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Nov 7, 2022

How to email a resume with 8 samples and templates

At some point during your career you’ll need to send your resume by email. Here's how you do it.

Blog writer

Lawrie Jones

Table of contents

Are you searching for a job? Thinking of applying?

Either way, at some point, you’ll need to send your resume by email.

When sending an email with a resume attached, you’ll need to ensure your message is targeted at the right person, provides all the information you need and hits the right tone of voice. 

How to email a resume

You might be wondering, what should I write in an email when sending a resume? That's what we show you in this guide on how to email a resume.

After going over the basic principles and essential things to note about emailing a resume, you can see 8 examples of resume emails.

What to write in an email when sending a resume

For each job, US employers can expect to receive around 250 resumes . Naturally, they’re looking for reasons to discard them. Informal emails, spelling mistakes, and grammar slip-ups will see your email filed under “Junk”.

Great resume emails are simple, straightforward and easy to understand. They’re not overly funny or attempt to be friendly. But they are professional and provide a little glimpse into your personality. 

The purpose of your email is simply to give the recruiter enough information so that they are encouraged to open your resume. This isn’t a cover letter, so you don’t need to go into vast levels of detail about who you are and why you’re applying, but a short “elevator pitch” is appropriate. 

10 things to include in every resume email 

Here’s a checklist of 10 things you should write in an email when sending a resume:

  • Short introduction of yourself
  • Statement about the position you are applying for (to avoid any misunderstanding!)
  • Brief “elevator pitch” about why you should be considered for the position
  • Previous experience with similar roles or relevant results of similar jobs
  • Relevant personal information (more on this in the email format section)
  • Contact details (including preference)
  • Helpful information (such as if you’re going on holiday in the next few days, for example)
  • Offer to answer any questions that the recruiter might have (about interview dates, for example)
  • Request for information on the next steps
  • And remember to attach your cover letter and resume!

Should you send a resume by email?

The answer is 100% yes. Sure, in many cases, you can submit your resume through an online form, so why should you send your resume by email?

Firstly, it creates a personal connection between you and the recruiter. You’ve taken the initiative to email them, and that’s more effective than the anonymity of a web form. 

Secondly, you’re not constrained by character counts. That means you can go into as much detail as you wish (as we explain below, don’t overload the recruiter with too much information). 

Thirdly, establishing a dialogue through email enables you to send follow-up emails if you need to – and in many cases, you will need to. Even the best-planned recruitment processes can be hit by delays , so be prepared to send a follow-up (and use our guide to help!).

Use a professional email address for your resume

Like it or not, your email address is an integral part of your first impression and silly email addresses can harm your chances of getting a job, say the experts. It takes seconds to set up a new online email account, so why put your job search success at risk? 

Some people use their work email accounts to send out resume emails. While it’s not a no-no, it’s risky. Someone may inadvertently see the message, or 

Sending resume email format

Hiring managers and executives are busy people, so you want to keep your email short and sweet. By stripping your messages back to the basics, they’re quicker and easier to write – which means you can spend more time searching for jobs!

When sending a resume email, use a professional format like this:

  • Resume email subject line
  • Email body (following our top 10 tips for effective resume emails)

Let’s look at the critical aspects of every resume email in more detail.

1. Subject line for resume email

Your resume email is a critical part of the process. Some online guides suggest you try to be friendly or funny, but don’t. Instead, please stick to the basics, keep things simple and make it easy for anyone to understand what your email is about. 

Here are some principles for effective resume email subject lines:

  • Label your email “Job application” or “Application for”
  • Include the job title in the subject line
  • Add a reference number

Here’s how this can work in practice:

  • Job application – Marketing Director – REF000111
  • Application for Marketing Director – REF000111
  • Resume attached – Marketing Director position – REF000111

Of course, you can experiment and develop your own resume email subject lines. In some industries, the creative sector, you may be bolder. 

2. Email body for sending resume

The email body is where you go into details about who you are, what job you’re applying for, and why. We’ve detailed the critical parts in include in your email body above, but as a brief recap, every resume email should include the following:

  • Introduction to you
  • Details of the job you’re applying for (including a reference number)
  • A short explanation of why you’re applying
  • Any other information 

It sounds like a lot, but you can cover it in a few short sentences. See our resume email examples below to see how we’ve achieved this. 

3. How to end a resume email

The end of your resume email is your opportunity to offer to answer any questions and ask about the next stage in the process. 

As well as a closing statement, you should provide the essential information the recruiter might need. Always end your resume email with the following:

  • Phone number
  • Relevant social media links, like LinkedIn and Twitter
  • Attach your cover letter and resume

4. Best resume email closings and sign-offs

Resume emails aren’t about being cool but clear, polite, and professional. Go with a classic email sign-off such as “look forward to hearing from you” or “kind regards”, and avoid exciting endings and exclamation marks (“Thanks!!!”).

8 resume email samples

We’ve unpacked the basics of a great resume email. Now it’s our chance to show you how to put everything into practice with 8 resume email samples.

We’ve tried to provide sample resume emails that cover several common situations. These templates include the essential hints and tips we’ve developed. 

Templates are great ways to learn how to format messages, but be sure to adapt and update these resume emails before sending them.

1. Sample email to send resume for job

This is a standard sample email for sending a resume for a job. This is a classic template that suits all circumstances, services, and sectors.

It’s not the most exciting, but it’s quick and easy to adapt, meaning you can send more applications faster. More applications mean more chances to secure a new job.

2. Sample email to send resume to recruiter

Recruiters can include those working in job agencies, internal recruiters and HR partners.

The flow of information is the same as the standard template above, but we add more detail about essentials that recruiters will need, including start dates, notice periods, and leave.

3. Simple sample email to send resume for job

If you have already had an interview with the company and you were asked to send a resume, keep it brief and simple. Sending a resume before an interview provides some vital background information and context for the company, so it’s worth doing if you can. 

4. Sample follow-up email after sending resume

As we’ve explained, you’ll likely have to send many resumes before securing a response or an interview.

If you’re excited about a position or want to understand the next steps in the process, here’s a sample follow-up email after sending a resume that you can use.

5. Sample email cover letter with attached resume

Some recruiters and some companies will request a cover letter alongside a resume. When this is the case, you can assume the recruiter will read your cover letter, which means your email can be much shorter and more precise.

There’s no need to go into much detail about why you’re passionate about the position. See what we mean in this sample email cover letter with the attached resume.

6. Thank you for considering my resume email sample

Some job seekers stop contact when they receive a no. Others will send a thank you email for considering a resume, which can establish a relationship. Here’s a classic “thank you for considering my resume” email sample.

7. Asking someone to review your resume email sample

Writing a resume isn’t easy, and after spending days poring over the details, it’s often a good idea to get someone else to check it before you send it. So here’s a sample email asking for someone to review your resume.

8. Sample how to respond to a resume received email

If you’re a manager or recruiter, you’ll probably have to send hundreds of emails responding to resumes. Here’s a standard professional sample response that you can cut and paste.

Best email template for sending resume

You’ve read our 8 sample resume samples, but we’ve saved the ultimate email for last. Here’s the best email template for sending a resume by email. 

Final words on sending your resume via email

If you’re searching for a job, you’ll spend lots of time sending out your resume. By breaking things down into chunks, it’s easier to apply them in practice.

When you come to write your resume emails, remember to follow our top tips, be professional and provide some insight into your personality.

You’ll likely experience rejection when sending out your resume, but don’t be disheartened. Your perfect job could be an email away!

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What To Write in an Email When Sending a Resume to an Employer? (+3 Email Templates)

  • Klara Cervenanska , 
  • Updated January 12, 2024 7 min read

Have you found a job posting that asks you to submit your resume via email? Or maybe you’ve decided to approach your dream company directly. If so, you’re probably asking yourself right now — what to write in an email when sending my resume so I will stand out?

Sometimes employers provide clear instructions on what the email format should include. If that’s the case, follow the employer’s directions closely. 

But if you can’t find any instructions, don’t worry — you can follow the best practices described in this article!

Additionally, there are also 3 email templates for what to write in an email when sending a resume to an employer that you can download and edit to your liking.

Table of Contents

Click on a section to skip

3 sample emails for sending your resume to recruiters:

How to email a resume: a few tips to keep in mind before sending the email.

  • Write an effective subject line. It's the first thing they're going to see

Email body for sending a resume: Keep it crisp, yet formal

Attaching files — resume and cover letter, what should you do before sending your email, what to write in your resume email key takeaways.

Feel free to use any of these templates as your first draft.

#1 Template of an email to send with your resume

#2 template of an email to send with your resume, #3 template of an email to send with your resume.

Additionally, these 10 more job application email templates will give you the help you need at any stage of the hiring process.

Finally, if you already have a fantastic LinkedIn profile but no resume, there's no need to write your CV from scratch. You can  convert your LinkedIn profile into resume  in seconds.

Before you start writing, ask yourself this:   Who is the person you're writing to?

Try to find the hiring manager's contact details so you can address them by name. A slightly more personal approach can decrease the chance of your resume being forgotten or disposed of.

Remember that   your email address needs to be professional . Emails like julezizcoolz@yahoo may have been cool in 2005, but not anymore. Instead, create a professional email address that consists of your first and last name.

You should also consider when to email your resume. In general, you want your email to be among the first ones they receive that day. This means you should send it very early — ideally before 8am.

The same applies for days of week. The later in the week you send your email, the lower the probability that someone reviews it. This is why you should send it very early on a Monday morning.

Naturally, do not put off applying if it's a first come first serve kind of job application. 

Key takeaways:

  • Look up the hiring manager's contact details;
  • Your email address needs to be professional;
  • Send it on a Monday, ideally well before 8am;

Write an effective subject line. It's the first thing they're going to see

Sure, the subject line is just a tiny part of the whole email. However, it's also the very first thing the recruiter is going to see. That's why you want the subject line of your resume email to be absolutely spot on.

First of all, check the job posting for instructions regarding the submission. There may be a preferred subject format the company uses. If that's the case, then you need to stick to it.

However, if there are no instructions, you should stick to the standard format for subject lines :

  • Subject: ‘Job application’ – Job title, Job ID (if applicable) — Your Name
  • Example: Job application – Office Manager, Job ID #1553 — Ian Lumberjack
  • Example (with referral): Referral from John Wick: Job application – Graphic Designer, Job ID #1554  — Nina Hughes

If someone recommended you for the job, definitely make this clear in the subject line. You can add your title or qualification if you wish — but remember, keep the subject line succinct.

Start off with a formal greeting and address the hiring manager by name (preferably last name).

In the first short paragraph you should state who you are, why you are sending this email and what the email contains.

Continue the next paragraph with a short but effective introduction of your best and proudest achievements. Of course, only mention those achievements that are relevant for the job. Close this paragraph by saying what value you would bring to the company and which skills you will use to accomplish this.

In the closing paragraph you need to say that you're looking forward to hearing back from them and meeting in person. You may add a captivating call for action   but be careful not to sound rude or overly keen.

Yours faithfully (US English) or Yours sincerely  (British English).

And finally, a professional signature is a must! Remember to include your contact details.

[Your name]

[Your job title]

[Email address]

[Phone number]

[LinkedIn profile] -  optional 

Remember, you want to keep the body of the email short and succinct. Don't go in too much detail otherwise you might loose the hiring manager's attention. 

Keep in mind that you simply cannot elaborate on every accomplishment and every work experience due to limited space. The email needs to be informative and concise.

This should go without saying but, don't forget to attach your resume to the email! 

Consider whether it's relevant to also attach your cover letter . When you apply for a job in bigger companies you may actually benefit from sending your cover letter as well as your resume. Just remember not to repeat yourself too much in your email body and your cover letter.

Avoid naming the attachments generically or randomly. Names like fghjvh.pdf or resume2.pdf can make it hard for the hiring manager to find these documents later. Name your a ttachments in a way that makes them easy to find   — Name_Surname_Resume.pdf and Name_Surname_Cover_Letter.pdf

The best format for sending your resume and cover letter is .pdf or .doc. We suggest saving your documents as  PDFs , since it's a universally accepted file format, it's easy to open and will not distort the formatting of your documents.

If you’re considering sending a video resume, you should know  how to convert video to MP4 , as it’s the most common format supported across different browsers and devices.

Keep in mind that files should not be larger than 10MB. Otherwise  they might be considered suspicious.

Last but not least, before sending it out, get your resume analyzed to make sure it contains everything it should.

  • Resume and cover letter need to be sent as attachments;
  • Name your attachments in a way that makes them easy to find;
  • Save documents in the PDF format;
  • Files should not be larger than 10MB.

Before you send the email with your resume and cover letter, you should check it for any spelling or grammatical mistakes.

Having bad grammar is definitely not something you want to be remembered for. Ask a friend to proofread all your documents. It can make a big difference. 

Additionally, it may be a good idea to send yourself a test email to see whether the formatting and layout of the email is up to the expected standard.

Don't forget to test download and open your files. Check whether you've attached the right file(s).

Also, avoid using any colorful fonts, pictures or emoticons. 

We can check your resume for you.

Scan your resume for issues and see how it compares against other resumes in our database.

Sending your resume attached to a well-written email can be a very effective strategy. It can help you find a way around ATS algorithms that filter out unsuitable resumes before they can even get to an HR employee for evaluation.

So how do you write one?

  • Before you start writing the email, make sure you know who to address. Knowing the hiring manager's name will make the email feel more personal and decrease the chance of it being forgotten.
  • Your resume address should sound professional. Send your resume email early on a Monday morning for maximum effectiveness.
  • We have provided you with email templates. No matter which one you choose, remember — keep the email short, informative and professional.
  • Attach your resume and cover letter in the PDF format and name them in a way that makes them easy to find, for example  Name_Surname_Resume.pdf and Name_Surname_Cover_Letter.pdf
  • After you have written the email and attached the documents, ask someone to proofread it for you to avoid any grammar errors and typos. Lastly, send yourself a test email to check the formatting and test download the files. 

After you send in your resume, cover letter and your job application, wait for a couple of days before sending a follow up email .

Christy's word of advice

For bigger companies, your application will probably be forwarded straight to the ATS, so just a short email referencing the attached cover letter/resume is fine. An exception is if you’ve been referred to them directly, in which case, keep it formal but mention the referee’s name. For smaller companies where your application is more likely to be manually reviewed, showing a bit of personality will help you to stand out.

Christy Morgan, Resident HR Expert

Concluding thought — even if you construct the perfect email to send with your resume, you still need to make sure you have an impressive resume and cover letter.  

We've got you covered. Check out these articles to help you create the perfect resume and cover letter:

  • How to Write a Resume: The Only Resume Guide You’ll Need in 2024
  • The Only Cover Letter Guide You’ll Need in 2024 (+Examples)

When emailing your resume to a hiring manager, start with a formal greeting using their last name. In the first paragraph, briefly introduce yourself and explain the purpose of your email. Next, highlight your most relevant and proud achievements, linking them to the value you can bring to the company and the skills you'll use to achieve this. Conclude by expressing your eagerness to hear back and the hope of meeting them in person. Sign off with "Yours faithfully" (US English) or "Yours sincerely" (British English), and include a professional signature with your contact details.

When sending your resume to a hiring manager via email, the subject should always include your name and purpose, e.g. Job application – Job title — Your Name .

In your email when sending a resume with a reference, briefly introduce yourself, mention the position you're applying for, and how you came to know about it. Specifically mention your reference's name and your relationship with them . Then continue by highlighting your most relevant and proud achievements, linking them to the value you can bring to the company. Conclude by expressing your eagerness to hear back and meeting them in person. Sign off.

Klara graduated from the University of St Andrews in Scotland. After having written resumes for many of her fellow students, she began writing full-time for Kickresume. Klara is our go-to person for all things related to student or 'no experience resumes'. At the same time, she has written some of the most popular resume advice articles on this blog. Her pieces were featured in multiple CNBC articles. When she's not writing, you'll probably find her chasing dogs or people-watching while sipping on a cup of coffee.

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Emailing Your Resume: The Guide with Sample Emails for a Job

how to make resume through email

In today’s highly competitive job market, it has become increasingly important to carefully craft and strategically send your resume to prospective employers. One of the most common methods for submitting your resume is via email.

The purpose of this guide is to provide a comprehensive overview of how to effectively email your resume for job applications. From crafting the perfect subject line to attaching your resume correctly, this guide covers all of the necessary steps for submitting a successful job application via email.

Emailing your resume is an important step in the job application process as it is often the first point of contact with a potential employer. A well-crafted email can make all the difference in whether your resume is even considered for the position.

Furthermore, email is a convenient and fast way to submit your job application. It allows you to tailor your message to the specific company and job posting and can be done quickly and easily from anywhere.

This guide will provide you with the knowledge and tools to confidently email your resume for job applications and increase your chances of landing your dream job.

Preparing Your Resume for Emailing

Tailoring your resume to match job description.

When searching for a job, it is essential to tailor your resume according to the job description of the position you’re interested in. Before sending out your resume, make sure it matches the requirements listed in the job description.

how to make resume through email

The hiring manager will receive a lot of resumes, and you want yours to stand out. If your resume is showing that you’re a perfect fit for the job, it will attract the attention of the recruiter.

To match your resume with the job description, carefully read through the requirements and skills in the job description to highlight relevant skills and experiences. For example, if the potential job requires someone with project management skills, describe specific experience when managing a project.

Highlighting your qualifications and achievements relevant to the job will give you a greater chance at getting the job.

Formatting Your Resume for Email Attachment

Before attaching your resume via email, consider the formatting of your document. The aim is to make sure that the person receiving your email can quickly read your resume on their device.

Use a basic style and font to keep your resume clear and easy to read, enusre it is error-free and that it doesn’t have any weird formatting, as it can become distorted when transmitted through email.

keep the design professional and as clean as possible, to ensure that the recruiter can absorb your content quickly and keep their focus on your qualifications.

Saving Your Resume in Different Formats (PDF, Word, etc.)

After formatting your resume, make sure to save it in different formats. This enables you to provide the document in a format that suits the recruiter. Before saving the file, double-check the file name and ensure that it is labelled correctly with your name and job title.

In most cases, PDF and Word formats are the common formats, but it’s important to be aware of the specific format that the company requires to ensure your resume is properly received.

Tailoring your resume to match the job description, formatting it for email attachment, and saving it in different formats are essential techniques to get your resume into the right hands. With these tips, you’ll be one step closer to landing your dream job.

Preparing Your Email

When it comes to emailing your resume, the preparation of your email can be just as important as the content of your resume. Here are some tips on how to prepare your email effectively:

Subject Line

The subject line of your email can make or break your chances of getting noticed in the recruiter’s inbox. Make sure it’s concise and attention-grabbing. A good subject line should include your name, the position you’re applying for, and any relevant keywords. For example, “John Smith – Marketing Manager Application” would be a great subject line to use.

Recipient Information

Make sure you address your recipient appropriately. If you have the name of the recruiter, use it. If not, address the email to the relevant department, i.e. “To the Hiring Manager”. Also, ensure that the email addresses of both the recipient and yourself are accurate and professional-looking.

how to make resume through email

Message Format

When it comes to formatting the actual email, it’s important to keep things simple and professional. Use a standard font, such as Times New Roman or Arial, and stick to a 10 or 12 pt. size. Avoid using fancy colors or fonts, as they can distract from the actual message. Also, make sure your email is easy to read by breaking it up into short paragraphs and using bullet points where necessary.

Message Content

The content of your email should be brief, yet engaging. Start with a polite greeting and an opening sentence that sets the tone for the rest of the email. Introduce yourself, state the position you’re applying for, and briefly explain why you’re a good fit for the role. Use your research about the company to highlight any relevant skills or experiences you have that are particularly applicable to the position.

In addition, you should attach a copy of your resume to the email for the recruiter’s convenience. Be sure to mention in the email that you have attached your resume for their reference.

Finally, make sure to thank the recruiter for taking the time to consider your application and provide your contact information in case they need to follow up with you.

The preparation of your email is a crucial part of the job application process. A well-written message that is concise, engaging, and professional-looking, will definitely get you noticed in the recruiter’s inbox.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Emailing Your Resume

After learning how to properly format and tailor your resume for a job, it’s important to understand the do’s and don’ts of emailing your resume to a potential employer. Here are some tips that can help you make a good impression and increase your chances of getting called in for an interview:

Use a clear and professional email address.  Your email address should be straightforward and easy to read. Avoid using any personal or silly email addresses that may not portray you in a professional light.

Write a clear and concise subject line.  Your subject line should be brief and to the point, mentioning the position you’re applying for and your name. This can help your email stand out in the employer’s inbox and make their job easier when sorting through applications.

Personalize your email.  Address the recipient by name and mention in your opening statement the source of the job posting or any previous interactions you’ve had with the recipient or the company.

Attach your resume using an appropriate file name.  Name your resume file with something specific (like “JohnJohnson_Resume.pdf”), rather than something vague (like “Resume.pdf”). This makes it easier for the employer to find your application and also shows attention to detail.

Write a strong and concise email message.  Keep your email message clear and concise, highlighting your qualifications, experience, and enthusiasm for the role. Avoid any irrelevant information that may distract the employer from your main focus.

The Don’ts:

Send a generic or impersonal email.  Don’t rely on a template or send a generic email that doesn’t specifically address the employer or the job posting. This shows a lack of effort and interest in the role.

Send your resume as the body of an email.  Attach your resume as a separate file rather than pasting it into the body of an email. This can make it difficult for the employer to review and can also distort the formatting and layout of your resume.

Use slang or informal language.  Keep your email professional and avoid any slang, abbreviations, or informal language. This can make you come across as unprofessional and unprepared.

Forget to proofread your email.  Always proofread your email for any errors in grammar, spelling, or punctuation. A sloppy and careless email can leave a negative impression on the employer.

Send your email without a closing statement or action.  Always end your email with a professional closing statement, such as “Thank you for considering my application” or “I look forward to your reply.” This shows your interest and enthusiasm for the role and leaves a positive impression on the employer.

Writing a Cover Letter for an Email

When it comes to applying for a job via email, writing a cover letter is just as important as crafting a professional resume. A well-written cover letter explains your qualifications, work experience, and accomplishments, giving the hiring manager a good reason to look at your attached resume.

Purpose of a Cover Letter

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce yourself and highlight why you are the best candidate for the job. It serves as an additional opportunity to sell yourself above and beyond the resume. Your cover letter should be concise and focus on the key points of your job history that match the job requirements.

The Importance of Customizing Your Cover Letter

Customizing your cover letter is critical to your success. Hiring managers don’t want to read a generic cover letter that could be sent to any job listing. The more personalized your cover letter is, the better. Do your research and tailor your letter by addressing key points in the job listing, such as the company’s values, work culture, and specific requirements for the job.

Writing Tips for a Cover Letter

When writing your cover letter for an email, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Keep it concise and to the point. Your cover letter should be no longer than one page.
  • Address the hiring manager by name. If you can’t find their name, use their job title.
  • Explain why you’re interested in the position and what you can bring to the table.
  • Highlight your achievements and how they relate to the company’s needs.
  • Use keywords from the job listing in your cover letter to show your understanding of the specific job requirements.
  • Proofread your cover letter to avoid any typos or grammatical errors.

By following these tips, you can write a compelling cover letter that will help you stand out from the crowd and increase your chances of landing your dream job.

Example of a Cover Letter for Your Resume

When submitting your resume to a potential employer, a well-written cover letter can make all the difference. Whether you are an entry-level candidate or an experienced professional, a cover letter is your opportunity to showcase your skills, qualifications, and enthusiasm for the job. Here are two sample cover letters to help you get started:

Sample Cover Letter for Entry-level Position

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I am excited to submit my resume for the [Position Name] opening at [Company Name]. As a recent graduate of [University Name] with a degree in [Field of Study], I am eager to begin my career in [Industry Name] and believe that [Company Name] would be the perfect place to do so.

During my time at [University Name], I gained valuable experience in [Specific Skill or Task], [Specific Skill or Task], and [Specific Skill or Task]. Additionally, I was involved in [Extracurricular Activity or Volunteer Work] which helped me develop my [Soft Skill or Trait].

I am confident that my skills and qualifications, combined with my passion for [Industry Name], make me an excellent candidate for the [Position Name] role. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to hearing from you.

[Your Name]

Sample Cover Letter for Experienced Professionals

I am writing to apply for the [Position Name] opening at [Company Name]. With [Number of Years] years of experience in [Industry Name], I am confident in my ability to excel in this role and contribute to the success of [Company Name].

Throughout my career, I have developed a strong background in [Specific Skill or Task], [Specific Skill or Task], and [Specific Skill or Task]. My experience working at [Previous Company Name] and [Previous Company Name] has helped me develop strong communication, leadership, and problem-solving skills, which I believe would be valuable assets to your team.

In addition to my skills and experience, I am also highly motivated and passionate about [Industry Name]. I am excited about the opportunity to join [Company Name] and contribute to the company’s continued success.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to discussing my qualifications further.

A well-written cover letter can be an effective tool in landing your dream job. Use these sample cover letters as a guide to craft your own compelling letter that highlights your skills, experience, and enthusiasm for the position. Good luck!

Sample Emails for Job Application

When it comes to job applications, sending the right email can make all the difference. Here are two sample emails that you can use as a guide when reaching out to prospective employers.

Email Example for Job Application

Subject: Application for [Job Title] Position

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With my [Number] years of experience in [Industry], I am confident that I would be a valuable addition to your team.

In my previous role at [Previous Company], I was responsible for [Brief Description of Responsibilities]. I also have experience in [Related Skills or Qualifications], which make me a strong candidate for this position.

Please find attached my resume and cover letter for your consideration. If you require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thank you for considering my application.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Follow up Email Example

Subject: Following Up on [Job Title] Application

I hope this email finds you well. I wanted to follow up on the [Job Title] position that I applied for at [Company Name].

I am still very interested in the position and wanted to reiterate my qualifications and experience in [Industry or relevant field]. I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to join [Company Name] and believe I could make a significant contribution to your team.

I understand that you are likely receiving many applications, and I appreciate any consideration given to my application. If there is any further information I can provide to assist in the decision-making process, please let me know.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Remember that following up can often be the key to landing a job. If a few days or a week have passed since your initial application, don’t hesitate to reach out and remind the employer of your interest in the position. Always be polite and professional, and avoid crossing the line into pushiness or impatience.

Using these sample emails as a guide, you can craft effective emails that showcase your qualifications and enthusiasm for the position. Good luck with your job search!

How to Follow Up After Sending Your Resume?

As crucial as it is to submit an impressive resume for a job position, following up on its status is just as important. Many job seekers often overlook this aspect, assuming that the company will get back to them if they are shortlisted. However, following up after sending your resume increases your chances of standing out among other applicants and getting hired.

Importance of Follow-up

Following up after sending your resume shows your enthusiasm for the position and the company. It also demonstrates that you are proactive, have attention to detail, and are genuinely interested in the job. Moreover, it helps you create a positive impression and relationship with your potential employer.

Timing Your Follow-up Emails

The timing of your follow-up emails can make or break your chances for a job. It’s critical to find the right balance between not appearing pushy and not missing out on an opportunity. Generally, it’s a good idea to wait for a week or two before following up on your application. However, if you were given a specific timeline by the company or have a personal connection with someone in the organization, consider customizing your follow-up tactics accordingly.

Moreover, it’s recommended to send follow-up emails during the middle of the week, mostly on Tuesday or Wednesday. Avoid sending them on weekends or Mondays when potential employers are busy catching up on pending work from the previous week.

Sample Follow-up Emails

Here are some sample follow-up emails you can use after sending your resume:

I hope this email finds you in good health and high spirits. I recently submitted my job application for the opening at [Company Name], and I wanted to follow up on its status.

I’m excited about the opportunity to contribute my skills and experience to [Company Name] and join the team. Please let me know if there’s any additional information I can provide or if you need more time to review my application.

Best regards,

I hope you’re doing well. I wanted to follow up on my job application for the [Position] role at [Company Name]. It’s been a week since I applied, and I’m enthusiastic about the chance to join the team at [Company Name].

Please let me know if there’s any additional information I can provide, or if you require further clarification to move forward with the process.

Following up after sending your resume can help you stand out among other applicants and increase your chances of getting hired. By timing your follow-up emails appropriately and using sample emails as a reference, you can impress potential employers and set yourself up for success in your job search.

Email Scams Targeting Job Seekers

As a job seeker, you need to be aware of email scams that could cause damage to your personal and financial well-being. Scammers are constantly coming up with new tactics to lure unsuspecting victims, and you need to be on the lookout for the red flags that indicate an email may be fraudulent.

Red Flags to Watch Out For

Unsolicited Emails: If you receive an email from a company or recruiter you’ve never heard of, be cautious. Legitimate companies usually do not send unsolicited emails to job seekers.

Suspicious Email Addresses: Scammers often use email addresses that look like real companies’ email addresses but contain slight variations or misspellings. Always verify that the email address is legitimate by checking the company’s website or contacting them directly.

Poor Grammar and Spelling: Many fraudulent emails contain poor grammar and spelling errors. Legitimate companies usually take the time to proofread their emails to ensure that they are professional and polished.

Request for Personal Information: If an email requests personal information like your social security number or bank account information, be suspicious. Legitimate companies do not request this information via email.

How to Avoid Email Scams

Use a Professional Email Address: Create a professional email address that includes your name. Avoid using email addresses with nicknames or inappropriate words.

Research before Responding: Before responding to an email, research the company and recruiter to verify their legitimacy. Check the company’s website, social media presence, and LinkedIn profiles to ensure that they are legitimate.

Verify Email Addresses: Always verify the email address by checking the sender’s name, domain, and suffix. Fraudulent emails often contain email addresses that look like the real thing but contain small variations or misspellings.

Never Pay for Job Opportunities: Legitimate companies do not require job seekers to pay for job opportunities, training, or certifications. If a recruiter requests payment, it’s likely a scam.

Trust Your Instincts: If an email seems too good to be true or makes you uncomfortable, trust your instincts and delete it. Never provide personal information or respond to an email that seems suspicious.

Email scams targeting job seekers are a real threat, but they can be easily avoided by staying vigilant and following these simple guidelines. Always remember that a legitimate employer or recruiter will not ask for personal information, require payment, or send emails from suspicious email addresses. With these tips, you can protect yourself from email scams and focus on finding the job of your dreams.

Email Etiquette

Email communication is an essential tool in today’s workplace, and knowing how to communicate professionally through email is crucial, especially when sending job applications. In this section, we will provide you with tips on professional email etiquette and common email etiquette mistakes to avoid.

Tips for Professional Email Etiquette

When sending a job application or any professional email, keep in mind the following tips to ensure you portray yourself as a professional and increase your chances of success:

1. Use a Professional Email Address

Your email address should sound professional, preferably your name or your name and surname. Do not use email addresses such as partygirl.

2. Use a Clear and Concise Subject Line

Make sure your subject line clearly indicates the purpose of your email. Use keywords that are relevant to the topic or job application, such as “Job Application: [Position Title]” or “Meeting Request: [Date and Time].”

3. Begin with a Polite Greeting

Start your email with a professional greeting, such as “Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name]” or “Hello [Recipient’s Name].” Avoid informal greetings like “Hey” or “Hiya.”

4. Use a Professional Tone and Language

Maintain a professional tone throughout your email. Use proper grammar, punctuation, and complete sentences. Avoid using slang, abbreviations, or excessive exclamation points, as they can come across as unprofessional.

5. Keep the Email Short and to the Point

Be concise in your email’s body and get straight to the point. Avoid lengthy paragraphs and unnecessary details. Use bullet points or numbered lists for clarity if necessary.

6. Use Proper Email Formatting

Ensure your email is well-formatted and easy to read. Use proper spacing between paragraphs, keep the font size legible, and use a professional font type like Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman. Avoid using fancy fonts or colorful backgrounds that may distract the reader.

7. Double-Check for Errors

Before hitting the send button, proofread your email for any spelling or grammatical errors. Typos can create a negative impression, so take the time to review your email carefully.

8. Use a Professional Email Signature

Include a professional email signature at the end of your email. It should include your full name, contact information, and any relevant links, such as your LinkedIn profile or personal website. This adds a touch of professionalism and makes it easier for the recipient to contact you.

Common Email Etiquette Mistakes to Avoid

While following the above tips, it’s also important to be aware of common email etiquette mistakes to avoid:

1. Sending Emails with Typos or Grammatical Errors

Poorly written emails can give the impression of carelessness or lack of attention to detail. Always proofread your emails before sending them.

2. Using Informal Language or Abbreviations

Using informal language, slang, or abbreviations can make your email appear unprofessional. Stick to proper language and avoid shortcuts or acronyms.

3. Writing Lengthy and Rambling Emails

Keep your emails concise and focused. Long, rambling emails can be overwhelming and may not receive the attention they deserve. Stick to the main points and be respectful of the recipient’s time.

4. Not Responding in a Timely Manner

Promptly respond to emails, especially when it comes to job applications or professional inquiries. Delayed responses can give the impression of disinterest or lack of professionalism.

5. Forgetting to Attach Relevant Documents

If you mention attachments in your email, double-check that you have actually attached them before sending. Forgetting to attach important documents can be seen as careless or unprepared.

Remember, your email communication reflects your professionalism and attention to detail. By following these email etiquette tips and avoiding common mistakes, you can make a positive impression and enhance your chances of success in the professional world.

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7 Examples: How to Email a Resume to an Employer

By Status.net Editorial Team on November 9, 2023 — 11 minutes to read

Understanding the Resume Email Process

First, let’s go over the basics to ensure that your email gets the attention it deserves.

Subject Line

A clear and concise subject line is vital. It’s the first thing the recipient will see, so make it count. Include your full name and the position you’re applying for. For example: Marketing Manager Application – Jane Smith

Email Address

Double-check that you have the correct email address for the potential employer. Little mistakes like this can make a big difference. If you’re unsure, give the company a call and ask for the correct contact information.

Start your email with a professional greeting. If you know the recipient’s name, use it. If not, a simple “Dear Hiring Manager” will suffice.

The body of your email should be concise and to the point. In just a few sentences, mention the position you’re applying for and explain why you’d be a good fit for the role. List a few key skills or achievements that make you stand out from other candidates.

Example 1 I’m excited to apply for the Marketing Manager position at (…) Company. With over five years of experience in digital marketing and a proven track record of increasing sales, I’m confident that my skills and passion for creating engaging content make me the right candidate for this position.

Attachments

Before sending, double-check that you have attached both your resume and any other required documents (e.g., cover letter, portfolio, etc.). Make sure to send them in a format that is compatible with the recipient’s software (usually PDF or Word).

End your email with a polite closing and your full name. You can also include your phone number and email address, making it easier for the employer to contact you. For example: Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity to further discuss my candidacy. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions.

Best regards, (Name)

Creating a Strong Subject Line

  • When you’re sending a resume to an employer, the subject line of your email plays a vital role in capturing their attention. Pick a clear and concise subject line that introduces your purpose, highlights your qualifications, or refers to the specific job opening.
  • For instance, you can combine your name and job title along with the job position you’re applying for, like this: “Jane Doe – Marketing Specialist Applying for Marketing Manager Position” . Another alternative is to mention your most impressive skills or accomplishments, such as “Certified Project Manager Seeking a New Opportunity” .
  • Avoid generic phrases such as “Applying for Job” or “Resume Submission” . These may get lost amid the employer’s numerous emails or convey a lack of effort on your part. Also, steer clear of all-uppercase subject lines as those might appear unprofessional and could be mistaken for spam.
  • Tailor your subject line to the company and position you’re targeting. If the job posting includes a specific reference number or job code, make sure to include that in your subject line. This will help your email get noticed and sorted correctly by the hiring team or applicant tracking system. For example, “John Smith – Graphic Designer – Job Code #12345” .

Introduction

When sending your resume via email, it’s important to make the email body stand out. This is the first thing the employer will read, so be sure to create a lasting impression. Use a friendly and professional tone to engage the reader, while maintaining clarity and conciseness.

Begin with a clear and well-structured subject line. Include the job title you are applying for and your name, for example: “Marketing Specialist – Jane Doe.” This will help the employer quickly identify your email’s purpose.

In the email body, start by addressing the recipient by their name, if known, or use a polite and respectful greeting, such as “Dear Hiring Manager.” Next, introduce yourself and briefly explain your intention in applying for the position. Connect your skills and experiences to the job requirements to show how you are a great fit for the role. Don’t forget to mention where you found the job posting, especially if it was a referral from a mutual connection.

Dear [Name],

I hope this finds you well. My name is [Your Name], and I am writing to apply for the Marketing Specialist position advertised on your company’s career page. With over 5 years of experience in digital marketing and a proven track record in increasing brand visibility, I am excited about the opportunity to bring my expertise to your team. I was referred to this position by John Brown, a current Marketing Specialist at your company, who recommended that I submit my resume.

Closing Remarks

To wrap up your email, express your enthusiasm for the potential opportunity and thank the recipient for considering your application. Let the employer know that you have attached your resume and any other requested documents to the email. Provide your contact information and invite them to reach out if they have any questions or require more information.

End your email with a professional closing, followed by your full name and email signature.

Thank you for taking the time to review my application. I am confident that my skills and experiences make me a strong candidate for the Marketing Specialist position. I have attached my resume for your review and am available to discuss my qualifications further at your convenience. Please don’t hesitate to reach me by phone at (555) 123-4567 or by email at [email protected].

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Attaching the Resume Right

Before hitting the send button, ensure that you attach your resume. There are a few things you should keep in mind when sending your resume to a potential employer.

  • Choose the Right Format: Save your resume in either a PDF or Word document format. PDF is preferred as it preserves the formatting and can be opened on any device without compatibility issues.

Example: FirstName_LastName_Resume.pdf

  • Properly Name the File: Use your full name and the word “Resume” for easy identification. Adding the targeted job title can also help make your email stand out to the hiring manager.

Example: Jane_Doe_Marketing_Resume.pdf

When composing the email, the subject line and content are essential for making a good impression. Here’s how you can approach it:

  • Subject Line: A clear and professional subject line is vital. Mention relevant context such as the job title, any reference or job number mentioned in the job posting, and your full name.

Example: Application for Marketing Specialist – Jane Doe (Job ID# 12345)

  • Email Content: Start with a friendly greeting addressing the recipient by name (e.g., “Dear Mr. Smith” or “Hi Sandra”). If you don’t know their name, a simple “Hello” can suffice. In the message body, briefly introduce yourself and mention the position you are applying for. Include how you found the job posting and why you feel you are an excellent candidate for the position.

Hello Steve,

My name is (…), and I am applying for the Marketing Specialist position I found on LinkedIn. With my five years of experience in digital marketing and proven track record in driving engagement and sales, I believe I would be a great fit for the role.

Please find my resume attached for your review. I am excited about the prospect of working for X Company and contributing to its growth.

I look forward to discussing my qualifications with you further. Thank you for considering my application.

Best regards,

[Name] [email protected] (123) 456-7890

Reviewing Before Sending

Before sending your email with the resume attached, double-check everything. Make sure your email address looks professional, ideally using your first and last name.

When writing the subject line , mention the job title and your name. For example: “Marketing Manager – John Doe”. The subject line will help your potential employer instantly recognize the purpose of your email.

Now, let’s focus on the email body . Start with a polite salutation, addressing the recipient by their name, if possible. For example: “Dear Mr. Smith,”. If you’re unsure of their name, you may use: “Dear Hiring Manager,”.

In the email body, briefly introduce yourself and express your interest in the position. Mention the job title, how you found it, and why you would be a great fit. Here’s an example:

“My name is (…), and I am reaching out to apply for the Marketing Manager position I found on LinkedIn. With over 5 years of experience in digital marketing, and a proven track record of campaign success, I believe I am a strong candidate for this role.”

Remember to attach your resume to the email, and briefly describe it in the email body. For example:

“Please find attached my resume, which highlights my relevant qualifications and work history.”

A compelling closing statement can leave a lasting impression. Express your appreciation for their time and consideration, and provide your contact information. For example:

“Thank you for considering my application. I’m excited about the opportunity to contribute to your team. Please feel free to contact me at [email protected] or (555) 123-4567 to discuss further. I look forward to hearing from you.”

Lastly, use a professional closing, such as “Sincerely,” “Best regards,” or “Kind regards,” followed by your full name. Ensure your email is free of typos, grammatical errors, and maintain a polite tone throughout. Double-check everything before hitting send, as it can significantly impact your chances of landing an interview.

Example of a Well-Written Resume Email

When you’re ready to email your resume to a potential employer, it’s important to craft an impactful message that highlights your strengths and conveys your professionalism. Below is a simple yet effective example of a well-written resume email:

Subject: Marketing Coordinator Application – [Your Name] Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name], I hope this email finds you well. I came across the Marketing Coordinator position at X Company listed on [Job Posting Website], and I believe my background in digital marketing and project management makes me an ideal candidate for this role. I have attached my resume for your review. In my previous role as a Digital Marketing Specialist at ABC Company, I achieved a 20% increase in website traffic and 15% growth in social media engagement over 12 months. I’m confident that my experience and skills can contribute significantly to the growth of X Company’s online presence. I am excited about the opportunity to join your team and collaborate on innovative marketing strategies. I would appreciate the chance to discuss my qualifications further and learn more about the Marketing Coordinator position. Please let me know if there is any additional information I can provide or if we could schedule a time to connect. Thank you for considering my application, and I look forward to the possibility of working together. Best regards, [Name] [Phone Number] [Email Address] [LinkedIn Profile URL]   Example 6 Dear Mr. Johnson, I hope this email finds you well. My name is Jane Smith, and I am very interested in the Project Manager position at (…) Company. Please find attached my resume and cover letter for your review. I believe my experience and skills make me a strong candidate for this role, and I would be thrilled to contribute to your team’s success. Thank you for taking the time to review my application. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further. Warm regards, [Name]

What is an example of an email when sending a resume with a reference?

When sending a resume with a reference, mention the reference in the body of the email and include their name, title, and your relationship.

Dear Ms. Thompson,

I hope this email finds you well. My name is [Name], and I am writing to express my interest in the Senior Accountant position at your company. Your colleague, Jane Smith, suggested that I apply for this position, as she believes my skills and experience would be a good fit for your team.

Please find attached my resume and cover letter for your review. I am excited about the opportunity to work at X Company, and I am confident that my background in accounting will make me a valuable asset to your team.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of discussing my qualifications further.

Kind regards,

This example demonstrates a clear, concise message that clearly conveys the candidate’s enthusiasm and qualifications for the role.

Frequently Asked Questions

What’s a good subject line for sending a resume.

A good subject line is clear, concise, and professional. Include the job title, your name, and any relevant information like a job reference number. For example: “Marketing Manager – Jane Doe (Job Ref #12345)”.

What should the body of an email include when sending a resume?

The body of the email should include a brief introduction, the purpose of the email, a mention of the attached resume, and a closing statement. Start by greeting the recipient professionally, then introduce yourself and express your interest in the job. Explain that you are attaching your resume and any other required documents. Finally, thank the recipient for their time and consideration.

How do I politely submit my resume via email?

To politely submit your resume, start by writing a professional and courteous email. Address the recipient by their name, if possible. In the email, briefly introduce yourself, explain the purpose of the email, and mention the attached resume. For example: “Dear Mr. Smith, I hope this email finds you well. I am writing to express my interest in the Sales Associate position at ABC Company. Please find my resume attached for your review. Thank you for considering my application.”

Can I send my resume using Gmail or other email providers?

Yes, you can send your resume using Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook, or any other email provider that allows you to attach files. Ensure you are using a professional email address, preferably one with your first and last name.

How do I send a resume through my phone?

To send a resume through your phone, you can use your email app to compose a new email, attach your resume file, and send it to the recipient. Some email apps also allow you to save email drafts, so you can compose the email on your phone and send it from a computer later.

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How to Email a Resume with Subject Line Examples

Quick Navigation:

What is a subject line?

How to email a resume, email resume with subject line template, email resume with subject line examples, tips for creating a resume subject line.

As a lot of organizations have moved the hiring process entirely to the internet, job applications and resumes are often requested via email. A potential employer may also request that you submit your cover letter and any additional documents by email. The subject line is an important part of the online application process as it is the first thing that the potential employer will view. This article discusses the necessary parts of the subject line and provides a few examples that you can use when drafting your own.

The subject line is the identifier portion of your email. The subject line should be short and concise so employers can read it while scanning through their inbox. The purpose of the subject line is to notify the reader what they can expect if they open the email. The contents of the subject line can either encourage the reader to open or delete the email. You might find that some employers request a specific subject line when submitting a resume via email. However, if they don’t, then it is up to you to create one that accurately describes the contents of your application while also encouraging the hiring manager to review your cover letter and resume.

During your career search, it is possible that you will come across employers who request that you email them your resume. 

You can email a resume with the following steps:

1. First, read the requirements of the application process

Some employers will list specific instructions. They might request that you submit your resume to a specific email address. They might also have other requests depending on the position, like including writing samples, stating your expected pay or addressing the email to a certain hiring manager. Evaluating these requirements before drafting your email will ensure that you meet all requests while also demonstrating your ability to follow directions.

2. Next, attach your resume

Most employers will request that you attach your resume to the email rather than include it in the body of the email. It is a good idea to save your resume on your computer in a way that is easy to identify. Include your last name and the name of the position. This will also help the hiring manager keep track of your resume. Make sure you save it in a recognizable format that can be opened on most computer programs, such as a PDF.

3. Then, write a cover letter

A cover letter is an important part of the application process, even when applying via email. The body portion of the email is the perfect place to draft your cover letter. Draft a new cover letter with each position and include the experience and skills that best relate to the position for which you’re applying.

4. Last, write your subject line

Before sending the email, you will want to draft your subject line. This is your chance to stand out from other applicants. Consider highlighting your intent in a concise and professional manner. Use words and titles that were also in the job description and call attention to any skills or achievements that will make you stand out.

You can draft your own subject line using the following template as a guide:

Subject: (Descriptive verb) (career) (actions) (position) (company)

  • Descriptive verb.  In this template, you are using a powerful verb to call out a specific skill or achievement. You might use descriptive words like award-winning, certified, experienced or dedicated.
  • Career.  Following the description, include information about the industry in which you want to work. You might include titles like nurse, teaching professional, receptionist or sales representative. Paired with the descriptive verb, you can highlight this position.
  • Action.  An actionable verb will connect your career title with your intended position. Here, you might use words like seeks, pursues, looking for, or inquiring about.
  • Position.  This is the formal name of the position that you are applying for. You can refer to the position in the same way that the job description does. This is also where you might include the job listing number, if there is one. This assists the hiring manager in keeping multiple job listings organized.
  • Company.  It can be useful to include the name of the company.

Here are a few examples of email subject lines using the above template:

  • Award-winning author seeks editor position with Delta Publishing
  • Registered nurse looking for emergency room employment with Jackson Hospital – ID #1234
  • Certified physical therapist seeking rehabilitation position with Beckton Therapy
  • Multilingual teacher pursuing language position with Dallas Institute

Keep these tips in mind as you draft your own email resume subject line:

  • Always include a subject line.  Employers can easily ignore emails without subject lines. The hiring manager may not notice the email in their inbox or they might assume that it is spam and delete it.
  • Keep it professional.  Similar to the cover letter, the subject line should always be professional. Use professional and formal language when drafting your subject line.
  • Be concise.  You only get so many characters until the subject line will appear cut off. Additionally, subject lines that are too long may be considered spam. It is best to keep it at 60 characters or less. It is important to be as descriptive as possible, while keeping the subject line concise. Include relevant details like the job title, as well as a few details that highlight your purpose.
  • Proofread.  The hiring manager’s first impression of you will be the subject line. Always proofread and edit your subject line until it is free of errors.
  • Use a professional email address.  You will also want to make sure that you are sending your resume from your professional email address. Hiring managers may not open emails from email addresses that do not appear professional.

How to Email a Resume to Your Employer With 7 Templates

  • Last Updated June 26, 2024

How to Email a Resume to Your Employer With 7 Templates

It’s a competitive job market across every industry. Spending hours to create an impressive resume is only half the battle. The other half is ensuring it lands in the hands of your potential employer in the most effective and professional manner. 

Imagine spending countless hours perfecting your resume, only for it to be overlooked due to a poorly crafted email. Heartbreaking, isn’t it? The initial email acts as a first impression, and just like an in-person meeting, you only get one shot at it. 

Even more importantly, employers value communication skills. The way you structure your email, your choice of words, and your overall tone give the employer a sneak peek into how you communicate. So, how do you nail it?

In this article, we will teach you how to write an email for sending your resume and ensure your resume gets the attention it truly deserves. We’ve also included 7 email samples and templates pertaining to ways and scenarios for emailing your resume.

So, let’s get started. 

How to email a resume: What to include in your resume email and how to format it

Emailing a resume isn’t as straightforward as simply introducing yourself in an email , attaching a file, and hitting the ‘send’ button. You need to give it the same attention and ensure it is impeccable as you did with your resume. 

There’s a strategy involved to ensure your email isn’t just seen but also resonates with the hiring manager or recruiter . So, we will start by discussing the essentials of what you should include in your resume email and show you how to format it.

What to write in an email when sending a resume

Here is what you need to include in your email as you send the resume. 

1. Express interest with a statement about the target position

Begin by stating which position you’re applying for. This immediately tells the recruiter or hiring manager what to expect from the email and sets a clear context. And while you’re at it, don’t just tell, express interest. Show that you want the job and that you care. 

Example: “I am writing to express interest in the Marketing Manager position at XYZ Company…”

2. Write an elevator pitch

It is a short, 30-second snippet about yourself, your qualifications, and what makes you the right fit for the job. It’s your chance to grab their attention right from the start and establish a difference with the competition. Think of this as selling yourself to the recruiter , your sales pitch, if you will.

Example: “I have over five years of experience  in digital marketing, and having successfully increased online conversions by 30% at my last role, I am excited about bringing my innovative strategies to a forward-thinking company like XYZ.”

3. Highlight relevant experience with similar roles or relevant results of similar jobs

Draw parallels between your past experiences and the role you’re applying for. Describe how your past has prepared you to handle the job with excellence. This section makes it easier for the recruiter to visualize you in the role, and they can immediately tell whether you’re fit for it. 

Example: “In my previous role as an Assistant Marketing Manager at ABC Corp, I spearheaded several social media outreach campaigns that led to a 20% rise in social media engagement and 50% brand recall.”

4. Point out that you’ve attached your resume (and cover letter, if applicable)

This might seem obvious, but it’s a courteous reminder that directs the employer to look for the attached documents. It is the main reason you are reaching out to them, and you want to make sure they don’t miss it. 

Example: “I have attached my resume and a cover letter for your perusal.”

Here are a few things you need to keep in mind for this:

  • File names to send resume: Rename your files to be clear and professional (e.g., “JohnDoe_Resume.pdf” or “JaneSmith_CoverLetter.docx”).
  • File formats: PDF is often preferred because it preserves formatting. Ensure the employer has not specified a different format.
  • Cover letter: If the job description asks for a cover letter, or if you believe it will enhance your application, attach one. Some candidates even choose to paste their cover letter into the body of the email.

5. Offer to answer any questions that the recruiter might have (about interview dates, for example)

The idea here is for you to show your openness and indicate that you’re available for any follow-up or clarification as you email your resume to an employer. 

Example: “Should you have any questions or require further details, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I am also flexible for an interview at a time that’s convenient for you.”

6. Add your contact details and other relevant or helpful information

While your resume will have your contact details, writing them in the email ensures they’re easily accessible. This could include your phone number, your professional email address, your LinkedIn profile, or even a personal website if relevant.

Example: “You can reach me directly at (555) 123-4567 or via LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/yourname.”

7. Request information on the next steps

Show eagerness and interest in moving forward in the recruitment process. You can make this your call to action, and it’ll entice them to give you a response as you wait — paving the way for further communication. 

Example: “I would appreciate the opportunity to learn more about the selection process and any next steps that might be coming up.”

Resume email format

We’ve covered the information your email must contain to be effective. Now, you need to know how to structure it in an email. As you can tell, the email you send here needs to be professional and use a formal tone. So, the format needs to be that of a formal email with:

  • A clear subject line
  • An email body
  • A professional email closing

1. Subject line: How to write the subject line of an email when sending a resume 

Your subject line is the first thing the recruiter sees. You are emailing them for a clear and simple reason. So make sure the subject line tells them what that reason is. It should be clear, to the point, and relevant to the job application. Here are some tips:

  • Mention the job title.
  • If there’s a job reference number, include it.
  • Personalize it if you know the recruiter’s name.
  • “Application for content writer position – [your full name]”
  • “Job application (#12345): [your full name] for sales manager role”
  • “Referral from [referrer’s name]: [your full name]’s application for project manager”

2. Email body: How to write the body of a resume email

Your email body is where you give a brief introduction about yourself and explain why you’re a good fit for the job. This is where all the resume email essentials we discussed earlier go. It’s a more concise version of your cover letter. Here is how you write it with perfection:

  • Start with a professional email greeting . If you know the hiring manager’s name, use it. If not, “Dear Hiring Manager” is a safe bet.
  • Briefly introduce yourself and express interest with a statement about the target position in the email opening line .
  • Show you’re a fit and sell yourself with an elevator pitch.
  • Highlight relevant experience with similar roles or relevant results of similar jobs
  • Mention that you’ve attached your resume (and cover letter, if applicable)
  • Show your openness by offering to answer any questions the recruiter might have (about interview dates, for example)
  • Add your contact details and other relevant or helpful information
  • Request for information on the next steps

3. Email closing: How to end an email sending a resume

The closing of your email should be professional and courteous. It’s also an opportunity to express gratitude and show enthusiasm for the next steps. Here are the components of an effective email closing when sending a resume:

  • Gratitude-driven closing line
  • Professional sign-off: Use professional sign-offs like “Sincerely”, “Best regards”, or “Kindly”.
  • Professional signature: Create an email signature that encompasses your full name and ways to get in contact with you. 

7 email sample for sending your resume for a job

Let’s explore three types of emails you might send during the job application process, each serving a unique purpose.

1. Sample email for sending a resume

This is basically an initial email to a prospective employer, and it serves as your digital handshake, setting you up for all further interactions. This introductory outreach email must strike a balance between showcasing your qualifications and expressing genuine interest in the role. 

Research the company and the role you’re applying for. By understanding the organization’s overarching goals and needs and how you fit in, you can tailor your email content to resonate more effectively with the hiring manager. Here is a resume email sample you can use:

Subject line: Graphic designer application – [your full name]

Dear [hiring manager’s name], My name is [your full name]. I am writing to express interest in the Graphic Designer position at [company name] that was advertised on [job board/company website]. My [x years] of experience in design positions me as an ideal candidate for this role. In my previous job at [previous company], I was responsible for [brief elevator pitch of accomplishments, skills, or duties that align with the new role]. I invite you to review my attached resume for more detailed information on my background and skill set. If you have any questions about my application or would like to discuss the role further, please feel free to contact me. Thank you for considering my application. Could you kindly provide information on the next steps in the hiring process? Best regards, [your full name] [your signature]

2. Sample email for sending your resume for a position you’ve been referred to

Referral emails harness the power of professional relationships. When someone vouches for your skills, it adds a layer of trust to your application. When writing this email, make sure to acknowledge the referring individual early on, as this connection may impact the hiring manager’s decision. 

Display gratitude for the referral and ensure that your message underscores the synergies between your experience and the role’s requirements. Here is an email sample you can emulate:

Subject line: Referral from [referrer’s name]: sales executive position

Dear [hiring manager’s name], Greetings! I am reaching out to apply for the Sales Executive role at [company name], a position I learned of through a referral from [referrer’s name]. I have a proven track record of increasing sales by [x%] in my last role at [previous company]. My experiences make me an excellent fit for this opportunity, as illustrated further in my attached resume. I am open to any questions you might have and would be happy to discuss the role and my qualifications further.  Thank you for your time and consideration. What would be the next steps in the selection process? Sincerely, [your full name] [your signature]

3. Sample follow-up email after sending your resume

See this email as a gentle nudge, a reminder of your enthusiasm for the role. That means your email shouldn’t come across as impatient but rather as a testament to your eagerness. 

The email should reiterate key points from your initial email and highlight your continuous interest in the position. 

Also, understand that timing is crucial—too soon, and you might appear desperate; too late, and the opportunity might have passed. Here is an email sample for this:

Subject line: Follow-up: [your full name]’s application for data analyst position

Dear [hiring manager’s name], I wanted to follow up on my application for the Data Analyst position at [company name], which I submitted on [Date]. As previously mentioned, I have a deep interest in joining your team and contributing my analytical skills to your esteemed projects. I invite you to review my resume for additional details on my qualifications. If you have any further questions or require more information, please don’t hesitate to reach out.  Thank you again for your time and consideration. May I inquire about the next steps in the application process? Kind regards, [your full name] [your signature]

4. Sample email cover letter with attached resume

An email cover letter with an attached resume is a concise version of a traditional cover letter. When you’re sending your resume via email , the cover letter content can be inserted in the body of the email itself, serving as an introduction to the attached resume. 

It should capture your qualifications and enthusiasm for the job while prompting the recruiter to view the attached document. Here is a sample email template you can use for this:

Subject line: Marketing specialist application – [your full name]

Dear [hiring manager’s name], I am writing to apply for the Marketing Specialist position at [company name]. With over [x years] of experience in [specific skill], I believe I am a perfect fit for this role. My attached resume provides detailed insights into my achievements and skills. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of contributing to your team. Warm regards, [your full name] [your signature]

5. Sample email for sending your resume for internship applications

When sending an email for an internship application, what will make you succeed is your passion for the field, your eagerness to learn, and how the internship aligns with your educational journey. This initial outreach sets the tone for your potential internship experience.

Here is an email sample you can use to write this effectively: 

Subject line: Internship Application for [department/role]

Dear [hiring manager’s Name], I am [your full name]. I am reaching out to express my interest in the [specific internship role] at [company name]. I am a [your major] major at [your university], and I believe this internship will provide experience aligning with my academic pursuits. Please find my resume attached. Thank you for considering my application. I am enthusiastic about learning and contributing to your team. Best, [your full name] [your university email address]

6. Sample email for expressing gratitude after sending resume

An email expressing gratitude after sending a resume can be a courteous way to reinforce your interest in the position and appreciate the recruiter’s time. This email should be succinct, showing gratitude while subtly reminding them of your application.

Here is a sample you can use:

Subject line: [your full name]’s application for [job role]

Dear [hiring manager’s name], I wanted to extend my gratitude for considering my application for the [specific role] at [company name]. I genuinely appreciate the time you invest in the hiring process and remain enthusiastic about the opportunity to join your team. Warm regards, [your full name] [your phone number]

7. Sample email for asking someone to review your resume

When seeking feedback on your resume, approach the person politely, stating why you value their perspective. This email should convey respect for the individual’s time and expertise, making it more likely they’ll assist. Here is an email template for this:

Subject line: Resume review request

Hello [person’s name], I hope this finds you well. As I embark on my job search, I am hoping to refine my resume and would immensely value your expertise and feedback.  Given your experience in [specific field or role], your insights would be invaluable. If you have some time, would you mind reviewing my attached resume? Thank you so much for considering my request. I genuinely appreciate your time and guidance. Best wishes, [your full name] [your signature]

Key takeaways

  • When it comes to emailing your resume, always consider the email the email body a concise version of a cover letter. Start with a professional greeting, introduce yourself briefly, express your interest in the position, highlight relevant experiences, and always mention any attached documents like your resume or cover letter.
  • Ensure that your resume (and cover letter, if applicable per the job posting) is attached to the email. It’s recommended to send them as PDFs to preserve formatting. Also, name your files professionally, ideally using your name and the document type (e.g., “JohnDoe_Resume.pdf”).
  • Your email address , tone, and content should all exude professionalism. It’s best to use an email address that incorporates your name rather than nicknames or unrelated phrases. Your tone should be respectful and formal, avoiding slang or overly casual expressions.
  • Need help with email marketing and lead generation ? We are ready to help. Nerdy Joe can help you get stellar results from our sophisticated email marketing efforts. Talk with us today. 

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How to Email a Resume to an Employer

how to make resume through email

How to Send a Resume to an Employer

How to send an email cover letter, include an introduction in your email, review a sample email message, tips for emailing a resume, frequently asked questions (faqs).

Emily Roberts / The Balance

Do you need to email a resume to apply for a job? If so, you might find yourself confused about the best way to do it. Should you send your cover letter and resume as attachments or include them in the body of the email?

Most importantly, always follow the employer’s instructions on how to submit your job materials. The job posting should give you detailed information on how you are expected to apply. You may be asked to upload your resume online or to email it. 

Here are step-by-step instructions for emailing your resume to apply for a job, including creating and formatting plain text resumes and sending PDF files or Word documents as attachments.

Key Takeaways

  • Always follow the employer’s instructions. They should indicate whether to paste your resume into the body of the email or send it as an attachment (and what file type to use in that case, e.g., a Word document or PDF).
  • Choose the right file name. The best file names include your name and do not include version numbers, which might make it seem as if you’re not invested in this particular job.
  • Proofread and test before sending. Make sure your email is professionally formatted and typo-free before you hit send.

If you’re asked to send your resume via email, you may be advised on what format you should use for it, what to include in the subject line of the email, and the deadline by which the employer needs to receive it.

For example, the employer may request that you upload or email your document(s) as a PDF file or a Microsoft Word document. When you email a resume or cover letter, you will typically be asked to add them to the message as attachments.

The first rule of thumb when emailing a resume is to do exactly what the job listing states. If the listing asks you to send your resume in a particular format or asks you to save your resume under a specific name, be sure to do so. 

Employers are less likely to consider job applications that do not follow submission instructions exactly.

Use a Clear Subject Line

The  subject line  is the first thing the employer will see when deciding whether or not to open your message. Make sure your subject line clearly states the purpose of the message so that the employer does not mistake it for spam or otherwise overlook it. The subject line should include the job title and your name and should be edited for spelling errors. Here are some examples:

  • Customer Service Representative – Your Name
  • Administrative Assistant Resume – Your Name
  • Communications Director Position – Your Name

Keep It Simple

Whether you paste your resume into the body of the email message or send it as an attachment,  keep the font and style simple . Use an easy-to-read font and remove any fancy formatting. 

Don't use HTML, emoticons, colored fonts, or images. You don't know what email client the employer is using, so simple is best. Otherwise, the employer may not see a formatted message the same way you do.

Attachments vs. Pasting Plain Text

Keep in mind that some employers do not accept attachments. In such cases, paste your resume into your email message as plain text. However, when there are no instructions, the easiest way to send your resume is as an attachment. That will preserve your resume content and format. Your cover letter can also be  sent as an attachment or it can be written  in the body of the email message .

How to Create a Plain Text Resume

Here's how to paste a formatted resume to create a plain text version:

  • Copy your resume into a plain text editor such as Notepad (which should be available as an app on your computer) or into a Word document or a Google Docs document. In Google Docs, right-click and select “Paste Without Formatting.” In Word, depending on your version, select “Paste Options: Keep Text Only” or “Paste Special: Unformatted Text.” 
  • Align the text to the left.
  • Replace bullets with dashes or asterisks. 
  • Use capital letters for section titles, for example, Work Experience, Education, etc.
  • Add spacing between sections so your resume is easy to read.

Choose a Resume File Format

If you're uploading your resume online or sending it as an email attachment, be sure to read the job listing carefully for any directions on what format the employer would prefer for your resume. If there are no directions, submit the resume as either a Microsoft Word document (.doc or .docx) or as a PDF file. These are the formats most commonly preferred by employers.  

If you have saved your  resume in Google Docs  or with word processing software other than Microsoft Word, convert it to the desired format. You should be able to click “File” and then "Download" and save it as a Word document or PDF.

Depending on your word processing software, you may be able to save your document as a PDF by selecting the “File” menu and then the submenu “Save As” (or “Save a Copy”) and then selecting "PDF" as the desired file format. If not, there are free programs you can use to convert a file to a PDF.

Name Your Attachment

If you attach your resume to your email, remember that your employer can see the title of your document. Include your name in the title so that the employer will know, at a glance, who you are. For example, you could name your resume “Firstname_Lastname_Resume.”

Don’t use a generic title such as “Resume” or, even worse, “Resume 1” or “Resume 2.” This might make the employer think you don’t care enough about the job to  tailor your materials  specifically to the position. It also doesn’t help the employer remember who you are.

Include Your Signature

At the bottom of the email message, include an email signature with your contact information so it's easy for the hiring manager to get in touch with you. In your signature, include your name, email address, phone number, and the URL of your LinkedIn profile, if you have one.

Sample Email Signature

Kyle McMahon kmcmahon@email.com 615-432-1111 linkedin.com/in/kylemcmahon

When applying for a job via email, you may be asked to send your cover letter in the body of your email message. If so, you can write your letter directly into the email or copy and paste an existing letter.

If the job posting doesn't specify how to send it, you can also choose to include your cover letter as an attachment. If you do so, use the same format you used for your resume (for example, if your resume is a PDF, your cover letter should be too). Also, use the same naming convention as you did for your resume, e.g., janedoecoverletter.doc.

Be sure to read the directions on the job application carefully: sometimes companies want all your materials sent as one PDF or Word document, and other times they want each document as a separate attachment.

If you do send both your resume and letter as attachments, include a brief introduction in your email message. In it, mention the job you are applying for, and note that your resume and cover letter (and any other requested materials) are attached.

Here's an example of an email message sent to apply for a job. It mentions that the candidate's resume and cover letter are attached.

Subject:  Customer Service Manager Position - Your Name

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am very interested in applying for the Customer Service Manager position that is listed on Monster.com.

I've attached my resume and cover letter. If there's any additional information you need, please let me know.

Thank you very much for your consideration.

FirstName LastName Email Phone LinkedIn

Before you send your resume to an employer, be sure the final version is perfect.

Carefully Edit and Proofread Your Documents

Make sure you use spellcheck and check your grammar and capitalization. Employers expect the same level of professionalism in emails as they do in paper correspondence. Be sure to proofread your subject line, the body of your email, and any attachments.

Many email programs have built-in spellcheckers you can use. Alternatively, write your message using a word processing program, spell- and grammar-check it, and paste it into the email. 

There are free online proofreading programs, such as Grammarly, that you can use to check your documents.

No matter how you write it, be sure not to rely solely on spellcheckers, which can miss many grammar and spelling mistakes. Reread your message yourself and consider having a friend look at it as well.

Use a Professional Email Address

Make sure to use a professional email address that includes your first and last name or at least part of your name. If you don’t have one yet, create a new professional email address, if possible.

Send a Test Email Message

Before you click “Send,” be sure your application is good to go:

  • Attach your resume to an email, then send the message to yourself to test that the formatting works. 
  • Open the attachment so you are sure you attached the right file in the correct format and that it opens correctly. 
  • If there are issues, update your materials and send another test message to yourself. Once everything looks good, send it to the employer.

Is it better to send a resume as a Word document or a PDF?

Most employers accept both Word documents and PDFs. In some cases, they will specify in the job posting which type of resume format they want to receive. A PDF preserves your original formatting, so it will be viewed the same way on all computers. A Word document can be easily read by many different programs. Some surveys report that employers prefer Microsoft Word documents.  

What should be included in an email message when a resume is sent as an attachment?

When you send a resume as an attachment, there are two options for writing an email to accompany it. You can either write an introductory email message and send your resume and cover letter as attachments, or you can write your cover letter in the body of the email. If the job posting specifies how to send your application materials, follow those instructions.

CareerOneStop. “ Design for Easy Reading .”

ZipJob. “ Should You Send Your Resume as a PDF or Word Doc? "

Google Docs Editors Help. “ Create, View, or Download a File .”

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5+ Sample Emails When Sending a Resume to an Employer [Mail Templates]

Emails When Sending a Resume to an Employer [Mail Templates]

Are you applying for a job via Email?

If yes, then this guide will help you understand the fundamentals of sending a resume to an employer via email. 

In this digital age, sending your resume via email has become the norm. However, it's not just about attaching your CV and hitting 'send.' The email you craft to accompany your resume can be the game-changer that sets you apart from the crowd.

The answers to these questions will help you understand the professional approach of sending your resume via email:

  • How to Email a resume in 2023?
  • What should you avoid while sending a resume to employers?

Before sending your resume, we recommend proofreading it twice to remove unwanted errors. For instance you can also use the resume scoring facility of HyreSnap Online Resume Builder to check your resume’s compatibility with the opportunity.

We highly recommend sending your resume only after you are completely satisfied that you have a perfect resume. For now, let’s move ahead and check the guidelines that you must follow while sending your resume to employers via email:

How to Email a Resume in 2023?

Emailing a resume in 2023 follows many of the same principles as in previous years, but it's important to ensure your email and resume are well-formatted, professional, and tailored to the specific job application. Here's a step-by-step guide on how to email a resume effectively:

  • Create a Professional Email Address: Use a professional and straightforward email address for sending your resume. If your current email address is unprofessional, consider creating a new one with your full name or initials.
  • Craft a Clear and Concise Subject Line: Your email subject line should be clear and relevant. Include your name and the purpose of the email, such as "John Smith Resume for [Job Title]."
  • Address the Recipient: Use a polite and appropriate salutation, such as "Dear [Hiring Manager's Name]" if you have that information. If not, you can use "Dear Hiring Manager" or a similar generic greeting.
  • Write a Professional Email: Compose a well-written and professional email. Start with a brief introduction of yourself and the position you are applying for. Mention where you found the job listing.
  • Attach Your Resume: Attach your resume as a PDF or Word document. Most employers prefer these formats. Make sure the file name is clear and includes your name, such as "JohnSmith_Resume.pdf."
  • Cover Letter (Optional): If you are sending a cover letter, include it as a separate attachment. Mention in the email that the cover letter is attached.
  • Signature: Include a professional email signature with your full name, phone number, and LinkedIn profile (if applicable).
  • Proofread: Carefully proofread your email for spelling and grammar errors. Mistakes can create a negative impression.
  • Send a Test Email: Before sending the email, send a test email to yourself or a friend to ensure everything appears as intended, including attachments.
  • Follow Up: If you don't receive a response after a reasonable time, it's acceptable to send a polite follow-up email to express your continued interest.
  • Respect Privacy: Ensure the recipient's privacy. Don't share personal or sensitive information in your email.
  • Save the Sent Email: After sending the email, save a copy in your "Sent" folder for your records.
  • Mobile Optimization: If you are sending the email from a mobile device, make sure the email and attachments are properly formatted.

Remember that every job application is unique, so customize your email and resume for each application. Tailor your email to express your interest in the specific position and company.

Things to Remember & Avoid While Writing an Email to Employers

When writing an email to employers for job applications or professional communication, there are certain things to remember and specific pitfalls to avoid. Here's a comprehensive guide on what to keep in mind and what to steer clear of:

Things to Remember:

  • Professional Email Address: Use a professional email address that includes your name, such as " [email protected] ."
  • Clear Subject Line: Craft a clear and specific subject line that conveys the purpose of your email.
  • Polite Salutation: Use a polite and formal salutation, e.g., "Dear Mr. Smith" or "Hello [Hiring Manager's Name]."
  • Professional Tone: Maintain a professional and courteous tone throughout your email. Avoid casual language and slang.
  • Concise and Organized: Keep your email concise and well-structured. Use short paragraphs and bullet points for clarity.
  • Personalization: Tailor your email for each employer and job application. Mention specific details about the company or job to show genuine interest.
  • Grammar and Spelling: Proofread your email for grammar and spelling errors. Mistakes can create a negative impression.
  • Attachments: Clearly state if you have attached documents, such as your resume or cover letter. Ensure they are properly named and formatted.
  • Respect Their Time: Keep your email concise and to the point. Avoid lengthy emails and respect the employer's time.
  • Highlight Your Value: In job application emails, briefly highlight your qualifications and why you're a strong fit for the position.
  • Express Gratitude: Express appreciation for the employer's consideration, e.g., "Thank you for taking the time to review my application."
  • Professional Signature: End your email with a professional signature that includes your full name, phone number, and LinkedIn profile (if applicable).
  • Follow Application Instructions: Ensure you follow any specific application requirements or instructions provided in the job posting.
  • Prompt Response: If the employer responds to your email, respond promptly, as it demonstrates your professionalism and interest.

Things to Avoid:

  • Unprofessional Email Address: Avoid using unprofessional or inappropriate email addresses for job-related communication.
  • Vague Subject Lines: Don't use vague or generic subject lines that don't indicate the purpose of your email.
  • Casual Language: Avoid using overly casual or informal language in your email. Maintain professionalism.
  • Lengthy Emails: Don't send overly long emails. Keep your email concise and to the point.
  • Ignoring Instructions: If the job posting provides specific application instructions, do not ignore them.
  • Ignoring Attachments: If the job posting requests specific documents, don't forget to attach them to your email.
  • Neglecting Proofreading: Avoid sending emails with grammar and spelling errors. Always proofread your messages.
  • Impersonal Communication: Don't send generic, one-size-fits-all emails. Personalize your messages for each application.
  • Lack of Follow-Up: If the employer responds to your email, don't forget to follow up and continue the conversation.
  • Inconsistent Tone: Maintain a consistent professional tone throughout the email. Avoid switching between formal and informal language.
  • Ambiguity: Be clear and specific in your email's content. Avoid ambiguity or unclear language.

By remembering these best practices and avoiding common pitfalls, you can create professional and effective emails when communicating with employers, ultimately increasing your chances of success in your job search.

5+ Email Samples When Sending a Resume to an Employer

Here are five professional email samples that you can use as templates when sending your resume to potential employers for different purposes, such as job applications, follow-ups, and networking:

Job Application Email

You can refer to the below listed job application email sample while sending your resume for the first time to any employer via email:

Subject Line: Application for [Job Title] - [Your Name]

Email Content:

Dear [Hiring Manager's Name],

I hope this email finds you well. I am writing to express my strong interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name], as advertised on [Job Board/Company Website].

I have attached my resume and cover letter for your consideration. I believe my [mention a relevant skill or experience] makes me a strong candidate for this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss how my qualifications align with the needs of your team.

[Your Full Name]

[Your Phone Number]

[LinkedIn Profile (Optional)]

Follow-Up Email After Application

You can use the below given email example to follow-up with your employer after some days of sending your resume via email:

Subject Line: Follow-Up on My Job Application

I hope this email finds you well. I recently applied for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name] and wanted to follow up on my application.

I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to join your team and believe that my qualifications align with the requirements of the role. If you need any additional information or would like to schedule an interview, please feel free to reach out.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Networking and Introduction Email

You can refer to the following email sample to expand your professional network and make new connections in your service niche:

Subject Line: Introduction and Networking Opportunity

Dear [Recipient's Name],

I hope this email finds you well. I recently came across your profile on LinkedIn and was impressed by your experience and expertise in the [Industry/Field].

I am passionate about [mention your career interests or goals] and am always eager to connect with professionals in the field. I have attached my resume for your reference and would welcome the opportunity to connect and learn from your insights.

Thank you for your time, and I look forward to the possibility of networking with you.

Best regards,

Thank You Email After Interview

You can use this email sample to thank your employer after attending a personal interview session:

Subject Line: Thank You for the Interview - [Job Title] Position

Dear [Interviewer's Name],

I wanted to express my sincere gratitude for the opportunity to interview for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. I enjoyed our conversation and am even more excited about the possibility of joining your team.

I appreciate your time and consideration and look forward to the next steps in the process. Please feel free to reach out if you need any additional information from my end.

Thank you once again for the opportunity.

Response to a Networking Contact

You must refer to this email sample before responding to any connection request by any other professional in your service area:

Subject Line: Re: Our Recent Conversation

Dear [Contact's Name],

Thank you for reaching out and for our recent conversation. It was a pleasure to connect and learn more about your experiences in the [Industry/Field].

I have attached my resume for your reference. I would welcome the opportunity to explore potential collaboration or any insights you can share regarding [mention a relevant topic or interest].

Thank you once again for connecting, and I look forward to the possibility of future discussions.

These email samples can serve as templates that you can adapt and customize for your specific circumstances and job applications.

HyreSnap Online Resume Builder

These email guidelines and samples will help you interact with your respective employers effectively and professionally. However, we recommend checking your resume before sending it to the employer. For that, you can use HyreSnap Online Resume Builder that offers a resume scoring facility.

Apart from this, you can use this marvelous resume building to craft a technically strong resume for your next job search. Below are some highlighting offerings of this 21st century resume-making platform:

Key Takeaways

We have listed every important step to craft a professional email for interacting with employers and sending them resumes professionally in 2023. However, if you missed anything, please check the key takeaways mentioned below:

  • Use a professional email address like [email protected]
  • Write a catchy subject line to help the employer understand your motive
  • Use easy-to-read English language for better readability
  • Attach your updated resume to the email
  • Proofread your email twice before sending it to your respective employer

Apart from this, if you have any confusion, please tell us your queries at [email protected] . Our experts will be more than happy to solve all your career issues and help you build a bright career in this highly competitive era.

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How To Email A Resume

  • Introduce Yourself In An Email
  • How To End An Email
  • Email Etiquette
  • Emailing A Resume
  • How To Cold Email
  • Warm Regards
  • How To Write A Letter Of Inquiry

Find a Job You Really Want In

Emailing a resume is a common task for job seekers, but it can be surprisingly tricky. You need to make a good impression on the recruiter, but at the same time, how much do you actually need to say in an email meant to deliver your resume?

Whether you’re applying for a job that asks you to email your resume or you’re cold-emailing your dream job, here you will find some tips and tricks on emailing a resume that will have a recruiter looking your way.

Key Takeaways:

Use a professional-sounding personal email address to send your resume .

Respond within 12 to 24 hours of a potential employer emailing you.

Tailor your resume for the specific job and include keywords from the job description.

How To Email A Resume (With Examples)

How to send your resume via email

Examples of how to send your resume to a prospective employer, tips for emailing your resume to a prospective employer, how to email a resume faq, final thoughts.

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To send your resume to any future employer , keep it simple. Greet them professionally, state the purpose of your email, and close with a note of thanks and your contact information.

Read the instructions carefully. Before you begin, remember to read the job post carefully. Sometimes, when people are using a job search board, they will quickly opt to click on the apply now button instead of reading the company’s instructions.

Use a clear subject for your email. When you are choosing what to put on your subject line, make it clear and concise. Keep in mind that recruiters have to comb through hundreds of applicants, try to keep it simple by writing your name and the position you are applying to. Here are several examples of subject lines:

Jane Smith– Junior Web Content Creator Position– Resume Jane Smith Resume — Junior Web Content Creator Position Resume of Jane Smith for the Junior Web Content Creator Position

Greet the recipient. Avoid using the phrase “To Whom It May Concern,” as this is an outdated way to begin an email.

The hiring manager can also interpret it as a sign of laziness. Before writing, search for the recipient’s name. This will go a long way to show that you are willing to put in the work. If you can’t find their name anywhere, try addressing them by their title or skipping a name altogether, as shown below:

Dear Hiring Manager, Dear Recruiter, Good morning, Good afternoon,

Write your opening paragraph. Your first paragraph should be used to introduce yourself and express your interest to your prospective employer about the current job opening. Remember to include the name of the position. It should also state where you found the job posting.

I am very interested in applying for the Junior Web Content Creator position listed on Zippia .com.

Write your body paragraph. The following paragraph should include a brief example of experiences that will highlight your abilities and make you more appealing to the hiring managers. However, you can also keep this paragraph brief and simply notify the recruiter that they may find your resume and cover letter in the attachments.

I have two years of experience writing copy, marketing emails, and blog posts, as well as SEO. During this time, I helped increase my employer’s website traffic by 25% over four months. I believe that this experience makes me a great fit for this role and would allow me to contribute in a meaningful way to your team. I’ve attached my resume for your consideration.

Closing the email. Thank the hiring manager for taking the time to look over your resume, and offer them the opportunity to contact you should they have any questions or need any additional information.

If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact me. Thank you again for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sign off. Moving forward, your emails should include a professional signature. This signature should include your name and contact information, such as your email and the best number to reach you at. You can also include a link to your LinkedIn profile — this will give them a better sense of who you are.

Sincerely, Jane Smith linkedin.com/in/janesmith [email protected] 781-555-3214

Attach your properly formatted resume file. It is essential that you do not copy and paste your resume onto the email directly. Instead, save it as a PDF or Microsoft Word document. Remember that you use a professional name when creating the document, such as:

John Smith Resume John Smith Cover Letter

Here are some example emails that you might send along with your resume to a potential employer.

Example resume email #1

Dear Hiring Manager, I am very interested in applying for the [Name of Position] position listed on [Name of the Website Where You Found the Job Posting]. Attached you’ll find my resume and cover letter. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact me. Thank you again for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you soon. Sincerely, [Your Name] [You LinkedIn Profile] [Your Email Address] [Your Number]

Example resume email #2:

Dear Mr./Ms. [ Surname] , My name is [Your Name] , and I would like to express my interest in the [Name of Position] position listed on your company’s website. For years I have been a huge fan of everything your company stands for and all the great work that it has done. I am very excited about the prospect of working at [Name of Company] and the chance to work with such a talented group of people. I have attached my resume and cover letter, as you requested. I would love to be considered for this position and the opportunity to work closely with you. Please let me know if you have any questions or need me to provide any additional information. Thank you for your time and consideration. Regards, [Your Name] [You LinkedIn Profile] [Your Email Address] [Your Number]

Example resume email #3:

Dear Recruiter, I would like to express my interest in the position of [Name of Positions] in the [Name of Department] Department that was posted last week on your company’s webpage. I have attached both my resume and cover letter. If you need any additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thank you so much for your time. Sincerely, [Your Name] [You LinkedIn Profile] [Your Email Address] [Your Number]

Example resume email #4:

Good morning, I came across your posting for the [Name of Position] position listed on [Name of the Website Where You Found the Job Posting] . This seems like a fantastic opportunity! I believe that my background in [mention strengths and qualifications] would make me an ideal candidate for this position and your company. I have attached my resume and cover letter, and I would be thrilled if I could be considered for the job. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact me. Thank you again for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you soon. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, [Your Name] [You LinkedIn Profile] [Your Email Address] [Your Number]

Example resume email #5:

Hello [First name, if you are on a first-name basis] I am very interested in applying for the [Name of Position] positions. I believe that my skills and qualifications would be a perfect match for your company. Please take a moment to review the attached documents. Here I have included my resume and a cover letter. I would love it if I could be considered for the position. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, [Your Name] [You LinkedIn Profile] [Your Email Address] [Your Number]

Example resume email #6:

Good afternoon, I am applying for the role of [Name of Position] and have attached my resume and cover letter. I believe that my experience in [relevant experience] has prepared me well for this role, and I’m excited about the possibility of contributing to your team. Thank you for your consideration. Please let me know if you have any questions. Sincerely, [Your Name] [You LinkedIn Profile] [Your Email Address] [Your Number]

Using a professional-sounding email address, double-checking for typos, and replying quickly will all help your email stand out to recruiters.

Use a professional email address. Try to avoid using your old high school or college email address. Though it may be tempting, using the email [email protected] is not very professional. Creating a professional email speaks volumes about the person you are and shows that you are someone to take seriously.

If you can, create an email that includes both your first name and your surname or your initial. Here are some examples:

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Double-check everything. It is imperative that you make sure that everything in your document is in order. Proofread your email and your document and make sure that your document is attached.

Many times these small details slip through the cracks, and you might get passed over for not being thorough.

Respond in a timely manner. If at any point you receive an email from a recruiter, be sure that you respond to that email promptly. Ideally, you should be sending your response within the first 12 to 24 hours of the original message.

What should I write in the email when sending a resume?

When sending a resume, you should write the reason why you’re sending the email, a thank you, and your contact information in the email. You can also talk about what you’d contribute to the company if you were hired. Just make sure you keep it to one or two short paragraphs.

How do you say your resume is attached?

You say your resume is attached by saying, “I’ve attached my resume.” Other variations of this include “I’ve attached my resume for your reference,” and “I have attached my resume, as you requested.” However you say it, just make sure it flows with the rest of your message.

Remember to carefully check your email for any spelling and grammatical errors before sending it to prospective employers, and make sure you have attached the correct documents.

It is imperative to follow all of the steps listed above to ensure that you move quickly along in the hiring process.

Stanford Career Education – Resumes/Cover Letters

Harvard University – Resumes and Cover Letters

USAJOBS – What Should I Include in My Federal Resume?

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Chris Kolmar is a co-founder of Zippia and the editor-in-chief of the Zippia career advice blog. He has hired over 50 people in his career, been hired five times, and wants to help you land your next job. His research has been featured on the New York Times, Thrillist, VOX, The Atlantic, and a host of local news. More recently, he's been quoted on USA Today, BusinessInsider, and CNBC.

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  • Email A Resume

Emailing a Resume: Tips and Samples

In most cases, employers ask job candidates to submit their applications through an online portal, but there are some employers who would rather receive resumes via email. In that case, the employer will likely make it clear in the job posting, and you can start off on a positive note by demonstrating that you pay attention to detail and follow directions. However, there are some considerations to keep in mind when emailing a resume.

This article will cover whether you should email your resume to a potential employer and tips for how to do so effectively, plus provide an example of powerful email copy to include with your resume.

Should You Email Your Resume?

You should email your resume only when expressly asked to do so. Most job applications and hiring processes are completed through online applicant tracking systems (ATSs), in which case you will likely submit your resume by uploading it. If you upload your resume in this manner, there’s no need to email it as well.

However, if the employer includes specific instructions to email your resume, then you should follow those directions to the letter. The employer might also include information about which email address to send it to, whether to attach your resume or send it in the body of the email, what to write in the subject line, whether they’d like you to answer any questions in the email, and so forth.

Specific instructions regarding emailing your resume can serve two purposes: it ensures that the employer receives your resume and any other information they need, and it can function as a basic test to see if you read the entire job posting and whether you can follow instructions.

Finding a good time to send your resume

Sending your resume at the right time can increase the chances of it being noticed and read by the hiring manager. The basic premise is to send it on a day and time when the hiring manager is well-rested and can read your application with fresh eyes. This means being number one in their email box.

How can you achieve this aim? Many resume articles recommend sending your documents between 9:00 p.m. and the time the hiring manager arrives the next morning.

The idea is that they probably won’t receive many emails during that time, and your resume email will be the first thing they see when they open their inbox. Hiring managers may be more likely to have time to check their emails in the morning, whereas it can be harder to do so later in the day as meetings and issues arise.

It’s also important to consider the day of the week you send your email. Corporate offices can get busy as the week goes on. For that reason, sending it Sunday night or early Monday morning may be a good option. This way, they’re refreshed from the weekend and more receptive to receiving applications.

Tips For Emailing a Resume

If you have determined that emailing your resume is the best course of action, here are some tips for how to do so successfully:

Use a Professional Email Address

Be sure to use a professional email address when you are submitting your resume or engaging in any other email contact with potential employers. An appropriate email address could be simply your first and last names, or, if that address is taken, you might use your first initial and last name or add your middle initial between your first and last names. Stay away from nicknames, long strings of numbers, immature email addresses, or addresses that are associated with your current or past jobs.

If you don’t have a professional email address already set up, you can use a service like Gmail to create a new email address for free.

Write a Concise Subject Line

If the employer has provided instructions for what to write in the subject line of your resume submission email, be sure to follow them. Otherwise, stick to a simple subject line that is clear and succinct but includes your name, the job you are applying for, and the word ‘resume,’ such as:

  • Jane Smith’s Resume for Marketing Manager Position
  • Resume - Marketing Manager - Jane Smith
  • Resume: Jane Smith for Marketing Manager Position

These subject line examples are brief, but they ensure that the hiring manager knows exactly what to expect when they open your email.

Send Your Resume as an Attachment

In most cases, it’s best to email your resume as an attachment, since that will preserve the style and formatting of the document. However, if the employer specifically asks you to include your resume as plain text within the email body, you will need to copy and paste the text of your resume into the email. Make any necessary adjustments to ensure that the content of your resume is still easily readable and well-organized.

If you attach your resume, be sure that it’s saved as a PDF to protect the format (unless the employer specifically asks for a Word Doc).

Name the file clearly with your full name and the word ‘resume.’ Ensure that the PDF or Doc file is less than 10 MB in size so there won’t be any problems sending it.

Include a Cover Letter

Read the job posting carefully to decide whether you need to include an attached cover letter, one within the body of the email, or simply a brief note to express your interest in the job and introduce your resume. If the hiring manager’s name is listed in the job posting, address the email to them specifically. If not, use a polite general greeting.

Sign Off Professionally

Thank the potential employer for their time and end your email with a professional sign-off that includes your full name, your email address, your phone number, and links to your LinkedIn and/or professional website if applicable.

Proofread the Email Carefully

Spend some time proofreading your email as well as your attached cover letter and/or resume. Check for spelling, grammar, syntax, and formatting errors. You may wish to send yourself a test email so you can ensure that the attachments are sent properly and the email body is formatted correctly. Double check that you have attached the right files as well. If proofreading isn’t your strong suit, send a copy of the email to a friend or family member for feedback.

Best practices for email attachments

When sending email attachments for a job application, there are a few best practices you need to keep in mind:

  • In the cover letter, say you have a resume attached to the email
  • Unless the job description says otherwise, save your resume template as a PDF file to preserve formatting1
  • Compress your PDF file so it fits within your email client’s file size limits
  • Send your resume to a friend before submitting to check that it opens and looks right
  • Change your resume examples file names to something logical and professional like “FirstNameLastNameResume”

These tips will help you keep your resume email professional and ensure you come across as a serious candidate deserving of strong consideration.

Sample Email for Sending a Resume

If you decide to write a cover letter in the email body, you will likely want to include one paragraph introducing yourself and outlining your interest in the position and another paragraph sharing the value that you can add to the company if you are hired. 

Instead of just writing a generic salutation like “Dear hiring manager” or “To whom it may concern,” you should include the hiring manager’s first and last name in your greeting. You might also briefly mention that you look forward to meeting them in person. 

At the end of the cover letter , you can provide your contact details so the hiring manager can reach out to you. Include your LinkedIn profile URL in case they want to connect with you on social media.

An effective resume submission email might look like this:

Subject line: Jane Smith’s Resume for Marketing Manager Position

I was excited to find your marketing manager position opening on Indeed as it sounds like an exceptional opportunity and a great fit for my skills! I would love to be considered for the position and I’ve attached my resume below for your perusal.

I have over 3 years of experience as a marketing assistant and a proven record of increasing sales by 40% or more year over year. My goal is to leverage my skills and experience to step into the role of marketing manager and help your company exceed your sales goals.

Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to meeting you in person and discussing the role in more depth.

Jane Smith [email protected] (123)345-6789 linkedin.com/in/janesmith

Attachment: JaneSmithResume.pdf

Common resume email mistakes to avoid

Learning when and how to email resumes is critical to landing a good job. Though email is often considered informal, it’s still essential to be concise.

If you need help with brevity when sending a resume, think about using short cover letter examples designed for email. This will help you avoid rambling on and write a message that respects the hiring manager’s time.

Additionally, you’ll want to avoid waiting too long to send your resume email. If you found the job posting online, remember that others are likely to see it at the same time. You’ll still want to send it at night or early in the morning, but don’t delay for several days just because you saw the job posting mid-week.

Though it isn’t addressed in many resume articles , you need to consider the industry or company’s working hours before sending your resume. For example, if the business is closed on Mondays, Tuesday morning may actually be the best time to send your email.

It’s also important to value professionalism. This means: 

  • Using formal language in the subject line and throughout your letter 
  • Having a professional email address
  • Avoiding funny or misleading subject lines
  • Checking the filename of the attached resume for clarity 

Following these tips for maximizing professionalism will go a long way toward helping you create the best impression on the hiring manager.

Finally, personalize each email. Ensure it's tailored to the specific job title and company you want to work for and not just a general message you send out to all businesses. Though cover letter templates can be helpful, personalizing them helps you come across as a candidate who cares.

Key Takeaways

In some cases it may be necessary to submit your resume via email instead of uploading it to an online job portal. If so, be sure to follow any instructions that the hiring manager lists in the job posting. If no instructions are included, keep your subject line simple and concise, include a brief message or a cover letter in the body of the email, and attach your resume as a PDF.

Of course, the first step to emailing a resume to a potential employer is to actually create a polished, compelling resume. If you need to revamp your resume before submitting it, consider using Jobseeker’s professional resume creation tool. You can enter in your information and easily switch between formats , color schemes, and fonts. Then download your finished resume and start applying for jobs!

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  • Email Subject Lines for...

Email Subject Lines for Resume & Job Applications (+Examples)

5 min read · Updated on March 25, 2021

Ronda Suder

Don't let your email get lost — or worse ignored — when submitting your resume.

Your email address and email subject line are the first two things a recruiter or hiring manager sees when you send them your resume. Since hiring managers can receive hundreds of emails a day, you want — and need — your job application subject line to catch their eye and pique their interest. Otherwise, the email with your attached resume might get lost, or worse ignored, in the email shuffle.

Read on to learn how to write the best email subject line to get your email noticed every time.

5 tips for writing the best email subject line when submitting a resume

Keep it short and concise.

Your email subject lines for a job application should be brief and to-the-point. If you write too much text, then it can get cut off in the subject line, especially on smaller devices like smartphones. In fact, eMailmonday reports that up to 77 percent of emails are opened on mobile phones.

As a result, it is suggested that subject lines be less than 50 characters. The first few words should identify that you're applying for a job and catch the reader's attention

Include referral info

If you were referred for a position, include the person's name in the subject line. Many organizations offer an employee referral program given that there is already credibility built into a referral. By including a referral name, you can get your foot in the door before anyone even looks at your resume. An example of a job referral subject line is:

“Referral From Jane Doe: Joe Smith, Resume for Junior Marketing Position”

Refer to instructions

If you have a job description to refer to, be sure to read it carefully and follow the submission instructions. If it says to include the position name, position location, position ID, and your name, then include only that. If you were referred to the job, it's OK to include the referral name as well. Here are a few subject line examples:

“Senior Marketing Manager, Houston, Job ID 21, Jane Doe”

“Referred by John Smith: Senior Marketing Manager, Houston, Job ID 21, Jane Doe”

Be professional

Keep your email subject line professional; don't use informal words such as “hey” and “howdy.” Also, avoid using shorthand or abbreviations if they aren't part of the job title or submission instructions.

 Avoid this: “Howdy Hiring Manager, Joe Smith Applying for Accountant, Houston”

And do this: “Job Application, Joe Smith Applying for Accountant Position, Houston”

Similar to any job marketing collateral, proofread your subject lines to ensure there are no typos or punctuation errors. You don't want your email to be overlooked or left unopened due to a bad first impression from an avoidable typo in your subject line.

How to write the perfect subject line for submitting your resume

Include the pertinent details.

If instructions on how to apply are not outlined in the job post and you don't have a referral, then the best email subject lines will include:

The reason for your email

Position title

Position location (if provided)

Position ID (if provided)

“Applying for Marketing Manager, Houston, Job ID 25, John Smith”

“Job application — Marketing Manager, Houston, Job ID 15 — John Smith”

If you're not applying for a specific job, and instead, you're inquiring about job possibilities, include:

Reason for your email

Brief qualifier (if beneficial and not too long)

Referral (if relevant) 

“Job inquiry — John Smith, 10+ years of experience in IT”

“Inquiry — Jane Doe, PR Specialist Open to New Opportunities”

“HR Operations Manager Looking for Next Position”

“Job Inquiry — Referred by Jane Doe — Joe Smith, HR Specialist”

Include certifications

If you have certifications or qualifications that add value to your job application or are required for the job, include them in the subject line. Here are a few email subject line examples of how to do that.

 “Job application — Marketing Manager, Job ID 25 — John Smith, Google Creative Certification”

 “Job application — IT Analyst — John Smith, Microsoft Certified”

 “Applying for Accountant Director — Jane Doe, CPA”

Use a professional email address

Think of your email address as your email subject line's partner. Many recruiters and hiring managers frown upon unprofessional email addresses and don't open emails from job applicants that use them — even if they have a good subject line. For example, don't use addresses like [email protected] or [email protected].

Your email address should be professional, and ideally, identify who you are. Use your first name and last name, if it's available. If it's not, then use some combination of your name and profession or your name and a numerical value. For example:

Your email subject line is a crucial part of your job-marketing strategy. Work with the tips above to craft email subject lines that help you get you one step closer to landing the job. You also want to ensure that you have a well-crafted resume that highlights why you're the right candidate for the job. Good luck!

Don't waste your time Googling. Get expert career advice delivered straight to your inbox .

Recommended Reading:

4 Smart Tactics for Sending Emails to Recruiters

Best Practices for Professional Email Etiquette in Every Situation

5 Ways to Keep Your Emails Short and Sweet

Related Articles:

8 Tips to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market

7 Signs Your Resume is Making You Look Old

Don't “Snowplow” Your Kids' Job Search — Set Them Up for Success Instead

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Resume Worded   |  Career Strategy

How to send networking emails with your resume (templates included).

  • Introduction and Key Insights
  • Email Template #1: Sending your resume by email
  • Email Template #2: Emailing your resume to a recruiter
  • Email Template #3: Applying to a job via email
  • Email Template #4: Following up on an application over email + attaching your resume
  • Email Template #5: Sending your resume via Linkedin
  • Email Template #6: How to email your resume to an external recruiter
  • Email Template #7: Emailing your resume if you were referred by a mutual contact

Email Subject Lines

  • Additional email and LinkedIn templates
  • Get more insights and strategies

Who enjoys sending cold emails? Right, obviously nobody does. But like a lot of stages in the job search process, they’re a necessary evil. Emailing out your resume doesn’t have to be a chore — especially with these handy tips and templates.

How to send your resume via email

Here’s how to craft the perfect email to go along with your resume:

  • Find a direct email address for the person you’re trying to contact. Don’t just email a generic contact address for the company — chances are it will never be seen by the intended recipient.
  • Address the recruiter or hiring manager by name.
  • Use a clear and attention-grabbing subject line. Ideally, this should include your name, the position you’re applying for, and other important information (like a referral or standout qualification).
  • Include 1-3 short paragraphs summarizing who you are, why you’re interested in the position, and your key skills and experience.
  • End with a simple call to action.

Why send your resume via email?

These days, most job applications go directly through online portals like LinkedIn or Indeed. But these aren’t the be-all and end-all of job applications — there are times when it makes more sense to email your resume directly. Sending an inquiry letter Most job openings are never publicly advertised, which means it pays to be proactive. Emailing an inquiry letter to a recruiter is a great way of finding out about any open positions before they’re advertised and giving yourself a significant advantage. Following up with contacts Not all networking is cold emails. If you’ve connected with a recruiter or hiring manager at an event or on LinkedIn, it makes sense to follow that up by sending through your resume. Even if they don’t have any open positions that are a good fit, it establishes a relationship and keeps you on their radar for future openings. Establishing a relationship If you don’t currently have a relationship with the hiring manager, why not initiate one? Even if you’ve applied to a position online, it can be a good idea to follow that up by emailing the hiring manager directly. When there’s no online portal Online job applications are fairly standard these days, but not every company is on board. Some companies — especially smaller businesses — may not have advertised a position on one of the major job sites or have their own online application system. In that case, emailing your email directly to the hiring manager is the best way to apply.

How to write a networking email

Make it personal Always start with an introduction — this is a professional email, not a sales pitch. Do your research on the company or recruiter first so you can customize it. Your email is essentially a mini cover letter, so treat it like one. Send it to the right person It’s worth taking the time to find a direct email address for the recruiter or hiring manager you’re trying to contact. Don’t just email a generic contact address for the company — chances are it will never be seen by the intended recipient. Polish it up

  • Email your resume as a PDF to preserve the formatting
  • Use Score My Resume to make sure you’re sending out the best possible version of your resume
  • Use a professional-looking email address

Ready to begin? Scroll down for some word-for-word email templates you can use to email your resume in any situation.

Sample email templates

Here are exact word-for-word email samples you can start using right away. use them in your emails, linkedin messages or whichever platform you use to network., template #1, email subject : [your name] — following up.

Hi [Name], I had a great time meeting you at [event] on [date]. [A brief sentence recalling something from your conversation.] I’m currently looking for positions [describe the role you’re seeking]. I know [Company] is doing great work in the field. Do you know of any open positions that might be a good fit? I’ve attached my resume for reference and I’m also on LinkedIn [link]. Please let me know if you have any suggestions for people I should be reaching out to. Thanks for all your help, and I look forward to seeing you at [future event]. Best, [Your Name]

Connecting with someone in your network. This takes a less formal approach than a standard cold email, since this is someone you’ve met before. By starting and ending with a friendly touch, you’re emphasizing that personal connection without losing sight of the main reason for your email.

Found this template useful? Bookmark it and you'll never get stuck on an email again. Also, please share it with your network! It helps us keep these templates free.

Before we get to the next template

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Template #2

Emailing your resume to a recruiter, email subject : open positions at [company].

Hi [Name], My name is [Your Name] and I’ve been following the work [Company] has been doing in [your industry] for some time. Congratulations on [recent development]! I’ve had great success as [role title] at [Your Company] in the past [x] years. [Briefly describe 1-2 of your top accomplishments.] I’m currently looking for an opportunity to branch out and grow [skill or career path you’re hoping to develop] and [Company] is on my radar. I’d love to chat about any open positions you think might be a good fit. I’ve attached my resume and you can find me on LinkedIn at [link]. Feel free to email or call me on [phone number]. Best, [Your Name]

If you’re reaching out to a recruiter or hiring manager you don’t have an existing relationship with, this template allows you to explain a bit about yourself and why you’re interested in that specific company.

Template #3

Applying to a job via email, email subject : [your name — job title].

Dear [Name], My interest was piqued when I came across the opening for [job title and reference number] on your website. I love the work [Company] does in [industry], especially [details of a recent development you’ve followed or something that appeals to you about the company]. [1-2 sentences linking that to your experience and skill set and outlining a specific benefit you could bring to the company.] I have [x] years of experience as a [job title] at [Your Company]. [1-2 sentences describing your top skills and achievements.] I’m currently looking for an opportunity to [briefly describe what you’re looking for] and think [Company] could be a great fit. I’ve attached my resume for your consideration. Please let me know if you’d like any further information. I look forward to hearing from you! Sincerely, [Your Name] [Phone number, email, and LinkedIn link]

An email accompanying a formal job application (as opposed to a more general networking email) is essentially a cover letter, and should be written like one. This template gives you space to describe your experience and interest in the company in a little more details. Since it’s in an official context, it also uses a more formal greeting and sign off and includes your contact details at the end.

Template #4

Following up on an application over email + attaching your resume, email subject : [role] at [company].

Hi [Name], I recently applied for the [role title] position at [Company]. I know you’re busy, but I would love to briefly touch base on your decision timeline. I’m excited about the opportunity to join your team and [briefly describe something concrete you can bring to the role]. I've attached my application materials for your convenience and would love to chat about how my experience in [briefly describe your most relevant skills or experience] can help [Company] [achieve a goal they’re working toward]. Please let me know if I can provide you with any additional details as you move to the next stage of the hiring process. Best, [Your Name]

Reminding the hiring manager of your most relevant skills or experience can help spark their memory of your application. This kind of follow-up makes sense to send if you’re further along in the application process or are a particularly strong candidate, but you don’t need to send an email like this after every online application you complete.

Template #5

Sending your resume via linkedin, email subject : linkedin message.

Hi Lauren, My name is Cameron and I came across an opening for a Product Designer at ABC Company. [Include a short note about why you’re interested in the role or company]. [Briefly describe 1-2 of your standout accomplishments or key skills in your current or previous position.] I’m currently looking for a role that allows me to take a leading role in designing products with sustainability in mind, and it sounds like the Product Designer role aligns perfectly with my experience. I’ve attached my resume for your convenience and you can see samples of my work on my profile. I’d love to connect and ask you a couple of questions about the company and what the hiring process is like. Thank you!

You can attach files to LinkedIn messages, so don’t be shy about sending your resume to hiring managers you find on LinkedIn. This is also a great alternative if you can’t find a recruiter’s direct email address, as a LinkedIn message is more likely to land than an email sent to a generic company account.

Template #6

How to email your resume to an external recruiter, email subject : follow up on [role] at [company].

Hi Petra, I read from your profile that you recruit for [roles] in [location]. I'm currently a [job title] at [Your Company] and wanted to connect with you in case you think my profile might be a good fit for current or future roles you seek to fill. I’m currently looking for a new role [briefly describe what you’re looking for and your key skills and experience]. I’ve attached my resume for your convenience. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you need any more information. Thanks, Jane

If you’ve found a recruiter for your industry and location — whether on LinkedIn or via referral — it’s okay to make the first move. Your initial email should include enough information for them to know whether you’re a potential match for any roles they’re currently recruiting for. Attaching your resume also allows them to keep you on file in case they come across any suitable roles in the future.

Template #7

Emailing your resume if you were referred by a mutual contact, email subject : openings at [company name].

Hi Veronica, My former coworker, Ted Crisp, suggested I ask you about potential openings for a Marketing Manager. I’ve been following Veridian Dynamics since the launch of Jabberwocky last year and I really admire the work you’ve been doing in robotics engineering. I’m currently a Marketing Copywriter at Digivation, where I recently led an online campaign that saw a 200% increase in sales in the first 3 months. I’m looking for a position that would allow me to put my skills in creating dynamic social media campaigns and guerilla marketing to use. I’ve attached my resume and you can view my LinkedIn profile [link]. I’d love to discuss how I can bring my expertise to your team. Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions. I look forward to connecting with you! Best, Linda

If you have a previous connection to a hiring manager, like an existing relationship or referral by a mutual contact, be sure to mention it upfront. Establishing a connection early can give a busy recruiter a reason to keep reading your email and may encourage them to look over your resume with a favorable eye.

These subject lines see the highest response rates. For details on other subject lines and why these work, read Email Subject Lines for Networking .

  • Open positions at [Company]
  • Follow up on our conversation
  • [Your Name — Job Title]
  • [Role] at [Company]

Other All Other Networking Templates

We've also found the following email templates that you should consider using., want more email templates choose a category..

  • Follow up emails
  • Informational interviews
  • Thank you emails
  • LinkedIn Messages

how to make resume through email

Thank you for the checklist! I realized I was making so many mistakes on my resume that I've now fixed. I'm much more confident in my resume now.

how to make resume through email

How To Write a Sample Email to Send a Resume to a Recruiter

Sarah Colley

3 key takeaways

  • The best way to write an effective job application email to a recruiter is to get straight to the point.
  • Lead with the outcomes you’ve achieved and how you align with the role in an application email.
  • Teal’s Job Application Tracker includes email templates for every stage of your job search.

HR professionals and recruiters don’t actually like sorting through resumes. They can see hundreds in a single day, even if they’re using an ATS.

To get through them, they’ve created procedures to prioritize the best-fit candidates. 

That’s why, if you’re going to email your resume directly to a recruiter, that email has to catch their eye. It has to be appealing enough to get them to willingly review yet another resume.

In this article, you’ll learn how to craft the perfect sample resume to send to a recruiter. You can also speed up the process and keep track of the jobs you’ve already applied for using Teal’s Job Tracker and Email Templates .

Struggling to land interviews with your resume? Get started with Teal’s AI Resume Builder for free.

How to write an email with your resume to a recruiter

In most cases, if you’re sending your resume to a recruiter it’s because:

  • They’ve reached out to you, either on LinkedIn or through email, to express interest in your background and your fit for the role. 
  • They list their email in the job posting, asking for resumes in their inbox rather than in an application.
  • You’ve discussed work with someone on social media, in-person, or another medium and they’ve asked you to send your resume.

In the first case, recruiters are sending out dozens of canned messages to all candidates within their database, or within a LinkedIn search. They often have a list of criteria they’re using to run this search, and you just happen to fit within that data set.

They know the more emails they send out, the more likely they are to get a response and, hopefully, find the right candidate within those responses. 

In both the first and second scenarios, recruiters are seeing a lot of emails from a lot of people. That is why you shouldn’t send your resume to a recruiter until you are sure it’s a decent match for your skills, work history, and interests for your next role.

Learn as much about the role as you can first. When you feel secure enough to send your resume, you can send it with confidence.

Once you’re ready, here’s how to email a resume to a recruiter:

Step 1: The subject line for a resume email

Your subject line is your first impression, and if it’s too generic, it’ll be completely ignored. An anonymous recruiter on a hiring forum made this clear, stating: 

“As someone who has seen a ton of these, I 100 percent do not suggest something generic. It's quite obvious from some people that they sent the same email to several people. These emails get ignored 90 percent of the time unless the hiring manager is desperate. As for the title, I suggest [you] to be very clear in what you are looking for, even if it's a little long. Example: "Expression of interest for XX-0X Position - [group name, ex: Policy Division] - Seeking Deployment Opportunity."

That’s why your email subject line needs to be a clear indicator of these few things:

  • Who you are (name)
  • The role you’re applying for
  • Your qualifications, if applicable (MBA, CP, Ph.D…)

Email subject lines are rather short, even on a desktop (60 characters at most), but they’re even shorter in mobile inboxes. 

You need to be clear not only about why you’re reaching out, but also put the most important words at the beginning to ensure they’re seen. 

Sample subject line in an email to send to a recruiter

If you’re referred to by someone, that’s what you should include first. The subject line, in that case, might look something like this:

sample email to send resume to recruiter

If you weren’t referred, here are a few other examples of email subject lines to a recruiter:

  • Notice of Interest - [Job title you seek]
  • Applying for [Position] – [Name] Resume
  • “[Job title][Your name],[Your qualification or job title]

Step 2: Greeting

Keep your greeting simple and professional with a “Hello” or “Dear” followed by their first name. 

Just be sure to spell it correctly. They won’t take kindly to being called something other than their name, especially when you can generally just look at their email to ensure correct spelling. Check their LinkedIn profile if you are unsure.

Step 3: Introduction

The introduction of your email is the first line after your greeting, and it’s really more of a courtesy than anything else.

You don’t need to draw it out. One or two sentences explaining why you’re reaching out and how you found out about the opportunity is adequate, especially if you were referred to the role. If you were, be sure to name drop.

If you really want to stand out from the standard email though, get straight to your message and express your enthusiasm for the position with something that stands out. 

Sample intro in an email to send to a recruiter

Sample email to send resume to recruiter with intro

Step 4: Qualifications and value proposition in your email body

Don’t just list your qualifications in your email as if it’s a resume. Instead, share the biggest highlights of your career in a conversational tone.

The best way to do this is to think through the outcomes you’ve produced in your position. If the role you’re applying for, or the roles you’ve had in the past, are not outcome based, consider how your work contributed to business goals. 

Maybe you’ve led a team that completed a detrimental project for the company. Maybe you’ve saved the company money somehow or increased the efficiency of an internal process. 

If former or current employers have benefited from your work in any way, share that. Then, of course, also share any certifications or earned titles, such as Ph.D.

Sample qualifications in an email to send to a recruiter

sample email to send to a recruiter or hiring manager

This works because it’s straightforward. Instead of oversharing, it dives right into the  results of past work. It wastes no time delivering the essential details that’ll help the recruiter make a decision.

Pro tip: Teal’s Job Tracker includes job application email templates tailored to your resume and cover letter.

Step 5: Call to Action

Point the reader in the direction you want them to take with confidence. Don’t leave it open-ended. 

For example, “please let me know if I’m a good fit” is too passive.

Instead, you want to be more assertive to earn the hiring manager's attention, urging them into action without coming across as entitled or pushy.

Sample call to action in an email to send to a recruiter

“Please see my resume attached to the link in my portfolio [URL] to check my samples and testimonials. My resume is also attached to this email. If I look like a fit, I'd love the opportunity to speak with you further on how I can apply my skills to [outcome] for [Company]. I'm available all Tuesday and Wednesday next week. Would you be up for a chat?”

Step 6: Best resume email closings and sign-offs

After asking for a meeting or closing with another call to action, thank the recruiter for their time and consideration. 

Sign off your email with a professional closing, such as "Best regards," "Sincerely," or "Thank you."

Include your full name, contact information, and any relevant links (such as your LinkedIn profile) in your email signature.

There are a few websites that make it easy to create a professional email signature . 

Sample signature in an email to send to a recruiter

sample email signature

You simply have to go into your email settings, to your signature, and paste your professional email signature there. From then on, every email you create will automatically include your signature. 

Step 7: Attaching your resume to a recruiter email

A lot of job applicants question whether or not they should email their resume as a word doc or a PDF file . 

A PDF has long been thought of as the clean and professional standard. They also have the advantage of maintaining your formatting, so recruiters will always see your resume as intended. 

But recently Word docs have been making a come back due to fears that ATS software isn’t able to read PDFs. 

However, as long as the text in the PDF isn't rasterized or cluttered with images and icons, an ATS should be able to read it. 

Annette Marie, a job seeker, shared this word of caution about using PDF resumes for job applications:

“The entire top portion of my PDF resume did not appear in the finished ATS scan, but everything appeared when I scanned my Word document (.docx). However, it’s worth mentioning that the top portion of my resume is within a text box, which may explain the issue. Just be cautious with shapes and objects, as they don’t seem to be compatible when using a PDF format. Nonetheless, the PDF still presents well for in-person interviews.”

Recruiters may sometimes favor Word doc resumes due to their ability to make changes, either to the formatting, or to remove certain items that might lead to unconscious bias (such as a picture).

Some recruiters might also need to remove contact information in order to protect your details and keep their clients from contacting you directly. 

But you’d have to be willing to have a recruiter alter your resume, potentially without consulting you. 

Unless they’re a career coach, a trusted friend, or a resume writing service, no one should be editing your resume. 

Step 8: Follow up on your recruiter email

There are several ways to follow up on a job application email, because, no, you don’t necessarily have to follow up via email.

  • Email: It’s rare for recruiters to get through all of their emails in one sitting, so it might take a few days to get to yours. But, if you haven’t heard back in a couple of days, it’s safe to send an email reasserting your interest in the position.

Aside from re-expressing your interest, you might also want to ask when you’ll be able to connect with a hiring manager. You can also reattach your resume and cover letter. 

Sample follow up job application email template

Subject line: [Your Name] - Job Application Follow-up for [Position] at [Company] Hello [Hiring Manager's Name], A few weeks ago, I applied for the [Position Title with Hyperlink to the Application] role at [Company Name]. I'm very excited about this opportunity, so I wanted to reach out, introduce myself, and see if you have any details from the hiring manger about the decision timeline. I'm a [Your Current Job Title] at [Your Current Company Name] who's [insert relevant qualifications and/or accomplishments] over the last [X] years. In particular, I'm interested in [Company Name] because [mention specific reasons why you're interested and why you’re a good fit]. Please let me know if you have any questions about my application or require further information from me. I look forward to hearing from you soon and learning more about the timeline. I can't wait to share some of my ideas on [insert challenge or goal related to your desired new job title]. [Best/Kind regards/Thank you], [Your Name] [Your Phone Number] [Your LinkedIn]
  • Phone: Resort to a phone call only after you haven’t heard back on your follow-up email. 
  • LinkedIn: Try to avoid reaching out to a recruiter on LinkedIn unless that was their initial method of contacting you. The reason? It’s far more informal and some recruiters only use their LinkedIn for personal use, or may not check it regularly. 

Here’s a simple follow-up LinkedIn message template : 

Dear [Contact Name], I recently submitted my application for the [Position] at [Company], and I wanted to follow up to express my continued interest in the opportunity and inquire about the status of my application. I am excited about the possibility of joining the team at [Company], and I believe my skills and experience make me a strong fit for the [Position]. I am confident that my [mention of relevant skills, qualifications or experiences] would contribute to the success of the team and the company. If there are any additional materials or information I can provide to support my application, please let me know. I am eager to further discuss my qualifications and how I can contribute to the success of [Company]. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Best regards, [Your Name] [Your Phone Number]

Note: Within Teal’s Job Application Tracker, you’ll find job application email templates to get your started in crafting a personalized email to a recruiter.

Common mistakes to avoid when sending your resume via email

Most emails sent to a recruiter are canned—a template or exact copy of an email sent again and again with little to no alterations. And recruiters are sick of it. 

Jules Lalo, a recruiter , echoes this when with this statement:

“One of my pet peeves is a CV with no context [in the email] intro [so] I have to decipher what group level they are substantively. This has a huge impact on filtering later on.”

In other words, recruiters aren’t just asking for more details and personalization from you because they don’t like it. They simply need more details to help place you in a role or ensure you’re a right fit (and they want to be able to find your email later).

But a lack of context isn’t the only mistake many job seekers make when sending a job application email. Here are a few common mistakes recruiters see: 

Using an unprofessional email address

Elby James , a former HR associate and resume consultant, finds it shocking how often people send emails from unprofessional email addresses. 

“The email address should be a professional email address. I don't mind Gmail or AOL but really, how much does it cost to buy a domain name today? Especially when it is for something as important as your career.

I remember seeing email addresses such as [email protected] . [email protected] . [email protected] . ”

Spelling errors on your resume or in the email 

Spelling mistakes won’t be a make or break for all recruiters, but it can be a put off for many, especially in a short email. With tools like Grammarly available today, most recruiters don’t take kindly to spelling mistakes. 

Elby shares his thoughts on this as well:

“I abhor typos. Maybe this is the graduate English major inside of me acting out but really, there is no need for typos; there are two reasons I say this: The first reason is spell check… it’s free! The second reason is [that] a resume is an important document, you should check it as many times as possible.”

Try to avoid buzzwords

You might be keyword stuffing your resume to get into the candidate pool, but you shouldn’t apply that same logic to a recruiter email. And really, you should try to avoid overstuffing your resume as well. 

Recruiters will often use keyword stuffing as a mental filter. They’ll automatically toss any resume or email that overly-uses buzzwords.

They need to be able to tell what you do in the simplest of terms and with a quick glance. But if you’re using phrases like—“transformed big-thinking into actionable steps, aligning with business goals and channel objectives”—no one will understand you. 

Pro tip: Teal’s free Chrome Extension shares the top five keywords in a job posting for free, and Matching Mode helps you optimize your resume accordingly (meaning you only need to use the most important words).

Teal's free Chrome extension pulls the top keywords from every job posting

Lack of personalization

It doesn’t take a lot to personalize an email to a recruiter. 

You’ll keep most of the details the same, like your qualifications and your call to action. But you’ll alter the company’s name, the recruiter’s name, and details about how you found out about the role. 

You’ll also want to alter anything pertinent to the role itself, such as how your experience applies. This isn’t the same for every role, and it’s very easy to tell if you aren’t paying attention to those differences. 

Recruiters want to know exactly how you fit that role, without digging. 

Start with a sample email to send a resume to a recruiter

As you may have caught on, recruiters see hundreds of resumes. They’re unsurprised by most stylings or attempts to be unique. But they’re far more numb to the generic resume emails they see all day.

So while it’s important to add personalization, get straight to your point, and include only the most compelling details in your email, you still need an email template to get started.

While recruiters may see a lot of emails, there’s truth to the job search being a numbers game. The longer you spend on one email, the longer you might be searching for a role. You might even miss out on some opportunities because you’re spending too much time on emailing a recruiter that will spend only seconds determining whether or not to put you in a candidate pool.

Using a sample resume email for recruiters as a template, you can speed up the process while adding some personalization. 

To find simple, but effective job application email templates, try Teal’s Resume Builder. Teal’s Job Application Tracker includes email templates to send your email to recruiters and hiring managers.

Frequently Asked Questions

What should you write in an email when sending a resume to a recruiter.

When sending a resume to a recruiter, keep your email concise and professional. Start with a clear subject line, greet the recruiter by name, briefly introduce yourself, highlight key achievements, include a call to action, and close with a professional sign-off.

What should you write when sending a CV via email?

When sending a CV via email, include a personalized greeting, a short introduction stating why you’re reaching out, and a summary of your qualifications and accomplishments. Add a clear call to action, thank the recruiter for their time, and attach your CV in a preferred format.

What should you write in an email subject line when sending a resume?

Your email subject line should clearly indicate who you are, the role you’re applying for, and any relevant qualifications. Examples include "Notice of Interest - [Job Title]", "Applying for [Position] – [Your Name]", or "[Job Title] - [Your Name], [Qualification]".

how to make resume through email

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How To Use Claude AI To Write a Resume

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A resume is a concise, informative summary of your abilities, education, and experience. It should highlight your strongest assets and skills, and differentiate you from other candidates seeking similar positions. Although it alone won’t get you a job or internship, a good resume is an important factor in obtaining an interview. Tailor your resume to the type of position you’re seeking. This doesn’t mean that all of your experiences must relate directly, but your resume should reflect the types of skills the employer would value.

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TOP SIX RESUME MISTAKES:

  • Spelling and grammar errors
  • Missing email and phone information
  • Using passive language instead of “action” words
  • Not well organized, concise, or easy to skim
  • Not demonstrating results

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  • Be sure that your formatting will translate properly if converted to a .pdf

PLAN TO WORK INTERNATIONALLY?

Resume guidelines can vary from country to country. See our international resources.

ACTION VERBS FOR YOUR RESUME

AccomplishedAchievedAdministeredAnalyzedAssignedAttainedChairedConsolidated
ContractedCoordinatedDelegatedDevelopedDirectedEarnedEvaluatedExecuted
HandledHeadedImpactedImprovedIncreasedLedMasteredOrchestrated
OrganizedOversawPlannedPredictedPrioritizedProducedProvedRecommended
RegulatedReorganizedReviewedScheduledSpearheadedStrengthenedSupervisedSurpassed
AddressedArbitratedArrangedAuthoredCollaboratedConvincedCorrespondedDelivered
DevelopedDirectedDocumentedDraftedEditedEnergizedEnlistedFormulated
InfluencedInterpretedLecturedLiaisedMediatedModeratedNegotiatedPersuaded
PresentedPromotedPublicizedReconciledRecruitedReportedRewroteSpoke
SuggestedSynthesizedTranslatedVerbalizedWrote
ClarifiedCollectedConcludedConductedConstructedCritiquedDerivedDetermined
DiagnosedDiscoveredEvaluatedExaminedExtractedFormedIdentifiedInspected
InterpretedInterviewedInvestigatedModeledOrganizedResolvedReviewedSummarized
SurveyedSystematizedTested
AssembledBuiltCalculatedComputedDesignedDevisedEngineeredFabricated
InstalledMaintainedOperatedOptimizedOverhauledProgrammedRemodeledRepaired
SolvedStandardizedStreamlinedUpgraded
AdaptedAdvisedClarifiedCoachedCommunicatedCoordinatedDemystifiedDeveloped
EnabledEncouragedEvaluatedExplainedFacilitatedGuidedInformedInstructed
PersuadedSet GoalsStimulatedStudiedTaughtTrained
AdministeredAllocatedAnalyzedAppraisedAuditedBalancedBudgetedCalculated
ComputedDevelopedForecastedManagedMarketedMaximizedMinimizedPlanned
ProjectedResearched
ActedComposedConceivedConceptualizedCreatedCustomizedDesignedDeveloped
DirectedEstablishedFashionedFoundedIllustratedInitiatedInstitutedIntegrated
IntroducedInventedOriginatedPerformedPlannedPublishedRedesignedRevised
RevitalizedShapedVisualized
AssessedAssistedClarifiedCoachedCounseledDemonstratedDiagnosedEducated
EnhancedExpeditedFacilitatedFamiliarizedGuidedMotivatedParticipatedProposed
ProvidedReferredRehabilitatedRepresentedServedSupported
ApprovedAcceleratedAddedArrangedBroadenedCatalogedCentralizedChanged
ClassifiedCollectedCompiledCompletedControlledDefinedDispatchedExecuted
ExpandedGainedGatheredGeneratedImplementedInspectedLaunchedMonitored
OperatedOrganizedPreparedProcessedPurchasedRecordedReducedReinforced
RetrievedScreenedSelectedSimplifiedSoldSpecifiedSteeredStructured
SystematizedTabulatedUnifiedUpdatedUtilizedValidatedVerified

(click on sample for pdf)

The document is a detailed resume sample for a student named Firstname Lastname. It includes contact information and various sections such as Education, Experience, Leadership, Skills & Interests. The Education section lists degrees from Harvard University and the University of London, including GPAs, relevant coursework, and extracurricular activities. The Experience section details roles such as Marketing Analyst Intern at Pepsi-Cola North America Beverages, Assistant Account Executive at Thomas Wilck Associates, and Technology Intern at Tech Hills, describing specific tasks and achievements. Leadership experience is demonstrated through roles in Harvard Undergraduate Women in Business and the Harvard College Marathon Challenge. The resume also lists technical skills in software like Stata and SQL, language proficiencies in French and Spanish, and personal interests such as ultimate frisbee and French films. The format includes clear headings, bullet points for easy reading, and consistent presentation of data.

RESUME TEMPLATE 1 (WITH BULLET POINTS)

The document is a resume template designed for a student from Harvard University. It includes sections for personal contact information, education details, experience, leadership and activities, and skills and interests. The education section allows for listing degrees, GPA, thesis, relevant coursework, study abroad experiences, and high school information. The experience section is structured to include job titles, organization names, locations, and dates, with bullet points to describe responsibilities and achievements using action verbs and quantifiable results. Leadership and activities follow a similar format, emphasizing roles and contributions. The skills and interests section is divided into technical skills, language proficiency, laboratory techniques, and personal interests. The template is formatted for clarity with headings, subheadings, and optional notes to guide customization.

RESUME TEMPLATE 2 (PARAGRAPH FORMAT)

how to make resume through email

WRITE AN EFFECTIVE COVER LETTER

Your cover letter is a writing sample and a part of the screening process. By putting your best foot forward, you can increase your chances of being interviewed. A good way to create a response-producing cover letter is to highlight your skills or experiences that are most applicable to the job or industry and to tailor the letter to the specific organization to which you’re applying.

how to make resume through email

Some general rules about letters:

  • Address your letters to a specific person if you can.
  • Tailor your letters to specific situations or organizations by doing research before writing your letters.
  • Keep letters concise and factual, no more than a single page. Avoid flowery language.
  • Give examples that support your skills and qualifications.
  • Put yourself in the reader’s shoes. What can you write that will convince the reader that you are ready and able to do the job?
  • Don’t overuse the pronoun “I”.
  • Remember that this is a marketing tool. Use plenty of action words.
  • Have an MCS advisor provide feedback on your letter.
  • If converting to a .pdf, check that your formatting translates correctly.
  • Reference skills or experiences from the job description and draw connections to your credentials.
  • Make sure your resume and cover letter are prepared with the same font type and size.

SAMPLE COVER LETTER

September 1, 2024

Morgan Smith  Director of Communications Jumpstart  308 Congress Street, 6 th Floor Boston, MA 02110 

Dear Morgan Smith: 

I am a senior at Harvard College studying History and Literature. I am writing to apply for the Marketing and Communications position at Jumpstart posted in Harvard’s Crimson Careers database. I’m very excited about the field of education, and would welcome the opportunity to bring my strong communication skills, creativity, and marketing experience to your growing team. 

Jumpstart’s commitment to early education for every child is of particular interest to me because of my passion for youth development. This past summer, I worked as a senior counselor in the Summer Urban Program, which is dedicated to preventing summer learning loss for children in the Boston and Cambridge area. I designed and taught fun, interactive classes to a group of 10 fifth graders, and planned and led local field trips and workshops daily with a junior counselor. Throughout the summer, I consistently strived to create math, science, and reading lessons and activities that were engaging and tailored to my students’ needs. 

Additionally, in my role as the Director of Marketing for the Social Innovation Collaborative, I led our team in creating a social media strategy to drive our member recruitment efforts and promote our programs and events on platforms including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. With so many competing events on campus each day, I had to continually be creative in my approach to developing and delivering content that would be compelling and effective. As a result of my efforts, our group experienced a 20% increase in our membership base and a 15% increase in our social media engagement. I’m excited at the prospect of bringing the skills I developed through this experience to the Marketing and Communications role at Jumpstart. 

Thank you for your consideration. I very much look forward to the opportunity to speak with you in person about my interest in this position. 

Sincerely, 

Alex Crimson 

how to make resume through email

Cooking up a great prompt: Getting the most from Copilot

Prompts are how you ask Copilot for Microsoft 365 to do something for you — like creating, summarizing, editing, or transforming. Think about prompting like having a conversation, using plain but clear language and providing context like you would with an assistant.

1. Tell Copilot what you need

"Give me a concise summary of recent news about [Product X]."

“Write a session abstract of this /[presentation].”

“Check this product launch rationale for inconsistencies.”

"Create a value proposition for [Product X].”

“Create an onboarding presentation based on this /[document].”

"What's the latest on [Project X].”

2. Include the right prompt ingredients

To get the best response, it’s important to focus on some of the key elements below when phrasing your Copilot prompts.

An infographic showing the four elements of a great prompt: Goal, Context, Source, and Expectations.

3. Keep the conversation going

Following up on your prompts help you collaborate with Copilot to gain more useful, tailored responses.

Lead with broader requests, then give specific details about the content.

Ask for a summary of a specific file, then ask relevant questions to gain deeper insights.

Request a meeting recap, then ask for more information about what you should know​.

Ask Copilot to translate a sentence to one of the supported languages, then ask for more context or a regional dialect.

Ask Copilot to write a story, then guide it by giving more specific, relevant details​.

Present a technical problem, then narrow it down, or ask for step-by-step guidance.

Helpful hints to keep in mind

Know Copilot’s limitations  Copilot is limited to your current conversation, so give lots of details.

Be professional Using polite language improves Copilot’s response.

Communicate clearly Pay attention to punctuation, grammar, and capitalization.

Use quotation marks ​​​​This helps Copilot know what to write, modify, or replace for you.

Start fresh Avoid interrupting and type “new topic” when switching tasks.

Copilot Lab

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CVs & Résumés

  • Jul 5, 2024
  • 13 min read

How to Use AI to Write Your Résumé: A Complete Guide

AI, aka: your personal résumé-writing assistant.

Chris Leitch

Chris Leitch

Editor-in-Chief & Résumé Expert

Reviewed by Electra Michaelidou

AI robot sitting at a desk writing a resume

Although artificial intelligence has lately been dominating news headlines in a rather fear-mongering fashion (“AI will steal your job” — it won’t … at least not yet, anyway), there is no denying how much it has positively contributed to the advancement of humanity, from as early as the 1950s.

Indeed, between analyzing bank transactions to detect (and prevent) fraud, recommending series and movies to next watch on Netflix, and finding the most efficient routes for our commute to work , AI has seamlessly been integrated into the fabric of our daily lives — and made them a whole lot better and easier in the process.

But the application of AI doesn’t stop there. It’s also a great — and often downplayed — tool to use in the marathon called the job search. That’s right: it can help you strategize your job-hunting efforts, prepare for job interviews and even write your résumé.

And that’s what this article is about: using AI to write a résumé that stands out and lands you your dream job.

What is artificial intelligence?

First things first: the burning question on many people’s lips who might be a little too embarrassed to ask out loud.

In very simple terms, artificial intelligence (or AI, for short) is technology that enables machines and computers to mimic human intelligence and problem-solving capabilities . It does this by processing large amounts of data through algorithms, learning patterns, and making predictions or decisions based on those patterns.

How can AI help you write your résumé?

Whether you’re writing a résumé from scratch or you’re fixing your existing one, it requires a lot of effort — and a deep understanding of résumé writing best practices as well as the ins and outs of applicant tracking systems. And that’s where artificial intelligence can be immensely helpful.

In fact, using a generative AI tool (basically a tool that creates AI-generated content, like Google’s Gemini, Microsoft’s Copilot or — perhaps the most famous example of all — ChatGPT) can make the whole résumé creation process a whole lot easier for you . And faster, too.

Specifically, AI-powered tools can help you put together a job-winning document by, among other things:

  • Recommending an appropriate résumé format based on your experience and specific career situation
  • Creating an outline to customize with your skills, experience and qualifications
  • Suggesting keywords to include based on job descriptions and industry standards
  • Advising you on ATS-compliance best practices
  • Providing content suggestions for bullet points and even entire sections (including your summary and work experience sections)
  • Recommending layout, formatting and style options
  • Answering questions about the entire résumé-writing process (like “Should I mention that I was named Employee of the Month on my résumé?”)

Should you use AI for résumé writing?

Much like the heated spicy debate surrounding the use of the Oxford comma (opposed by yours truly — most of the time, anyway), writing a résumé with AI has been met with raised eyebrows and controversy from users and commentators alike, particularly from an ethical standpoint .

After all, isn’t it just a form of plagiarism? Well, yes — if you’re just doing a simple copy-and-paste job. Then it is plagiarism (See: Stealing and cheating. Also: Highly discouraged.)

But that’s not how generative AI tools are intended to be used. They’re meant to help you write your résumé, not actually write it for you . And that’s because, beyond the whole cheating thing, a machine — no matter how advanced it is — can’t effectively capture your unique voice, personality, career journey and, most importantly, humanity.

Ultimately, it’s not a question of whether you should use AI-powered tools like ChatGPT to write your résumé — but rather how you should use them. Specifically, as a source for inspiration and guidance to write a first draft .

How to use AI to write your résumé

And now for the juicy bit: actually using AI to write your résumé. Here’s how!

Step 1: Gather your information

Before you set out to write your résumé (with or without the help of AI), it’s a good idea to first gather all the information you will need for the task at hand.

A great starting point is to compile a list of all your experiences, skills , qualifications and achievements , as well as your contact details, certifications and anything else for potential inclusion.

This is what we call in the industry a “master résumé”. Essentially: a simple document, free of formatting and stylistic choices, that catalogues your entire professional and educational journey in one place so you can choose relevant information to tailor your (final) résumé to the specific job you’re applying for.

It’s also a good idea to gather any relevant documents in a desktop folder, too, like your current résumé and cover letter, portfolio, and even performance reviews, as well as links to your LinkedIn profile, website and the job ad itself.

Why do this? Well, having everything on standby will save you the time and trouble of having to remember specific career details or locate important documents while you’re deep in the résumé creation process.

Step 2: Choose an AI tool

The internet is so crammed with generative AI tools (with more and more seemingly popping up every day) that you’re truly spoiled for choice.

Beyond the usual suspects (like ChatGPT, Claude, Copilot and Gemini), you’ll also find tools that are specifically intended for writing a résumé. This includes résumé builders like Rezi and Kickresume, which offer a selection of templates to use as the basis of your résumé and provide content suggestions to put it all together. That said, they usually lack the flexibility of more “traditional” generative AI tools — in the sense that you can’t “converse” with them to plan and optimize your job application documents.

Whichever tool you decide to use for résumé creation, though, it’s important to weigh your needs against the potential capabilities and limitations of the tools you’ve shortlisted . Equally important is to consider the tool’s reputation, output quality, accuracy, ease of use, security and even pricing (most AI tools work on a freemium model ).

Step 3: Craft thoughtful prompts

This is the point where you actually start writing your résumé with AI, and it all begins with carefully crafted prompts — basically, questions or instructions that you feed into the generative AI’s interface to get responses.

The best kind of prompts are clear and specific , and they — above all — provide context to get the most relevant and useful responses . For example, simply telling the AI tool “I need help writing my résumé” will only provide you with general tips and advice. But if you also explain that you’re a recent graduate or you’re changing careers, the responses you’ll receive will be more tailored to your background, current situation, and career goals.

That said, crafting the perfect prompt might take a bit of trial and error. If you don’t get a response that you’re completely satisfied with, spend some time refining your initial prompt, asking follow-up questions, offering additional information and context, and clarifying exactly what you need.

Indeed, the more you “converse” with AI, the better it will perform and the better the results it will deliver — and the better at writing prompts you will get.

Step 4: Provide assets to ensure customization

Remember those documents and links you have on standby? Your current résumé and cover letter, performance reviews , portfolio, and all that? These are the assets you’ll need here.

When feeding prompts into the AI tool, you’ll want to provide as much detail and context as possible (as we discussed earlier), and this often involves providing relevant assets so that AI can really understand the assignment and work its magic .

You can either copy-and-paste the content of your documents directly into the tool’s text field along with your prompt, or simply add it as an attachment. (Most AI tools can “read” images, too, so you don’t really need to worry about file types.)

Once you submit everything, the AI tool will then scan the files and links you’ve provided, and finally personalize its responses as best as possible according to your specific needs and goals.

Step 5: Review and edit

One of the biggest misconceptions about using ChatGPT and other generative AI tools is that you’re meant to copy the content it suggests over to your résumé verbatim. But, as we touched upon earlier (and I will keep reminding you this), AI should act as a résumé-writing assistant , not a résumé writer .

(Side note: If you would like someone to write your résumé, then you might want to consider our professional résumé writing services . Yes, some self-promotion here. No, we’re not even sorry.)

Once AI responds to your prompts, the wise thing to do is to review and rework (or even fully rewrite) any content suggestions before copying them over to your résumé. Remember: even though AI is tailoring responses to your needs as much as possible (provided that your prompts are on point), it will never know you as much as you hopefully know yourself.

What does this mean? Only you can provide accurate numbers and stats as proof of your professional achievements, or effectively communicate your background, skills and expertise to potential employers.

Résumé writing AI prompt examples

We’ve broadly talked about AI writing prompts, but what are some good examples? Here are 10 to get you started:

1. Choosing a résumé format

I am a sales representative and I am currently in the process of changing careers to become an account manager. Which résumé format would help me effectively present my transferable skills and experience?

2. Creating an outline

I have 10 years’ experience as a criminal lawyer and I am now returning to the workforce after a 2-year career break , during which time I volunteered my legal expertise to various non-profit organizations in Asia and South America. Please create an outline for my résumé that will help me effectively address my career break and explain what I've been up to in those two years.

3. Finding keywords

I am applying for the Graphic Designer position at Company ABC — see the attached job description. Based on the job description, as well as the graphic design field as a whole, list 25–30 keywords that hiring managers and applicant tracking systems might be scanning for when reviewing my résumé.

4. Writing a career summary

I’m applying for a senior accounting position and have 15 years of experience in financial analysis and auditing. Can you help me write a compelling résumé summary that showcases my skills and experience?

5. Finding action verbs

I managed multiple large-scale projects in my previous role as a project manager. Can you suggest some strong action verbs and phrases to describe my responsibilities and accomplishments on my résumé ?

6. Highlighting achievements

As a marketing specialist, I designed and executed a social media campaign that boosted engagement by 40% and generated significant leads. Can you help me emphasize these achievements on my résumé?

7. Listing skills

I want to group skills together in my résumé. Can you provide 3–5 skill group ideas for a maître d’hôtel résumé, and suggest 3–6 in-demand skills for each group, please?

8. Asking general questions

I am a content writer, and have worked both as an employee and as a freelancer. In my résumé, should I highlight my freelance experience in a dedicated section or within my work experience section?

9. Asking for feedback

I am attaching a copy of my résumé as well as the job description for the English teacher position that I’m applying to at ABC Academy. Could you review my résumé and provide me with feedback regarding its content, layout, tone, ATS-compliance and customization to the job description, as well as if there’s anything I could improve, add or delete?

10. Proofreading

Attached is a copy of my résumé, written in British English. Please proofread it for grammar, syntax, spelling and overall consistency, and mark any errors that you find.

AI résumé-writing best practices

We’ve discussed how it’s okay to use AI to write your résumé, and we’ve explored how to do just that. Now, let’s take a look at some final tips and best practices to keep in mind throughout the entire process:

  • Don’t rely on AI to write your résumé. Remember: it should be used to guide you through the process — not do all the work for you. Be prepared to invest the same amount of time and effort you would if you were writing your résumé on your own.
  • (Always) Provide the job description. This will help AI better tailor its responses to your prompts. (You can do this by providing the link, pasting the description into a prompt, or adding it as an attachment.)
  • Have a conversation. The more you converse with AI, asking follow-up questions, asking for adjustments and referring to previous prompts, the more optimized AI’s responses will be. (Saying “please” and “thank you” is optional, but it just might mean you’ll survive the robot uprising, if it ever happens.)
  • Verify information. No matter how helpful generative AI tools are, they’re not completely up to date. ChatGPT, for example, only has access to data up until 2022, which means it’s not aware of the latest résumé trends and ever-changing writing conventions.
  • Proofread. Just as you would if you wrote a DIY résumé, it’s important to manually proofread your document before submitting it to potential employers. This includes double-checking employment dates and contact details as much as grammar and spelling.
  • Ask for human feedback. Once you’ve finished your résumé, ask a friend, relative or résumé expert (some more shameless self-promotion) to go over it too, and get their feedback on any potential problems.

Key takeaways

Using AI to write your résumé is a pretty straightforward process once you get the hang of it, while it can transform an otherwise daunting task into a streamlined and efficient experience. The key, however, is to use AI thoughtfully .

  • Gather your information. Compile a master résumé with all your experiences, skills and qualifications.
  • Choose an AI tool. Select a reliable generative AI tool that meets your specific needs.
  • Craft thoughtful prompts. Provide detailed and context-rich prompts for the best AI-generated responses.
  • Review and edit. Customize and refine AI suggestions to ensure your résumé accurately represents you.
  • Follow best practices. Continuously engage with AI, verify all information, and seek human feedback.

Got a question? Let us know in the comments section below!

Résumé Writing

Artificial Intelligence

how to make resume through email

IMAGES

  1. How to Email a Resume to Recruiter : Sample & Writing Tips

    how to make resume through email

  2. Emailing a Resume: Sample and Complete Guide [12+ Examples]

    how to make resume through email

  3. How to Email Your Resume Professionally (Quick Guide)

    how to make resume through email

  4. How to Email a Resume [+Sample Email for a Job]

    how to make resume through email

  5. How to Email a Resume to an Employer: 12+ Examples

    how to make resume through email

  6. How To Write A Resume Email Sample

    how to make resume through email

VIDEO

  1. How to Write 🔥 Resume Email Subject Line

  2. How write email for job application with resume#job application email #youtubeshorts #shortvideo

  3. How To Write A Perfect Resume: 10 Tips For Creating A Strong Resume

  4. 1. How to Write an E-Mail to Apply for a Job

  5. How to Get Your Resume Through ATS Screens

  6. How to Send Resume to Hr

COMMENTS

  1. What to Say When Emailing a Resume (with Examples)

    Add a clear subject line. Make the point of your email clear with a logical subject line - you could include the job title of the vacancy you're applying for, for example, or refer to the fact that the email is a job application or resume. Choose a professional greeting. Think "Dear [name]," or even just " [name]," rather than "Hiya ...

  2. How To Email a Resume to an Employer (With Example)

    2. Attach a file. The easiest way to email your resume is by attaching the file directly to the email. First, save your resume file as a Word Document (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf) file format. To do this, find "Save As" in your toolbar. From the file formats available, select Word Document or PDF.

  3. Resume email

    Best email template for sending resume. You've read our 8 sample resume samples, but we've saved the ultimate email for last. Here's the best email template for sending a resume by email. Hi (Recipient's name), I have attached my resume for the position of (insert details).

  4. What to Write in an Email When Sending a Resume [+ Examples & Tips

    Examples of introduction when emailing a resume: "My name is Roger Jones. I'm writing this email to express my interest in the job vacancy at Valcor". "My name is Roger Jones, and I am submitting my application for the current job opening as Financial Analyst at Valcor.". "My name is Roger Jones. I came across Valcor's job ads on ...

  5. How to Email a Resume [+Sample Email for a Job]

    3. Make your subject line clear and professional. The subject line of your email should be brief and to the point. There are three elements to a professional email subject line: Your name. Target job title. The term "job application". Here's an example of a good subject line for emailing a resume:

  6. How to Email a Resume to an Employer [Template + Examples]

    Here's how to send an email and attach your resume in Gmail: Log in to Gmail. Click on the "Attach files" icon (look for the paper clip at the bottom of your email) Attach your resume to an email using the paper clip icon in Gmail. Select your resume. Press "Open".

  7. What To Write in an Email When Sending a Resume? (+Samples)

    If that's the case, then you need to stick to it. However, if there are no instructions, you should stick to the standard format for subject lines: Subject: 'Job application' - Job title, Job ID (if applicable) — Your Name. Example: Job application - Office Manager, Job ID #1553 — Ian Lumberjack.

  8. How to Email a Resume to Get a Job [+ Examples]

    I have attached my resume and a cover letter for the Account Executive position at Tethos, as advertised on your company's website. 4. Say What Value You'd Bring to the Company. Grab the attention of the hiring manager by highlighting the unique qualities that make you the perfect candidate.

  9. Emailing Your Resume: The Guide with Sample Emails for a Job

    Attach your resume using an appropriate file name. Name your resume file with something specific (like "JohnJohnson_Resume.pdf"), rather than something vague (like "Resume.pdf"). This makes it easier for the employer to find your application and also shows attention to detail. Write a strong and concise email message.

  10. 7 Examples: How to Email a Resume to an Employer

    To politely submit your resume, start by writing a professional and courteous email. Address the recipient by their name, if possible. In the email, briefly introduce yourself, explain the purpose of the email, and mention the attached resume. For example: "Dear Mr. Smith, I hope this email finds you well.

  11. Email a Resume

    The body portion of the email is the perfect place to draft your cover letter. Draft a new cover letter with each position and include the experience and skills that best relate to the position for which you're applying. 4. Last, write your subject line. Before sending the email, you will want to draft your subject line.

  12. How to Email a Resume to Your Employer With 7 Templates

    Sincerely, [your full name] [your signature] 3. Sample follow-up email after sending your resume. See this email as a gentle nudge, a reminder of your enthusiasm for the role. That means your email shouldn't come across as impatient but rather as a testament to your eagerness.

  13. How to Email a Resume to an Employer

    Include an Introduction in Your Email. Review a Sample Email Message. Tips for Emailing a Resume. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Photo: Emily Roberts / The Balance. How to send a resume via email, including which file format to use, what to include in the message, and how to attach and send a file, with examples.

  14. How to Email Your Resume Professionally (Quick Guide)

    Click the New Email button in the upper left corner to start a new email. 2. Type the email, including the recipient's email address and subject line. Use the Attach File icon to attach your resume to an email in MS Outlook. 3. Click the Attach File icon (it looks like a paper clip) at the top of the screen. 4.

  15. 5+ Sample Emails When Sending a Resume to an Employer [Mail Templates]

    Craft a Clear and Concise Subject Line: Your email subject line should be clear and relevant. Include your name and the purpose of the email, such as "John Smith Resume for [Job Title]." Address the Recipient: Use a polite and appropriate salutation, such as "Dear [Hiring Manager's Name]" if you have that information.

  16. How To Email A Resume

    Example resume email #2: Dear Mr./Ms. [ Surname], My name is [Your Name], and I would like to express my interest in the [Name of Position] position listed on your company's website. For years I have been a huge fan of everything your company stands for and all the great work that it has done.

  17. What to Write in Email When Sending Resume Out

    Body of your email: Include a brief paragraph (two to three sentences) with your name, interest and relevant skills. Direct the reader to the attached resume and cover letter. Closing: Add a call to action.Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Sincerely, your name.

  18. How to Email Resumes and Get Yourself Noticed

    If you attach your resume, be sure that it's saved as a PDF to protect the format (unless the employer specifically asks for a Word Doc). Name the file clearly with your full name and the word 'resume.'. Ensure that the PDF or Doc file is less than 10 MB in size so there won't be any problems sending it.

  19. Email Subject Lines for Resume & Job Application (+Examples)

    Here are a few email subject line examples of how to do that. "Job application — Marketing Manager, Job ID 25 — John Smith, Google Creative Certification". "Job application — IT Analyst — John Smith, Microsoft Certified". "Applying for Accountant Director — Jane Doe, CPA".

  20. How To Email A Resume: A Step-By-Step Guide (With Sample)

    Consider following the six steps given below to learn how to email a resume: 1. Review any instructions carefully. Before sending your resume, read the job description attentively for any guidelines that hiring managers want candidates to follow while applying for a role. Suppose the job listing specifies that you send your resume through email ...

  21. How to Send Networking Emails With Your Resume (Templates Included)

    Email Template #3: Applying to a job via email. Email Template #4: Following up on an application over email + attaching your resume. Email Template #5: Sending your resume via Linkedin. Email Template #6: How to email your resume to an external recruiter. Email Template #7: Emailing your resume if you were referred by a mutual contact.

  22. How To Write a Sample Email to Send a Resume to a Recruiter

    From then on, every email you create will automatically include your signature. ‍ Step 7: Attaching your resume to a recruiter email. A lot of job applicants question whether or not they should email their resume as a word doc or a PDF file. A PDF has long been thought of as the clean and professional standard.

  23. CREATE A STRONG RESUME

    Draft a resume using one of the MCS templates. Attend a Resume Workshop to learn the nuts and bolts of getting started. See the MCS events calendar for dates. View the recorded MCS Resume Webinar. Get advice via drop-ins, Monday-Friday, 1:00-4:00pm. Ask quick career-related questions and have an advisor review your resume.

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    Even if you receive hundreds of job application emails, it can be beneficial to respond to each one. Each application email response provides the opportunity for several key benefits for yourself and your company. Using an email template for job application responses can streamline the process and make answering every applicant more manageable.

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  26. How to Use AI to Write Your Résumé (Tips & Examples)

    How to use AI to write your résumé. And now for the juicy bit: actually using AI to write your résumé. Here's how! Step 1: Gather your information. Before you set out to write your résumé (with or without the help of AI), it's a good idea to first gather all the information you will need for the task at hand.

  27. How Long Should a Resume Be? [2024]

    Concise and focused: The one-page limit ensures that you present your relevant skills and qualifications using clear and concise language. Easy to scan: A one-page format makes it easier for recruiters and hiring managers to locate essential skills, experiences and achievements at a glance. Shows strong communication skills: Crafting a one-page resume demonstrates the ability to condense ...

  28. 10 Best Resume Builders to Create A Great Resume

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