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190 Society Speech Topics [Persuasive, Informative, Argumentative]

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Jim Peterson has over 20 years experience on speech writing. He wrote over 300 free speech topic ideas and how-to guides for any kind of public speaking and speech writing assignments at My Speech Class.

In this article:

Informative

Argumentative, list of society speech topics.

society speech topics

  • Why you should push people to try new things.
  • No child should be considered a “lost cause”.
  • We shouldn’t have to pay for internet access.
  • Celebrities should have more privacy rights.
  • Life is better now than it was 50 years ago.
  • Why stereotypes are harmful.
  • Why everyone should know about feminism.
  • Support the wounded warrior project.
  • Should companies market to children?
  • Prisoners should be allowed to vote.
  • Are we doing enough to end poverty?
  • Is Social Darwinism true?
  • The USA has too many prisoners.
  • Why we should have a three day weekend.
  • How to fix harmful gender roles.
  • Is trick or treating a bad thing?
  • Should retirement homes be free?
  • Public toilets should be cleaner.
  • Generic products are just as good.
  • How bullying changes who you are.
  • How bullying can lead to suicide.
  • Societal beauty demands are harmful.
  • The advantages of politeness.
  • Why you should not shop at Walmart.
  • Volunteering in your community.
  • The need for affordable housing.
  • Should we get longer holidays?
  • The danger of propaganda.
  • Too much money is a bad thing.
  • We need free bus rides for seniors.
  • We need better public transportation.
  • The importance of volunteering.
  • Homeless people deserve a home.
  • The importance of preventing cyber bullying.
  • Donate money to charity.
  • Raise the retirement age.
  • We need to stop censorship.
  • We need more foster parents.
  • Why everyone is equal.
  • Single parent families need help.
  • Mandatory sentencing weakened communities.
  • Corporate corruption weakens the country.
  • The pledge of allegiance should not be mandatory.
  • Shop at local stores.
  • Buy security alarms.
  • We need more prison alternatives.
  • Frivolous lawsuits hurt the country.
  • We need more affirmative action.
  • More resources should be devoted to fighting poverty.
  • Bar closing hours should be later.
  • Police corruption needs to be stopped.
  • Stay at home moms deserve more respect.
  • Women’s pay rates should be equal to men’s.
  • Cosmetic surgery should be highly regulated.
  • We need to care for our aging population.
  • Racial profiling needs to be stopped.
  • Privacy rights must be respected.
  • Women’s rights must be advanced.
  • Race relations need to be improved.
  • Columbus day should be eliminated.
  • Gun control saves lives.
  • Media bias is harming our country.
  • Beauty contests are harmful.
  • Privatize social security.
  • A more open immigration policy will cause economical disasters.
  • Action movies reflect the fall of good manners.
  • Activism on engaging social matters are on the rise.
  • African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans are still discriminated against.
  • Alternative lifestyles influence art.
  • Art festivals should raise awareness on key social issues.
  • Arts are an invention of the elite.
  • Binge drinking has a lasting negative effect on social behavior.
  • Bisexuality is equal to heterosexuality in the western world.
  • Crime maps should be made public.
  • Cultural diversity is not a barrier for social unity.
  • Curfews reduce street violence.
  • Education, housing, and hiring must be equal for all citizens.
  • Elder abuse can be prevented.
  • Former prisoners need help to re-enter society.
  • Gay soap-opera characters must kiss each other.
  • Hip-Hop and R&B gangsta rap music influence our youth.
  • Homelessness figures are not exaggerated.
  • Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes.
  • It is impossible for news media to devote equal attention to all people.
  • Let graffiti artists clean the walls they ruin themselves.
  • Media violence is damaging children.
  • Multinationals rule the world, not governments.
  • National lotteries must find a way to help gambling addicts.
  • Not enough money is available for international refugee programs.
  • Not enough public buildings have easier access for people with disabilities.
  • Not having a car means less choice in how to conduct your life.
  • Our liberties should be protected at all costs.
  • People could learn a lot about life from the Amish.
  • Permanent affordable supportive housing helps people live more stable lives.
  • Prohibit skateboards and hoverboards on sidewalks.
  • Public shame in TV reports is a perfect way for criminal retribution.
  • Ratings are not effective in curbing violence.
  • Rhetoric techniques pave the way to success in life.
  • Safety and security are what society needs most.
  • Sexist images of women should be banned.
  • Skinny models are setting a bad example for teenagers.
  • Social deprivation is the source of crime.
  • Spanish Americans have been at a disadvantage in society for decades.
  • Television soaps are responsible for the increasing number of breast implants today.
  • The dangers of gambling are not only short term.
  • The environment of a young person has a direct effect on her of his prospects.
  • The G8 leaders cause more poverty in developing nations.
  • The Patriot Act violates civil liberties.
  • The poor should be seen as consumers with special needs.
  • The private lives of celebrities should remain private.
  • The right to freedom is more important than security issues.
  • The social costs of legalized casino gambling outweigh the benefits.
  • There will always be homeless people.
  • There will never be an end to poverty.
  • To understand American society, you must first understand blues music.
  • We are better off today than we were five years ago.
  • We are lost our cultural identity.
  • We can stop girls from being maimed and abused.
  • Western nations must not impose their standards on developing countries.
  • Women are not fairly portrayed in the media.
  • Zero tolerance policies are not working.
  • There are ways to stop the continuous growth of Earths population.
  • Children in … fill in the nation of your choice … have a better life than ten years ago.
  • China is right to have a one-child policy.
  • The world is nowhere near prepared for unexpected dooms and disasters.
  • There are ways to control the human population.
  • Why are dogs known as man’s best friend?
  • Is happiness a good measure of social progress?
  • The day to day duties of a police officer.
  • The benefits of teamwork.
  • Some inexpensive places to take your date.
  • The benefits of male paternity leave.
  • The importance of providing shelter to homeless veterans.
  • Aggression is a real presence in society.
  • What rights consumers have.
  • What is the correct tipping etiquette?
  • The different types of personalities.
  • How fashion ruins the kids of today.
  • Wealth is not measured with money.
  • The negative aspects of living in an era of apathy.
  • Silence against violence is harmful.
  • Feminism and its misconceptions.
  • The reasons shops should be closed on Sunday.
  • Is being good looking important?
  • How to make the U.S. a better country.
  • How LGBT youth are protected.
  • The state of the rich and the poor.
  • The history of hello kitty.
  • The most interesting world records.
  • The invention of pop rocks.
  • What life will be like in the future.
  • How to cope with natural disasters.
  • Celebrate diversity.
  • How we should respond to chemical and biological threats of violence.
  • Swimming programs for the elderly.
  • The history of aboriginals in Australia.
  • The history of global crime.
  • Typical social roles we expect from men and women in society.
  • Unemployment rates compared to a decade ago.
  • Indigenous people around the world.
  • The considerable shortage of women in Alaska
  • The development of the human sex ratio in our country.
  • What indigenous people should do to preserve their culture.
  • Why global population keeps growing.
  • What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.
  • How people are judged by their skin color.
  • How parents don’t understand our generation.
  • Hollywood has a negative impact on society.
  • The taboo on recreational drugs is unjustified.
  • The negative effects of racism.
  • Why do people believe in superstitions?
  • Privacy is not the most important right.
  • The negative effects of selfishness.
  • Are nursing homes necessary in our society?
  • Do we still live in a sexist society?
  • Does social status matter?
  • The Miss America pageant is sexist.
  • How to stop cyber bullying.
  • Is laziness a good thing?
  • Is life in the city preferable to live life in the country?
  • A little bribery is okay to get everything going your way.
  • Ban piercings in the face.
  • Computer nerds will always be unpopular.
  • Drivers must be retrained every 15 years
  • Everybody does not have the right to carry a gun.
  • Give immigrants the right to vote on Election Day.
  • Hispanic poverty is not only caused by racism.
  • One income tax rate for everyone regardless of level of income.
  • The American Way of Life does not exist anymore.
  • This country has failed to live up to its ideals.

75 Group Discussion Topics

60 Speech Topics on Religion and Spirituality [Persuasive, Informative]

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Social Issue Speech Topics

Social issues affect the lives of people in society in many ways. Social issues are mostly caused by different problems that are beyond human control. These are the most common causes of disagreements between people in a society.

Social issues exist within the moral, cultural, and ethnic margins of society, and so they always differ from a group of people to the other. Considering this diversity in conformity, there are always many disagreements within different social groups that should be solved.

The way different societies perceive different social issues is different. And so, what you may consider a problem in your culture may not be an issue in another community. Social issues are controversial in nature, and the arguments range from health care, polities to religion. They may as well be about issues such as government statistics, data, and the usefulness of the data in analyzing the changes and trends in a country.

When given an essay to work on that requires you to write about social issue speech, you must be objective in your research and writing. The topic you use should relate and be relevant to the social issue you are addressing in your speech.

  • The narrative that all humans are equal
  • The homelessness figures in the United States are real
  • Fashion is the leading cause of child misguidance
  • Corporate corruption is the leading cause of weak economies in different countries
  • The right to privacy should never be taken for granted
  • Guns don’t kill people. People kill each other
  • The essence of beauty contests is obscure
  • Media violence has raised the figures of spoiled kids
  • The largest population in the world has lost its cultural identity
  • There is a need to stop the maiming and abusing of school girls
  • The one-child policy in China is justifiable
  • The proper tipping etiquette and techniques in modern society
  • What life would be without technology?
  • Immigrants should be given the right to vote in national elections
  • Bullying has been attributed to the increased cases of suicide
  • How to protect LGBT kids from violence?
  • Laziness is the leading cause of increased poverty levels
  • Happiness cannot be sued to measure one’s social progress
  • Looking good is a lifestyle and social indication of maturity
  • Treating and empowering women is a good way to boost lives
  • The city life is easier and cheaper for the working class
  • Media biasness is the leading cause of marriage breakages
  • Media biasness is the leading cause of high corruption in governments
  • Living today is better than it was 50 years ago
  • There is a need to allow prisoners to vote
  • Police corruption is the leading cause of weak economies
  • Media violence has adverse effects on the lives of children
  • There is a need to make public toilets cleaner
  • Women should be banned from posting erotic pictures
  • Retirement homes should be free of charge
  • Single-parent families need more than just financial assistance
  • Teamwork at workplaces and its many benefits

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150 Good Persuasive Speech Topics for Students in 2024

April 1, 2024

Do you know that moment in your favorite film, when the soundtrack begins to swell and the main character stands up and delivers a speech so rousing, so impassioned, it has the entire room either weeping or cheering by the time it concludes? What distinguishes the effectiveness of such a speech is not only the protagonist’s stellar delivery but also the compelling nature of the subject matter at hand. Choosing an effective persuasive speech topic is essential for guaranteeing that your future speech or essay is as moving as these . If this sounds like a tall order, have no fear. Below you’ll find a list of some of the best and most interesting persuasive speech topics for high school students to tackle, from the playful (“Pets for President”) to the serious (“Should We Stop AI from Replacing Human Workers?”).

And if you’re craving more inspiration, feel free to check out this list of Great Debate Topics , which can be used to generate further ideas.

What is a Good Persuasive Speech?

Before we get to the list, we must address the question on everyone’s minds: what is a persuasive speech, and what the heck makes for a good persuasive speech topic? A persuasive speech is a speech that aims to convince its listeners of a particular point of view . At the heart of each persuasive speech is a central conflict . Note: The persuasive speech stands in contrast to a simple informative speech, which is intended purely to convey information. (I.e., an informative speech topic might read: “The History of Making One’s Bed,” while a persuasive speech topic would be: “Why Making One’s Bed is a Waste of Time”—understand?)

And lest you think that persuasive speeches are simply assigned by your teachers as a particularly cruel form of torture, remember that practicing your oratory skills will benefit you in all areas of life—from job interviews, to business negotiations, to your future college career in public policy or international relations . Knowing how to use your voice to enact meaningful change is a valuable skill that can empower you to make a difference in the world.

Components of a Great Persuasive Speech Topic

The ideal persuasive speech topic will inspire the audience to action via both logical arguments and emotional appeals. As such, we can summarize the question “what makes a good persuasive speech topic?” by saying that the topic must possess the following qualities:

  • Timeliness and Relevance . Great persuasive speech topics grapple with a contemporary issue that is meaningful to the listener at hand. The topic might be a current news item, or it might be a long-standing social issue. In either case, the topic should be one with real-world implications.
  • Complexity . A fruitful persuasive speech topic will have many facets. Topics that are controversial, with some gray area, lend themselves to a high degree of critical thinking. They also offer the speaker an opportunity to consider and refute all counterarguments before making a compelling case for his or her own position.
  • Evidence . You want to be able to back up your argument with clear evidence from reputable sources (i.e., not your best friend or dog). The more evidence and data you can gather, the more sound your position will be. In addition, your audience will be more inclined to trust you.
  • Personal Connection. Do you feel passionately about the topic you’ve chosen? If not, it may be time to go back to the drawing board. This does not mean you have to support the side you choose; sometimes, arguing for the opposing side of what you personally believe can be an effective exercise in building empathy and perspective. Either way, though, the key is to select a topic that you care deeply about. Your passion will be infectious to the audience.

150 Good Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Should tech companies regulate the development of AI systems and automation to protect humans’ jobs?
  • Should we limit screen time for children?
  • Is it ethical for AI models like Dall-E to train themselves on artists’ work without the artists’ permission?
  • Should the government regulate the use of personal drones?
  • Is mass surveillance ethical? Does its threat to civil liberties outweigh its benefits?
  • Are virtual reality experiences a valuable educational tool?
  • Do the positive effects of powerful AI systems outweigh the risks?
  • Do voice assistants like Siri and Alexa invade individuals’ privacy?
  • Are cell phone bans in the classroom effective for improving student learning?
  • Does the use of facial recognition technology in public violate individuals’ privacy?
  • Should students be allowed to use ChatGPT and other AI tools for writing assignments?
  • Should AI-generated art be allowed in art shows or contests?
  • Who holds responsibility for accidents caused by self-driving cars: the driver or the car company?

Business and Economy

  • Should we do away with the minimum wage? Why or why not?
  • Is it ethical for companies to use unpaid internships as a source of labor?
  • Does the gig economy benefit or harm workers?
  • Is capitalism the best economic system?
  • Is it ethical for companies to use sweatshops in developing countries?
  • Should the government provide free healthcare for all citizens?
  • Should the government regulate prices on pharmaceutical drugs?
  • Should the government enact a universal base income?
  • Should customers be required to tip a minimum amount in order to ensure food service workers make a living wage?
  • Should someone’s tattoos or personal appearance factor into the hiring process?
  • Should US workers have more vacation time?
  • Is big game hunting beneficial for local communities?
  • Should we legalize euthanasia?
  • Is it ethical to use animals for medical research?
  • Is it ethical to allow access to experimental treatments for terminally ill patients?
  • Should we allow genetic engineering in humans?
  • Is the death penalty obsolete?
  • Should we allow the cloning of humans?
  • Is it ethical to allow performance-enhancing drugs in sports?
  • Should embryonic stem cell collection be allowed?
  • Do frozen IVF embryos have rights?
  • Should state and federal investigators be allowed to use DNA from genealogy databases?
  • Should the government limit how many children a couple can have?
  • Is spanking children an acceptable form of discipline?
  • Should we allow parents to choose their children’s physical attributes through genetic engineering?
  • Should we require parents to vaccinate their children?
  • Should we require companies to give mandatory paternal and maternal leave?
  • Should children be allowed to watch violent movies and video games?
  • Should parents allow their teenagers to drink before they turn 21?
  • Should the government provide childcare?
  • Should telling your children about Santa Claus be considered lying?
  • Should one parent stay home?
  • Should parental consent be required for minors to receive birth control?
  • Is it an invasion of privacy for parents to post photographs of their children on social media?

Social Media

  • Should social media platforms ban political ads?
  • Do the benefits of social media outweigh the downsides?
  • Should the government hold social media companies responsible for hate speech on their platforms?
  • Is social media making us more or less social?
  • Do platforms like TikTok exacerbate mental health issues in teens?
  • Should the government regulate social media to protect citizens’ privacy?
  • Is it right for parents to monitor their children’s social media accounts?
  • Should social media companies enact a minimum user age restriction?
  • Should we require social media companies to protect user data?
  • Should we hold social media companies responsible for cyberbullying?
  • Should schools ban the use of social media from their networks?
  • Should we be allowed to record others without their consent?
  • Do online crime sleuths help or hurt criminal investigations?

Education – Persuasive Speech Topics 

  • Would trade schools and other forms of vocational training benefit a greater number of students than traditional institutions of higher education?
  • Should colleges use standardized testing in their admissions processes?
  • Is forcing students to say the Pledge a violation of their right to freedom of speech?
  • Should school districts offer bilingual education programs for non-native speakers?
  • Should schools do away with their physical education requirements?
  • Should schools incorporate a remote learning option into their curriculum?
  • Should we allow school libraries to ban certain books?
  • Should we remove historical figures who owned slaves from school textbooks and other educational materials?
  • Should we have mixed-level classrooms or divide students according to ability?
  • Should grading on a curve be allowed?
  • Should graphic novels be considered literature?
  • Should all students have to take financial literacy classes before graduating?
  • Should colleges pay student athletes?
  • Should we ban violent contact sports like boxing and MMA?
  • Should sports leagues require professional athletes to stand during the national anthem?
  • Should sports teams ban players like Kyrie Irving when they spread misinformation or hate speech?
  • Should high schools require their athletes to maintain a certain GPA?
  • Should the Olympic committee allow transgender athletes to compete?
  • Should high schools ban football due to its safety risks to players?
  • Should all high school students be required to play a team sport?
  • Should sports teams be mixed instead of single-gender?
  • Should there be different athletic standards for men and women?
  • In which renewable energy option would the US do best to invest?
  • Should the US prioritize space exploration over domestic initiatives?
  • Should companies with a high carbon footprint be punished?
  • Should the FDA ban GMOs?
  • Would the world be a safer place without nuclear weapons?
  • Does AI pose a greater threat to humanity than it does the potential for advancement?
  • Who holds the most responsibility for mitigating climate change: individuals or corporations?
  • Should we be allowed to resurrect extinct species?
  • Are cancer screening programs ethical?

Social Issues – Persuasive Speech Topics

  • College education: should the government make it free for all?
  • Should we provide free healthcare for undocumented immigrants?
  • Is physician-assisted suicide morally justifiable?
  • Does social media have a negative impact on democracy?
  • Does cancel culture impede free speech?
  • Does affirmative action help or hinder minority groups in the workplace?
  • Should we hold public figures and celebrities to a higher standard of morality?
  • Should abortion be an issue that is decided at the federal or state level?
  • Should the sex offender registry be available to the public?
  • Should undocumented immigrants have a path to amnesty?
  • Do syringe services programs reduce or increase harmful behaviors?
  • Should there be a statute of limitations?
  • Should those who are convicted of a crime be required to report their criminal history on job and housing applications?

Politics and Government

  • Is the Electoral College still an effective way to elect the President of the US?
  • Should we allow judges to serve on the Supreme Court indefinitely?
  • Should the US establish a national gun registry?
  • Countries like Israel and China require all citizens to serve in the military. Is this a good or bad policy?
  • Should the police force require all its officers to wear body cameras while on duty?
  • Should the US invest in the development of clean meat as a sustainable protein source?
  • Should the US adopt ranked-choice voting?
  • Should institutions that profited from slavery provide reparations?
  • Should the government return land to Native American tribes?
  • Should there be term limits for representatives and senators?
  • Should there be an age limit for presidential candidates?
  • Should women be allowed in special forces units?

Easy Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Should schools have uniforms?
  • Can video games improve problem-solving skills?
  • Are online classes as effective as in-person classes?
  • Should companies implement a four-day work week?
  • Co-ed learning versus single-sex: which is more effective?
  • Should the school day start later?
  • Is homework an effective teaching tool?
  • Are electric cars really better for the environment?
  • Should schools require all students to study a foreign language?
  • Do professional athletes get paid too much money?

Fun Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Should we allow pets to run for public office?
  • Does pineapple belong on pizza?
  • Would students benefit from schools swapping out desks with more comfortable seating arrangements (i.e., bean bag chairs and couches)?
  • Is procrastination the key to success?
  • Should Americans adopt British accents to sound more intelligent?
  • The age-old dilemma: cats or dogs?
  • Should meme creators receive royalties when their memes go viral?
  • Should there be a minimum drinking age for coffee?
  • Are people who make their beds every day more successful than those who don’t?

Interesting Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Is the movie ranking system an effective way to evaluate the appropriateness of films?
  • Should the government place a “health tax” on junk food?
  • Is it ethical to create artificial life forms that are capable of complex emotions?
  • Should parents let children choose their own names?
  • Creating clones of ourselves to serve as organ donors: ethical or not?
  • Is it ethical to engineer humans to be better and more optimized than nature intended?
  • Should we adopt a universal language to communicate with people from all countries?
  • Should there be a penalty for people who don’t vote?
  • Should calories be printed on menus?
  • Does tourism positively or negatively impact local communities?
  • When used by non-Natives, are dreamcatchers cultural appropriation?
  • Should companies require their employees to specify pronouns in their signature line?
  • Should commercial fishing be banned?
  • Are cemeteries sustainable?
  • Is it okay to change the race, culture, and/or gender of historical figures in movies or TV shows?

I’ve Chosen My Topic, Now What?

Once you’ve selected your topic, it’s time to get to work crafting your argument. Preparation for a persuasive speech or essay involves some key steps, which we’ve outlined for you below.

How to Create a Successful Persuasive Speech, Step by Step

  • Research your topic. Read widely and smartly. Stick to credible sources, such as peer-reviewed articles, published books, government reports, textbooks, and news articles. The right sources and data will be necessary to help you establish your authority. As you go, take notes on the details and nuances of your topic as well as potential counterarguments. Research the counterarguments, too.
  • Choose an angle. For example, if you chose the topic “Should we limit screen time for children?” your speech should come down firmly on one side of that debate. If your topic is frequently debated, such as abortion, capital punishment, gun control, social media, etc. try to find a niche angle or new research. For example, instead of “Should abortion be legal?” you might consider “Should you be able to order abortion pills online?” Another example: “Should the death penalty be banned?” might become “How long is it ethical for someone to stay on death row?” If you do some digging, even the most cliche topics have incredibly interesting and relatively unexplored sub-topics.
  • Create an outline. Your outline should include an introduction with a thesis statement, a body that uses evidence to elaborate and support your position while refuting any counterarguments, and a conclusion. The conclusion will both summarize the points made earlier and serve as your final chance to persuade your audience.
  • Write your speech. Use your outline to help you as well as the data you’ve collected. Remember: this is not dry writing; this writing has a point of view, and that point of view is yours . Accordingly, use anecdotes and examples to back up your argument. The essential components of this speech are logos (logic), ethos (credibility), and pathos (emotion) . The ideal speech will use all three of these functions to engage the audience.

How to Practice and Deliver a Persuasive Speech

  • Talk to yourself in the mirror, record yourself, and/or hold a practice speech for family or friends. If you’ll be using visual cues, a slide deck, or notecards, practice incorporating them seamlessly into your speech. You should practice until your speech feels very familiar, at least 5-10 times.
  • Practice body language. Are you making eye contact with your audience, or looking at the ground? Crossing your arms over your chest or walking back and forth across the room? Playing with your hair, cracking your knuckles, or picking at your clothes? Practicing what to do with your body, face, and hands will help you feel more confident on speech day.
  • Take it slow. It’s common to talk quickly while delivering a speech—most of us want to get it over with! However, your audience will be able to connect with you much more effectively if you speak at a moderate pace, breathe, and pause when appropriate.
  • Give yourself grace. How you recover from a mistake is much more important than the mistake itself. Typically, the best approach is to good-naturedly shrug off a blip and move on. 99% of the time, your audience won’t even notice!

Good Persuasive Speech Topics—Final Thoughts

The art of persuasive speaking is a tricky one, but the tips and tricks laid out here will help you craft a compelling argument that will sway even the most dubious audience to your side. Mastering this art takes both time and practice, so don’t fret if it doesn’t come to you right away. Remember to draw upon your sources, speak with authority, and have fun. Once you have the skill of persuasive speaking down, go out there and use your voice to impact change!

Looking for some hot-button topics in college admissions? You might consider checking out the following:

  • Do Colleges Look at Social Media?
  • Should I Apply Test-Optional to College?
  • Should I Waive My Right to See Letters of Recommendation?
  • Should I Use the Common App Additional Information Section?
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Lauren Green

With a Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing from Columbia University and an MFA in Fiction from the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas at Austin, Lauren has been a professional writer for over a decade. She is the author of the chapbook  A Great Dark House  (Poetry Society of America, 2023) and a forthcoming novel (Viking/Penguin).

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persuasive speech topics about social issues

112 Persuasive Speech Topics That Are Actually Engaging

What’s covered:, how to pick an awesome persuasive speech topic, 112 engaging persuasive speech topics, tips for preparing your persuasive speech.

Writing a stellar persuasive speech requires a carefully crafted argument that will resonate with your audience to sway them to your side. This feat can be challenging to accomplish, but an engaging, thought-provoking speech topic is an excellent place to start.

When it comes time to select a topic for your persuasive speech, you may feel overwhelmed by all the options to choose from—or your brain may be drawing a completely blank slate. If you’re having trouble thinking of the perfect topic, don’t worry. We’re here to help!

In this post, we’re sharing how to choose the perfect persuasive speech topic and tips to prepare for your speech. Plus, you’ll find 112 persuasive speech topics that you can take directly from us or use as creative inspiration for your own ideas!

Choose Something You’re Passionate About

It’s much easier to write, research, and deliver a speech about a cause you care about. Even if it’s challenging to find a topic that completely sparks your interest, try to choose a topic that aligns with your passions.

However, keep in mind that not everyone has the same interests as you. Try to choose a general topic to grab the attention of the majority of your audience, but one that’s specific enough to keep them engaged.

For example, suppose you’re giving a persuasive speech about book censorship. In that case, it’s probably too niche to talk about why “To Kill a Mockingbird” shouldn’t be censored (even if it’s your favorite book), and it’s too broad to talk about media censorship in general.

Steer Clear of Cliches

Have you already heard a persuasive speech topic presented dozens of times? If so, it’s probably not an excellent choice for your speech—even if it’s an issue you’re incredibly passionate about.

Although polarizing topics like abortion and climate control are important to discuss, they aren’t great persuasive speech topics. Most people have already formed an opinion on these topics, which will either cause them to tune out or have a negative impression of your speech.

Instead, choose topics that are fresh, unique, and new. If your audience has never heard your idea presented before, they will be more open to your argument and engaged in your speech.

Have a Clear Side of Opposition

For a persuasive speech to be engaging, there must be a clear side of opposition. To help determine the arguability of your topic, ask yourself: “If I presented my viewpoint on this topic to a group of peers, would someone disagree with me?” If the answer is yes, then you’ve chosen a great topic!

Now that we’ve laid the groundwork for what it takes to choose a great persuasive speech topic, here are over one hundred options for you to choose from.

  • Should high school athletes get tested for steroids?
  • Should schools be required to have physical education courses?
  • Should sports grades in school depend on things like athletic ability?
  • What sport should be added to or removed from the Olympics?
  • Should college athletes be able to make money off of their merchandise?
  • Should sports teams be able to recruit young athletes without a college degree?
  • Should we consider video gamers as professional athletes?
  • Is cheerleading considered a sport?
  • Should parents allow their kids to play contact sports?
  • Should professional female athletes be paid the same as professional male athletes?
  • Should college be free at the undergraduate level?
  • Is the traditional college experience obsolete?
  • Should you choose a major based on your interests or your potential salary?
  • Should high school students have to meet a required number of service hours before graduating?
  • Should teachers earn more or less based on how their students perform on standardized tests?
  • Are private high schools more effective than public high schools?
  • Should there be a minimum number of attendance days required to graduate?
  • Are GPAs harmful or helpful?
  • Should schools be required to teach about standardized testing?
  • Should Greek Life be banned in the United States?
  • Should schools offer science classes explicitly about mental health?
  • Should students be able to bring their cell phones to school?
  • Should all public restrooms be all-gender?
  • Should undocumented immigrants have the same employment and education opportunities as citizens?
  • Should everyone be paid a living wage regardless of their employment status?
  • Should supremacist groups be able to hold public events?
  • Should guns be allowed in public places?
  • Should the national drinking age be lowered?
  • Should prisoners be allowed to vote?
  • Should the government raise or lower the retirement age?
  • Should the government be able to control the population?
  • Is the death penalty ethical?

Environment

  • Should stores charge customers for plastic bags?
  • Should breeding animals (dogs, cats, etc.) be illegal?
  • Is it okay to have exotic animals as pets?
  • Should people be fined for not recycling?
  • Should compost bins become mandatory for restaurants?
  • Should electric vehicles have their own transportation infrastructure?
  • Would heavier fining policies reduce corporations’ emissions?
  • Should hunting be encouraged or illegal?
  • Should reusable diapers replace disposable diapers?

Science & Technology

  • Is paper media more reliable than digital news sources?
  • Should automated/self-driving cars be legalized?
  • Should schools be required to provide laptops to all students?
  • Should software companies be able to have pre-downloaded programs and applications on devices?
  • Should drones be allowed in military warfare?
  • Should scientists invest more or less money into cancer research?
  • Should cloning be illegal?
  • Should societies colonize other planets?
  • Should there be legal oversight over the development of technology?

Social Media

  • Should there be an age limit on social media?
  • Should cyberbullying have the same repercussions as in-person bullying?
  • Are online relationships as valuable as in-person relationships?
  • Does “cancel culture” have a positive or negative impact on societies?
  • Are social media platforms reliable information or news sources?
  • Should social media be censored?
  • Does social media create an unrealistic standard of beauty?
  • Is regular social media usage damaging to real-life interactions?
  • Is social media distorting democracy?
  • How many branches of government should there be?
  • Who is the best/worst president of all time?
  • How long should judges serve in the U.S. Supreme Court?
  • Should a more significant portion of the U.S. budget be contributed towards education?
  • Should the government invest in rapid transcontinental transportation infrastructure?
  • Should airport screening be more or less stringent?
  • Should the electoral college be dismantled?
  • Should the U.S. have open borders?
  • Should the government spend more or less money on space exploration?
  • Should students sing Christmas carols, say the pledge of allegiance, or perform other tangentially religious activities?
  • Should nuns and priests become genderless roles?
  • Should schools and other public buildings have prayer rooms?
  • Should animal sacrifice be legal if it occurs in a religious context?
  • Should countries be allowed to impose a national religion on their citizens?
  • Should the church be separated from the state?
  • Does freedom of religion positively or negatively affect societies?

Parenting & Family

  • Is it better to have children at a younger or older age?
  • Is it better for children to go to daycare or stay home with their parents?
  • Does birth order affect personality?
  • Should parents or the school system teach their kids about sex?
  • Are family traditions important?
  • Should parents smoke or drink around young children?
  • Should “spanking” children be illegal?
  • Should parents use swear words in front of their children?
  • Should parents allow their children to play violent video games?

Entertainment

  • Should all actors be paid the same regardless of gender or ethnicity?
  • Should all award shows be based on popular vote?
  • Who should be responsible for paying taxes on prize money, the game show staff or the contestants?
  • Should movies and television shows have ethnicity and gender quotas?
  • Should newspapers and magazines move to a completely online format?
  • Should streaming services like Netflix and Hulu be free for students?
  • Is the movie rating system still effective?
  • Should celebrities have more privacy rights?

Arts & Humanities

  • Are libraries becoming obsolete?
  • Should all schools have mandatory art or music courses in their curriculum?
  • Should offensive language be censored from classic literary works?
  • Is it ethical for museums to keep indigenous artifacts?
  • Should digital designs be considered an art form? 
  • Should abstract art be considered an art form?
  • Is music therapy effective?
  • Should tattoos be regarded as “professional dress” for work?
  • Should schools place greater emphasis on the arts programs?
  • Should euthanasia be allowed in hospitals and other clinical settings?
  • Should the government support and implement universal healthcare?
  • Would obesity rates lower if the government intervened to make healthy foods more affordable?
  • Should teenagers be given access to birth control pills without parental consent?
  • Should food allergies be considered a disease?
  • Should health insurance cover homeopathic medicine?
  • Is using painkillers healthy?
  • Should genetically modified foods be banned?
  • Should there be a tax on unhealthy foods?
  • Should tobacco products be banned from the country?
  • Should the birth control pill be free for everyone?

If you need more help brainstorming topics, especially those that are personalized to your interests, you can  use CollegeVine’s free AI tutor, Ivy . Ivy can help you come up with original persuasive speech ideas, and she can also help with the rest of your homework, from math to languages.

Do Your Research

A great persuasive speech is supported with plenty of well-researched facts and evidence. So before you begin the writing process, research both sides of the topic you’re presenting in-depth to gain a well-rounded perspective of the topic.

Understand Your Audience

It’s critical to understand your audience to deliver a great persuasive speech. After all, you are trying to convince them that your viewpoint is correct. Before writing your speech, consider the facts and information that your audience may already know, and think about the beliefs and concerns they may have about your topic. Then, address these concerns in your speech, and be mindful to include fresh, new information.

Have Someone Read Your Speech

Once you have finished writing your speech, have someone read it to check for areas of strength and improvement. You can use CollegeVine’s free essay review tool to get feedback on your speech from a peer!

Practice Makes Perfect

After completing your final draft, the key to success is to practice. Present your speech out loud in front of a mirror, your family, friends, and basically, anyone who will listen. Not only will the feedback of others help you to make your speech better, but you’ll become more confident in your presentation skills and may even be able to commit your speech to memory.

Hopefully, these ideas have inspired you to write a powerful, unique persuasive speech. With the perfect topic, plenty of practice, and a boost of self-confidence, we know you’ll impress your audience with a remarkable speech!

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persuasive speech topics about social issues

Transizion

The Admissions Strategist

191 best persuasive speech topics: give an amazing speech.

Does the thought of public speaking make you cringe?

While almost everyone experiences some stage fright speaking in front of an audience, there are ways to tame this debilitating fear.

Half the battle of giving a speech is selecting a topic that engages your audience.

For any speech, whether informative or persuasive, your speech idea should meet these criteria:

  • Well-researched with solid examples and evidence
  • Broad enough to be universal, narrow enough to be original
  • Meaningful and customized to your audience

Additionally, you should possess a measure of expertise on your topic.

Understanding the nuances of what you are speaking about is a sure way to ease those jitters. This is how you come up with the best speech idea.

When choosing a persuasive speech topic, all of the above criteria apply, along with a few additional requirements.

191 Best Persuasive Speech Topics

Click above to watch a video on Speech Topics.

What Makes a Good Persuasive Speech Topic?

While an informative speech merely presents factual information, a good informative speech topic goes a step further.

  • The goal of a persuasive speech is to convince the audience that your perspective is valid.

This does not mean that the audience will agree with every opinion you present, but a good persuasive speech makes the audience think* .

A great persuasive speech makes an audience act.

As transcendentalist writer Ralph Waldo Emerson said: “Speech is power: speech is to persuade, to convert, to compel.”

Therefore, a strong persuasive speaker will:

  • Present a clear and sincere perspective. The audience should not be questioning your stance on an issue.
  • Exhibit passion that inspires others to think or act.
  • Be confident in both your perspective and topic.

Not all persuasive speeches need to be deeply controversial, but there should be some gray area in your chosen topic.

Political , social and ethical issues make compelling persuasive speech topics for this reason.

The persuasive speech should address a burning question that incites intellectual debate:

  • Should strict gun control laws be implemented?
  • Is it possible to be an animal lover and a carnivore?
  • Is the government at fault for the increasing homeless population?

Such questions may seem divisive, but, in a civilized society, they are essential to ask.

Posing such questions directly to your audience during your speech engages a group in the Socratic Method of critical thinking.

Furthermore, if a topic isn’t inherently controversial, then it might not make the most powerful speech.

Your job as a persuasive speaker is to argue your point, which is not necessary to do on topics that most people agree on.

In that vein, here are a handful of topics that would not make for good persuasive speeches.

  • Learning a foreign language is important.
  • Fighting in overseas wars can be dangerous.
  • Social Security income is not sufficient for many retired Americans.
  • Technical skills are crucial in the 21st-century job market.
  • Cardiovascular fitness improves longevity.

…And you get the picture. So, what does make a good persuasive speech topic? Well, there are at least 191 answers to that question.

Get personalized advice!

191 best persuasive speech topics.

Before we reveal the 191 best persuasive speech topics, let’s preview each of the categories:

  • Politics and law : This topic revolves around pressing issues including voting, Supreme Court decisions, political leadership, and criminal justice.
  • Environmental activism : Climate change, offshore oil drilling, and green technology are just a few of the hot-button issues you’ll discover in this category.
  • Social justice : Covering all issues of equality, social justice topics invite debate – and demand solid supporting facts or powerhouse emotional appeals .
  • Ethics : Comprising our basic morals and values that drive our behaviors, the ethics category examines how to deal with issues like animal abuse, abortion, and stem cell research.
  • Health : Regarding important issues like our food supply, how should we best protect and promote human health in the 21 st century?
  • Potpourri : And now we come to the miscellaneous category of “everything else.” You’ll find engaging or even entertaining ideas related to music, movies, curriculum, and more.

Take a deep breath and read on!

Politics and Law

  • Alternative political parties (i.e., Green Party, Libertarian Party, etc.)
  • Declaring “Independent” or “No Party Affiliation” on voter registration.
  • Should voters with no party affiliation be allowed to vote in primary elections?
  • Are newly proposed voter registration laws discriminatory?
  • How many terms should politicians be allowed to serve?
  • Popular vote vs. Electoral College
  • Are women underrepresented in Congress?
  • Swing states (i.e., Florida and Ohio)
  • Do current proposed abortion laws violate Roe v. Wade?
  • Political correctness versus freedom of speech
  • Terrorist watch lists – safety precaution or blatant prejudice?
  • Corporate lobbyists and campaign contributions
  • Are laws too lenient on violent criminals?
  • Tax responsibility: income tax, property tax, sales tax.
  • Should the voting age be increased or decreased?
  • Capital punishment: right or wrong?
  • DNA evidence in criminal cases: is it enough?
  • Should criminal minors be prosecuted and sentenced as adults?
  • How to deal with the issue of illegal immigration
  • Should cigarettes be taken off the market and made illegal?
  • Legalization of Marijuana
  • Should health insurance be mandatory by law?
  • Is the death penalty obsolete?
  • Private vs. Public Prisons
  • Should politicians be allowed to use private donations to campaign?
  • Is it right for the government to fund partisan organizations?
  • Appointment of Supreme Court Justice
  • How can the mass shooting crisis be solved?
  • Minimum wage: should it exist or be forgotten?
  • Should citizens be required to serve in the military for a period of time?
  • Gun rights on school campuses: is it safe?
  • Military members and income tax

Environmental Activism

  • Hybrid and electric cars on the road
  • Oil spills and world wildlife
  • Saving rainforests and their indigenous species
  • Palm oil: should it be outlawed?
  • Make all bills and business correspondence paperless.
  • Dangers of drilling for oil
  • Replacing plastic with glass and cardboard
  • Trophy hunting: should the penalties be harsher?
  • Banning disposable diapers in favor of cloth diapers
  • Benefits of public transportation, biking, walking, or carpooling
  • Conserving water in our everyday lives
  • Wildfires on the rise in California
  • Greenhouse gas emissions in Asia
  • Global climate change and increased severity of storms
  • Growing food as a homesteader
  • Impact of big box stores on the environment
  • Impact of online retailers’ packaging and shipping on the environment
  • Turning the practice of recycling into a law punishable by hefty fines
  • Overfishing and dwindling populations of marine wildlife
  • Factory farms and greenhouse gas emissions
  • Controlling E. Coli and other food borne illnesses
  • Are is worth it to ban plastic straws?
  • Drones and the environment
  • Should hunting be outlawed in national parks to protect its wildlife?
  • Hair care and air quality
  • Better education for at home waste management
  • Should it be illegal to flush certain things into the sewage system?
  • Is it right to cut down a tree for the holidays?
  • How do marijuana farms affect the surrounding area’s environment?
  • Water contamination: What preventative measures can be taken?
  • How to reduce your carbon footprint
  • Should new homes support solar energy only?
  • Organic farming practices

Social Justice

  • Do you agree with the research on equal pay between men and women?
  • Should government employees go without pay during a shutdown?
  • Police brutality and shootings (in general or a specific case in the news such as Philando Castile in Minnesota)
  • Should all policemen wear body cameras?
  • Is racial discrimination on the rise? Why or why not?
  • Scholarship opportunities for minority students
  • The benefits (or challenges) of a multicultural society
  • Should bullies be expelled from school?
  • What can be done about anonymous online bullying?
  • Unrealistic beauty/body standards and self-image
  • How to create a strong community
  • Welfare, SNAP, and other social assistance programs
  • The 40-hour work week is too long.
  • Comparing the work week in Europe to the work week in the United States
  • Caring for an aging population: are Social Security and Medicare enough?
  • Civil lawsuits should not receive so much attention in the media.
  • Racial and ethnic profiling (including FBI criminal profiling)
  • Being a foster or adoptive parent
  • Buying local builds up the community.
  • Refusing to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance
  • Battling stereotypes and making them obsolete
  • Mandatory community service for all U.S. citizens
  • Is common law marriage outdated?
  • Should companies be allowed to deny service to anyone?
  • Changing gender on a driver’s license
  • Affirmative Action today
  • DACA DREAMers Movement
  • Legalization of gay marriage
  • Should individuals be allowed to adopt?
  • Re-sentencing for crimes involving marijuana in states where it is now legal
  • Unlimited Paid Time Off vs Accrued time off
  • License revoking for older drivers: is it against their rights?
  • Wearing fur or using fur for any profit
  • Mistreatment of farm animals: what is the solution?
  • How do we address the increasing problem of homelessness?
  • Tithing – how much should each person give?
  • Euthanasia for terminally ill individuals
  • Was it right for Dr. Kevorkian (assisted suicide physician) to be imprisoned?
  • Pet shops and breeders versus shelters
  • Returning or rehoming pets: is it right?
  • Preselecting the gender and other aspects of an unborn baby
  • Abortion: pro-choice or pro-life?
  • Product testing on animals in labs
  • Stem cell research
  • Protecting children from inappropriate websites
  • When should a child be allowed to have a smartphone?
  • Should children be allowed into an R-rated movie even with a guardian?
  • Should violent movies and video games be banned?
  • Do zoos and circuses abuse animals?
  • Arranged marriage: a cultural tradition or outdated practice?
  • Raising children without being married
  • How to impart ethical behavior to the next generation
  • Ethics as a mandatory high school class
  • Do parents deceive children by telling tales of Santa Claus?
  • Should pharmaceutical patents be removed so affordable generics can be made?
  • 13 Reasons Why: Did it glorify suicide?
  • Wrongful termination case study
  • Is the borrowing limit for student loans too high?
  • Pay for play in college athletics
  • Performance enhancing steroids in competitive sports
  • Is it right to own a gun for personal protection?
  • Mandated reporting (Mandated reporters are individuals who are required to report any information they receive about abuse, suicidal ideation, etc.)
  • Can an influencer be held responsible if they promote a harmful product unknowingly?
  • Conventional versus organic produce
  • Food additives, preservatives, and cancer rates
  • Meat consumption and its effects on life expectancy
  • Dangers of sitting at a desk all day
  • Fast food industry and obesity rates
  • Medical marijuana to treat chronic conditions
  • GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) in foods: to label or not to label?
  • Mandatory CPR and First Aid training for new parents
  • School cafeteria food and children’s health
  • Alternative uses of oral contraceptives
  • Restaurant responsibility with peanut, gluten, and other allergies
  • Everyday products that could be dangerous: deodorant, toothpaste, etc.
  • Teaching yoga and meditation in public schools
  • Moving from the “medical model” to holistic health
  • Massages as necessities rather than luxuries
  • Which vitamin supplements are worthless and should go off the market?
  • The mind-body connection and its influence on health
  • Social media and mental health
  • The cumulative effects of poor sleep (and how electronics impact our sleep)
  • IVF (Invitro fertilization): Should becoming a parent be covered?
  • Should there be more physical education in schools?
  • Is diabetes reversible?
  • Doctors and insurance: should they accept all insurance?
  • Do detox diets really work?
  • Is binge-watching Netflix bad for our health?
  • Keto vs Paleo vs Vegan: which is better?
  • Should a patient be allowed to deny medical care?
  • Pre-existing conditions and insurance rates
  • Employers should offer mental health days without question
  • Alternative sex education (not abstinence-only and inclusive of LGBT lifestyle)
  • Mind-body fitness versus traditional Western sports
  • Best genre and time period of music
  • Healthiest world cuisine
  • Uneven distribution of wealth: the top 1% versus everyone else
  • Cost of living versus average salaries
  • What to do about cults, gangs, and similar groups
  • How to get accepted into an Ivy League school
  • Religion versus spiritualism
  • Survival skills should be taught in school.
  • Benefits of forest schools for children
  • The best U.S. President in history
  • The most influential leader or figure in history
  • Most effective ways to manage stress
  • Obscure movies that people should watch
  • Multitasking: fact or fiction?
  • Buying a house versus renting an apartment
  • Most exciting travel destination
  • How to ace any test
  • Overcoming social anxiety
  • How our phones are hurting our eyes
  • Are multi-level marketing companies really pyramid schemes?
  • Protests: are they effective?
  • Is a wedding reception worth the price tag?
  • Should catfishing be a criminal offense?
  • Mandatory study abroad semester in college
  • Student loan borrowing: should it ever be forgiven?
  • Responsible credit card strategies
  • Living with parents to save money
  • Can someone find true love on The Bachelor?
  • Telemarketers and Harassment
  • Marvel vs DC

And there you have it – 100+ unique topics to stoke your imagination and help you identify your passion.

Feel free to go beyond these springboard ideas or customize them to your perspective.

Advice from Persuasive Speech Experts

To help you out even more, we asked the experts on the best tips for giving a persuasive speech.

From Melora Kordos, visiting assistant professor of theatre arts at Sweet Briar College:

When selecting a persuasive speech topic, a student should first look to her own interests and passions. If she chooses something that she cares deeply about or has great interest in, then she will be able to more easily identify the best three points that support her argument and focus on those in her speech. If she is not already engaged in the topic, it will be much harder to persuade others to agree with her point of view. She should use both logical and emotional appeals throughout her speech, giving her a better chance of resonating with a larger percentage of her audience.

From Dr. Allison Beltramini, associate professor of communications at Waubonsee Community College:

When doing a persuasive  speech , it’s helpful to choose a topic that you personally believe in or support. It’s much easier to speak on something that you have a connection to. The next tip is to do your homework. This includes exploring the opposite side of the issue. Your audience needs to know that you are well-versed in the topic. Incorporate this research to support the claims you are making. Curate your sources carefully. Know who/what organizations are behind the sources you are using. And please, verbally cite your sources. Using research without the verbal citations in your  speech  is plagiarism. Persuasion is incremental. You can’t just tell someone something and expect they will believe you. You have to set up the issue, show how the problem effect people, talk about what will help or fix the problem and show why the solutions will work. All of these steps are vital. Finally – practice is essential. Your  speech  should be prepared but conversational. Reading to an audience word for word is not a good idea.

From Nate Masterson, HR manager of Maple Holistics :

The key to giving a persuasive  speech  is to engage your audience, and there are several ways to do this. Firstly, make eye contact with different people in the audience, but make sure to scan the whole room and not just focus on one area. Also, research the group of people you will be addressing so that you better know their priorities, cultural norms, inside jokes, etc. To make sure that your speech is sufficiently compelling, stick to just a few main talking points or objectives. This will ensure that your speech stays focused and that you can spend adequate time and energy backing up these main points without boring your audience.

From Jeffrey Davis, executive speech coach at Speak Clear Communications :

First, the best speakers build their argument emotionally as well as logically. Every point has a complelling story attached to it. Second, they make arguments that are novel and innovative. The “how” of the argument is as important as the “why.” Lastly, great speakers do not hold back on hand gestures!  Gesturing is scientifically proven to enhance a speaker’s impression with the audience.

From Bridgett McGowen, CEO of BMcTALKS :

While it’s important your audience has a memorable experience during your presentation and that it learns something new or gains a new perspective on something it already knew, it is equally important to move the audience to actually do something with what you shared … something that will inspire or change their lives, professions, or communities … because you are there to persuade! Remember any time you present, consistently think to yourself “In what difference-making endeavor do I want my audience to join?” or “Now that everyone has heard this, now what?” Give them the answers to those questions to further your persuasive message.

From Martha Krejci, business coaching leader :

Don’t write everything out! The last thing you want to do is look like you’re reading a speech verbatim. You want to illuminate your authority in the field you are speaking about. Reading does not do that….at all. So, here’s what I do. I think about the end goal of what I’m trying to communicate. Then, reverse engineer the points that take us there. Write the points out on a notecard if you need it, or if you’re lucky enough to have a teleprompter, use that. And finally, above all…tell stories! Don’t just have a bunch of dry information that anyone with a wifi signal could google. Tell stories that bring your audience into your problem, but also your solution you propose. If you can master storytelling, you may just be surprised by how good you can get at public speaking.

From Neil Thompson, founder of Teach the Geek :

Telling an easy-to-follow story is crucial in being persuasive. If people have to think too hard to understand what you’re talking about, they’re less likely to listen. If they don’t listen, you won’t have a chance to persuade them. If there are studies, surveys, or other types of data that can vouch for what you’re saying, that’ll also go a long way to persuading others. Lastly, you have to believe what you’re talking about. If you truly believe your message, it’ll shine through and people will be inclined to believe you, too.

From Adam Cole, expert writer and author:

Number one is the invitation to listen. It ensures that the listener has a context in which to understand what you are presenting so that everyone is on the same page when the important information comes. The invitation may contain relevant humorous anecdotes to break the tension and present the speaker as appealing, and it must be accessible enough that the listener will at least know what the topic is and why they should care. Number two is the topic. Depending on the complexity of the topic, it should be structured for maximum clarity. While humor and anecdotes can be used to illustrate the point, they should not distract from it or become the focus (unless the task is to highlight the speaker, rather than the topic, which is ok). Number three is the follow-through. If the listener has learned something, a good summation will help them retain the most important points from the learning so that they can remember it and follow up with more learning (perhaps from the speaker’s books, videos, or other appearances!) Taking the topic and framing it in terms of an action step for the audience may be a powerful way for them to keep the presentation (and the speaker) in their heads.

Conclusion: Best Persuasive Speech Topics

Remember, your passion and expertise on the topic will translate to audience engagement – and hopefully a good grade!

  • Delivering a persuasive speech doesn’t have to be a nerve-wracking experience if you’re prepared and passionate.

In the words of Cicero: “A good orator is pointed and impassioned.”

To follow the advice of the great Roman orator, find your passion and then express it through your persuasive speech.

The skills you develop now in this area will benefit you throughout your professional and personal life.

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Edueuphoria

220+ Persuasive Speech Topics For All Students (Updated 2023)

Whether you’re a student preparing for a class presentation or an aspiring public speaker looking to captivate audiences, choosing the right persuasive speech topic is crucial. However, the process can be overwhelming, with countless possibilities to consider. Fear not! In this blog, we’ll delve into the world of persuasive speech topics, unravelling a treasure trove of ideas that are both impactful and easy to understand. 

From pressing social issues to intriguing debates, we’ll explore a wide array of subjects that will not only engage your audience but also leave a lasting impression. So, let’s embark on this journey together, and unlock the power of persuasive speech!

Table of Contents

What To Keep In Mind While Selecting Persuasive Speech Topics

When selecting persuasive speech topics, it’s important to keep several key factors in mind:

Audience Relevance

Consider the interests, beliefs, and concerns of your audience. Choose a topic that resonates with them and is relevant to their lives or the larger community.

Personal Interest

Select a topic that you are genuinely passionate about. Your enthusiasm will shine through in your speech and engage your audience more effectively.

Knowledge and Expertise

Choose a topic that you have a good understanding of or are willing to research extensively. It’s important to present accurate information and back your arguments with evidence.

Controversy and Debate

Opt for topics that have varying viewpoints or invite discussion. Controversial subjects often spark interest and encourage audience engagement.

Impactful and Timely

Consider selecting a topic that addresses a pressing issue or has societal relevance. Topics related to current events or ongoing debates can generate greater interest.

Strike a balance between being challenging and respectful. Avoid excessively sensitive or offensive topics that might alienate or upset your audience.

Feasibility

Ensure that the chosen topic can be effectively covered within the given time constraints of your speech. Select a topic that can be adequately explored and supported within the allocated time frame.

Remember, the ultimate goal of a persuasive speech is to inspire, educate, and motivate your audience. By keeping these considerations in mind, you can select a persuasive speech topic that captures attention, encourages thoughtful discourse, and leaves a lasting impact.

10+ Religion Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Role of Religion in Shaping Moral Values.
  • Examining the Impact of Religious Freedom on Society.
  • Exploring the Controversy Surrounding Religion in Schools.
  • Addressing the Need for Interfaith Dialogue and Understanding.
  • Analysing the Relationship Between Religion and Science.
  • Discussing the Importance of Religious Tolerance and Acceptance.
  • The Ethics of Proselytising: Balancing Freedom of Religion and Respect for Others.
  • Investigating the Influence of Religion on Gender Equality.
  • Debating the Role of Religion in Politics and Governance.
  • Exploring the Challenges and Benefits of Religious Pluralism in a Globalised World.

10+ Persuasive Speech Topics About Music & Fashion

  • The Impact of Music on Mood and Emotions: Exploring the Power of Melody.
  • Fashion Industry’s Influence on Body Image and Self-Esteem: Redefining Beauty Standards.
  • Music Streaming Services: Revolutionising the Way We Discover and Enjoy Music.
  • The Cultural Significance of Fashion: Celebrating Diversity and Expression.
  • The Role of Music Education in Developing Creativity and Critical Thinking Skills.
  • Sustainable Fashion: Promoting Ethical and Eco-Friendly Clothing Choices.
  • Music as Therapy: Harnessing the Healing Power of Sound.
  • Fashion Trends: Unveiling the Social and Psychological Factors Behind Their Popularity.
  • The Evolution of Music Genres: Tracing the Influence of Historical and Cultural Movements.
  • Fast Fashion: Examining the Environmental and Social Consequences of Disposable Clothing.
  • Music and Memory: Exploring the Connection between Melodies and Recall.
  • Body Positivity Movement: Challenging Stereotypes and Promoting Acceptance in Fashion.

10+ Arts and Culture Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Importance of Arts Education in Schools.
  • Preserving Cultural Heritage: The Need for Funding and Support.
  • The Power of Music Therapy: Promoting Mental Health and Well-being.
  • Addressing Gender Representation in the Film and Entertainment Industry.
  • The Role of Art in Promoting Social Change and Activism.
  • Art Censorship: Protecting Freedom of Expression and Creativity.
  • Promoting Diversity and Inclusion in the Arts and Cultural Sector.
  • Art as a Catalyst for Economic Growth and Tourism.
  • Exploring the Influence of Social Media on Art and Culture.
  • The Impact of Art on Individual and Community Identity.
  • Supporting Local Artists: Building Thriving Arts Communities.
  • The Relationship Between Art and Science: Fostering Innovation.
  • Art and Healing: The Therapeutic Benefits of Creative Expression.

10+ Government Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Importance of Voting: Exercising Your Civic Duty.
  • Implementing Stricter Gun Control Laws for Public Safety.
  • Addressing Climate Change: The Urgency for Government Action.
  • The Need for Comprehensive Immigration Reform.
  • Promoting Equality: Ensuring LGBTQ+ Rights and Protections.
  • Combating Fake News: The Role of Government in Media Literacy.
  • Raising the Minimum Wage: Fighting Income Inequality.
  • Reforming the Criminal Justice System: Reducing Mass Incarceration.
  • Protecting Net Neutrality: Preserving an Open Internet.
  • Enhancing Access to Affordable Healthcare: A Government Responsibility.
  • Regulating Big Tech: Balancing Innovation and Consumer Protection.
  • Investing in Renewable Energy: Transitioning to a Sustainable Future.

10+ Family Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Benefits of Family Dinners: Why Eating Together Matters.
  • Should Parents Allow Children to Use Social Media?
  • The Importance of Teaching Financial Responsibility to Kids.
  • Balancing Work and Family: Tips for Achieving Work-Life Balance.
  • The Effects of Divorce on Children and Strategies for Coping.
  • Addressing Domestic Violence: How Families Can Break the Cycle.
  • Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling: Which is the Better Option?
  • The Dangers of Helicopter Parenting and Letting Kids Fail.
  • The Impact of Technology on Family Relationships.
  • Supporting LGBTQ+ Youth in Family Environments.
  • The Pros and Cons of Having Only One Child.
  • Navigating Family Conflict: Strategies for Effective Communication.

10+ Environment Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The urgency of reducing plastic waste and embracing sustainable alternatives.
  • The impact of deforestation on climate change and biodiversity loss.
  • The need for stricter regulations on air pollution to combat respiratory diseases.
  • Promoting renewable energy sources to mitigate the effects of fossil fuel consumption.
  • The importance of water conservation in the face of increasing scarcity.
  • Addressing the detrimental effects of pesticide use on ecosystems and human health.
  • Raising awareness about the consequences of overfishing and the need for sustainable fishing practices.
  • The role of individuals and communities in combating climate change through small lifestyle changes.
  • The significance of preserving and protecting endangered species from extinction.
  • The importance of recycling and waste management in reducing environmental pollution.
  • Promoting sustainable agriculture practices to ensure food security and protect the environment.
  • The impact of urbanization on natural habitats and the importance of green spaces in cities.
  • Advocating for stricter regulations on industrial pollution to safeguard environmental and human health.
  • The benefits of promoting eco-tourism as a sustainable alternative to mass tourism.

10+ Sports Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Importance of Physical Education Programs in Schools.
  • The Benefits of Youth Sports in Character Development.
  • The Need for Stricter Regulations in Professional Sports.
  • The Impact of Sports on Mental Health and Well-being.
  • Promoting Gender Equality in Sports: Breaking the Glass Ceiling.
  • The Dangers of Performance-Enhancing Drugs in Athletics.
  • Addressing the Issue of Concussions in Contact Sports.
  • The Role of Sports in Promoting Social Inclusion and Diversity.
  • The Influence of Sports Sponsorships on Athletes and Teams.
  • The Ethics of Animal Sports: Should They Be Banned?
  • The Debate on Paying College Athletes: Fair Compensation or Exploitation?
  • The Role of Sports in Fostering Teamwork and Leadership Skills.
  • Promoting Sports as a Tool for Conflict Resolution and Diplomacy.
  • The Impact of Technology on Sports: Enhancing Performance or Diminishing Fairness?
  • The Significance of Title IX in Advancing Women’s Sports.

10+ Education Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The importance of incorporating financial literacy in school curricula.
  • Addressing the need for comprehensive sex education in schools.
  • Promoting the benefits of arts education for well-rounded development.
  • The significance of teaching critical thinking skills in the digital age.
  • Implementing mindfulness and mental health education in schools.
  • Bridging the gender gap in STEM education and careers.
  • The value of inclusive education for students with disabilities.
  • Promoting cultural diversity and inclusivity in educational institutions.
  • Addressing the impact of standardized testing on students’ well-being.
  • The role of technology in transforming traditional classroom learning.
  • Promoting environmental education for a sustainable future.
  • Advocating for comprehensive anti-bullying policies and education in schools.
  • The benefits of bilingual education in a globalized world.
  • Encouraging physical education and healthy lifestyles in schools.

10+ Scientific Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Importance of Vaccinations: Protecting Public Health Through Immunization.
  • Climate Change: Urgency for Global Action to Combat Rising Temperatures.
  • The Benefits of Renewable Energy Sources: Transitioning Towards a Sustainable Future.
  • Exploring the Potential of Stem Cell Research in Advancing Medical Treatments.
  • Artificial Intelligence: Balancing its Potential Benefits and Ethical Concerns.
  • The Role of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in Addressing Food Security.
  • Space Exploration: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe and Expanding Human Knowledge.
  • The Impact of Plastic Pollution on Marine Ecosystems: Seeking Sustainable Solutions.
  • The Power of Meditation: Enhancing Mental Well-being and Cognitive Abilities.
  • Human Cloning: Ethical Implications and Scientific Advancements.
  • Nanotechnology: Unleashing the Potential of Tiny Innovations in Various Industries.
  • The Influence of Social Media on Mental Health: Promoting Digital Well-being.

10+ Video Games Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Impact of Violent Video Games on Youth Behavior.
  • How Video Games Promote Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking Skills.
  • The Benefits of Video Games in Enhancing Cognitive Abilities.
  • The Role of Video Games in Fostering Social Connections and Collaboration.
  • Exploring the Educational Potential of Video Games in the Classroom.
  • Addressing Video Game Addiction: Recognizing the Signs and Seeking Help.
  • The Positive Effects of Video Games on Mental Health and Well-being.
  • Video Games as a Tool for Rehabilitation and Therapy.
  • Debunking Stereotypes: Gender Representation in Video Games.
  • The Influence of Video Games on Body Image and Self-Esteem.
  • Examining the Link Between Video Games and Increased Physical Activity.
  • The Ethical Implications of Loot Boxes and In-Game Purchases in Video Games.

10+ Public Speaking Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Importance of Mental Health Awareness in Schools.
  • The Impact of Social Media on Society.
  • Promoting Renewable Energy for a Sustainable Future.
  • The Need for Stricter Gun Control Laws.
  • Raising Awareness about Climate Change and Its Consequences.
  • Addressing the Gender Pay Gap in the Workplace.
  • Combating Cyberbullying: Creating a Safer Online Environment.
  • The Benefits of Implementing Comprehensive Sex Education in Schools.
  • Promoting Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace.
  • The Importance of Voting: Exercising Your Democratic Rights.
  • Ending Animal Testing: Advancing Ethical Research Alternatives.
  • Tackling Food Waste: Promoting Sustainable Consumption Habits.
  • The Impact of Plastic Pollution on Marine Life and Ecosystems.
  • Encouraging Organ Donation: Saving Lives through Generosity.
  • Breaking the Stigma: Raising Awareness about Mental Illness.

10+ Medical Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Importance of Vaccinations: Debunking Myths and Promoting Public Health.
  • The Ethics of Organ Transplantation: Balancing Supply and Demand.
  • Addressing the Opioid Crisis: Strategies for Prevention and Treatment.
  • Promoting Mental Health: Breaking the Silence and Ending Stigma.
  • Advancements in Precision Medicine: Personalizing Healthcare for Better Outcomes.
  • The Role of Telemedicine in Improving Access to Healthcare.
  • Enhancing Patient Safety: Preventing Medical Errors in Healthcare Settings.
  • Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Combating Obesity and Chronic Diseases.
  • The Benefits of Integrative Medicine: Bridging Conventional and Alternative Approaches.
  • Exploring the Impact of Technology on Healthcare Delivery.
  • Promoting Sexual Health Education: Empowering Individuals to Make Informed Choices.
  • The Importance of Early Detection: Screenings for Cancer and Other Diseases.
  • The Role of Medical Research in Advancing Treatment and Finding Cures.

10+ Business Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Benefits of Implementing Flexible Work Arrangements in Companies.
  • Promoting Ethical Practices in Business: Combating Corruption and Fraud.
  • The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility in Building a Positive Brand Image.
  • Fostering Innovation and Creativity in the Workplace.
  • The Advantages of Embracing Diversity in Business Teams.
  • Harnessing the Power of Technology for Enhanced Customer Experience.
  • Promoting Work-Life Balance: Improving Employee Well-being and Productivity.
  • The Importance of Effective Leadership in Driving Organizational Success.
  • Addressing Workplace Gender Inequality: Achieving Gender Balance in Leadership Roles.
  • The Benefits of Investing in Employee Training and Development Programs.
  • Promoting Sustainable Business Practices: Environmental Responsibility and Profitability.
  • Exploring the Advantages of Implementing Remote Work Policies.
  • The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Business Operations and Job Market.
  • Nurturing a Positive Company Culture: The Key to Employee Engagement and Retention.
  • The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Effective Business Communication.

10+ Mental Health Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Prioritizing Mental Health Education in Schools: Nurturing Emotional Well-being from an Early Age.
  • Overcoming the Stigma: Promoting Open Discussions on Mental Health in Communities.
  • The Need for Increased Accessibility to Mental Health Services: Breaking Barriers to Care.
  • Mental Health in the Workplace: Creating Supportive and Productive Environments.
  • Raising Awareness about Suicide Prevention: Saving Lives through Compassion and Understanding.
  • Addressing the Impact of Social Media on Mental Health: Finding Balance in the Digital Age.
  • Breaking Down Gender Stereotypes in Mental Health: Encouraging Emotional Expression for All.
  • Promoting Self-Care Practices for Mental Well-being: Nurturing a Healthy Mindset.
  • Combating Mental Health Stigma among College Students: Fostering Supportive Campus Communities.
  • The Role of Exercise and Physical Activity in Enhancing Mental Health: A Holistic Approach to Well-being.

10+ Persuasive Essay Topics About Animals

  • The Ethics of Animal Testing: Finding Alternatives for Scientific Research.
  • Protecting Endangered Species: Preserving Biodiversity for Future Generations.
  • The Cruelty of Animal Circuses: Advocating for a Ban on Animal Entertainment.
  • Animal Agriculture and Environmental Impact: Promoting Sustainable Food Choices.
  • The Importance of Animal Adoption: Encouraging Responsible Pet Ownership.
  • Ban on Trophy Hunting: Preserving Wildlife and Ecosystems.
  • Animal Rights in Entertainment: Ending the Use of Animals in Films and Shows.
  • The Ethics of Zoos: Rethinking Captivity and Animal Welfare.
  • Animal Experimentation: Promoting Ethical Guidelines and Oversight.
  • Fur Industry: Advocating for Cruelty-Free Fashion and Alternatives.
  • Marine Captivity: Ending the Keeping of Whales and Dolphins in Theme Parks.
  • The Link Between Animal Cruelty and Violence Against Humans: Strengthening Laws and Awareness.
  • Factory Farming: Promoting Humane Treatment of Farm Animals.
  • The Role of Animal-Assisted Therapy in Improving Human Well-being.
  • Wildlife Conservation: Combating Illegal Wildlife Trade and Poaching.

10+ Persuasive Speech Topics for College

  • The Benefits of Financial Literacy Education for College Students.
  • Promoting Mental Health Support Services on College Campuses.
  • Addressing the Issue of Campus Sexual Assault: Ensuring Safety and Justice.
  • The Importance of Ethical Consumption: Making Sustainable Choices in College.
  • Encouraging Diversity in Higher Education: Embracing Inclusion on Campus.
  • Combatting the Rising Costs of College Education: Exploring Solutions for Affordability.
  • Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Encouraging Exercise and Nutrition in College.
  • The Need for Comprehensive Sexual Consent Education in College.
  • Fostering Entrepreneurship and Innovation in College Education.
  • Empowering Students to Combat Fake News: Promoting Media Literacy on Campus.

10+ Unique Persuasive Topics

  • The Power of Empathy: Cultivating Compassion in Everyday Life.
  • Promoting Mindfulness: Finding Balance in a Fast-Paced World.
  • The Benefits of Outdoor Education: Nurturing a Connection with Nature.
  • Exploring the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence in the Modern Age.
  • Building Stronger Communities through Volunteerism and Civic Engagement.
  • The Importance of Financial Literacy: Empowering Individuals for a Secure Future.
  • Unveiling the Truth: The Role of Media Literacy in an Era of Misinformation.
  • Redefining Beauty Standards: Embracing Body Positivity and Self-Acceptance.
  • Harnessing the Power of Positive Thinking: Cultivating a Growth Mindset.
  • The Impact of Arts Education: Fostering Creativity and Well-Being in Schools.

10+ Economic Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Benefits of Implementing Universal Basic Income.
  • Exploring the Impact of Globalization on Job Markets.
  • Addressing Income Inequality: Closing the Wage Gap.
  • The Role of Government Regulation in Promoting Fair Competition.
  • Promoting Sustainable Economic Growth through Green Initiatives.
  • The Importance of Financial Literacy Education in Schools.
  • Exploring the Pros and Cons of Minimum Wage Increases.
  • The Impact of Automation on the Future of the Workforce.
  • The Economic Benefits of Investing in Renewable Energy.
  • Examining the Effects of Trade Wars on Global Economies.
  • The Role of Entrepreneurship in Stimulating Economic Development.
  • Analyzing the Economic Implications of Immigration Policies.
  • The Significance of Economic Diplomacy in International Relations.
  • The Influence of Consumer Behavior on the Economy.
  • Exploring the Economics of Healthcare: Challenges and Solutions.

10+ Ethics Persuasive Speech Topics

  • The Ethical Implications of Artificial Intelligence in Today’s Society.
  • Animal Rights: Promoting Ethical Treatment and Protection.
  • Ethical Considerations in Genetic Engineering and Human Enhancement.
  • The Ethics of Capital Punishment: Examining the Death Penalty.
  • The Moral Dilemma of Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.
  • Ethical Issues Surrounding Privacy and Data Protection in the Digital Age.
  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Ethical Business Practices for a Sustainable Future.
  • Ethical Implications of Cloning and Genetic Manipulation.
  • The Ethics of Animal Testing: Balancing Scientific Progress and Animal Welfare.
  • Ethical Considerations in Medical Research: Informed Consent and Participant Rights.
  • The Ethics of Privacy Invasion: Surveillance in the Name of Security.
  • Ethical Challenges in the Age of Big Data and Data Mining.
  • The Moral Debate of Physician-Assisted Death and End-of-Life Care.
  • Ethical Implications of Human Trafficking: Combating Modern-Day Slavery.
  • Ethical Issues in Globalization: Balancing Economic Growth and Social Justice.

How To Craft Persuasive Speech?

Remember, this is just a template, and you can modify and adapt it according to your specific speech topic and requirements.

An Example Of Persuasive Speech Topic

Title: the importance of volunteering in our community.

Introduction:

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,

Today, I stand before you to shed light on a topic that is close to my heart: the importance of volunteering in our community. We often get caught up in the busyness of our lives, but it is crucial to take a step back and recognize the profound impact we can have when we extend a helping hand. Through volunteering, we not only improve the lives of others but also enrich our own. Let’s explore how giving our time, skills, and compassion can make a lasting difference in our community.

Building Stronger Communities:

Volunteering fosters a sense of belonging and strengthens the fabric of our community. By working together towards a common goal, we forge meaningful connections and create a support system that benefits everyone involved. Whether it’s cleaning up local parks, organizing food drives, or mentoring youth, our collective efforts can transform neighborhoods and create a positive ripple effect.

Making a Difference in Individual Lives:

Each act of volunteering has the power to touch someone’s life in ways we may never fully comprehend. From offering a listening ear at a homeless shelter to tutoring underprivileged children, we have the ability to empower and uplift individuals facing adversity. Our actions can instill hope, provide opportunities, and inspire others to believe in their own potential.

Personal Growth and Development:

Volunteering is not just about giving; it is also an incredible avenue for personal growth. As we step outside our comfort zones and engage with diverse communities, we develop empathy, compassion, and a broader perspective on life. Volunteering allows us to hone our skills, learn new ones, and build a strong sense of self-esteem. It is an investment in ourselves that pays dividends in personal and professional spheres.

Addressing Social Issues:

Our community faces numerous social challenges, from poverty to environmental degradation. Through volunteering, we become agents of change, actively working to address these pressing issues. By dedicating our time and resources to organizations and causes that align with our values, we contribute to the collective efforts of creating a more equitable and sustainable world.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, volunteering is not a mere act of kindness; it is a transformative force that can shape our community and ourselves. By embracing the spirit of giving, we build stronger communities, make a profound impact on individual lives, experience personal growth, and contribute to solving societal issues. I urge each one of you to find a cause that resonates with you, explore volunteering opportunities, and embark on this incredible journey of service. Together, let’s make a lasting difference in our community, one selfless act at a time.

In conclusion, persuasive speech topics hold immense power to shape opinions, provoke critical thinking, and inspire action. Throughout this blog, we have explored a wide range of persuasive speech topics, covering social issues, ethics, and public speaking. 

Remember that when selecting a persuasive speech topic, it is crucial to consider the audience’s relevance, your personal interest, and the potential impact of the topic. Crafting a persuasive speech involves engaging the audience through a compelling introduction, presenting well-supported arguments, addressing counter arguments, and concluding with a strong call to action. 

By utilizing these techniques, you can effectively deliver a persuasive speech that leaves a lasting impression and drives positive change. So, embrace the art of persuasive communication, be the voice of change, and make your words resonate in the hearts and minds of your audience. 

Together, let’s harness the power of persuasive speech to create a better, more informed, and compassionate world.

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Public Speaking Resources

237 Easy Persuasive Speech Topics and Guide

A persuasive speech is a speech written and delivered to convince people of the speaker’s viewpoint. It uses words to make the audience ‘see’ the speaker’s point of view and to ‘sway’ them into agreeing with it.

It is not a simple matter of presenting gathered facts and evidence. More than just seeing why the speaker thinks that way, a persuasive speech tries to persuade the audience in accepting that line of thought and make it the way they, too, think.

To jump to the persuasive speech topic section, click here .

This is where it differs from an argument. The difference between an argumentative and persuasive speech is that one tries to prove a point while the other tries to affect the listener’s perspective.

  • Informative Speech Topics and Ideas
  • Toastmasters Project 9: Persuade With Power

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Some examples of a persuasive speech are sales pitch, the speech of politicians, the speech of environmentalists, the speech of feminists, the speech of animal activists, etc.

In the above examples, you must have noticed that all these kind of speech has a goal. A sales pitch is to get you to buy something, politicians give speeches to get you to vote for them, and environmentalists, feminists, and animal activists have a cause to advocate. They all want you to ‘do’ something.

Action is a persuasive speech’s end goal. Ultimately, the speaker wants to persuade you to do something. And why would you do that?

Say, an environmentalist wants people to re-cycle because they think or know that it is good for the environment. Now, it is the people who need to know and think recycling is good for the environment. Only then they would recycle.

Therefore, a more complete definition of a persuasive speech would be “Speech that convinces the audience of a certain idea to inspire them into the desired action.”

Art of Persuasion

Persuasive speech is an art form.

Take an example of a man who was begging in the street. He had a hat in front of him and a sign that said “I am blind, please help” He got a few coins. Then, a lady came along, turned the sign around, and wrote something. A lot more people started to give the man money. His hat was filled with coins. What did that lady write? What persuaded people to give?

“Today is a beautiful day and I cannot see it.”

The second line got him more money because it ‘affected’ people, it appealed to their emotions more than the straightforward “I am blind, please help.” This is called pathos.

According to Aristotle, there are three components of or modes to affect people. They are Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.

Ethos in layman’s terms is credibility or authority. The dictionary defines it as “the character or disposition of a community, group, person, etc.” So, you need to have that disposition that makes you a reliable or trustable person.

For example, a woman talking about women’s problems is more likely to have an effect on the audience than a male speaker. The principal comes into the class and tells you ‘Tomorrow is a holiday and no questions will be asked. But if your teacher says so, you will investigate first. You will be more eager to listen to a popular person in the field than to a newbie.

It is having an effect on people by your person so that they would be more receiving of you.

Pathos in Greek means ‘suffering’ or ‘experience’. It is generally defined as an appeal to people’s emotions. Like in the story of the blind boy above, Pathos is to tap into people’s experience of suffering in order to move them towards a certain action.

Of course, those people have not experienced blindness but they can imagine losing the privilege of sight that they now possess. In simple words, it is to evoke feelings of pity, fear, anger, and such.

Logos is the logical appeal. This is to persuade by the means of reasoning. If the speaker makes a claim such as ‘polythene bags should be banned, then he should give a reason as to ‘why’ like ‘polythene bags do not biodegrade and continue to pollute the environment or facts like ‘Thousands of bags are produced every week and are dumped somewhere after use’ or ‘every bag produced since 19_ still exists somewhere on earth today.’

Presentation- Monroe’s motivated sequence

Presentation is very important. It is the backbone. How you perform your speech, how you deliver the words have the maximum effect on people. Therefore, a speech needs to be organized.

Monroe’s motivated sequence is a technique for organizing persuasive speech. It consists of the following steps.

Grab their attention. Start with a startling statement, an intriguing story, a dramatic action, anything that will make the audience take notice of you. This is also the introduction part. Hook them. Build their interest.

Now, convince the people that there is a problem. More than that, convince them that action needs to be taken against the problem, that it will not go away by itself. Tap into their imagination to show how this problem affects them. Use reasons and facts to support your claims and to impress upon them the need for change.

The audience should be looking forward to the ‘solution’ to the problem. They should want to know what they can do. In this step, introduce your solution. Demonstrate or give examples to make the audience understand how it works and how it solves the problem. Use testimonials or statistics to prove the effectiveness of that solution.

Paint a world where nothing was done and how it affected them. Also, paint a world where they did as you suggested and how it changed the situation for the better. Use vivid imagery to make them ‘feel’ the troubles and relief of not doing and doing as you said. Create a viable scenario. It should be relatable and believable.

Call to action. Strike when the iron is hot. It should be something that they can readily do and immediately. More the time passes less they are likely to follow with it as other things in life take precedence and the feeling of urgency is lost. Make it easy too. Do most of the handiwork so they have to put the least effort.

This is a classic technique developed by Alan Monroe in the mid-1930s. It is still the most effective basis for many persuasive speeches.

Some people are born with the skill of persuasion while others can build on it by applying such techniques and practicing. Here are some Persuasive Speech Topics that you can practice with.

Take a look at the video below. It explains how to write an introduction for a persuasive speech.

Below are 6 sample videos of persuasive speeches.

  • Why homeschooling is good and should be promoted. (School)

Some students do better in a group with a healthy competition to keep them motivated. Some children are better off studying on their own, continuing at their own fast or slow pace which is hindered when moving along with other children.

  • Students should get minimum of 45 minutes tiffin break. (School)

All work and no play make Jack a dull boy. Keeping children cooped up in a room for a long is not good. They need regular refreshing breaks to revitalize, to talk with their friends…

  • Is it racism to ban Marijuana when smoking tobacco is legal? (Funny)

Everybody knows cigarettes are harmful and addictive. Yet, there are big industries manufacturing these drugs on a large scale. Then there is Marijuana that is less harmful, less addictive, and has dozens of use; is it not racism to ban it?

  • Some juveniles needs to be prosecuted as adults. (School?)

More and more teenagers are committing heinous crimes. They know they will get off easy, that they will not face serious consequences. According to the level of savagery committed, juveniles should at times be prosecuted as adults.

  • Are pretty or handsome students really dumber? (School)

This is just a stereotype, just like saying women are less logical and others. Or. That appears to hold true in most cases. As time is limited, people who spend more time on appearance spend less time learning and those who spend time learning fails to look after their appearance.

  • Proficiency in academics is not the only measure of intelligence. (School)

Are grades everything? Different people possess different types of intelligence but grades measure only a few kinds. Is it not like judging a fish on its ability to climb a tree?

  • What is the right age to start owing a mobile phone? (Parenting)

Most parents believe that the right age to own mobile is when children can pay for it so that they can be aware of their expenditure. Else, they might engage in long, unnecessary conversation and…

  • Should children be bought a mobile phone for emergencies? (Parenting)

Mobiles or cell phones are the fastest means of communication. Should children, therefore, be allowed to owe mobiles so that they can contact their guardians in case of emergency?

  • Homework should be banned. (School)

Children spend most of their waking hours in school. They have only a few hours at the home to do things other than academics. But homework is the tag along with that…

  • Should men pay child support even if pregnancy was a one sided decision? (Feminism)

If a woman decides to bear a child despite her partner’s protest, is he still obligated to provide monetary support upon divorce for the same reason?

  • Laws should not be based on religion.

There are many religions. Their ideas vary. But the law should be uniform. Basing laws on certain religions is like forcing the ideas of that religion on every citizen.

  • Birth controls should be free and easily available. (Feminism?)

If teen pregnancy is to be avoided, birth controls should be free and easily available with no parental permission required. Imagine asking your parents if you can have sex or parents permitting it. It is the same as unavailability of the contraceptives which takes us back to square one.

  • Honking unnecessarily should be punishable.

Honking during a traffic jam is not going to clear it up. It only disturbs and aggravates everyone else. Honking at girls is offensive. Honking to bully is wrong. Honking unnecessarily like this should be considered criminal and punished.

  • Divorced and happy parents is better for the children than living in a conflicted home.

Some parents stay together for the sake of their children but fail to get along. This creates a very tense environment and that is not how a home should be.

  • Hiding your HIV status in a relationship should be punishable by law.

HIV is a serious disease with no cure available. If a person is aware of his/her HIV positivity, withholding the information and therefore transmitting it to the unsuspecting partner in the process is criminal.

  • Legalization of prostitution has more positive effects than negative.

Stopping prostitution is impossible. They will continue to operate underground where they face many problems. Girls get trafficked, tricked, or forced into it. Making it legal will at least ensure safety and justice to the sex workers and will also help control forced labor.

  • Schools should take bullying more seriously. / Why bullying is a serious offense. (School)

Bullying is very damaging to the victim and can take a very dangerous turn. But it is dismissed as children’s play in most cases. We don’t realize its seriousness until it is too late…

  • Partial Birth Abortion is a sin.

In this method of abortion, a living baby is pulled out from the womb feet first. The base of the skull is punctured and the brain is removed with a powerful suction machine. This is no different from murder. It is usually allowed by law only in order to save the mother’s life but many healthy mothers’ babies are aborted this way every year…

  • All institutions like schools, colleges and offices should start only after 10.

When such institutions start early, people need to wake up earlier for preparation. Waking up feeling unrested can make a person inactive, irritable, and unproductive. Scientists say that a person’s mind is not fully awake until 10 in the morning…

  • Sexual relationship before marriage is not a crime.

Sex is a biological need and a healthy sex life has a lot of mental and physical benefits. If the partners involved are adults and there is mutual consent…

  • School and teachers should stay away from student’s personal life. (School?)

Every institution has some rule. This rule should govern the members within the institution. But some schools like to take this beyond the school grounds and have control over what students do and do not in their personal time.

  • Energy drinks should be considered borderline medicines. (Health)

Energy drinks provide added energy. So, it should only be consumed when your body lacks energy, in a weakened state, like medicine. Plus, it contains a lot of caffeine that does more harm than good…

  • Parents should properly answer their children’s curiosities. (Parenting)

‘How does a baby come?’ children ask and parents tell them about gods and storks. This raises more questions and does nothing but confuse the child. Try to give an anatomically correct answer without being graphic. Never try to dismiss any of their questions or scold them…

  • Euthanasia, is it ethical?

A person should get to choose whether they want to live or die in dire conditions. Or. Euthanasia is no different from suicide. Supporting euthanasia is like supporting suicide.

  • Prospective parent(s) should get a psychiatric approval before adoption. (Parenting)

We want to find a home for every orphaned child but we want a happy home. There are many sick people out there who want to adopt a child only to abuse them or for some other kind of personal gain…

  • Cigarettes should be illegal.

Cigarettes are like drugs and they should be illegal just like drugs are. It has adverse health effects on the smoker as well as people around him…

  • Smoking in public places should be fined.

Cigarettes are very harmful and their harmful smoke does not affect the smoker alone. It affects the surrounding people as well. Not all people are suicidal that way. Why should they suffer? When one’s action harms the other, it is an offense.

  • Are uniforms necessary?

Uniform brings uniformity. It eliminates frivolous fashion competition which is not what school is for… Or. Clothes are a form of expression. Students spend most of their time in school. They should be comfortable with what they wear…

  • Number of children one can have should be limited and children with previous partner(s) counts.

Four from two, eight from four; population multiplies that way. Already, the earth has become so crowded. If this is to continue, we will rid this world of ourselves.

  • Would it be ethical to genetically design babies? (Technology?)

Yes. Why not use science to cure diseases and eradicate the possibility of a child’s suffering? Or. This method can be misused to alter more than just a threat of diseases and that will disturb the diversity in the gene pool…

  • ‘Living together’ relationships, good or bad?

Marriage cannot keep together those who want to go their separate ways and those who want to together do not need such a constitution.

  • ‘Early to sleep, early to rise’ benefits.

They say ‘Early to sleep and early to rise makes a man healthy and wise.’ This was not said without a reason. Going to bed early and waking up early the next day have many benefits, for both our mind and body.

  • Every property should compulsorily have trees. (Environment)

Trees produce oxygen and filters air. We need more trees. But the population is increasing. We are cutting down trees to erect concrete buildings instead…

  • Fast foods are overpriced.

Fast foods like French fries, burgers, pizza, etc. cost way more than they actually should. The restaurants are ripping us off. Take fries for example…

  • Using animals as test subjects is cruel and unfair. (Animal rights)

For you, it is one animal among many. But for that particular animal, one life is all it has and you have no right to play with it.

  • Why Gay Marriage should be legalized. (Gay rights)

Homosexuality is not a disease. It is how people are. They want to marry their partner for the same reasons heterosexual couples do. Not legalizing gay marriage is discrimination…

  • Marriage is not about procreation. (Gay rights)

One, almost logical, reason people give against gay marriage is that they cannot bear kids because of which it is definitely not natural/ biological or ‘how god intended’. But marriage is not about procreation. It is about you and your comfort or happiness, about who you want to spend the rest of your life with.

  • Electronics are stealing childhood.

These days, children spend a lot of time on mobile phones, computers, or other electronic devices instead of running around, going out, and playing as a child should.

  • Teens cannot be good parents. (School/ Parenting)

Some teens decide to start a family when the female partner gets pregnant. While this is seen as an admirable option against abortion, are teen parents really good for the kid?

  • Ads should be tested for sexist messages before being aired. (Feminism)

Not only children but everyone learns from what they see and hear. The subliminal sexist messages in ads impart gender roles on their minds, undoing a lot of feminists’ efforts. But mostly, it brainwashes the coming generation and we should not allow that.

  • Protection and breeding of white tigers is illogical; why hinder natural selection? (Environment/ Animal rights)

White tigers do not fare well in the wild due to their color. It was a case of mutation that would have naturally been eliminated if humans had not interfered. I am not saying all living white tigers must be killed but why are people breeding it in captivity instead of letting it die out? Just because they’re pretty and we like pretty?

  • Exotic pets are not pets. (Animal rights)

Exotic animals belong in the wild. They need to be with their own kind, living in their natural habitat. They should not be isolated in people’s homes where their mobility is limited.

  • Feminism should be made a compulsory subject in high school and college. (Feminism)

Feminism is an eye-opener. It is something every man and woman should know of. Thus, it should be a compulsory and common subject instead of being exclusive to Arts or few other faculty.

  • Age 16 is not juvenile. (School?)

Are 16-year-olds really kids? Can they not be expected to know the difference between right and wrong? Maybe they do not know it is a crime to download songs and movies but what about rape and murder? If 16 is old enough to drive in most countries, it is old enough to be tried as an adult.

  • Playing Video games for few hours does good. (School/ parenting?)

It has been found out that playing a few hours of video game help improve people’s hand-eye coordination and enhances cognitive power. Also, games based on real history or science can impart knowledge…

  • Read before agreeing to sites and applications.

We download apps and software and signup on different sites. Each of these requires us to click ‘I agree’. We click this ‘I agree’ without actually reading the agreement. This can later cause problems…

  • Is death penalty ethical?

It is not ethical to eliminate people like we try to eliminate diseases. What about human rights? Or. What kind of rights for the person who does not respect others’ rights and freedom? It is a befitting punishment.

  • Send drug dealers to prison but addicts for rehabilitation.

Drug Addicts are victims too. They need rehabilitation, not prison. Dealers are the real criminals.

  • Parents should cook tastier option instead of making children eat the healthy foods they don’t want.

If not meat then milk and pulses. There is a range of choices for the required nutrition. So why should children have to eat something they don’t like? Just give them a tastier option.

  • If girls can wear pants, boys can wear skirts. (Funny?)

Is all equality fighting for girls only? What about boys’ rights? When girls can wear boys’ clothes why can boys not wear that of girls?

  • Being slim is not just about looks but health too. (Health?)

Beauties were those who were plum. Now, skinny is the fashion. But to those who want to be ‘comfortable’ in their size, know that a slim body is more than just looks.

  • There should be one holiday in the middle of workdays.

Saturday and Sunday’s rest do not keep us charged up to Friday. This makes people less productive by Thursday and Friday. A break in the middle would be wonderfully refreshing…

  • Considering the real meaning behind Nursery Rhymes, should they be taught to children? (School)

The fun nursery rhyme “Ring around the Rosie” is actually about the bubonic plague that killed nearly 15% of the country. This is only an example among many. Consider the lyrics of “Three blind mice” that goes “… Who cut off their tails, With a carving knife.” Is it okay to teach these to the children?

  • Countries should provide free Wi-Fi in tourist destinations.

Doing this will help tourists as they will be able to contact their people without wandering around confused in a foreign land. This will definitely increase the flow of both national and international tourists. It will be most helpful to students from abroad.

  • Know the woes of genetically modified Chickens.

To meet the demand of the growing population, chickens are fed hormones and other drugs to make them grow faster and fat, especially the meat in the breast area. Because of this, the chickens cripple under their own weight. They suffer terribly…

  • Children should be allowed to use electronics like mobile, notebooks etc. during breaks. (Students)

Using electronics during class is certainly bad and for a number of reasons. But break times belong to the students. Breaks are for recreation. If students choose to enjoy electronics, what is wrong with that?

  • Teachers, too, should keep their mobiles in silent during class.

Class time is for teaching and learning. Students should keep their mobile in silence so as to not disturb the class. But, so should the teacher. They shouldn’t pick up their call during class.

  • Humans are consuming way more salt than necessary. (Health)

Sodium is important. But the larger amount of sodium intake has often been associated with an increase in blood pressure that leads to strokes. 1500 to 2300mg is the maximum amount per day.

  • Benefits of donating blood.

Donating blood is the right thing to do. It saves lives. There are a few moral reasons as such to donate blood but do you know that you are not losing anything either? Donating blood is good for your own health too…

  • Why become an organ donor?

Perfectly healthy people die when trying to donate their organs to their loved ones. Even if they survive, they may have to face complications and they are now, somehow, deficient. If an organ could be got…

  • Original organic fruits taste better than the hybrids.

Hybrid fruits are larger and juicer but it lacks in terms of taste. The taste tastes diluted…

  • Why people who have should give.

Many people suffer from poverty. They have a hard time meeting basic needs like food, shelter, and clothes.

  • Why suicide over ‘love troubles’ is stupid. (Students)

Life moves on. Time heals. Things will happen if you continue to live. But the exaggerated fictional idea of love that the movies market has…

  • Why women should earn irrespective of their husband’s economic status. (Feminism)

Be independent. Money is power. Do not let anyone have an upper hand and be vulnerable to possible abuse…

  • Recycle e-waste. (Environment)

E-waste contains many recoverable materials such as aluminum, copper, gold, silver etc. Reusing this will take a load off of natural resources. E-waste also contains toxins like mercury, lead, beryllium, and others that will inevitably infuse into soil and water.

  • Do not tolerate abuse, speak out. (Feminism)

Certainly, nobody enjoys abuse? Then why do women continue to stay in abusive relationship despite being educated and holding a good job? Why do they tolerate other kinds of abuse as well? There are many reasons for this…

  • Every citizen should be required to, at least, pass high school. (School)

Up to high school, the education is basic. Imagine needing to stop ocean pollution. An educated person would be more easily persuaded or would know why ocean pollution is bad. Or. There are good and bad people. Education will teach the good how to be good and may persuade the bad…

  • Hostels, is it good or bad for children? (Parenting)

Hostels teach children independence. They learn to do a lot in their own. Or. No one can take better care of children than their parents. Children need parents’ love and support. Away in the hostel, surrounded by children no wiser than themselves…

  • Teachers should discuss among themselves to avoid giving too much homework. (School)

After studying for hours in school, spending all the hours in-home doing homework will mentally tire the student. Homework should be very light. But light homework of all the teachers added will take up all of the students’ time. So…

  • Importance of clubs in school or colleges. (School)

School and college clubs are the best way to learn different valuable skills in. In school and college-level clubs, the eligibility for membership is less strict and one gets to learn from the more skilled seniors.

  • Should plastic surgery be so commercial?

Everyone wants to look good. When accidents or attacks disfigure us, we can turn to plastic surgery to try and gain back our lost selves. But intentionally altering ourselves to…

  • Online piracy should be monitored more strictly.

People have a right to their intellectual property. It is so easy to find and download pirated materials that it seems non-criminal…

  • Are single-sex schools better than coed? (School)

According to research done in Korea, students from single-sex schools scored better than those from coed and had more chances of pursuing college-level education. However, this is from a general viewpoint. When considering students at an individual level, it really depends on what kind of environment that particular student does better in.

  • Spaying or neutering pets is good or bad? (Animal right)

Some say that neutering or spaying pets have a lot of benefits, both for the animal and the owner. Others say that neutering or spaying does not change much but only invites diseases upon the poor animal.

  • Are master’s degree or doctorate really necessary? (Students)

High School teaches us the basics and a bachelor is more career-oriented. We can get a good job after bachelor and hone our skills for a better position. Is a master’s and higher degree really important when we can learn more in the field?

  • Who is more responsible for poaching? Poachers or buyers? (Animal right)

This may be an ‘egg first or chicken question. Scientists have now found out that chickens come first but the question ‘Poacher or buyers’ remains.

  • What kind of food should school or college canteen offer? (Student)

From unhealthy commercial food items to unappetizing bland gibberish; can school or college canteens not offer an in-between option? What would be best for the students?

  • What age is proper to talk about the birds and the bees? (Parenting)

From the time a child starts asking about sex is the time from when to start talking about the birds and the bees. Children as young as 4-5 years old are curious about where a baby comes from. Answer them truthfully but avoid being graphic. Also, answer only what they ask.

  • Fee for facilities aside, the tuition fee should be fixed by the government. (Student)

Schools and colleges take a ridiculous amount of tuition fees. It is understandable that according to the facilities provided, the fee may be less or more but the tuition fee, at least, should be a fixed amount that greedy schools cannot increase as they wish.

  • How long should a drunk driver lose his license for?

Drinking and driving can be fatal to both the driver and an innocent passerby. But people do not take it seriously. They think they can handle their liquor and end up causing accidents. This is absolute carelessness.

  • The amount of water one should drink per day. (Health)

About 60% of the human body is water. We continually lose this water through skin and urine. This causes dehydration…

  • Aliens exist. (Paranormal)

There have been many UFO sightings and stories of alien abduction. Even in the old age paintings, cave paintings, Sanskrit scrolls, the extraterrestrial life form is evident. Scientists have found other habitable planets. An intelligent life form somewhere other than Earth is no longer an idea of a fantasist…

  • White meat over red meat or the other way around? (Health)

White meat is less fatty but red meat contains more vitamins like zinc, iron, and B vitamins…

  • Why religion and science should go hand in hand. / Why religion should evolve with scientific discoveries. (Philosophy)

Science explores the universe for answers while religion makes claims about it. Science is open to change, it acknowledges that it can err and backs its claims with evidence. Religion on the other hand is a ‘belief’ system

  • Should astrologers, mediums and the likes be arrested for fraud? (Paranormal)

Do heavenly bodies really affect our personality or future? Do dead ones really become spirits and can be contacted through mediums? Or are these all just a big hoax?

  • Cats or dogs?

Are you a cat person or a dog person? Say why a dog is better than a cat as a pet or that cat makes a better pet.

  • Benefits of eating fruit over drinking its juice. (Health)

There is a whole fruit and we throw away more than half of the substance when choosing to drink its juice even though eating the fruit itself is healthier because of the fiber it contains.

  • Women shouldn’t have to change their last name after marriage. (Feminism)

Having to change our last name after marriage is sexist. It confirms the power males hold over the women in our patriarchal society.

  • Internet promotes communication, not kill it.

Social networks like Facebook, Twitter, messenger, and others keep us in contact with many friends that we would otherwise have forgotten. It is an easy means of communication…

  • Does pressure build or break a person?

Pressure is healthy. It drives us. Or. Yes. Pressure drives us. It drives us nuts.

  • Hiring volunteers on zero pay is cruel.

Volunteers are those who want to donate labor. They need not be paid for their work but what about their expenses like transportation and others? These kinds of expenses, at least, should be covered.

  • Learning multiple language widens our perception of the world.

There are always those words that cannot be exactly translated to another language. This is because that way of thinking does not exist in that other language. It is like the egg of Cristopher. We discover a new way of expressing ourselves, one we couldn’t think of in the limitation of our own language.

  • Oceans are not trash bins. (Environment)

Tons of human waste are thrown into the ocean. This is creating a big problem in the ocean ecosystem…

  • Killing for fun is inhuman, hunting is inhuman. (Animal rights)

How to have fun with animals? By playing with them, baby talking to them, watching them in their weird but fun action. Not by chasing them down and killing them.

  • Cigarette, alcohol or drugs are not the answer for stress or other problems in life.

People tend to depend on harmful substances like cigarettes, alcohol, or drugs when faced with a problem or when under stress. These substances do not cure stress but could be a self-harming method of coping with problems. People under stress tend to show more unhealthy behaviors such as these…

  • Music heals.

On hearing good music, the brain releases dopamine. Dopamine is an essential chemical that plays a number of important roles in the brain and body. Music has also proven effective against stress…

  • Why breakfast is the important meal of the day. (Health)

Breakfast is the first meal after a long gap during the night. It provides us with vital nutrients like calcium, vitamins, minerals, and energy…

  • Fairytales should be re-written for the next generation children.

Fairytales often star a damsel in distress who not only ‘waits’ for a handsome rescuer but also possesses subjugating qualities like obedience, daintiness, etc. It imparts sexist values in young minds…

  • How a time table can help manage our daily lives.

People do not realize how time table can make our day-to-day lives much more manageable and therefore fruitful or efficient. Some find it tedious and some pretentious…

  • Everyone should learn swimming.

Swimming is not just for fun like cycling. It could save someone’s life. It is an important survival skill that everyone should know of.

  • Good thoughts lead to good actions.

Our actions result from our thoughts. Action is a mind’s reflection…

  • Benefits of meditation. (Health)

Meditation has a lot of benefits, both on body and mind. It reduces stress, improves concentration, reduces irritability, increases perseverance, etc…

  • Zoos are not big enough for wild animals. (Animal rights)

How large can you make a zoo? And how can it mimic nature when different animals are confined separately. Wild animals belong in the wild.

Some more Persuasive Speech Topics:

  • Why is adopting a pet better than buying one?
  • How does having a pet better your everyday life?
  • Having a snake as a pet is as cool as it sounds
  • Should you get rid of a pet that harms another person?
  • Is breeding pets for sale unethical?
  • Selfies with animals in tourist locations should be made equal
  • A dog is the perfect pet
  • Why a pet is essential for a growing child
  • Owning a pet makes you healthier
  • Slaughterhouses are unethical
  • Animals are facing extinction, we should do something about it
  • Why wild animals should be left in the wild
  • Petting exotic animals should be made illegal
  • Why dolphin farming is horrific
  • The Yulin Dog festival displays one of the worst sides of humans
  • Why neutering your pets is wrong
  • Advantages of owning a horse(besides looking fantastic)
  • People need to stop fueling pug markets.
  • Is animal slaughter for religious purposes ethical?
  • Manual drivers are unnecessarily aggressive about their cars
  • Why you should not drive without a kid seat
  • Why sports cars are not worth it
  • If you can’t call while driving, then why is there a hands-free mode?
  • New ideas for lessons drivers have to take before getting a license
  • Should you charge people for driving tests?
  • Why cycling is cooler than driving
  • Why traffic rules are designed against bike rides
  • Driving licenses should need a renewal every 5 years
  • Why co-ed education is the best way to teach
  • GPA isn’t everything
  • 9.30 is too early
  • Why teachers need to be recertified
  • Listening to music during exams should be allowed
  • Should sports and arts be mandatory?
  • Does our school curriculum need obligatory life skill classes?
  • Phones in classes are beneficial and convenient
  • Every student should be encouraged to take a gap year
  • Cyber-bullying should be punished the same as bullying
  • Why art classes are just as important as science
  • School canteens need to serve healthier alternatives
  • More institutes should promote nternational exchange programs
  • Curriculums should be designed with the job market in mind
  • Textbooks are overpriced and should be replaced with digital alternatives
  • Should religion be taught in schools?
  • Is repeating classes beneficial for underperforming students?
  • Students should not have to ask to use the restroom
  • Is having a handwriting class beneficial?
  • Is there a point to giving homework?
  • Education needs to be available in prisons
  • We are being overcharged for education
  • Online learning should be held to equal importance as schools
  • Are teachers paid enough?
  • Is there room for commercial advertisement in schools?
  • Are study halls still relevant?
  • Are our children safe at school?
  • School trips are a waste of money
  • Educational institutes should be more welcoming to technological changes
  • Schools should teach multiple languages
  • Public schools are better than private schools
  • Why meditation should be included in the daily curriculum
  • Are scholarships reaching the right people?
  • Current environmental laws are insufficient
  • Green energy is the future
  • The environmental impact of palm oil
  • The environmental impact of single-use bags
  • Fishing restrictions need to be stricter
  • Oil spills are deadly to marine life
  • Leaving fossil fuels behind
  • Pollution has reached alarming levels
  • Garden owners should be allowed to grow exotic plants
  • Switch to hybrid cars to help the environment
  • Rainforests are going extinct at an alarming rate
  • Why natural resources are quickly going extinct
  • Alternative energy sources should be pushed by governments
  • Euthanasia should be legalized
  • Why eating meat does not make me a bad person
  • Can true equality ever really be achieved?
  • Is messing with unborn children’s genetics ethical?
  • Stereotypes are stereotypes for a reason
  • Animal testing is a necessary part of production
  • Why we need to stop producing and buying fur
  • Prostitution should be legalized
  • Doping and it’s place in sports 
  • Why workplace relationships should be avoided
  • Is religion a cult?
  • Should prayers be included in schools?
  • Parents should not be able to choose the sex of their unborn child
  • Donating to charities is a scam
  • Aborting fetuses with birth defects is not immoral
  • Wars have positive consequences as well
  • Why genital mutilation in infants needs to be stopped
  • Conventional beauty standards are misleading
  • China’s One-child policy was a good idea for population control
  • Animal testing and why it is immoral
  • Why banning cigarettes and alcohol from advertisements is not effective
  • Sugar is added to everything we eat
  • Children should be taught to cook
  • Why growing your own food will help both you and the environment
  • Peanuts: The secret superfood
  • We should be more open to genetically engineered food products
  • The proper way to dispose your food waste
  • The loopholes in labelling laws
  • Keto goes against the natural human evolution
  • Artificial chemicals in our food products is harming us
  • The legal age for contraceptive treatment should be lowered
  • Fast food is slowly killing you
  • How positive thinking can change your life
  • Breakfast isn’t the most important meal of the day
  • Stomach stapling should not be normalized
  • If you don’t wear a seat belt, you are putting yourself at great risk
  • How diabetes can affect your work
  • How daily exercise can change your life
  • Stress as the leading cause of teen suicide
  • Diet pills are a scam
  • Body shaming is putting lives at risk
  • Contraceptive education is an effective solution for teen pregnancy
  • There is such a thing as too much soda
  • Free condom distribution at schools is better than teaching about abstinence
  • The toothpick you pick matters
  • Surrogacy should be more widely accepted
  • Why insomnia should be taken as a more serious health concern
  • Helmets and seatbeat save lives
  • Restaurants need to be more vigilant about handling allergies
  • How Big Pharma is controlling your life
  • The medical field is criminally underfunded
  • We are eating too much salt
  • Organ donation should be an opt-out system
  • The dangers of an anti-vaxxers movement
  • Why fire drills are ineffective
  • Why you need to take that vacation
  • Good sleep is underrated
  • Why vaping is not a better alternative
  • Your stress is killing you
  • It is not healthy for children to be vegetarians
  • Parents don’t need to be informed about underage abortions
  • Donating blood should be encouraged early
  • How much do you know about what’s in your food

I hope you find the tips for persuasive speech and persuasive speech topics useful. Let me what you think of them by commenting below.

Module 10: Persuasive Speaking

Appendix a: persuasive speech topic ideas.

Environmental Topics

  • Citizens should try to reuse items before recycling them.
  • The U.S. should ban mountaintop removal as a mode of harvesting coal.
  • Contemporary climate change is human-caused.
  • Governmental funding for clean energy should be increased.
  • All municipalities should offer public transportation.
  • The U.S. should ratify the Kyoto Protocol.
  • Bottled water should undergo the same quality testing as municipal water.
  • Preservation is a better environmental sustainability model than is conservation. • Hunting should be banned on all public lands.

Social Justice Topics

  • The right to marry should be extended to gays and lesbians.
  • Abortion should be illegal.
  • State colleges should be free to attend.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. was the most influential leader of the civil rights movement
  • The death penalty should be abolished.
  • Convicted rapists should be sentenced to the death penalty.
  • Women should receive equal pay for equal work.
  • Affirmative action does not work and should be ended.
  • Individuals and communities affected by environmental injustices should receive compensation.

Campus Life

  • Dorm rooms should have individual thermostats.
  • Professors’ office hours should be held at reasonable hours, not 7 a.m. on Mondays.
  • Free coffee should be provided in all classroom buildings before noon.
  • Student fees at universities are too high.
  • Dining halls should provide nutritional information for all meals.
  • Student government leaders should host regular forums to answer questions from the general student population.
  • Plagiarism should be prosecuted to the fullest extent.

Everyday Life Topics

  • The legal drinking age should be lowered to 18.
  • Frequent flyers should not be required to remove their shoes in airport security lines.
  • Eating five meals a day is better than eating three.
  • Smoking should be illegal in all public areas.
  • Gmail is the best email service.
  • All restaurants should offer vegan and vegetarian options or substitutes.
  • Netflix and Hulu are better ways to watch movies and television shows.
  • ATM fees should be outlawed.
  • Proximity to religious facilities should have no bearing on alcohol sales.

Economic Topics

  • Social security benefits should be guaranteed for those who pay in to the program.
  • All multi-year jobs should include pension plans.
  • The U.S. should spend less on wars and more on education.
  • Everyone should be required to pay an equal percentage of taxes.
  • A consumption tax is more just than an income tax.
  • The minimum wage in the U.S. is too low.
  • Multi-million dollar bonuses for corporate executives are unjust because they preclude better wages/reduced prices for others.

Quirky Topics

  • Tacos are the greatest of human inventions.
  • Ghosts are real.
  • Short haircuts are more comfortable than long hairstyles.
  • Bourbon should only be served “on the rocks.”
  • Traditional eyeglasses make those who wear them look smarter.
  • Eating chicken with a fork should be illegal. (An actual law in Gainesville, Georgia!)
  • Chapter 16 Appendix A. Authored by : Sarah Stone Watt, Ph.D. and Joshua Trey Barnett. Provided by : Pepperdine University Malibu, CA and Indiana University Bloomington, IN. Located at : http://publicspeakingproject.org/psvirtualtext.html . Project : The Public Speaking Project. License : CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives

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Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 105 interesting persuasive speech topics for any project.

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Are you struggling to find good persuasive speech topics? It can be hard to find a topic that interests both you and your audience, but in this guide we've done the hard work and created a list of 105 great persuasive speech ideas. They're organized into ten categories and cover a variety of topics, so you're sure to find one that interests you.

In addition to our list, we also go over which factors make good persuasive speech topics and three tips you should follow when researching and writing your persuasive speech.

What Makes a Good Persuasive Speech Topic?

What makes certain persuasive speech topics better than others? There are numerous reasons, but in this section we discuss three of the most important factors of great topics for a persuasive speech.

It's Something You Know About or Are Interested in Learning About

The most important factor in choosing and creating a great persuasive speech is picking a topic you care about and are interested in. You'll need to do a lot of research on this topic, and if it's something you like learning about, that'll make the process much easier and more enjoyable. It'll also help you sound passionate and informed when you talk, both important factors in giving an excellent persuasive speech.

It's a Topic People Care About

In fourth grade, after being told I could give a persuasive speech on any topic I wanted to , I chose to discuss why the Saguaro cactus should be the United State's national plant. Even though I gave an impassioned talk and drew a life-size Saguaro cactus on butcher paper to hang behind me, I doubt anyone enjoyed the speech much.

I'd recently returned from a family vacation to Arizona where I'd seen Saguaro cacti for the first time and decided they were the coolest thing ever. However, most people don't care that much about Saguaro cacti, and most people don't care what our national plant is or if we even have one (for the record, the US has a national flower, and it's the rose).

Spare yourself the smattering of bored applause my nine-old self got at the end of my speech and choose something you think people will be interested in hearing about. This also ties into knowing your audience, which we discuss more in the final section.

It Isn't Overdone

When I was in high school, nearly every persuasive speech my classmates and I were assigned was the exact same topic: should the drinking age be lowered to 18? I got this prompt in English class, on standardized tests, in speech and debate class, etc. I've written and presented about it so often I could probably still rattle off all the main points of my old speeches word-for-word.

You can imagine that everyone's eyes glazed over whenever classmates gave their speeches on this topic. We'd heard about it so many times that, even if it was a topic we cared about, speeches on it just didn't interest us anymore.

The are many potential topics for a persuasive speech. Be wary of choosing one that's cliche or overdone. Even if you give a great speech, it'll be harder to keep your audience interested if they feel like they already know what you're going to say.

An exception to this rule is that if you feel you have a new viewpoint or facts about the topic that currently aren't common knowledge. Including them can make an overdone topic interesting. If you do this, be sure to make it clear early on in your speech that you have unique info or opinions on the topic so your audience knows to expect something new.

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105 Topics for a Persuasive Speech

Here's our list of 105 great persuasive speech ideas. We made sure to choose topics that aren't overdone, yet that many people will have an interest in, and we also made a point of choosing topics with multiple viewpoints rather than simplistic topics that have a more obvious right answer (i.e. Is bullying bad?). The topics are organized into ten categories.

Arts/Culture

  • Should art and music therapy be covered by health insurance?
  • Should all students be required to learn an instrument in school?
  • Should all national museums be free to citizens?
  • Should graffiti be considered art?
  • Should offensive language be removed from works of classic literature?
  • Are paper books better than e-books?
  • Should all interns be paid for their work?
  • Should employees receive bonuses for walking or biking to work?
  • Will Brexit hurt or help the UK's economy?
  • Should all people over the age of 65 be able to ride the bus for free?
  • Should the federal minimum wage be increased?
  • Should tipping in restaurants be mandatory?
  • Should Black Friday sales be allowed to start on Thanksgiving?
  • Should students who bully others be expelled?
  • Should all schools require students wear uniforms?
  • Should boys and girls be taught in separate classrooms?
  • Should students be allowed to listen to music during study hall?
  • Should all elementary schools be required to teach a foreign language?
  • Should schools include meditation or relaxation breaks during the day?
  • Should grades in gym class affect students' GPAs?
  • Should teachers get a bonus when their students score well on standardized tests?
  • Should children of undocumented immigrants be allowed to attend public schools?
  • Should students get paid for getting a certain GPA?
  • Should students be allowed to have their cell phones with them during school?
  • Should high school students be allowed to leave school during lunch breaks?
  • Should Greek life at colleges be abolished?
  • Should high school students be required to volunteer a certain number of hours before they can graduate?
  • Should schools still teach cursive handwriting?
  • What are the best ways for schools to stop bullying?
  • Should prostitution be legalized?
  • Should people with more than one DUI lose their driver's license?
  • Should people be required to shovel snow from the sidewalks in front of their house?
  • Should minors be able to drink alcohol in their home if they have their parent's consent?
  • Should guns be allowed on college campuses?
  • Should flag burning as a form of protest be illegal?
  • Should welfare recipients be required to pass a drug test?
  • Should white supremacist groups be allowed to hold rallies in public places?
  • Should assault weapons be illegal?
  • Should the death penalty be abolished?
  • Should beauty pageants for children be banned?
  • Is it OK to refuse to serve same-sex couples based on religious beliefs?
  • Should transgender people be allowed to serve in the military?
  • Is it better to live together before marriage or to wait?
  • Should affirmative action be allowed?
  • Should prisoners be allowed to vote?
  • Should Columbus Day be replaced with Indigenous Peoples' Day?

Government/Politics

  • Should the government spend more money on developing high-speed rail lines and less on building new roads?
  • Should the government be allowed to censor internet content deemed inappropriate?
  • Should Puerto Rico become the 51st state?
  • Should Scotland declare independence from the United Kingdom?
  • Whose face should be on the next new currency printed by the US?
  • Should people convicted of drug possession be sent to recovery programs instead of jail?
  • Should voting be made compulsory?
  • Who was the best American president?
  • Should the military budget be reduced?
  • Should the President be allowed to serve more than two terms?
  • Should a border fence be built between the United States and Mexico?
  • Should countries pay ransom to terrorist groups in order to free hostages?
  • Should minors be able to purchase birth control without their parent's consent?
  • Should hiding or lying about your HIV status with someone you're sleeping with be illegal?
  • Should governments tax soda and other sugary drinks and use the revenue for public health?
  • Should high schools provide free condoms to students?
  • Should the US switch to single-payer health care?
  • Should healthy people be required to regularly donate blood?
  • Should assisted suicide be legal?
  • Should religious organizations be required to pay taxes?
  • Should priests be allowed to get married?
  • Should the religious slaughter of animals be banned?
  • Should the Church of Scientology be exempt from paying taxes?
  • Should women be allowed to be priests?
  • Should countries be allowed to only accept refugees with certain religious beliefs?
  • Should public prayer be allowed in schools?

Science/Environment

  • Should human cloning be allowed?
  • Should people be allowed to own exotic animals like tigers and monkeys?
  • Should "animal selfies" in tourist locations with well-known animal species (like koalas and tigers) be allowed?
  • Should genetically modified foods be sold in grocery stores?
  • Should people be allowed to own pit bulls?
  • Should parents be allowed to choose the sex of their unborn children?
  • Should vaccinations be required for students to attend public school?
  • What is the best type of renewable energy?
  • Should plastic bags be banned in grocery stores?
  • Should the United States rejoin the Paris Agreement?
  • Should puppy mills be banned?
  • Should fracking be legal?
  • Should animal testing be illegal?
  • Should offshore drilling be allowed in protected marine areas?
  • Should the US government increase NASA's budget?
  • Should Pluto still be considered a planet?
  • Should college athletes be paid for being on a sports team?
  • Should all athletes be required to pass regular drug tests?
  • Should professional female athletes be paid the same as male athletes in the same sport?
  • Are there any cases when athletes should be allowed to use steroids?
  • Should college sports teams receive less funding?
  • Should boxing be illegal?
  • Should schools be required to teach all students how to swim?
  • Should cheerleading be considered a sport?
  • Should parents let their children play tackle football?
  • Will robots reduce or increase human employment opportunities?
  • What age should children be allowed to have a cell phone?
  • Should libraries be replaced with unlimited access to e-books?
  • Overall, has technology helped connect people or isolate them?
  • Should self-driving cars be legal?
  • Should all new buildings be energy efficient?
  • Is Net Neutrality a good thing or a bad thing?
  • Do violent video games encourage players to become violent in real life?

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3 Bonus Tips for Crafting Your Persuasive Speech

Of course, giving a great persuasive speech requires more than just choosing a good topic. Follow the three tips below to create an outstanding speech that'll interest and impress your audience.

Do Your Research

For a persuasive speech, there's nothing worse than getting an audience question that shows you misunderstood the issue or left an important piece out. It makes your entire speech look weak and unconvincing.

Before you start writing a single word of your speech, be sure to do lots of research on all sides of the topic. Look at different sources and points of view to be sure you're getting the full picture, and if you know any experts on the topic, be sure to ask their opinion too.

Consider All the Angles

Persuasive speech topics are rarely black and white, which means there will be multiple sides and viewpoints on the topic. For example, for the topic "Should people be allowed to own pit bulls?" there are two obvious viewpoints: everyone should be allowed to own a pit bull if they want to, and no one should be allowed to own a pit bull. But there are other options you should also consider: people should only own a pit bull if they pass a dog training class, people should be able to own pit bulls, but only if it's the only dog they own, people should be able to own pi tbulls but only if they live a certain distance from schools, people should be able to own pit bulls only if the dog passes an obedience class, etc.

Thinking about all these angles and including them in your speech will make you seem well-informed on the topic, and it'll increase the quality of your speech by looking at difference nuances of the issue.

Know Your Audience

Whenever you give a speech, it's important to consider your audience, and this is especially true for persuasive speeches when you're trying to convince people to believe a certain viewpoint. When writing your speech, think about what your audience likely already knows about the topic, what they probably need explained, and what aspects of the topic they care about most. Also consider what the audience will be most concerned about for a certain topic, and be sure to address those concerns.

For example, if you're giving a speech to a Catholic organization on why you think priests should be allowed to marry, you don't need to go over the history of Catholicism or its core beliefs (which they probably already know), but you should mention any research or prominent opinions that support your view (which they likely don't know about). They may be concerned that priests who marry won't be as committed to God or their congregations, so be sure to address those concerns and why they shouldn't worry about them as much as they may think. Discussing your topic with people (ideally those with viewpoints similar to those of your future audience) before you give your speech is a good way to get a better understanding of how your audience thinks.

More Resources for Writing Persuasive Speeches

If you need more guidance or just want to check out some examples of great persuasive writing, consider checking out the following books:

  • Lend Me Your Ears: Great Speeches in History by William Safire—This collection of great speeches throughout history will help you decide how to style your own argument.
  • The Essentials of Persuasive Public Speaking by Sims Wyeth—For quick direct tips on public speaking, try this all-purpose guide.
  • Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World's Top Minds by Carmine Gallo—This popular book breaks down what makes TED talks work and how you can employ those skills in your own presentations.
  • We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Make Good Art by Neil Gaiman—These two recent speeches by contemporary writers offer stellar examples of how to craft a compelling (and engaging) argument.

Conclusion: Persuasive Speech Ideas

Good persuasive speech topics can be difficult to think of, but in this guide we've compiled a list of 105 interesting persuasive speech topics for you to look through.

The best persuasive speech ideas will be on a topic you're interested in, aren't overdone, and will be about something your audience cares about.

After you've chosen your topic, keep these three tips in mind when writing your persuasive speech:

  • Do your research
  • Consider all the angles
  • Know your audience

What's Next?

Now that you have persuasive speech topics, it's time to hone your persuasive speech techniques. Find out what ethos, pathos, logos, and kairos are and how to use them here .

Looking to take your persuasive technique from speech to sheets (of paper)? Get our three key tips on how to write an argumentative essay , or learn by reading through our thorough breakdown of how to build an essay, step by step .

Want a great GPA? Check out our step-by-step guide to getting good grades in high school so you can have a stellar transcript.

Interested in learning about other great extracurricular opportunities? Learn more about job shadowing , community service , and volunteer abroad programs.

Still trying to figure out your courses? Check out our expert guide on which classes you should take in high school.

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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40+ Captivating Persuasive Speech Topics For Students

persuasive speech topics

Persuasive speeches have the remarkable ability to inspire change, challenge conventional beliefs, and shape the way we perceive the world. However, finding the perfect topic that strikes a chord with your audience and aligns with your own values can be a daunting task. 

So, whether you’re passionate about social justice, environmental sustainability, or personal growth, join us on this journey of discovery and let these captivating persuasive speech topics inspire your next remarkable presentation. Get ready to wield the power of words and make a difference through the art of persuasion. Let’s dive in!

What Is Persuasive Speech?

Table of Contents

A persuasive speech is a form of communication that aims to convince or influence an audience to adopt a particular viewpoint, belief, or action. The speaker presents arguments and supporting evidence to sway the audience’s opinions and encourage them to align with the speaker’s perspective.

The primary objective of a persuasive speech is to persuade the audience to think, feel, or act in a specific way. It involves employing various persuasive techniques, such as logical reasoning, emotional appeal, and credible evidence, to make a compelling case for the speaker’s position.

Persuasive speeches are often delivered in a structured format that includes an introduction, body, and conclusion. In the introduction, the speaker grabs the audience’s attention, establishes credibility, and presents the main argument or thesis statement. The body of the speech provides supporting evidence, examples, and counterarguments to strengthen the speaker’s position. The conclusion summarizes the main points and reinforces the call to action or desired outcome.

Effective persuasive speeches not only present persuasive arguments but also consider the audience’s values, beliefs, and potential objections. They engage the listeners by addressing their concerns, offering solutions, and appealing to their emotions. By employing persuasive techniques and thoughtful rhetoric, speakers strive to leave a lasting impact and inspire their audience to embrace the desired message or take action.

Persuasive speeches are commonly used in various settings, including classrooms, political rallies, sales pitches, and public advocacy campaigns. They play a crucial role in influencing public opinion, raising awareness, and promoting social change.

Importance Of Persuasive Speech That You Must Know

Here are some key reasons why persuasive speech is important:

1. Influence and Persuasion

Persuasive speeches are powerful tools for influencing and persuading others to adopt a particular viewpoint or take specific action. Whether it’s convincing people to support a cause, change their behavior, or vote for a candidate, persuasive speeches can effectively sway opinions and inspire action.

2. Public Speaking Skills

Delivering persuasive speeches helps develop essential public speaking skills. It enhances one’s ability to articulate thoughts clearly, engage an audience, and communicate persuasively. These skills are valuable in various professional fields, such as business, politics, education, and advocacy.

3. Critical Thinking

Crafting a persuasive speech requires in-depth research, analysis, and critical thinking. Speakers must evaluate different perspectives, anticipate counterarguments, and provide logical reasoning to support their claims. Engaging in persuasive speech encourages individuals to think critically, examine evidence, and form well-reasoned arguments.

4. Advocacy and Social Change

Persuasive speeches play a crucial role in advocating for social issues and driving positive change. They raise awareness about important topics, challenge societal norms, and inspire individuals to take action. Through persuasive speeches, individuals can mobilize communities, influence public opinion, and contribute to meaningful transformations.

5. Effective Communication

Persuasive speeches enhance overall communication skills. Speakers learn to effectively structure their ideas, convey messages concisely, and adapt their language and tone to connect with diverse audiences. 

6. Building Confidence

Delivering a persuasive speech requires confidence and self-assurance. As individuals prepare and present their arguments, they develop a sense of confidence in their ability to express their ideas and influence others. This confidence extends beyond public speaking and can positively impact various aspects of life, including personal relationships, negotiations, and leadership roles.

7. Empowering Individuals

Persuasive speeches have the potential to empower individuals by giving them a platform to express their beliefs, values, and concerns. It allows individuals to share their perspectives, challenge the status quo, and inspire others to take action. Through persuasive speaking, individuals can find their voice and make a difference in their communities and beyond.

8. Enhancing Persuasive Writing Skills

Crafting a persuasive speech often goes hand in hand with developing persuasive writing skills. The process of organizing thoughts, structuring arguments, and selecting impactful language strengthens one’s ability to write persuasively. These writing skills are valuable in academic settings, professional environments, and personal communication.

9. Fostering Open Dialogue

Persuasive speeches encourage dialogue and open discussions. By presenting different viewpoints and engaging in respectful debate, speakers create opportunities for diverse perspectives to be heard and understood. This fosters an environment of intellectual exchange, encourages critical thinking, and promotes a deeper understanding of complex issues.

10. Inspiring Action

Ultimately, the goal of a persuasive speech is to inspire action. Whether it’s encouraging individuals to donate to a cause, change their behaviors, or support a particular policy, persuasive speeches have the power to motivate people to act upon their convictions. They can ignite passion, instill a sense of purpose, and mobilize individuals and communities to bring about positive change.

Here in this section, we will tell you 40+ Captivating Persuasive Speech Topics For Students:

1. The Importance of Recycling

Persuade others to adopt recycling practices by discussing the environmental benefits of recycling and the impact on reducing waste.

2. Benefits of Meditation

Explore the positive effects of meditation on mental and physical well-being, such as stress reduction and increased focus.

3. Social Media Addiction

Discuss the negative impacts of excessive social media use on mental health and personal relationships, and advocate for mindful usage.

4. Animal Testing

Argue against the use of animals for scientific experiments and promote alternative methods that are more ethical and effective.

5. Climate Change

Present the urgency of addressing climate change and advocate for sustainable practices to mitigate its effects and preserve the planet.

6. Benefits of Volunteering

Highlight the personal growth, community impact, and sense of fulfillment that comes with volunteering.

7. Cyberbullying

Raise awareness about the harmful effects of cyberbullying on individuals’ mental health and advocate for stricter measures to prevent and combat it.

8. The Importance of Mental Health Education

Advocate for the inclusion of mental health education in schools to reduce stigma, promote early intervention, and support overall well-being.

9. Gun Control

Present arguments for stricter gun control regulations and advocate for measures to enhance public safety and prevent gun violence.

10. Importance of Financial Literacy

Advocate for the inclusion of financial literacy education in schools to empower individuals with essential money management skills and prevent financial difficulties.

11. Gender Equality

Discuss the importance of achieving gender equality in various spheres of life, addressing issues like pay gaps, representation, and equal opportunities.

12. Benefits of Exercise

Highlight the physical and mental health benefits of regular exercise, including improved mood, increased energy, and reduced risk of diseases.

13. Online Privacy

Discuss the implications of compromised online privacy, such as identity theft and data breaches, and advocate for better protection of personal information.

14. Importance of Arts Education

Advocate for the inclusion of arts education in schools and highlight its positive impact on creativity, critical thinking, and overall development.

15. The Harmful Effects of Fast Food

Present arguments against excessive consumption of fast food and promote healthier eating habits for better long-term health.

16. Capital Punishment

Discuss the ethical considerations surrounding capital punishment and argue for its abolishment based on issues of morality, fairness, and wrongful convictions.

17. Access to Education

Advocate for equal access to quality education for all individuals, addressing educational disparities based on socioeconomic background, race, or geography.

18. Dangers of Texting While Driving

Raise awareness about the risks of distracted driving due to texting and advocate for stricter penalties and awareness campaigns to reduce accidents.

19. Importance of Renewable Energy

Discuss the benefits of transitioning to renewable energy sources and advocate for sustainable energy practices to combat climate change and reduce reliance on fossil fuels.

20. The Influence of Media on Body Image

Highlight the negative impact of media’s portrayal of ideal body images on self-esteem, body image dissatisfaction, and promote body positivity and self-acceptance.

21. Universal Healthcare

Argue for the implementation of universal healthcare, emphasizing the benefits of affordable and accessible healthcare for all individuals, regardless of socioeconomic status.

22. Legalization of Marijuana

Present arguments for the legalization of marijuana, addressing its potential benefits for medical use, tax revenue, and reducing criminal activity associated with prohibition.

23. The Impact of Plastic Pollution

Raise awareness about the detrimental effects of plastic pollution on the environment and advocate for reducing plastic consumption and promoting sustainable alternatives.

24. Immigration Policies

Discuss the importance of fair and compassionate immigration policies, addressing issues of human rights, economic contributions, and cultural diversity.

25. Mental Health Stigma

Address the stigma surrounding mental health, educate others about the realities of mental health disorders, and advocate for increased awareness, acceptance, and support for individuals facing mental health challenges.

26. Affordable Housing Crisis

Discuss the issue of affordable housing shortage in many communities, explore the impact on individuals and families, and advocate for policies to address this pressing problem and provide affordable housing options.

27. The Benefits of Early Childhood Education

Present arguments for the importance of early childhood education in fostering cognitive and social development, preparing children for academic success, and narrowing the achievement gap.

28. Cybersecurity

Discuss the increasing threats in cyberspace, including hacking and identity theft, and advocate for stronger cybersecurity measures to protect personal and sensitive information.

29. Workplace Diversity

Highlight the advantages of diverse and inclusive workplaces, including increased creativity, innovation, and improved company performance, and advocate for equal opportunities for underrepresented groups.

30. School Bullying

Address the issue of bullying in schools, discuss its harmful effects on victims and the overall learning environment, and advocate for prevention programs, increased awareness, and stronger anti-bullying measures.

31. Accessible Transportation

Advocate for improved accessibility in public transportation systems, addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities and promoting inclusivity.

32. Importance of Nutrition Education

Advocate for comprehensive nutrition education in schools to combat the rise of unhealthy eating habits, obesity rates, and promote lifelong health and well-being.

33. Animal Cruelty

Raise awareness about different forms of animal cruelty, such as animal testing, factory farming, and wildlife exploitation, and advocate for stricter laws and ethical treatment of animals.

34. Renewable Energy Transition

Discuss the urgent need to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power, and advocate for government support, incentives, and investment in renewable energy infrastructure.

35. Access to Clean Water

Address the global issue of clean water scarcity, its impact on communities, and advocate for sustainable water management practices and initiatives to ensure access to clean water for all.

36. Media Literacy

Advocate for the importance of media literacy education, empowering individuals to critically analyze and interpret media messages, identify misinformation, and make informed decisions.

37. Genetic Engineering

Present arguments for and against genetic engineering, discussing its potential benefits in medicine, agriculture, and ethical considerations, and advocate for responsible and regulated practices.

38. Mental Health Support in Schools

Discuss the need for increased mental health support and resources in educational institutions, addressing the prevalence of mental health disorders among students and advocating for comprehensive mental health services.

39. Sustainable Fashion

Raise awareness about the environmental and social impact of fast fashion, advocate for sustainable and ethical practices in the fashion industry, and promote conscious consumerism.

40. Artificial Intelligence Ethics

Discuss the ethical implications and potential risks of artificial intelligence, such as privacy concerns, job displacement, and bias, and advocate for responsible development and regulation of AI technologies.

41. Genetic Discrimination

Address the issue of genetic discrimination based on genetic information and advocate for policies to protect individuals from discrimination in employment, healthcare, and insurance based on their genetic profile.

42. Universal Basic Income

Present arguments for the implementation of a universal basic income, exploring its potential to alleviate poverty, promote economic stability, and address income inequality.

43. Mental Health Support in the Workplace

Advocate for increased mental health support and resources in the workplace, promoting a supportive and inclusive environment, and addressing the importance of work-life balance and employee well-being.

44. Sustainable Agriculture

Discuss the benefits of sustainable agriculture practices, such as organic farming, regenerative agriculture, and local food systems, and advocate for their widespread adoption to promote food security, environmental sustainability, and health.

  • Argumentative Essay Topics
  • Business Speech Topics

How to Find Persuasive Speech Topics

Here are some of the ways on how to find persuasive speech topics:

1. Brainstorming

Set aside some time to brainstorm ideas. Think about your own interests, passions, and experiences. Consider current events, social issues, and topics that you feel strongly about. Write down any ideas that come to mind, no matter how unconventional they may seem.

2. Personal Reflection

Reflect on your own experiences, challenges, and beliefs. Is there a particular issue or cause that you are passionate about? Is there a problem you’ve encountered that you would like to address? Your personal insights and experiences can often lead to unique and persuasive speech topics.

3. Research

Stay updated on current events, social issues, and emerging trends. Read news articles, opinion pieces, and research studies to gain insights into various topics. Look for controversial or thought-provoking subjects that generate different viewpoints and discussions.

4. Explore Social Issues

Consider the issues that impact society and provoke debates. Topics like climate change, gender equality, racial justice, healthcare access, and technological advancements often generate passionate discussions. Research the different perspectives and arguments surrounding these topics to find a compelling angle for your speech.

5. Audience Analysis

Understand your audience’s interests, concerns, and values. Think about what topics would resonate with them and what issues they may be interested in learning more about. Tailoring your speech to the specific needs and interests of your audience can make it more persuasive and engaging.

6. Online Resources

Explore online resources such as websites, forums, and social media platforms that discuss and debate various topics. Platforms like TED Talks, news websites, and online forums can provide inspiration and ideas for persuasive speech topics.

7. Seek Inspiration from Others

Listen to speeches or watch presentations given by renowned speakers, activists, and thought leaders. Pay attention to the topics they discuss and the way they deliver their arguments. While you should never copy someone else’s speech, these can serve as sources of inspiration and guidance.

8. Consult with Others

Engage in conversations with friends, family members, colleagues, or classmates about potential speech topics. Discuss current events, social issues, and areas of interest. Their perspectives and suggestions may help you discover new and compelling topics.

Significance of Choosing the Right Persuasive Speech Topics

Here is the significance of choosing the right persuasive speech topics

1. Audience Engagement

A well-chosen topic captures the interest and attention of your audience. When you select a topic that resonates with your listeners, they are more likely to be engaged and actively participate in the speech. This increases the effectiveness of your persuasive message and enhances the impact of your speech.

2. Personal Connection

When you choose a topic that you are passionate about or have personal experience with, your authenticity and enthusiasm shine through. This connection with the topic helps you deliver a more compelling speech and establish a stronger rapport with your audience. Your genuine passion and knowledge make your arguments more persuasive and convincing.

3. Relevance

The right topic is one that is relevant to your audience’s lives, interests, or concerns. By addressing issues that are meaningful to them, you establish a direct connection and demonstrate that you understand their perspectives. This relevance creates a sense of importance and urgency, making your speech more impactful and likely to generate positive change or action.

4. Emotional Appeal

Persuasive speeches often rely on evoking emotions to influence the audience. Choosing a topic that taps into emotions, such as empathy, compassion, or a sense of justice, can be highly effective in driving your message home. Emotionally compelling topics have the power to motivate, inspire, and create lasting impact on the listeners.

5. Credibility and Research

A well-chosen topic allows you to gather credible research and evidence to support your arguments. It ensures that you have access to reliable sources, data, and expert opinions that strengthen your persuasive message. The availability of credible information helps build your credibility as a speaker and enhances the persuasiveness of your speech.

6. Diverse Perspectives

Consider selecting topics that present multiple viewpoints and encourage critical thinking. By exploring different perspectives and addressing counterarguments , you demonstrate a fair and balanced approach. This approach not only makes your speech more credible but also encourages open-mindedness and fosters constructive dialogue among your audience.

7. Social Impact

The right persuasive speech topic has the potential to create positive social change. By addressing pressing issues, raising awareness, and advocating for specific actions or policies, you contribute to the broader discussions and movements happening in society. Your speech can inspire others to rethink their beliefs, change their behaviors, or take active steps toward a better future.

In conclusion, the significance of choosing the right persuasive speech topics cannot be overstated. It is through careful selection that we can engage our audience, establish personal connections, and create relevance. By addressing topics that resonate with our listeners, we capture their attention and foster an environment conducive to persuasion.

The impact of a well-chosen topic goes beyond mere engagement. It taps into emotions, evokes empathy, and drives action. When we speak passionately about subjects that hold personal meaning for us, our authenticity shines through, making our arguments more compelling and persuasive.

Furthermore, selecting the right topic allows us to gather credible research and evidence, bolstering our credibility and enhancing the strength of our message. It also opens the door to exploring diverse perspectives, encouraging critical thinking and constructive dialogue among our audience.

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Persuasive Speech Topics: The Best 150 Ideas

Plus, a step-by-step guide for writing and delivering your speech.

Persuasive Speech Topics

Persuasive speech topics can inspire an audience and influence change in your community, town, or city. Whether you are giving a presentation at a large conference or converting a college essay into a speech to be given at your high school's auditorium, delivering a persuasive speech is not an easy task. We are here to guide you through this difficult process and provide you with 150 persuasive speech topics that can help you prepare your own inspirational presentation.

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Article Contents 13 min read

The art of persuasion.

The art of oratory is one of the oldest and most compelling persuasion tactics in human history. The power of speech has been used for centuries by men and women to negotiate peace, start revolutions, and inspire generations. At the source of change, we often witness a great speaker or speech that affected people’s worldviews. King Solomon, Socrates, Cicero, Elizabeth I, Napoleon, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, were all powerful speakers who changed the course of human history.  

Luckily, not every persuasive speech happens on such a grand scale. You do not have to become Napoleon to change the lives of people who hear what you have to say. You might have experienced this yourself – perhaps you have had a teacher who instilled in you a great passion for the study of physics during his lectures? Or you happened to attend a political, grassroots gathering where you heard a speech that changed your attitude towards homelessness or poverty. Or maybe your classmate's presentation revealed something about a novel you were reading in class that made you reflect on your own life and the people in it.

The power of a speech lies in your conviction and delivery of the topic you choose to discuss. A persuasive speech topic can be anything you are passionate about. Yes, it is true; whether you want to discuss the repercussions of the Cuban Revolution or analyze the power of K-pop in popular culture, it is up to you to enthrall the audience with your topic. The key to any successful speech is your confidence and enthusiasm. So, let’s start by examining what makes a speech persuasive.

To deliver a speech takes a lot of guts – not everybody is comfortable with public speaking. But to deliver a good speech takes conviction. Think of it like this: you must believe in the importance of your speech topic to discuss it. This must be something you care about and believe in; otherwise, your topic must be something that drives your curiosity, and you believe that it must be examined further.

Conviction stirs your desire to share this topic with others – you are convinced that other people will similarly find this topic fascinating! Whether it is the importance of recycling or bike lanes, the conviction is what will become the backbone of a successful and persuasive topic choice, as well as drive your desire to give a speech in the first place.

With conviction comes passion. These two elements of a successful speech are intimately intertwined. If you believe in the importance of something, you will be passionate about sharing it with the public.

If we look at some of the most famous speeches in human history, you will notice that conviction and passion are the driving force that makes these speeches legendary. Whether it's Cicero's defense of the Republic in the Roman Senate or Martin Luther King's speech in the defense of civil rights almost two millennia later, both these speakers believed in the importance of their convictions and were passionate about sharing their beliefs. In these cases, even despite the threats of death.

Unbiased Expertise

Conviction and passion should also drive your need to know everything there is to know about your topic. To give a persuasive speech, you must not only show confidence and excitement but demonstrate that you are an expert in the topic of your choice. Granted, if you are a high school student or an undergraduate who's been assigned to deliver a speech in less than 2 weeks, you are not going to become a world-renowned expert in your subject matter. However, as I pointed out, your speech topic should be something you are already passionate about, so you must have done some research and have some knowledge of your topic.

A persuasive speech should be based on facts. It should deliver arguments and counterarguments to show many sides of the issue you choose to discuss. For example, if you choose to discuss the importance of bike lanes, you can present several arguments in support of creating more bike lanes in your town or city, such as safety, decrease in traffic, environmental benefits, etc. However, make sure to include arguments that also show the other side of the issue, such as having to close down several major streets in your city to reconstruct the roads to fit in the new bike lanes and the side-effects of construction for businesses. Presenting both sides of the issue will show your comprehensive knowledge of the topic and demonstrate your professionalism.

Using the bike lanes topic as an example, I want to emphasize that showing unbiased research and knowledge of your topic can win the audience’s favor. You can, and should, still have your own opinion on the matter and defend your conviction in the speech but presenting the audience with both sides of the story is a tactic that will make them trust you.

Additionally, knowing both sides of the coin shows that you have come to your conviction after long and thorough research. You are not just presenting an uneducated opinion.

Taking care of the substance of your speech is the first step. While learning how to properly deliver your speech may seem less important, even the most well-researched and factually based speech will seem weak if the orator does not engage the public.

Though they certainly help your confidence, conviction and passion do not always result in strong delivery. This is understandable since public speaking is not everyone’s forte. While you may be animated and absorbing when you speak of your topic with friends, gripping an audience full of strangers is different.

There are three potential goals of any persuasive speech:

To familiarize your audience with a topic they have never considered before and inspire them to research it on their own. "}]" code="timeline1">

When you think about it, these objectives are pretty ambitious. Delivery plays a huge part in achieving these goals. It will be hard to move your audience to pursue any of these goals without clear articulation, professionalism, and charisma.

Strong delivery can be developed. Yes, there are those to whom oratory skills come more naturally, but this is rather an exception than the rule. Many successful orators were terrified of public speaking but worked hard to overcome their fears. A good example of this is King George VI of England. Before taking the throne in 1936, he was already an infamously bad speaker. The King trained to keep his speech impediment and nerves at bay once he was crowned and delivered one of the most inspiring speeches against Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich at the beginning of World War II.

Now that you know what makes a speech topic persuasive, let's go over a step-by-step formula that will help you choose the right topic for you. 

  • Brainstorm where your convictions lie and what you are passionate about. You must reflect on what interests, hobbies, news, events, individuals, and activities of yours could be developed into a persuasive, strong narrative. 
  • Narrow these down to 2 or 3 topics that are particularly important or riveting to you. 
  • Now comes the practical side of the brainstorming process: take a moment to think whether preparing a comprehensive and compelling speech on this topic is feasible in the amount of time you have available. Consider the following questions: Are the topics of your choice well researched by you? Do you know these topics well? If you are not well-versed in the topic of your choice, do you have enough time to do research to present a comprehensive and complete narrative? Do you have enough time to form a well-developed stance about this topic? A thesis? Will you be able to cover several sides of this topic in the amount of time you have available?
  • If you have answered “No” to these questions regarding each of the topics you had in mind, you must go back to the drawing board. 
  • If you have come up with a topic that results in a positive response to all the questions mentioned in step 3, you might have found the winner.
  • Start by developing a thesis, i.e., the main message of your speech. Without a thesis, you will not have a strong speech. 
  • Develop arguments that endorse your thesis and support them with facts. Remember, a strong speech must be based on facts, rather than opinions and unsubstantiated statements.
  • Research counterarguments to your thesis. While you may not personally support these, you must present a well-rounded picture of the issue you are discussing. 
  • You can finish off your speech by responding to the counterarguments in a way that reinforces your thesis. Don't forget to re-emphasize your main message in the closing paragraphs of your speech.

Know your audience

It is always a good idea to know who your audience is. Whether you are giving a speech in your high school, or traveling to attend an undergraduate conference, reflect on who will be listening to your speech. Before you sit down to write it, consider whether you can give yourself the freedom to use technical language, jargon, or make inside jokes on the matter. In general, I would advise you to avoid overly technical or niche language. It is never a good tactic for making a persuasive speech – this might alienate a large part of your audience.

However, if you are delivering a speech to a like-minded audience, you may use "industry lingo". For example, if you are delivering a speech at a video game convention, it is likely that many, if not most, attendees will be familiar with the terms and vocabulary you use. You will be able to strengthen your speech by using language that unites you with your audience. In this case, you are encouraged to engage the public by making inside jokes, using niche terminology, and creating a relatable experience with your speech.

Knowing your audience will allow you to develop a language for your speech. It will also allow you to gauge how deep you can delve into the topic of your choice. For example, if you are a young physics aficionado who is giving a lecture on black holes to your sophomore classmates, you might want to consider the fact that many of them have never studied physics in depth. This may help you shape your speech into something accessible and interesting for others.

If you are unsure about who your audience might be, try researching it. It is always good practice to know whom you will be addressing. Not only will it help you prepare the speech, but it will also ease your anxiety about the day of your speech delivery.

Hook the audience

Your opening sentences can hook the audience and guarantee their attention. While it will be the substance of your speech that keeps them listening to you, the opening must be captivating for your speech to have a chance for success.

So, what do I mean by hooking the audience with your opening? For example, you can state a shocking statistic about your topic. It will be especially impactful if it is related to your audience’s experiences, geographical area, community, or hot-topic issue. Here’s an example for an opening sentence for a speech about the importance of bike lanes:

“Last year, the city of Toronto recorded 715 serious accidents involving cyclists, with over 5% of these accidents resulting in a fatality."

Now, if I was living in Toronto, I would be surprised to hear such information; especially, if I have never thought about this before. I am saddened by this statistic and would like to learn how we can help prevent these accidents.

Let’s examine another opening. This time, we will consider a speech topic involving a historical event. For example, if you are captivated by the mystery of Princess Anastasia of the Russian royal family, the House of Romanov, you might start your speech thusly:

“The question of whether the Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna Romanova survived the brutal execution of her entire family by the Bolsheviks is one of the greatest mysteries of the 20th century.”

This sentence performs several tasks:

The opening sentence is your chance to establish yourself as the expert! You will seem like the authority on this topic, especially if you can pronounce the Princess's name without mistakes. "}]" code="timeline2">

Coming up with a strong opening sentence is not easy, but very worthwhile for delivering a persuasive speech. If you are having trouble finding the right opening sentence, you do not need to wait to start writing your speech. If you are stuck, move on to the main body of your speech and return to creating a captivating opening later.

To be persuasive, your speech must have a thesis. A thesis is the main argument you are trying to convince your audience of, or simply put, the purpose of you giving the speech. Without a thesis, your speech will be aimless, chaotic, and most likely, unengaging.

And while you can write your introduction after the main body of your speech is ready, you cannot write your speech without a thesis. It will be the landmark, the leading light, of your speech. Everything you say and every fact and argument you include in your essay must support your thesis. Certainly, you will be able to bring up alternative points of view later in the speech, but as we already discussed, your objective is to persuade the audience that your thesis is the correct one.

Let’s return to our bike lanes example. If you are a proponent of bike lanes, your thesis should be more than “Bike lanes are good”. While this can be considered a thesis, it is pretty thin. Instead, find a way to make your thesis compelling, include a supporting statistic, or a benefit of having bike lanes. For example: 

“Having more bike lanes in our city will not only reduce traffic by X% but also allow our city to be at the forefront of the environmentally friendly initiatives happening all over our country.” 

This thesis is clear and introduces the audience to some of the main points of the speech. The listeners get a concise prelude to what the speech is about and what it stands for.

Research and Arguments

Research is always conducted before you sit down to write. While you may have some general knowledge about your topic, remember that you are trying to be as persuasive as you possibly can be. This means that you need the latest statistics, the most up-to-date information, and the strongest support from experts in the field. 

Tip: keep in mind your thesis as you are writing. All your arguments and facts must be in support of the main purpose of your essay. While you should present alternative points of view in your speech to make it well-rounded and unbiased, a strong speech must contain arguments that make it clear that your thesis is the correct one.

Concluding your speech has a twofold purpose. In addition to persuading the audience of your thesis, you must complete your narrative. Give the audience some closure about the topic. On the other hand, you must leave them even more interested in learning about your research. In other words, they must be compelled to explore on their own.

Tip: your conclusion cannot be a dry summary of your thesis and arguments. While you must restate your thesis in the conclusion, you are strongly encouraged to incite an emotional response from your audience. For example:

“More bike lanes will alleviate the heavy traffic and relieve our city from car fumes and soot. It is our responsibility to start making our city more eco-friendly. These small steps will inspire even more initiatives across our hometown and lead to a brighter, greener, future."

In this example, the audience is not only reminded of the main purpose of the speech but is also encouraged to think of other green initiatives that can help their town. The author does a good job of invoking responsibility for the future to encourage their audience to act. 

Want to learn how to choose persuasive speech topics? Check out our infographic:

Now, let’s go over 150 persuasive speech topics that can inspire your own essay and presentation! Note that these are questions that should help you form ideas, arguments, and most importantly, theses. Rather than giving you the thesis upfront, we are encouraging you to come up with your own opinion and answers to these questions.

Your speech should be between 15 to 20 minutes long. Anything longer may lose your audience's attention. If applicable, don't forget to factor in some time after your presentation for questions from the audience.

The best way to approach the choice of topic is to reflect on your convictions and passions. If you are truly interested in a topic, your excitement will be felt by the audience.

Of course, you must be interested in your topic, first and foremost. Secondly, your speech must demonstrate a level of expertise and knowledge that will allow the audience to believe that you know what you are talking about. Thirdly, your delivery will have a great effect on whether you succeed in persuading the audience. Even a well-researched speech will suffer from poor delivery.

Firstly, only practice can really help you improve. Once you have written your speech, read it over several times. Do not memorize it, but rather, remember the structure, the flow of your arguments, your main points. Then start practicing pronouncing your entire speech in front of the mirror. Do this until you are quite confident with the content of the essay. Then, you can start practicing with family members, your friends, and classmates. Ask for their feedback: can they hear you well? Are you being articulate? Does your speech have a logical flow? Did they understand your thesis? Their feedback can help you modify not only your content, but also your presentation.

Your speech should take the form of an academic essay: introduction, main body, and conclusion.

Your speech must have a thesis, otherwise it will be meandering and pointless. A thesis will guide you and keep your essay/presentation well-structured. A thesis is what you will be arguing for (or against, if it's a negatively stated thesis) throughout your speech. And while you can include some alternative points of view in your speech, your thesis will inform every argument you make in the speech.

Typically, you should avoid using overly technical language. Even if you are presenting at a professional conference in front of peers, there is a chance that some of your audience will be unfamiliar with the professional terminology. To be inclusive, you should avoid niche language.

To be frank, there is no such thing. You can make a great speech on any topic of your choosing! Your research, your delivery, and your passion will determine whether your speech is successful.

Acknowledging opposing views and presence of debate will demonstrate your thorough knowledge of the topic. Additionally, you will demonstrate that you came to your conclusion/thesis after researching the topic, rather than simply forming an uneducated opinion.

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persuasive speech topics about social issues

Mr Greg's English Cloud

Good Persuasive Speech Topics

Persuasive speaking is a powerful tool, capable of influencing opinions, sparking change, and encouraging action. Whether you are a student preparing for a classroom debate, a professional aiming to convince stakeholders, or someone passionate about social issues, choosing the right topic is crucial for delivering an impactful persuasive speech. Here, we explore a variety of engaging and relevant persuasive speech topics across different categories, providing a springboard for speakers to develop their arguments and connect with their audience effectively.

Table of Contents

  • The Case for Free College Education : Argue the benefits of making higher education accessible to all, including boosts to the economy and increased equality.
  • Should Schools Implement Year-Round Education? : Discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of eliminating long summer breaks to enhance continuous learning and information retention.
  • The Importance of Arts in Education : Make a case for why arts programs should not be cut from schools, emphasizing their role in fostering creativity and emotional intelligence.
  • Benefits of Bilingual Education : Persuade your audience on how early bilingual education can improve cognitive development and prepare students for a globalized world.
  • The Impact of Social Media on Youth : Argue whether social media platforms are more harmful or beneficial to young people.
  • Privacy vs. Security in the Age of Surveillance : Discuss the balance between maintaining privacy and ensuring national security in the context of modern surveillance technologies.
  • Should There Be Regulations on AI Development? : Explore the potential dangers of artificial intelligence and the need for stringent ethical regulations.
  • The Future of Work: Automation and Employment : Debate the impact of automation and robotics on job opportunities and employment rates.

Health and Wellness

  • Mandatory Vaccinations for Public Health : Advocate for or against compulsory vaccinations, discussing rights versus public health safety.
  • The Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet : Persuade listeners about the health and environmental advantages of reducing meat consumption.
  • Mental Health Education in Schools : Argue the need for incorporating mental health education into the school curriculum to better equip students to manage stress and recognize mental health issues.
  • The Role of Government in Regulating Junk Food : Discuss whether the government should have a say in controlling the sale and advertising of junk food, especially to children.

Environment

  • Climate Change is the Most Pressing Issue of Our Time : Convince your audience of the urgency to act on climate change and suggest possible solutions.
  • Should Plastic Packaging Be Banned? : Argue the environmental impacts of plastic waste and propose alternatives.
  • The Economic Benefits of Renewable Energy : Discuss how investing in renewable energy can be economically beneficial as well as good for the planet.
  • Urban Planning and Green Spaces : Advocate for the integration of more green spaces in urban planning to improve quality of life and biodiversity.

Social Issues

  • The Death Penalty: Justice or Injustice? : Explore the ethical considerations and effectiveness of the death penalty in deterring crime.
  • Gun Control Laws to Reduce Crime : Argue the need for stricter gun control laws and how they could reduce violent crime rates.
  • Equal Pay for Equal Work : Make a case for closing the gender pay gap, discussing its benefits for society and the economy.
  • Animal Rights and Experimentation : Debate whether it is ethical to use animals for research, considering the scientific benefits against the rights of animals.

Politics and Governance

  • The Importance of Voting : Persuade younger audiences on why their participation in elections is crucial for democracy.
  • Should Corporations Have a Say in Politics? : Debate the influence of corporate lobbying on democracy, arguing for or against it.
  • National vs. Global Citizenship : Discuss the concept of global citizenship and whether loyalty should extend beyond national borders.
  • The Role of Whistleblowers in Maintaining Government Transparency : Argue the necessity of whistleblowers in upholding the integrity of governmental institutions.

Culture and Society

  • The Impact of Advertising on Body Image : Discuss how advertising perpetuates unrealistic body standards and propose ways to mitigate this issue.
  • Cultural Appropriation vs. Cultural Exchange : Define the line between appropriation and exchange, and discuss the importance of cultural sensitivity.
  • The Effect of Globalization on Indigenous Cultures : Explore how globalization can both threaten and enrich indigenous cultures.
  • The Media’s Role in Shaping Public Opinion : Debate the extent to which media influences our views and decisions.

How to Choose the Right Topic

When selecting a topic for a persuasive speech, consider the following tips to ensure it resonates with your audience and holds their attention:

  • Relevance : Choose a topic that is relevant to the interests and concerns of your audience. This increases the likelihood they will engage with your speech.
  • Passion : Select a topic you are passionate about. Enthusiasm is contagious, and if you care deeply about your topic, it will show in your delivery.
  • Researchability : Ensure there is enough information available to build a strong case. A well-researched argument is more convincing.
  • Controversy : Topics that provoke thought or debate are often more engaging. However, be prepared to handle different viewpoints respectfully.

Final Thoughts

The art of persuasive speech is not just about presenting facts but about weaving a compelling narrative that appeals to the emotions and rationality of the audience. Whether discussing the transformative potential of technology, the critical issues in education, or the pressing debates in society, the goal is to leave the audience pondering, persuaded, or even propelled to action. By choosing a topic that is timely, significant, and resonant, you set the stage for a persuasive discourse that can truly make a difference.

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Leave a reply cancel reply, about mr. greg.

Mr. Greg is an English teacher from Edinburgh, Scotland, currently based in Hong Kong. He has over 5 years teaching experience and recently completed his PGCE at the University of Essex Online. In 2013, he graduated from Edinburgh Napier University with a BEng(Hons) in Computing, with a focus on social media.

Mr. Greg’s English Cloud was created in 2020 during the pandemic, aiming to provide students and parents with resources to help facilitate their learning at home.

Whatsapp: +85259609792

[email protected]

persuasive speech topics about social issues

100 Persuasive Speech Topics for Students

  • Homework Tips
  • Learning Styles & Skills
  • Study Methods
  • Time Management
  • Private School
  • College Admissions
  • College Life
  • Graduate School
  • Business School
  • Distance Learning
  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

There is a small but important difference between planning a persuasive speech and writing a persuasive essay. First, if you are planning a persuasive speech, you should think about a topic that can engage your audience. For this reason, you may want to consider a few topics before settling on the one that allows you to be more descriptive and entertaining.

Another important factor when picking a persuasive speech topic is to choose one that can provoke your audience. If you stir up a little emotion in your audience members, you'll keep their attention. The list below is provided to help you brainstorm. Choose a topic from this list or use the list to generate an idea of your own.

  • Studying martial arts is good for mind and health.
  • Competitive sports can teach us about life.
  • Reality shows are exploiting people.
  • Community service should be a graduation requirement for all high school students.
  • The characteristics that make a person a hero.
  • It's important to grow things in a garden.
  • Violent video games are dangerous.
  • Lyrics in a song can impact our lives.
  • Traveling and studying abroad are positive experiences.
  • Journal writing is therapeutic.
  • You should spend time with your grandparents.
  • A laptop is better than a tablet.
  • Religion and science can go hand in hand.
  • School uniforms are good.
  • All-female colleges and all-male colleges are bad.
  • Multiple choice tests are better than essay tests .
  • We should not spend money on space exploration.
  • Open-book tests are as effective as closed-book tests.
  • Security cameras keep us safer.
  • Parents should have access to students' grades.
  • Small classes are better than big classes.
  • You need to start saving for retirement now.
  • Credit cards are harmful to college students.
  • We should have a royal family.
  • We should protect endangered animals.
  • Texting while driving is dangerous.
  • You can write a novel.
  • Recycling should be required in the U.S.
  • State colleges are better than private colleges.
  • Private colleges are better than state colleges.
  • We should do away with penny coins.
  • Fast food containers hurt the environment.
  • Plastic straws are harmful to the environment.
  • You can eat and enjoy healthy snacks.
  • You can become a millionaire.
  • Dogs are better pets than cats.
  • You should own a bird.
  • It's unethical to keep birds in cages.
  • Liberal arts degrees prepare graduates to be better workers than other degrees.
  • Hunting animals should be banned.
  • Football is a dangerous sport.
  • School days should start later.
  • Night school is better than day school.
  • Technical training is better than a college degree.
  • Immigration laws should be more lenient.
  • Students should be able to choose their schools.
  • Everyone should learn to play a musical instrument.
  • Grass lawns should be prohibited.
  • Sharks should be protected.
  • We should do away with cars and go back to horse and carriage for transportation.
  • We should use more wind power.
  • We should pay more taxes.
  • We should do away with taxes.
  • Teachers should be tested like students.
  • We should not interfere in the affairs of other countries.
  • Every student should join a club.
  • Homeschooling is better than traditional schooling.
  • People should stay married for life.
  • Smoking in public should be illegal.
  • College students should live on campus .
  • Parents should let students fail.
  • Giving to charity is good.
  • Education makes us happier people.
  • T​he ​ death penalty should be outlawed.
  • Bigfoot is real.
  • We should increase train travel to save the environment.
  • We should read more classic books.
  • Fame is bad for young children.
  • Athletes should stay loyal to teams.
  • We should reform our prisons.
  • Juvenile offenders should not go to boot camps.
  • Abraham Lincoln was the best president.
  • Abraham Lincoln gets too much credit.
  • Students should be allowed to have cell phones in elementary, middle, and high school.
  • College student-athletes should be paid for playing.
  • Elderly citizens on fixed income should receive free public transportation.
  • Colleges and universities should be free to attend.
  • All American citizens should complete one year of community service.
  • Students should be required to take Spanish classes.
  • Every student should be required to learn at least one foreign language .
  • Marijuana should be legal for recreational use nationwide.
  • Commercial testing of products on animals should no longer be allowed.
  • High school students should be required to participate in at least one team sport.
  • The drinking age in the U.S. should be 25.
  • Replacing fossil fuels with cheaper alternative energy options should be mandated.
  • Churches need to contribute their share of taxes.
  • The Cuba embargo should be maintained by the U.S.
  • America should replace income taxes with a nationwide flat tax.
  • Once they reach the age of 18, all U.S. citizens should be automatically registered to vote .
  • Doctor-assisted suicide should be legal.
  • Spammers—people who bombard the internet with unsolicited email—should be banned from sending junk mail.
  • Every automobile driver should be required to take a new driver's test every three years.
  • Electroshock treatment is not a humane form of therapy.
  • Global warming is not real.
  • Single-parent adoption should be encouraged and promoted.
  • Gun companies should be held accountable for gun crimes.
  • Human cloning is not moral.
  • Religion does not belong in public education.
  • Juveniles should not be tried as adults.
  • American workers should be guaranteed a three-day weekend by law.
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Persuasive Speech Outline, with Examples

March 17, 2021 - Gini Beqiri

A persuasive speech is a speech that is given with the intention of convincing the audience to believe or do something. This could be virtually anything – voting, organ donation, recycling, and so on.

A successful persuasive speech effectively convinces the audience to your point of view, providing you come across as trustworthy and knowledgeable about the topic you’re discussing.

So, how do you start convincing a group of strangers to share your opinion? And how do you connect with them enough to earn their trust?

Topics for your persuasive speech

We’ve made a list of persuasive speech topics you could use next time you’re asked to give one. The topics are thought-provoking and things which many people have an opinion on.

When using any of our persuasive speech ideas, make sure you have a solid knowledge about the topic you’re speaking about – and make sure you discuss counter arguments too.

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • All school children should wear a uniform
  • Facebook is making people more socially anxious
  • It should be illegal to drive over the age of 80
  • Lying isn’t always wrong
  • The case for organ donation

Read our full list of  75 persuasive speech topics and ideas .

Ideas for a persuasive speech

Preparation: Consider your audience

As with any speech, preparation is crucial. Before you put pen to paper, think about what you want to achieve with your speech. This will help organise your thoughts as you realistically can only cover 2-4 main points before your  audience get bored .

It’s also useful to think about who your audience are at this point. If they are unlikely to know much about your topic then you’ll need to factor in context of your topic when planning the structure and length of your speech. You should also consider their:

  • Cultural or religious backgrounds
  • Shared concerns, attitudes and problems
  • Shared interests, beliefs and hopes
  • Baseline attitude – are they hostile, neutral, or open to change?

The factors above will all determine the approach you take to writing your speech. For example, if your topic is about childhood obesity, you could begin with a story about your own children or a shared concern every parent has. This would suit an audience who are more likely to be parents than young professionals who have only just left college.

Remember the 3 main approaches to persuade others

There are three main approaches used to persuade others:

The ethos approach appeals to the audience’s ethics and morals, such as what is the ‘right thing’ to do for humanity, saving the environment, etc.

Pathos persuasion is when you appeal to the audience’s emotions, such as when you  tell a story  that makes them the main character in a difficult situation.

The logos approach to giving a persuasive speech is when you appeal to the audience’s logic – ie. your speech is essentially more driven by facts and logic. The benefit of this technique is that your point of view becomes virtually indisputable because you make the audience feel that only your view is the logical one.

  • Ethos, Pathos, Logos: 3 Pillars of Public Speaking and Persuasion

Ideas for your persuasive speech outline

1. structure of your persuasive speech.

The opening and closing of speech are the most important. Consider these carefully when thinking about your persuasive speech outline. A  strong opening  ensures you have the audience’s attention from the start and gives them a positive first impression of you.

You’ll want to  start with a strong opening  such as an attention grabbing statement, statistic of fact. These are usually dramatic or shocking, such as:

Sadly, in the next 18 minutes when I do our chat, four Americans that are alive will be dead from the food that they eat – Jamie Oliver

Another good way of starting a persuasive speech is to include your audience in the picture you’re trying to paint. By making them part of the story, you’re embedding an emotional connection between them and your speech.

You could do this in a more toned-down way by talking about something you know that your audience has in common with you. It’s also helpful at this point to include your credentials in a persuasive speech to gain your audience’s trust.

Speech structure and speech argument for a persuasive speech outline.

Obama would spend hours with his team working on the opening and closing statements of his speech.

2. Stating your argument

You should  pick between 2 and 4 themes  to discuss during your speech so that you have enough time to explain your viewpoint and convince your audience to the same way of thinking.

It’s important that each of your points transitions seamlessly into the next one so that your speech has a logical flow. Work on your  connecting sentences  between each of your themes so that your speech is easy to listen to.

Your argument should be backed up by objective research and not purely your subjective opinion. Use examples, analogies, and stories so that the audience can relate more easily to your topic, and therefore are more likely to be persuaded to your point of view.

3. Addressing counter-arguments

Any balanced theory or thought  addresses and disputes counter-arguments  made against it. By addressing these, you’ll strengthen your persuasive speech by refuting your audience’s objections and you’ll show that you are knowledgeable to other thoughts on the topic.

When describing an opposing point of view, don’t explain it in a bias way – explain it in the same way someone who holds that view would describe it. That way, you won’t irritate members of your audience who disagree with you and you’ll show that you’ve reached your point of view through reasoned judgement. Simply identify any counter-argument and pose explanations against them.

  • Complete Guide to Debating

4. Closing your speech

Your closing line of your speech is your last chance to convince your audience about what you’re saying. It’s also most likely to be the sentence they remember most about your entire speech so make sure it’s a good one!

The most effective persuasive speeches end  with a  call to action . For example, if you’ve been speaking about organ donation, your call to action might be asking the audience to register as donors.

Practice answering AI questions on your speech and get  feedback on your performance .

If audience members ask you questions, make sure you listen carefully and respectfully to the full question. Don’t interject in the middle of a question or become defensive.

You should show that you have carefully considered their viewpoint and refute it in an objective way (if you have opposing opinions). Ensure you remain patient, friendly and polite at all times.

Example 1: Persuasive speech outline

This example is from the Kentucky Community and Technical College.

Specific purpose

To persuade my audience to start walking in order to improve their health.

Central idea

Regular walking can improve both your mental and physical health.

Introduction

Let’s be honest, we lead an easy life: automatic dishwashers, riding lawnmowers, T.V. remote controls, automatic garage door openers, power screwdrivers, bread machines, electric pencil sharpeners, etc., etc. etc. We live in a time-saving, energy-saving, convenient society. It’s a wonderful life. Or is it?

Continue reading

Example 2: Persuasive speech

Tips for delivering your persuasive speech

  • Practice, practice, and practice some more . Record yourself speaking and listen for any nervous habits you have such as a nervous laugh, excessive use of filler words, or speaking too quickly.
  • Show confident body language . Stand with your legs hip width apart with your shoulders centrally aligned. Ground your feet to the floor and place your hands beside your body so that hand gestures come freely. Your audience won’t be convinced about your argument if you don’t sound confident in it. Find out more about  confident body language here .
  • Don’t memorise your speech word-for-word  or read off a script. If you memorise your persuasive speech, you’ll sound less authentic and panic if you lose your place. Similarly, if you read off a script you won’t sound genuine and you won’t be able to connect with the audience by  making eye contact . In turn, you’ll come across as less trustworthy and knowledgeable. You could simply remember your key points instead, or learn your opening and closing sentences.
  • Remember to use facial expressions when storytelling  – they make you more relatable. By sharing a personal story you’ll more likely be speaking your truth which will help you build a connection with the audience too. Facial expressions help bring your story to life and transport the audience into your situation.
  • Keep your speech as concise as possible . When practicing the delivery, see if you can edit it to have the same meaning but in a more succinct way. This will keep the audience engaged.

The best persuasive speech ideas are those that spark a level of controversy. However, a public speech is not the time to express an opinion that is considered outside the norm. If in doubt, play it safe and stick to topics that divide opinions about 50-50.

Bear in mind who your audience are and plan your persuasive speech outline accordingly, with researched evidence to support your argument. It’s important to consider counter-arguments to show that you are knowledgeable about the topic as a whole and not bias towards your own line of thought.

Persuasive Speeches — Types, Topics, and Examples

Daniel Bal

What is a persuasive speech?

In a persuasive speech, the speaker aims to convince the audience to accept a particular perspective on a person, place, object, idea, etc. The speaker strives to cause the audience to accept the point of view presented in the speech.

The success of a persuasive speech often relies on the speaker’s use of ethos, pathos, and logos.

Success of a persuasive speech

Ethos is the speaker’s credibility. Audiences are more likely to accept an argument if they find the speaker trustworthy. To establish credibility during a persuasive speech, speakers can do the following:

Use familiar language.

Select examples that connect to the specific audience.

Utilize credible and well-known sources.

Logically structure the speech in an audience-friendly way.

Use appropriate eye contact, volume, pacing, and inflection.

Pathos appeals to the audience’s emotions. Speakers who create an emotional bond with their audience are typically more convincing. Tapping into the audience’s emotions can be accomplished through the following:

Select evidence that can elicit an emotional response.

Use emotionally-charged words. (The city has a problem … vs. The city has a disease …)

Incorporate analogies and metaphors that connect to a specific emotion to draw a parallel between the reference and topic.

Utilize vivid imagery and sensory words, allowing the audience to visualize the information.

Employ an appropriate tone, inflection, and pace to reflect the emotion.

Logos appeals to the audience’s logic by offering supporting evidence. Speakers can improve their logical appeal in the following ways:

Use comprehensive evidence the audience can understand.

Confirm the evidence logically supports the argument’s claims and stems from credible sources.

Ensure that evidence is specific and avoid any vague or questionable information.

Types of persuasive speeches

The three main types of persuasive speeches are factual, value, and policy.

Types of persuasive speeches

A factual persuasive speech focuses solely on factual information to prove the existence or absence of something through substantial proof. This is the only type of persuasive speech that exclusively uses objective information rather than subjective. As such, the argument does not rely on the speaker’s interpretation of the information. Essentially, a factual persuasive speech includes historical controversy, a question of current existence, or a prediction:

Historical controversy concerns whether an event happened or whether an object actually existed.

Questions of current existence involve the knowledge that something is currently happening.

Predictions incorporate the analysis of patterns to convince the audience that an event will happen again.

A value persuasive speech concerns the morality of a certain topic. Speakers incorporate facts within these speeches; however, the speaker’s interpretation of those facts creates the argument. These speeches are highly subjective, so the argument cannot be proven to be absolutely true or false.

A policy persuasive speech centers around the speaker’s support or rejection of a public policy, rule, or law. Much like a value speech, speakers provide evidence supporting their viewpoint; however, they provide subjective conclusions based on the facts they provide.

How to write a persuasive speech

Incorporate the following steps when writing a persuasive speech:

Step 1 – Identify the type of persuasive speech (factual, value, or policy) that will help accomplish the goal of the presentation.

Step 2 – Select a good persuasive speech topic to accomplish the goal and choose a position .

How to write a persuasive speech

Step 3 – Locate credible and reliable sources and identify evidence in support of the topic/position. Revisit Step 2 if there is a lack of relevant resources.

Step 4 – Identify the audience and understand their baseline attitude about the topic.

Step 5 – When constructing an introduction , keep the following questions in mind:

What’s the topic of the speech?

What’s the occasion?

Who’s the audience?

What’s the purpose of the speech?

Step 6 – Utilize the evidence within the previously identified sources to construct the body of the speech. Keeping the audience in mind, determine which pieces of evidence can best help develop the argument. Discuss each point in detail, allowing the audience to understand how the facts support the perspective.

Step 7 – Addressing counterarguments can help speakers build their credibility, as it highlights their breadth of knowledge.

Step 8 – Conclude the speech with an overview of the central purpose and how the main ideas identified in the body support the overall argument.

How to write a persuasive speech

Persuasive speech outline

One of the best ways to prepare a great persuasive speech is by using an outline. When structuring an outline, include an introduction, body, and conclusion:

Introduction

Attention Grabbers

Ask a question that allows the audience to respond in a non-verbal way; ask a rhetorical question that makes the audience think of the topic without requiring a response.

Incorporate a well-known quote that introduces the topic. Using the words of a celebrated individual gives credibility and authority to the information in the speech.

Offer a startling statement or information about the topic, typically done using data or statistics.

Provide a brief anecdote or story that relates to the topic.

Starting a speech with a humorous statement often makes the audience more comfortable with the speaker.

Provide information on how the selected topic may impact the audience .

Include any background information pertinent to the topic that the audience needs to know to understand the speech in its entirety.

Give the thesis statement in connection to the main topic and identify the main ideas that will help accomplish the central purpose.

Identify evidence

Summarize its meaning

Explain how it helps prove the support/main claim

Evidence 3 (Continue as needed)

Support 3 (Continue as needed)

Restate thesis

Review main supports

Concluding statement

Give the audience a call to action to do something specific.

Identify the overall importan ce of the topic and position.

Persuasive speech topics

The following table identifies some common or interesting persuasive speech topics for high school and college students:

Persuasive speech examples

The following list identifies some of history’s most famous persuasive speeches:

John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address: “Ask Not What Your Country Can Do for You”

Lyndon B. Johnson: “We Shall Overcome”

Marc Antony: “Friends, Romans, Countrymen…” in William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar

Ronald Reagan: “Tear Down this Wall”

Sojourner Truth: “Ain’t I a Woman?”

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Easy persuasive speech topics: examples

309 good persuasive topics + resources for writing persuasive speeches

By:  Susan Dugdale  

Let's be right up front about this.

'Easy' and 'persuasive' are seldom paired when it comes to speech topics! Therefore, examples of easy persuasive speech topics are a bit of a rarity, and finding them can be tricky.

However, all is not completely lost. They can, and do, come together, but only if you work at it.  Let me show you how. 

What's on this page

309 potentially easy persuasive speech topics.

  • the myth of 'easy' and an 'easy speech'
  • what makes a successful persuasive speech
  • how a persuasive speech topic can become easy
  • additional persuasive speech resources

persuasive speech topics about social issues

The myth of 'easy' and an 'easy' speech

That word 'easy' is so very tempting. It seductively implies something you can fling together, without a lot of effort, at short notice. 

Image: a tiger-budgie. Text: Easy and persuasive are seldom paired when it comes to speech topics. That makes easy persuasive speech topics a bit of a rarity. Just like this tiger-budgie.

An 'easy' persuasive speech is not going to take a lot of work to plan, research, to write, or to practice. Everything needed to prepare it will be done without hassle, because it's, 'easy'. The entire process will flow smoothly from start to finish without fuss.

When you present the speech, the audience will be spell-bound, riveted by your outstanding choice of subject and its treatment. In short, they will be amazed. Gob smacked * , and 100% persuaded!

* astounded, overwhelmed.

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What a successful persuasive speech usually takes

To give a successful persuasive speech means being able to use a compelling mix of reasoning and emotional appeal to convince whoever you are talking to that your point of view is right or at least, worth considering. Generally doing that well takes thought and effort.

You need to have chosen a subject your audience will be genuinely interested in and to use just the right combination of logical reasoning and emotional appeal to engage and hold them from the first words you say till your last. That in turn means thinking your speech through carefully, step by step, and then doing whatever is needed to make it work.

Those things include:

  • deciding on a specific speech purpose, (what you want people to do as a result of listening to your speech)
  • research to pull facts together to ground your speech, to give you a solid platform to build your speech on
  • understanding your audience so you know how best to shape your material to address their concerns
  • sorting out any additional resources you may want to use (e.g. images, graphs, handouts ...)
  • practice, and then more practice. 

You, see? Easy and persuasive don't seem to have a lot in common.

However, there is a way through.

How a persuasive speech topic becomes easy

You'll be glad to know there are exceptions. 

A persuasive topic becomes 'easy' if:

  • it fits with the criteria you've been given, 
  • you already know a lot about it, 
  • there's a readily accessible, and credible body of knowledge covering it, 
  • you're passionate about it, and
  • you genuinely want to do what is required to do it well.

Difficulties miraculously melt away when you are totally engrossed! 

Below are 309 good persuasive topics chosen for their broad appeal, and because they are subjects people generally feel strongly about.

  • 69 topics based on education
  • 135 based on aspects of health : mental health , the psychology of motivation , autism , natural medicine , the dangers of alternative medicine , current medical issues

21 food themed persuasive speech topics

  • 53 topics based on ethics, morals and values
  • 20 economy themed topics  

Read them through, making a note of any that jump out and that you think you may be able to use. These will be the ones you'll find much 'easier' than the others because you're already interested! 

69 persuasive speech topics on education

Put a group of people together who share concerns about the direction society seems to be headed and it won't be long before the hot topic under discussion is education!

Nelson Mandela quote: Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.

  • that there is no such thing as the best form of education 
  • that some types of education are a waste of time and resources
  • that all education should be free
  • that education should be paid for by those who want or use it
  • that schools should provide experienced specialist support teachers to meet the needs of all their pupils 
  • that no child should be denied an education on the grounds of gender, race, poverty or the legal status of their parents
  • that online learning can never replace real-time and place class room learning
  • that competition with other students is a necessary part of education
  • that different learning styles need to be to be taken into account by teachers
  • that a student who drops out of school has been failed by the school system
  • that the problems created by illiteracy are bigger than we think
  • that society benefits from promoting gender equality and women's empowerment through education
  • that it is vital to teach media literacy to combat fake news and misinformation
  • that scholarships for those who need them should be increased
  • that a college education is not the right choice for everyone
  • that private schools support elitism
  • that the advantages of project-based learning far outweigh the disadvantages
  • that having a bilingual education is an advantage in a globalized world
  • that a good education is the passport to a better life
  • that a school uniform helps make everyone equal
  • that schools need to systematically teach critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • that teachers should be held responsible for the performance of their students
  • that the students of a teacher who is enthusiastic about their topic will always achieve better grades
  • that textbooks, and other school supplies, should be provided free of charge to those who need them
  • that there needs to a comprehensive education program on consent and sexual assault prevention in schools
  • that life skills, (how to cook, how to budget and manage money effectively, how to shop economically, how to garden...) should be taught in schools
  • that making some school subjects compulsory should be abolished
  • that coding and computer science should be taught from an early age
  • that taking a gap year should be encouraged
  • that an arts education fosters creativity and critical thinking 
  • that alternative forms of education should be encouraged, and supported
  • that teachers should be thoroughly background checked
  • that teachers should have to pass a regular 'fitness to teach' test
  • that the school leaving age should be raised
  • that students should not be forced to take classes they do not want to
  • that there are significant advantages for using technology in the classroom
  • that school violence is a mirror of the society we live in
  • that students who take part in protests are actively learning about their rights and responsibilities
  • that grades do not reflect intelligence
  • that truancy is powerful comment on the relevancy of schools 
  • that homework, for homework's sake, should be banned
  • that residential segregation has a direct impact on the quality of education students receive
  • that prestigious schools maintain their prestige through only admitting students who are likely to succeed
  • that schools should focus on the core subjects: reading, writing and arithmetic
  • that parents should be far more involved in their children's education
  • that a person who is homeschooled is not disadvantaged 
  • that far too much importance is placed on IQ tests
  • that corporal punishment should never be used
  • that meditation and other forms of mindfulness should be taught in schools
  • that single sex schools are better for girls
  • that intelligence is more than quick accurate recall and clever problem solving
  • that a holistic education is best
  • that an education should be a right, not a privilege
  • that it is important to teach students about empathy and emotional intelligence  
  • that no girl should ever be barred from school because she is pregnant
  • that there is no 'right, one way' to educate a child
  • that bullying, in any form, by anyone, should be addressed immediately and appropriately
  • that students need to be taught how to handle social media responsibly
  • that the arts are equally as valuable as the sciences
  • that an old-fashioned school curriculum teaches respect and values
  • that it is advantageous to learn at least one other language, in addition to your mother tongue
  • that the foundation of all education is laid down in the home
  • that civics and ethics should be core subjects
  • that extracurricular activities are an essential part of a well-rounded education
  • that cheating on a test or in an examination is understandable
  • that community service should be an essential part of education
  • that financial education is essential and should be taught to all students in all schools
  • that guns should never be taken to school
  • that getting top marks in an examination is not the only way to prove a person’s intelligence

dividing line dark green

 135 persuasive speech topics about health

Health, according to the World Health Organization , is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity."  It's a huge topic! And that is an understatement! 

46 mental health persuasive speech topics

Knowing your own darkness is the best method of dealing with the darkness in others. - Carl Jung

  • that mental health should be taken more seriously by general health practitioners
  • that mental health should be discussed in schools
  • that mental health and physical health are interdependent
  • that early intervention is important to prevent long-term mental health problems
  • that good mental health begins with a good diet
  • that being 'mad' does not mean a person is 'bad'
  • that a person can learn to become more mentally resilient
  • that to be vulnerable is to be strong
  • that laughter heals
  • that how the media portrays mental health issues influences public perception for better and for worse
  • that mental health issues are passed down from generation to generation
  • that mental health issues can unnecessarily limit what people choose to do with their lives
  • that poverty and homelessness underpin many mental health issues
  • that we need mental health screenings and regular check-ups to monitor our overall well-being
  • that prolonged lack of sleep can cause mental health concerns
  • that religious practices and beliefs can contribute to mental health problems
  • that anxiety and depression need to be more widely understood
  • that sticks and stones will break my bones, but names will never hurt me is a lie.
  • that vacations are essential for good mental health
  • that learning to live with mental health is very different from suffering from it
  • that acknowledging our own struggles with mental health makes it easier to understand other people's
  • that teachers need training to recognize symptoms of possible mental health issues in their students
  • that there is a direct link between physical exercise and mental health
  • that substance abuse can mask mental health issues
  • that green environments promote good mental health
  • that bullying can have serious consequences
  • that the real reason a bully bullies is never the person who is being bullied by them
  • that the impact of chronic pain on mental health needs to be more widely understood
  • that negative self-worth beliefs are reflected in mental health problems
  • that treatment for mental health issues should be fully integrated with any other health service providers 
  • that loneliness and isolation are often factors in mental health concerns
  • that cultural difference can underpin mental health issues
  • that being mentally unwell is not a sign of weakness
  • that shaming a person for needing treatment for mental illness is both cruel and ignorant behavior
  • that regular doom-scrolling significantly impacts on a person's mental health
  • that overlooking symptoms of mental health problems is dangerous
  • the pressure to 'fit in', to conform and to become someone else's idea of who you should be is unhealthy
  • that seeking help for mental health concerns is a positive proactive thing to do
  • that taking responsibility for our own mental wellbeing is vital
  • that to be a little bit crazy is a good thing
  • that understanding the cyclical link between addictive behaviors and mental health issues is critical to providing solutions
  • that how we talk to ourselves, about ourselves, influences our state of mind
  • that self-care and self-compassion are important for maintaining good mental health
  • that the adverse impact of traumatic events on mental health is often ignored or underestimated
  • that strategies for recovery from trauma and ongoing resilience should be taught in schools
  • that peer support groups and community networks are an important part of a person's recovery because they  provide a sense of belonging and support 

For 50 more mental health persuasive speech topics

24 persuasive ideas: the psychology of motivation

Motivation

Why do people behave the way they do?

What makes one person deliriously happy when they're in front of a large group of people telling them what to do and another person, utterly miserable?

Why do some people absolutely have to have the latest widget-wodget? And why do others not think about widget-wodgets at all?

The answers are found in motivation.

Motivation is the driving force behind our behavior. It provides the explanation for what we do. 

  • that personal success is motivating
  • that envy is a powerful motivator
  • that 'Fear of Missing Out' (FOMO) motivates/influences people to do things regardless of whether they really want to or not
  • that seeing success in significant others gives people the motivation to make positive changes
  • that finding out what motivates a person at a fundamental level is key to persuading them to follow a certain course of action
  • that social media is responsible for motivating people to strive for the unattainable
  • that carefully selected strategies for motivating students lead them to excel in their studies.
  • that fear of failure motivates many people
  • that the desire to be better than others, and to be seen to be better, is a powerful motivator for many people
  • that money makes the world go round: the need and desire for money motivates how we behave
  • that desire for public recognition and acknowledgment is a powerful motivating force 
  • that the possibility and promise of becoming famous and powerful can motivate all sorts of extreme behavior
  • that knowing what you do is helpful, useful, and kind is motivating
  • that mindfulness practices increase personal motivation
  • that the desire to understand a particular process or to solve a specific problem is the motivation behind most innovative developments and inventions
  • that setting inspiring yet realistic goals motivate a person to strive to reach them
  • that fear of consequences motivates people to continue to do what they would rather not
  • that curiosity motivates exploration and experimentation
  • that being motivated by the acquisition of material rewards, wealth and possessions, will ultimately not be enough
  • that fear and anxiety motivate aggression
  • that serving your community the best way you can is motivating
  • that positive self-talk increases and sustains motivation
  • that people are happiest and most creative when they motivated by what they are passionate about
  • that being genuinely and sincerely proud of oneself is motivation to keep ourselves on track
  • that we need to understand and nurture what motivates us to become the best of ourselves

For more information:  Motivation and What Really Drives Human Behavior (positivepsychology.com)

10 persuasive speech topics about autism

Image: jigsaw puzzle with a piece missing. Text: Persuasive speech topics on Autism

Autism, or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), refers to a broad range of mild to severe conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication. A recent (2020) study revealed that 1 in 36 children (2.7%) in USA have been diagnosed with the disorder. And that number is increasing. 

  • that promoting autism awareness matters and makes a difference
  • that early intervention and treatment is important 
  • that education for students with autism should be inclusive and supportive
  • that the myths and stereotypes about autism need challenging 
  • that inclusive hiring practices and workplace accommodations are beneficial for everyone: employers and employees.
  • that families affected by autism need accessible resources, services, and support systems.
  • that technology plays an important role in enhancing communication for nonverbal individuals with autism.
  • that ongoing research, and funding, is required to improve understanding and treatment options.
  •  that there needs to be a holistic approach to autism care.
  • that individuals on autism spectrum have value and strengths just like any other person.

19 persuasive speech topics on natural medicine

The term 'natural medicine' is one of several used interchangeably to describe any medical product or practice that is not standard (conventional) medical care.

Other synonyms are:

  • alternative medicine or therapies,
  • holistic medicine which implies taking into account the 'whole' person rather than focusing on and treating isolated symptoms,
  • herbal (plant based) remedies and,
  • complementary medicine: a treatment regime that includes elements of conventional and alternative medical care.

'Natural medicine' polarizes people. There are those who are vehemently against any form of it and who will not consider any treatment other than what is current standard medical practice. Then there are those who resolutely choose alternative options. Either way, it's a fascinating field!    

Image: chamomile daisy plants. Text: Chamomile tea has been used for centuries to aid relaxation.

  • that traditional herbal remedies effectively treat common ailments
  • that acupuncture is beneficial for pain management
  • that practicing meditation and mindfulness improves mental health
  • that chiropractic treatments effectively relieve back and neck pain
  • that yoga supports physical and mental wellness
  • that naturopathy should be used as a complementary approach to conventional medicine.
  • that homeopathy is effective in treating chronic illnesses.
  • that aromatherapy can relieve stress and enhance relaxation.
  • that traditional Chinese medicine should be incorporated into modern healthcare.
  • that good nutrition prevents disease
  • that massage therapy promotes physical and mental well-being.
  • that energy healing treatments like Reiki and acupuncture work well
  • that CBD (cannabidiol) oil helps people effectively manage pain and anxiety.
  • that the advantages of integrative medicine: combining conventional and alternative approaches should not be underestimated
  • that herbal supplements support good immune system health.
  • that holistic Ayurvedic medicine and practices are proven and promote wellness.
  • that the common myths about alternative health care and its potential harms are overstated
  • that acupuncture is an effective fertility treatment 
  • that hypnotherapy is an effective treatment for public speaking fear, smoking cessation, weight loss, and more...

14 persuasive speech topics on the possible dangers of using alternative medicine

Image: mortar and pestle with herbs. Text: 14 persuasive speech topics on the possible dangers of using alternative medicine

  • that there are hidden risks in using unregulated alternative health care practices
  • that there are potential dangers in relying solely on alternative health care for serious medical conditions
  • that there are risks in self-diagnosis and self-treatment with alternative health care
  • that misinformation is a problem in alternative health care practices
  • that there are potential adverse effects with unproven alternative health care treatments
  • that there are hidden financial risks with alternative health care therapies
  • that evidence-based medicine is more reliable than alternative health care approaches
  • that we need to protect vulnerable people from the dangers of untested alternative health care remedies
  • that unqualified practitioners in alternative health care fields can cause harm
  • that relying on unverified testimonials and anecdotal evidence in alternative health care is dangerous
  • that there are risks of negative interactions with conventional medications while using alternative health care treatments
  • that unregulated supplements and herbal remedies in alternative health care could be dangerous
  • that alternative health care therapies for incurable diseases promote false hopes 
  • that informed consent and transparency in alternative health care practices is important

22 current medical issues speech topics

Image: doctor giving a patient a vaccine. Text: 22 current medical issues speech topics. Example: that vaccine hesitancy must be addressed and countered.

  • that vaccine hesitancy must be addressed and countered 
  • that stigmas around mental health must be challenged
  • that good accessible mental health care should be available for all
  • that cosmetic and reconstructive surgery should only be for those who genuinely need it
  • that comprehensive specialized mental health programs and support systems need to in schools 
  • that the lessons for the opioid crisis must be learned
  • that inequal access to medical services needs addressing
  • that the balance between patient autonomy and a physician's responsibility needs careful monitoring
  • that strategies for promoting healthy aging and elderly care are essential with an aging population
  • that organ donation needs to be actively encouraged to overcome the shortage of organs available for transplantation
  • that the ethical implications of genetic testing need careful consideration
  • that healthy active lifestyles must be promoted to combat childhood obesity and the obesity epidemic
  • that the increasing role of technology in healthcare presents as many innovations as it does challenges
  • that pharmaceutical drugs need to be accessible and affordably priced
  • that the impact of social media on body image need to be countered by actively promoting positive self-perception
  • that developing countries need support to improve health care infrastructure and access 
  • that precision medicine or personalized healthcare has better patient outcomes
  • that we should encourage conversations about end-of-life care before the need for it arises
  • that the legal and ethical concerns about euthanasia and assisted suicide can be humanely and respectfully resolved
  • that the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in medicine presents great opportunities as well as challenges
  • that improving obstetric care would lower maternal mortality rates
  • that for the good of the health of the mother, abortion on demand should be legal
  • that all tobacco products should be banned
  • that the use of medical marijuana by patients in hospitals needs careful consideration from a legal standpoint

The subject of food: its cultivation, preparation, scarcity or abundance, generates passionate debate regardless of who we are, or where we are on the planet.

Have fun with these!

Image: root vegetables growing in garden Text: 21 food-themed persuasive speech topics. Example: that a plant-based diet is healthier.

  • that poor nutritional health in first world countries is the result of poor food choices
  • that the use of unsustainably produced palm oil in food and other products should be banned
  • that the benefits of eating locally sourced food outweigh the disadvantages
  • that we must reduce food waste to lessen its environmental impact
  • that eating fast food long-term is dangerous
  • that a plant-based diet is healthier
  • that the negative effects of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in our food system outstrip their shorter term benefits
  • that organic farming has positive effects on health and the environment
  • that nutrition education in schools helps combat childhood obesity
  • that a sugar tax would help control the consumption of foods with high sugar content
  • that factory farming is unethical
  • that we need to adopt humane animal welfare practices
  • that advertising and marketing of unhealthy food choices makes them attractive
  • that food safety and strictly enforced regulations are necessary for public health
  • that food waste should be against the law
  • that food deserts (areas that have limited access to affordable and nutritious food) have an enormous impact on the health of communities 
  • that there are workable, sustainable, affordable strategies to combat the effects of food deserts and food insecurity
  • that the food we eat effects our mental as well as our physical health
  • that producing food sustainably helps combat climate change 
  • that there are significant health risks associated  artificial food additives and preservatives
  • that genetically modified foods must be labeled for consumer awareness

53 topics: ethics, morals and values

The words 'ethics', 'morals' and 'values' are frequently interchanged as if they mean the same thing. However, although there is considerable overlap between them, they don't.

Diagram showing the overlap of values, morals and ethics.

Values  are the core beliefs on which we center and base our lives. They are the values we have decided are important and can be personal as well as shared. Examples are honesty, service, cooperation, family, heritage, freedom of expression, independence, privacy, loyalty, integrity, or success. 

Morals  are based on our values. They elicit feeling or emotional responses in us. For instance, we feel good when we behave in accordance with our values, and bad when we don't. Like values, our moral codes can be either personal or shared.

For example: if one of our core values is the importance of family, then we will feel guilty and uncomfortable if we don't honor it. We make a moral judgment about our own behavior. 

Ethics : These let us know what is right and wrong. For instance, many professions have a code of ethics to regulate the behavior of their members. Examples are medical practitioners, lawyers, and teachers. They are rules based on a shared moral code as are the laws governing how we function as a society. 

Because life and people's experience of it, is not static, values, morals and ethics can change over time. And although there are some behaviors that have generally always been unlawful, (murder, fraud, infanticide...), what was acceptable and normal once, does not guarantee its rightness now.

For a fuller explanation please see this excellent article:  What's the Difference Between Ethics, Morals and Values?

28 topics based on morals and ethics

  • that there are major ethical implications of the role of artificial intelligence in our daily lives
  • that the unmonitored use of facial recognition technology is a violation of individual rights
  • that corporations have a moral responsibility to address climate change
  • that war is never right ethically or morally
  • that the ethics of genetic engineering and its impact on society need careful monitoring
  • that it is important to fully consider the ethics in the development and use of emerging technologies like blockchain and cryptocurrency need
  • that the ethical challenges of data privacy and protection in the digital age must be met for the safety and security of society
  • that the ethical implications of using animals for scientific research requires regular reviewing
  • that the ethical and moral implications of our current abortion laws need thorough and careful investigation
  • that the ethics of capital punishment need scrutinizing. Is it ever morally justifiable?
  • that the ethical implications and long-term impact of gene editing and designer babies need careful consideration
  • that it is no longer either ethical or moral to differentiate salaries or workplace benefits on the basis of gender
  • that the moral obligations of healthcare professionals in end-of-life decisions need to be fully considered 
  • that whistleblowing is an ethical way of ensuring corporate accountability
  • that the use of drones and autonomous weapons demands a thorough review of the ethical considerations involved
  • that an individual has the right to choose their own death. The moral dilemma of euthanasia, if there is one, is their own to solve. 
  • that the ethical implications of the long-term impacts of genetic testing and personalized medicine need to be thoroughly investigated
  • that social media platforms have ethical responsibilities in combating the spread of online harassment and misinformation
  • that the moral issues surrounding the use of performance-enhancing drugs in sports need to examined calmly and carefully
  • that the ethics of factory farming and its impact on animal welfare need to be thoroughly and regularly reviewed
  • that the ethical and moral implication of discriminatory adoption laws should be investigated
  • that the ethics and impact of online advertising should be independently monitored
  • that the ethical considerations in the allocation of healthcare resources should always play a major role in decision making
  • that the moral implications of genetic cloning and its potential consequences will force our governing bodies to legislate against it
  • that the ethics of global wealth distribution and poverty alleviation will always be in question while inequality exists
  • that the ethical challenges of conducting research on human subjects is entirely justifiable
  • that internet censorship is both sensible and ethical
  • that it is ethical and morally responsible that children should have their use of social media and the internet monitored.

25 persuasive speech topic ideas on values

Image: Father Christmas. Text: 309 persuasive speech topics. Example: that we must never tell lies to children, except about Father Christmas...

  • that we must never tell lies to children except about Father Christmas, the Tooth Fairy and the Easter Rabbit
  • that honesty in personal and professional relationships is best at all times
  • that embracing diversity is essential for a harmonious society
  • that team sports build good character traits
  • that empathy, (compassion and understanding), has the power to change lives
  • that education is fundamental for personal growth and the progress of society
  • that privacy and the protection of personal information matters more than ever
  • that everybody is entitled to privacy, including children and teenagers
  • that taking personal responsibility and promoting sustainability for our planet's environment is vital for our and its survival
  • that actively advocating for gender, racial and social justice promotes equality
  • that life was better before the influence of online social media took over
  • that everyone should spend several months per year working for the betterment of others in a non-profit social service organization
  • that regular acts of kindness and goodwill make a positive impact no matter how small
  • that becoming self-aware increases our emotional intelligence, which in turn, improves our relationships with others
  • that the lives of all living creatures should be valued and protected
  • that we need to celebrate, tolerate and accept differences in beliefs, cultures and lifestyles
  • that expressing oneself freely is more important than getting the grammar, punctuation and spelling right
  • that integrity, honoring moral principles, in personal and professional settings, builds trust and respect
  • that cooperation, volunteering and civic engagement builds strong healthy communities
  • that everybody should learn to cook and clean for themselves
  • that we need to value, understand and learn from our history
  • that genuinely and sincerely acknowledging and apologizing for hurtful, damaging behavior promotes healing and encourages transformation
  • that it is better to earn your own living rather than to be financially provided for by someone else
  • that money is not a meaningful measure of success

20 persuasive speech topics about the economy

Diagram of the interrelationship of economics

What is an 'economy'? What does the word mean?  I hear and read it frequently and its often in different contexts. 

For example, at my local grocery store there's a large sign telling me that buying 10 cakes of soap at a never to be repeated discounted rate of 33% off per cake is good economy.

On the news I hear that our economy is challenging. There have been significant rises in the price of food over the past six months and mortgage rates are set to increase.

That's two different uses. The first is implying that buying in bulk will save me money. The second suggests it refers to the ebb and flow of monetary exchange for goods and services in society. 

I sought a definition for clarity and found this:

"An economy is a complex system of interrelated production, consumption, and exchange activities that ultimately determines how resources are allocated among all the participants. The production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services combine to fulfill the needs of those living and operating within the economy.

An economy may represent a nation, a region, a single industry, or even a family."

For more information:  Economy: What It Is, Types of Economies, Economic Indicators (investopedia.com)

This definition covers the dynamic interconnecting web of exchanges for goods and services underpinning our daily lives, and that is the focus of the topics below.  

  • that promoting entrepreneurship for economic growth has benefits
  • that investing in renewable energy for a sustainable economy is important
  • that there are both advantages and disadvantages of globalization on national economies
  • that the impact of automation on employment requires carefully thought through strategies for economic adaptation.
  • that multinational corporations need stricter regulations 
  • that increasing the minimum wage to improve income equality benefits everyone
  • that the advantages of a universal basic income for economic stability outweigh its disadvantages
  • that government should play an active role in fostering innovation and technological advancements
  • that financial literacy education benefits both individuals and the economy
  • that promoting fair trade practices benefits developing economies
  • that income inequality impacts on social stability and economic growth
  • that free trade agreements have significant advantages
  • that investing in infrastructure for economic development is important
  • that implementing sustainable economic policies has benefits for long-term growth
  • that government has a role in reducing poverty and income disparities
  • that immigration and inclusive immigration policies have a positive impact on the economy
  • that the advantages of austerity measures during economic crises outweigh the disadvantages
  • that promoting small businesses is important for local economic development
  • that investing in education and skills training benefits economic competitiveness
  • that technology transforms traditional industries and creates new economic opportunities

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More persuasive speech resources

Persuasive speech topics.

Image: one lonely piece of chocolate cake on a plate. Text: Fun persuasive speech topics - Having you cake and eating it too is fair.

  • 105 fun persuasive speech topics : ideal for light-hearted, informal speeches
  • 100 non-boring persuasive speech ideas   - a 'tired' topic is not for you. Choose something fresh and original.
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  • 310 persuasive speech topics for college : mental health, society, family & friends, animals, education
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For assistance with planning and writing

  • Writing a persuasive speech - a 7 step action plan that includes how to choose a topic, analyze your audience, set a good speech purpose, decide on a structural pattern (with examples) and, more.
  • A persuasive speech outline example using the 5 step structural pattern: Monroe's Motivated Sequence. (With a free printable outline)
  • A persuasive speech example using Monroe's Motivated Sequence

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persuasive speech topics about social issues

persuasive speech topics about social issues

125+ Persuasive Speech Topics To Amaze Your Audience

Speaker talking to audience

Reviewed by:

Former Admissions Committee Member, Columbia University

Reviewed: 4/26/24

This article provides a comprehensive list of persuasive speech topics and answers to some of your frequently asked questions about speech topics. 

Persuasive writing is hard, and it’s even harder to try to come up with an engaging topic that interests you and your audience. 

Not only do you have to convince your audience to take your side on subjects that are often pretty divisive, you also have to persuade them to take your side of the argument. The first step to making a successful persuasive speech that will amaze your audience is having a strong topic.  

Keep reading for 125+ persuasive speech topics. 

125+ Topics for a Persuasive Speech

Persuasive speech ideas are harder to come up with than you may think. There is a fine balance between interesting your audience, interesting to you, unique and fresh, all while being thought-provoking without being outright offensive. 

Here is a breakdown of various topics for persuasive speeches, organized by categories, to inspire you. 

1. Arts & Culture

Art and culture are always hot topics amongst individuals and groups. There are many interesting arguments and stances on both topics, and many people have strong opinions when it comes to the subject matter. 

See below for prompts for persuasive speeches about art and culture: 

  • Is graffiti art? 
  • Should art classes be mandatory for all students?
  • Should we keep reading classic literature that is offensive? 
  • Should there be a distinction between ‘high’ and ‘low’ literature?
  • Are romcoms and erotica series like Fifty Shades of Grey empowering for women?
  • Is reading actually more beneficial than watching TV or playing video games?
  • Is there any benefit or relevance to teaching high school students Shakespeare?
  • Should video games be considered a high form of entertainment?
  • Are biographical movies of deceased musicians and artists ethical?
  • Is modern music really worse than older music?
  • Should paparazzi be banned and unable to sell their photos?

Topics in arts and culture are always fun to debate and discuss because you have the opportunity to talk about your favorite pieces of media!

2. Economics

Economics is a hotly debated topic. There is no shortage of compelling, engaging arguments involving economics. 

Here are some good persuasive speech ideas on the topic of economics: 

  • Is capitalism a functional, ethical economic system? 
  • Should everyone, despite their income, be taxed at the same rate?
  • Can we introduce another economic system to our society? 
  • Should each state, the federal government, or individual companies be responsible for setting a living wage?
  • Should minimum wage be doubled?
  • Should everyone adapt to the four-day work week?
  • Should people who make under a certain amount per year not be taxed at all?
  • Should governments encourage and reward people for shopping locally? 
  • Should advertisements be banned during TV and media programming aimed at kids?
  • Has modern consumerism gone too far?

Economics is a great topic for a persuasive speech because it affects our everyday lives in so many ways. There are tons of research and perspectives to help support your argument. 

3. Education

Many people feel strongly about education and there are many sides and perspectives that come into play: teachers, parents, students, student athletes, and more. 

Here is a list of some engaging topics to write a persuasive speech on:

  • Should post-secondary education be free?
  • Should taking a year off between high school and college be mandatory?
  • Is it fair to take cell phones away from kids in middle/high school while they are in class?
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory in all high schools?
  • Should cursive writing still be taught in schools?
  • Do frats and sororities actually serve their purpose? 
  • Should programming and coding be introduced to young students?
  • Should school lunches be free?
  • Is college/university necessary anymore?
  • Does the education system prepare students for adult life?
  • Should gyms be mandatory for all students?
  • Do schools need to do a better job at teaching students a second language?
  • Should schools teach sign language?
  • What age should students be taught sex ed?
  • Should distant learning be encouraged, or avoided at all costs?

Education is another great topic to write a speech about because it intersects with economics, culture , and politics . These topics will guarantee an engaged audience. This is a popular topic for high school students who are learning about tuition and scholarships at their top colleges! 

4. Environment

Since the release of Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth” and Greta Thunberg’s unapologetic activism, climate change has been at the forefront of many political, economic, and cultural conversations. 

If environmental issues spark your interest, consider writing on one of the topics below:

  • Can we ever live in a truly ‘green’ and environmentally friendly society?
  • Should water bottles be banned?
  • Are businesses responsible for implementing environmentally friendly production and products?
  • Should there be a carbon tax?
  • Should electric cars be mandatory in the near future?
  • Should we switch over to entirely renewable energy?
  • Do low-income families have the same duties to be eco-conscious as high-income families do? Should plastic bags and single use plastic be completely banned?
  • Should car racing be banned?
  • Should fast fashion be banned?

The environment and climate change are becoming, if not already, some of the most pressing issues of our day. 

Ethics may be one of the most difficult topics to write a persuasive speech about because the topics tend to cover sensitive subject matter. However, ethics are also some of the most compelling and complex topics to explore. 

Here are some potential topics for a persuasive speech about ethics:

  • Is animal testing ethical?
  • Is drinking coffee unethical?
  • Are animal shelters that allow euthanization ethical?
  • Should more people try to adopt a vegetarian/vegan diet?
  • Is the death penalty ethical? 
  • Can racism ever truly be eliminated?
  • Can the prison system genuinely contribute to the improvement and rehabilitation of individuals?
  • Should justice systems and incarceration facilities focus on rehabilitation over punishment? 
  • Should cosmetic plastic surgery be covered by insurance?
  • Are morals objective or subjective?
  • Should zoos and circuses be banned?
  • Should fur coats be illegal?
  • Are censorship laws ethical?
  • Is it ethical to genetically modify an embryo? 
  • How should we, and who is responsible, for addressing the homelessness crisis? 
  • Should minors who commit violent crimes be charged and tried as adults?

Tackling a persuasive speech on ethics is a challenge, as many of these topics are complex and sensitive. It can also be difficult to wrap up a speech on such huge ethical debates. 

However, these topics also provide some of the most riveting and energizing debates - if you’re up to the challenge, you should definitely try to tackle one of these topics. 

From fitness to food prices to economic privilege, there are tons of debatable topics regarding health. Here are just some of the potential topics you can write a speech on:

  • Are individuals solely responsible for their own health?
  • Should prescription medications be free?
  • Should sugary drinks like pop be taxed at higher rates?
  • Should Starbucks be allowed to advertise their high-calories and high sugar drinks?
  • Should the government regulate the prices of fruits and vegetables?
  • Should fast food restaurants regulate and reduce their portions?
  • Should gym memberships be free?
  • Should the government change and restructure the work week to reduce stress?
  • Should nurses be paid more?
  • Should smoking be banned?
  • Should insurance companies fully cover rehabilitation stays for health issues like eating disorders?

People have varying opinions and understanding of health, which makes these topics very engaging and interesting to write about.

7. Politics

It goes without saying that almost every political issue is debatable. 

  • Do we actually live in a truly democratic society?
  • Should there be a minimum wage or a living wage?
  • Should the legal voting age be decreased?
  • Does the pay gap exist?
  • Are younger politicians more effective?
  • Should there be stricter gun laws?
  • Should Presidents be able to serve more than two terms?
  • Should everyone get the day off work to go vote?
  • Should political party funding be regulated?
  • Should political smear campaigns be banned?
  • Is there a political bias in mainstream media?
  • Should you date someone with opposing political views? 
  • Is the government spending too much on the military sector?

Politics are all about persuading people to take a side, which makes it a strategic topic for delivering a moving persuasive speech. 

Sports is another big topic that people care a lot about. There are sports related matters that are questioned everywhere: sports on TV, the Olympics, college sports and athletics, and athletic sponsorships . 

Below is a list of captivating sports topics for a persuasive speech: 

  • Should the pay for professional teams be based on audience viewership? 
  • Are professional sports getting too violent? 
  • Are athletes overpaid?
  • Is cheerleading empowering or exploitative? 
  • Should children be allowed to compete in competitive sports?
  • Should we continue spending millions of dollars on the Olympic Games?
  • Do people put too much importance on high school and college football?
  • Should alcohol and tobacco ads be banned during sports?
  • Is betting on sports teams ethical?
  • Should high school and college athletes be paid?

Sports is a topic that people don’t often think of as controversial. However, your audience is bound to be engaged and contemplating your argument as you present your speech. 

9. Technology

As the world increasingly moves to online spaces, and technology advances faster than ever before, technology is another hot topic that people have a lot of thoughts and opinions on. 

  • Should all workplaces offer hybrid/remote work?
  • Should we pursue Artificial Intelligence?
  • Do we need to put resources into travelling to space?
  • Should parents monitor their children’s online activity?
  • Is it okay for phones to use facial recognition and fingerprint technology?
  • Is technology actually addicting?
  • Can we blame technology for increased stress and anxiety?
  • Are security cameras and body cameras an invasion of privacy? 
  • Should the internet be surveilled or managed?
  • Should video game chats be surveilled or even banned?
  • Are machines replacing human labor? 
  • Should cloning be outlawed/banned?

As technology continues to advance and expand into our personal lives, it is a great topic to write a unique persuasive speech on. 

Having a unique and creative speech topic discussing one of your interests can make it stand out more! Think about extracurriculars you participate in, podcasts you enjoy, or fascinating facts you’ve learned. Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box. 

  • What makes a hero?
  • Are we headed towards World War 3?
  • Did humans really land on the moon?
  • Are serial killers born or made?
  • Can good and evil be separated neatly?
  • Is cancel culture a positive or negative thing?
  • Can money buy happiness?
  • How to become a millionaire
  • How to become more confident
  • How to live to be 100
  • How to survive an apocalypse
  • Do extraterrestrial beings exist?
  • Why students should start investing at 16
  • The true history of… (event of your choice, such as the Chernobyl disaster, the Black Plague, Salem Witch Trials, etc.)

Exploring these kinds of diverse and intriguing topics will not only capture your audience's attention but will also allow you to share your passions with your peers! 

What Makes a Good Persuasive Speech Topic?

The best persuasive speech topics are topics that are not overdone, and topics that the speaker is genuinely passionate and knowledgeable about. 

Persuasive speech topics should also be a bit controversial (this does not mean offensive) because the topic and speech itself should be thought-provoking. The more people are emotionally invested in the topic, the better. 

For example, while you can try to persuade your audience that strawberry ice cream is better than chocolate ice cream, it’s unlikely that many people have a strong emotional investment in that topic. Without an emotional investment, audiences will be sitting listening to your speech thinking: “so what?” 

On the other hand, a topic like “Should government’s set limits on how many children a family can have in overpopulated countries?” is emotionally charged and truly matters to people. 

FAQs: Persuasive Speech Topics

After reading through all the possible topics you can write a persuasive speech on, you may still have some questions before you get going. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about persuasive speech topics. 

1. What Are Some Easy Persuasive Topics?

Any persuasive topic can be easy to write about if you are passionate about your stance. The more passionate and knowledgeable you are about your topic, the easier it will be to research and write. 

There are also easy persuasive topics that are more lighthearted than controversial, which some people may find easier to debate and write about. Some easy persuasive topics include: 

  • Should everyone have a three-day weekend?
  • Should every public place have free Wi-Fi?
  • Does social media do more harm than good?
  • Should kids get paid for getting high grades?
  • Do we need more holidays?

These topics are all fun to debate, which makes it easy to write a persuasive speech or essay. Whereas some persuasive topics can be complex and sensitive, the topics listed above are pretty straightforward, which makes them easier to discuss than more complex topics. 

2. What Is a Good Persuasive Speech Topic For School?

A good start to finding a good speech topic for school is looking for a topic that involves something related to school. For example, you can look into talking about school uniforms, class sizes, tuition and scholarships, and school sports, just to name a few. 

Having a speech topic related to school is a good idea for school because your audience (teachers and peers) are directly in that environment as well. This means they will likely be more engaged as the topic, whether they agree or disagree, is relevant to their everyday lives. 

3. What are Three Examples of a Persuasive Speech Topic?

Any of the above topics listed in this article are examples of persuasive speech topics. Three specific examples that have not been listed are:

  • Is social media to blame for the rates of depression and anxiety amongst youth?
  • Do young adult romance novels encourage harmful and toxic relationships to their target audience?
  • Should children under 18 have total control over medical decisions made about their bodies?

These topics are examples of persuasive speech topics because you need to take a clear stance in order to answer the question. The point of a persuasive speech is to convince or persuade the audience that your side of the argument is valid and should be considered, so the topic needs the individual to take a specific stance. 

As briefly touched upon before, your topic needs to interest your audience for a successful persuasive speech. While you should make sure your topic isn’t overdone, you don’t want to go with something too ‘safe’ as that will most likely bore your audience. 

Final Thoughts

Coming up with a topic for a persuasive speech may be the most difficult part of the writing process. 

Read over our list of topics and pick out a few topics that genuinely interest you. From there, do some preliminary research on each topic and see which one has the strongest evidence to support your argument. Then, you’ll be good to start writing your persuasive speech that will amaze your audience!

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    112 Engaging Persuasive Speech Topics. Tips for Preparing Your Persuasive Speech. Writing a stellar persuasive speech requires a carefully crafted argument that will resonate with your audience to sway them to your side. This feat can be challenging to accomplish, but an engaging, thought-provoking speech topic is an excellent place to start.

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    Lots of timely persuasive topics can be found using social media, the radio, TV and newspapers. We have compiled a list of 75 persuasive speech topic ideas covering a wide range of categories. Some of the topics also fall into other categories and we have posed the topics as questions so they can be easily adapted into statements to suit your ...

  7. 191 Best Persuasive Speech Topics: Give an Amazing Speech!

    191 Best Persuasive Speech Topics. Before we reveal the 191 best persuasive speech topics, let's preview each of the categories: Politics and law: This topic revolves around pressing issues including voting, Supreme Court decisions, political leadership, and criminal justice.; Environmental activism: Climate change, offshore oil drilling, and green technology are just a few of the hot-button ...

  8. 220+ Persuasive Speech Topics (Updated 2023)

    Throughout this blog, we have explored a wide range of persuasive speech topics, covering social issues, ethics, and public speaking. Remember that when selecting a persuasive speech topic, it is crucial to consider the audience's relevance, your personal interest, and the potential impact of the topic.

  9. 100 Easy Persuasive Speech Topics: A Guide

    This article includes 100 amazing persuasive speech topics with short description of each of them. ... Social networks like Facebook, Twitter, messenger, and others keep us in contact with many friends that we would otherwise have forgotten. ... Persuasive Speech Topics about Ethical Issues. Euthanasia should be legalized;

  10. 108 feminist persuasive speech topics for college students

    There are 108 persuasive speech topics here covering many current feminist issues. For example: that copy-cat fast fashion reinforces the relentless consumer cycle and the poverty trap, that the advertising industry deliberately manufactures and supports body image insecurities to serve its own ends, that gendered language reinforces the ...

  11. Appendix A: Persuasive Speech Topic Ideas

    Appendix A: Persuasive Speech Topic Ideas. Environmental Topics. Citizens should try to reuse items before recycling them. The U.S. should ban mountaintop removal as a mode of harvesting coal. Contemporary climate change is human-caused. Governmental funding for clean energy should be increased.

  12. 107 Persuasive Speech Topics: A Comprehensive Guide

    Social Issues - Persuasive Speech Topics. Social issues provide a platform to challenge societal norms and advocate for change. The fight for gender equality is a prime example, of addressing disparities in the workplace, education, and politics. Persuasive speeches on this topic often highlight the ongoing struggle for equal pay ...

  13. 100 Good Persuasive Speech Topics & Ideas

    Here, you'll find a giant list of persuasive speech topic ideas and examples that are broken down into 10 different categories, from arts and culture to economics to ethics and more. So no matter ...

  14. 105 Interesting Persuasive Speech Topics for Any Project

    105 Topics for a Persuasive Speech. Here's our list of 105 great persuasive speech ideas. We made sure to choose topics that aren't overdone, yet that many people will have an interest in, and we also made a point of choosing topics with multiple viewpoints rather than simplistic topics that have a more obvious right answer (i.e.

  15. Persuasive speech ideas

    100+ persuasive speech ideas grouped by theme: animals/birds, arts/culture, automotive, business/economy, social/community, environment, education, ethics, global/world, sports... Notes covering: what makes a speech topic 'good'. why some topics are potentially boring for an audience to listen to and best left alone.

  16. 40+ Captivating Persuasive Speech Topics For Students

    Business Speech Topics; How to Find Persuasive Speech Topics. Here are some of the ways on how to find persuasive speech topics: 1. Brainstorming. Set aside some time to brainstorm ideas. Think about your own interests, passions, and experiences. Consider current events, social issues, and topics that you feel strongly about.

  17. Persuasive Speech Topics: The Best 150 Ideas

    Persuasive speech topics can inspire an audience and influence change in your community, town, or city. Whether you are giving a presentation at a large conference or converting a college essay into a speech to be given at your high school's auditorium, delivering a persuasive speech is not an easy task. We are here to guide you through this difficult process and provide you with 150 ...

  18. Good Persuasive Speech Topics

    Good Persuasive Speech Topics. Persuasive speaking is a powerful tool, capable of influencing opinions, sparking change, and encouraging action. Whether you are a student preparing for a classroom debate, a professional aiming to convince stakeholders, or someone passionate about social issues, choosing the right topic is crucial for delivering ...

  19. 100 Persuasive Speech Topics for Students

    We should pay more taxes. We should do away with taxes. Teachers should be tested like students. We should not interfere in the affairs of other countries. Every student should join a club. Homeschooling is better than traditional schooling. People should stay married for life. Smoking in public should be illegal.

  20. Persuasive Speech Outline, with Examples

    Ideas for your persuasive speech outline 1. Structure of your persuasive speech. The opening and closing of speech are the most important. Consider these carefully when thinking about your persuasive speech outline. A strong opening ensures you have the audience's attention from the start and gives them a positive first impression of you.

  21. Persuasive Speeches

    The three main types of persuasive speeches are factual, value, and policy. A factual persuasive speech focuses solely on factual information to prove the existence or absence of something through substantial proof. This is the only type of persuasive speech that exclusively uses objective information rather than subjective.

  22. 'Easy' persuasive speech topics: 309 great examples

    69 topics based on education. 135 based on aspects of health: mental health, the psychology of motivation, autism, natural medicine, the dangers of alternative medicine, current medical issues. 21 food themed persuasive speech topics. 53 topics based on ethics, morals and values.

  23. 125+ Persuasive Speech Topics To Amaze Your Audience

    There is a fine balance between interesting your audience, interesting to you, unique and fresh, all while being thought-provoking without being outright offensive. Here is a breakdown of various topics for persuasive speeches, organized by categories, to inspire you. 1. Arts & Culture. Art and culture are always hot topics amongst individuals ...