OF POPULATION AND SAMPLE

    • To select sampling method. • To decide method of data analysis. • To understand research ethics. • To take decision about research tool. • To prepare research proposal and research report.

  19. Research Proposal Example (PDF + Template)

    Research Proposal Example/Sample. Detailed Walkthrough + Free Proposal Template. If you're getting started crafting your research proposal and are looking for a few examples of research proposals, you've come to the right place. In this video, we walk you through two successful (approved) research proposals, one for a Master's-level ...

  20. Sampling: how to select participants in my research study?

    The essential topics related to the selection of participants for a health research are: 1) whether to work with samples or include the whole reference population in the study (census); 2) the sample basis; 3) the sampling process and 4) the potential effects nonrespondents might have on study results. We will refer to each of these aspects ...

  21. POPULATIONS AND SAMPLING

    Determining Sample Size through Power Analysis: Need to have the following data: Level of significance criterion = alpha a, use .05 for most nursing studies and your calculations: Power = 1 - b (beta); if beta is not known standard power is .80, so use this when you are determining sample size Population size effect = gamma g or its equivalent, e.g. eta squared h 2; use recommended values for ...