Cover Letter Format (w/ Examples & Free Templates)

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Give someone who knows nothing about cooking the ingredients to a perfect meal and you’ll end up with a disorganized, very possibly inedible, meal. 

The same disorganized, quite possibly tasteless, fate awaits your cover letter if you don’t know how to properly format it. 

Getting the cover letter format right is the same as having those coveted cooking skills that can turn the right ingredients into a meal that leaves you wanting more.

Now, if you’re wondering whether your formatting skills are enough to impress recruiters, there’s no need to worry. 

This article is going to show you exactly how to format a cover letter the right way. 

Here’s what we’re going to cover: 

  • What Should Go On a Cover Letter?
  • How to Format Your Cover Letter
  • (Free) Cover Letter Templates You Can Use
  • How to Format Your Cover Letter When Sending It Via Email

The Best Cover Letter Format - What Goes on a Cover Letter

Your cover letter’s format is both how your cover letter looks and how it’s structured. 

So, cover letter formatting includes everything from page margins, spacing, and font size to how long your cover letter should be, how many paragraphs it should have, and what each paragraph should contain. 

Pretty substantial, if you ask us - which is exactly why we’ll go over these elements one by one. Before we do, however, let’s first get the essentials out of the way. 

What exactly goes into a cover letter? The short answer is as follows:  

  • A header , which contains your contact information and the employer’s or recruiter’s contact information.
  • A greeting to the recruiter and the opening paragraph , which you want to use to grab the reader’s attention.
  • The body of your cover letter , which is between 1-3 paragraphs.
  • A closing paragraph , which usually contains a call to action.
  • A formal salutation .

And here’s what that looks like in practice: 

cover letter structure

A Look into Your Cover Letter Format, by Section

In theory, all these rules are pretty straightforward...

But if you’ve ever written a cover letter before, you’ll probably agree with us that actually writing one ain’t all that simple.

In this section, we’ll take you through the entire process of creating a cover letter, section by section!

Starting with:

#1. Header 

Your cover letter’s header should contain your contact info, the date, and the hiring manager’s or employer’s contact info. 

If you’re wondering which contact information you should include and which you should leave out, here are the essentials: 

  • Full name and professional title (where applicable) 
  • Phone number
  • Name and professional title of the hiring manager
  • Name of the company you’re applying to 
  • Company address 

Here’s a visual representation of this: 

cover letter header example

If you want to know more about header formatting, such as what you can optionally include and what you should definitely leave out, head over to our guide on how to start a cover letter . 

#2. Greeting 

After listing your contact information, it’s time to address the cover letter . 

First things first: the impersonal and overly popular “To Whom It May Concern” and “Dear Sir/Madam” are yesterday’s news. They’re impersonal and just about every other applicant uses them. 

And you want your cover letter to stand out, right?

So, greet the hiring manager directly, instead. For example: 

Dear Mr. Brown, Dear Mrs. Waldorf,

If, however, you are unsure about their title, gender, marital status, or pronouns, use their entire name to avoid any mistakes, such as: 

Dear Alex Brown, Dear Blair Waldorf,

Alternatively, the recruiter may hold a title, such as Doctor, Professor, or sergeant, or you might be addressing a letter without a contact person. 

In such cases, here are some do-s and don’t-s to keep in mind: 

Dear John Doe, Dear Mr./Mrs. Doe, Dear Dr. Leonard, Dear Rev. Owen, Dear Marketing Hiring Team, Dear Director of Marketing,

To Whom It May Concern, What’s Up Hiring Team, Dear Sir/Madam, Hey John, Hi there Hiring Team,

#3. Opening Paragraph 

The opening paragraph of your cover letter is where the recruiter first gets to really hear your voice. As such, you’ve got to make it count and grab their attention before they move on to the next applicant.  

And how exactly do you do that? Well, for starters, avoid being generic. You don’t want your opening paragraph to sound as if you’re applying to dozens of jobs with the same letter.

Instead, you want your opening paragraph to mention:

  • Your name, profession, and years of experience.
  • 1-2 of your top achievements (to help you stand out).
  • The name of the firm and position you’re applying for.

Here’s what this would look like in a cover letter:

My name is Ellen and I’d like to join Company X as a marketing expert. I believe that my 5+ years of experience as a marketing specialist, as well as my skills in PPC management and copywriting, will help me drive new users to your platform Additionally, I believe that my past experience in the financial industry will help me excel at the role.

Struggling with writing your own cover letter introduction? Check out our guide on how to start a cover letter effectively! 

#4. Cover Letter Body 

The body of your cover letter usually consists of 1-3 paragraphs and is where you convince the recruiter that you're the right person for the job.

We have a few pointers to help you do that:

  • Don’t just rehash your CV. The recruiter already read it. Instead, use your cover letter to elaborate on your achievements and back them up with even more evidence. 
  • Understand the job requirements. Check the requirements for the position in the job listing, see how you can match them with your strengths and qualifications, and use the body of your cover letter to show you’re a good fit for the job. 
  • Research the company. Also important is to show that you match the company’s culture. Read up about the company you’re applying for and learn what’s their product/service, what are they known for, what kind of culture they have, and so on. Then, in your cover letter, mention a bit about the company’s culture and talk about how you’re a good fit.

And here’s hows the body of your cover letter would look like in practice: 

In my previous role as a Marketing Expert, I also handled the company’s Digital Marketing. During the course of one year, I managed the company’s monthly Facebook ad budget, which amounted to $20,000+ and the process of ad creation and management end-to-end. The process involved creating ad copies, images, picking out the targeting, running optimization trials, and so on. 

In addition to Facebook advertising, I am also knowledgeable in other Pay Per Click channels, such as: 

I actually learned a lot about PPC management basics from your company YouTube channel, and really admire how you guys manage your ad accounts. Since I’m already familiar with how Company X handles ads, I believe that I’d be able to really excel at the role.

#5. Closing Paragraph (And a Call to Action) 

Now, how you end a cover letter is just as important as how you start it. 

As you wrap up your cover letter, it’s important to do the following:

  • Mention anything that you couldn’t in the previous paragraphs . If you have anything left to say, mention it here. 
  • Thank the hiring manager for their time . Good manners go a long way. 
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action . Your cover letter’s last sentence should be a call to action, such as asking the hiring manager to take some sort of action. 

Here’s an example of that: 

In conclusion, thank you for considering my application. I hope I have the chance to help your company take its marketing initiatives to the next level. It would be great to discuss how my experience so far can make that a reality. 

As for your formal salutation, you can use any of the following “tried and tested” greetings: 

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,

Cover Letter Format Guide 

We went over what goes in your cover letter section by section. However, how your cover letter looks on the outside is just as important. 

Following some standard formatting tips will show the hiring manager that you took the time and put in the effort to hand in the best version of a cover letter, which is sure to help your case. 

Here are the rules that you need to follow: 

  • Keep your cover letter between half and one page in length to make sure the recruiter actually reads the whole thing (if you had to read 100+ cover letters, you’d want applicants to stick to one page too). That’s between 250-400 words long . 
  • Use 1 or 1.5 line spacing throughout your text , and double spacing between paragraphs. 
  • Go for a simple and readable font and set your font size to 11 or 12 pts . Using custom fonts may seem like a good idea, but there’s no guarantee the hiring manager’s computer will have that specific font installed.
  • Save your cover letter in PDF format to make sure the layout stays the same despite the type of software or Operating System (OS) that opens it. 

Or Choose One of Our Cover Letter Templates 

The cover letter is an inseparable part of any application package. As such, you want your cover letter format to be as impeccable as possible. 

And while the formatting rules we’ve listed above aren’t complicated to follow, you’d rather not take any risks with your cover letter format.  

Want to make sure that your cover letter format is impeccable?

Just use a cover letter template!

The format is done for you - all you have to do is fill in the contents. 

cover letter format

Our cover letter templates are well-designed and guaranteed to leave a good impression on the recruiter!

On top of that, all of our templates come with a matching resume template , ensuring that your job application stands out from the rest.

Sending Your Cover Letter Via Email? Here’s How To Do It! 

It’s safe to assume that nowadays, most cover letters are sent via email. That means that you’re probably submitting your email in one of two ways: 

  • Sending it as an email attachment.
  • Uploading it to the company’s webpage.

If that’s the case, you’re good with the formatting rules listed above. 

If, however, you’re sending your cover letter in the body of the email, here’s what you need to do differently: 

  • Write a professional subject line. The best and safest formula is “Name - Position you’re applying to” (e.g. “Helen Simms - Application for Marketing Expert Position”).
  • Remove the header. As the hiring manager’s contact details and the date are no longer necessary, remove the header altogether and place your contact information underneath the formal salutation. 
  • Look out for typos. Check your cover letter and then double-check it. Typing on a keyboard can be tricky; sometimes, a typo might just be a matter of fast typing. Avoid that by being extra careful. 

And you’re about ready to press “Send.”

Key Takeaways

Your cover letter format is a big part of the impression your job application can make. As such, it’s important to get the formatting right. 

Here are the main points this article covers to achieve that: 

  • Make sure to structure your cover letter the right way. 
  • Address your cover letter the right way and write an attention-grabbing opening paragraph.
  • Wrap up your cover letter with a call to action. 
  • Pay attention to the margins, space lining, font size, and cover letter length.
  • If you’re sending your cover letter as the body of your email, make sure to tweak the formatting accordingly.  

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How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

I ’ve read thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of cover letters in my career. If you’re thinking that sounds like really boring reading, you’re right. What I can tell you from enduring that experience is that most cover letters are terrible — and not only that, but squandered opportunities. When a cover letter is done well, it can significantly increase your chances of getting an interview, but the vast majority fail that test.

So let’s talk about how to do cover letters right.

First, understand the point of a cover letter.

The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just your résumé. Managers generally aren’t hiring based solely on your work history; your experience is crucial, yes, but they’re also looking for someone who will be easy to work with, shows good judgment, communicates well, possesses strong critical thinking skills and a drive to get things done, complements their current team, and all the other things you yourself probably want from your co-workers. It’s tough to learn much about those things from job history alone, and that’s where your cover letter comes in.

Because of that …

Whatever you do, don’t just summarize your résumé.

The No. 1 mistake people make with cover letters is that they simply use them to summarize their résumé. This makes no sense — hiring managers don’t need a summary of your résumé! It’s on the very next page! They’re about to see it as soon as they scroll down. And if you think about it, your entire application is only a few pages (in most cases, a one- or two-page résumé and a one-page cover letter) — why would you squander one of those pages by repeating the content of the others? And yet, probably 95 percent of the cover letters I see don’t add anything new beyond the résumé itself (and that’s a conservative estimate).

Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you’re applying for an assistant job that requires being highly organized and you neurotically track your household finances in a detailed, color-coded spreadsheet, most hiring managers would love to know that because it says something about the kind of attention to detail you’d bring to the job. That’s not something you could put on your résumé, but it can go in your cover letter.

Or maybe your last boss told you that you were the most accurate data processor she’d ever seen, or came to rely on you as her go-to person whenever a lightning-fast rewrite was needed. Maybe your co-workers called you “the client whisperer” because of your skill in calming upset clients. Maybe you’re regularly sought out by more senior staff to help problem-solve, or you find immense satisfaction in bringing order to chaos. Those sorts of details illustrate what you bring to the job in a different way than your résumé does, and they belong in your cover letter.

If you’re still stumped, pretend you’re writing an email to a friend about why you’d be great at the job. You probably wouldn’t do that by stiffly reciting your work history, right? You’d talk about what you’re good at and how you’d approach the work. That’s what you want here.

You don’t need a creative opening line.

If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don’t. Just be simple and straightforward:

• “I’m writing to apply for your X position.”

• “I’d love to be considered for your X position.”

• “I’m interested in your X position because …”

• “I’m excited to apply for your X position.”

That’s it! Straightforward is fine — better, even, if the alternative is sounding like an aggressive salesperson.

Show, don’t tell.

A lot of cover letters assert that the person who wrote it would excel at the job or announce that the applicant is a skillful engineer or a great communicator or all sorts of other subjective superlatives. That’s wasted space — the hiring manager has no reason to believe it, and so many candidates claim those things about themselves that most managers ignore that sort of self-assessment entirely. So instead of simply declaring that you’re great at X (whatever X is), your letter should demonstrate that. And the way you do that is by describing accomplishments and experiences that illustrate it.

Here’s a concrete example taken from one extraordinarily effective cover-letter makeover that I saw. The candidate had originally written, “I offer exceptional attention to detail, highly developed communication skills, and a talent for managing complex projects with a demonstrated ability to prioritize and multitask.” That’s pretty boring and not especially convincing, right? (This is also exactly how most people’s cover letters read.)

In her revised version, she wrote this instead:

“In addition to being flexible and responsive, I’m also a fanatic for details — particularly when it comes to presentation. One of my recent projects involved coordinating a 200-page grant proposal: I proofed and edited the narratives provided by the division head, formatted spreadsheets, and generally made sure that every line was letter-perfect and that the entire finished product conformed to the specific guidelines of the RFP. (The result? A five-year, $1.5 million grant award.) I believe in applying this same level of attention to detail to tasks as visible as prepping the materials for a top-level meeting and as mundane as making sure the copier never runs out of paper.”

That second version is so much more compelling and interesting — and makes me believe that she really is great with details.

If there’s anything unusual or confusing about your candidacy, address it in the letter.

Your cover letter is your chance to provide context for things that otherwise might seem confusing or less than ideal to a hiring manager. For example, if you’re overqualified for the position but are excited about it anyway, or if you’re a bit underqualified but have reason to think you could excel at the job, address that up front. Or if your background is in a different field but you’re actively working to move into this one, say so, talk about why, and explain how your experience will translate. Or if you’re applying for a job across the country from where you live because you’re hoping to relocate to be closer to your family, let them know that.

If you don’t provide that kind of context, it’s too easy for a hiring manager to decide you’re the wrong fit or applying to everything you see or don’t understand the job description and put you in the “no” pile. A cover letter gives you a chance to say, “No, wait — here’s why this could be a good match.”

Keep the tone warm and conversational.

While there are some industries that prize formal-sounding cover letters — like law — in most fields, yours will stand out if it’s warm and conversational. Aim for the tone you’d use if you were writing to a co-worker whom you liked a lot but didn’t know especially well. It’s okay to show some personality or even use humor; as long as you don’t go overboard, your letter will be stronger for it.

Don’t use a form letter.

You don’t need to write every cover letter completely from scratch, but if you’re not customizing it to each job, you’re doing it wrong. Form letters tend to read like form letters, and they waste the chance to speak to the specifics of what this employer is looking for and what it will take to thrive in this particular job.

If you’re applying for a lot of similar jobs, of course you’ll end up reusing language from one letter to the next. But you shouldn’t have a single cover letter that you wrote once and then use every time you apply; whatever you send should sound like you wrote it with the nuances of this one job in mind.

A good litmus test is this: Could you imagine other applicants for this job sending in the same letter? If so, that’s a sign that you haven’t made it individualized enough to you and are probably leaning too heavily on reciting your work history.

No, you don’t need to hunt down the hiring manager’s name.

If you read much job-search advice, at some point you’ll come across the idea that you need to do Woodward and Bernstein–level research to hunt down the hiring manager’s name in order to open your letter with “Dear Matilda Jones.” You don’t need to do this; no reasonable hiring manager will care. If the name is easily available, by all means, feel free to use it, but otherwise “Dear Hiring Manager” is absolutely fine. Take the hour you just freed up and do something more enjoyable with it.

Keep it under one page.

If your cover letters are longer than a page, you’re writing too much, and you risk annoying hiring managers who are likely sifting through hundreds of applications and don’t have time to read lengthy tomes. On the other hand, if you only write one paragraph, it’s unlikely that you’re making a compelling case for yourself as a candidate — not impossible, but unlikely. For most people, something close to a page is about right.

Don’t agonize over the small details.

What matters most about your cover letter is its content. You should of course ensure that it’s well-written and thoroughly proofread, but many job seekers agonize over elements of the letter that really don’t matter. I get tons of  questions from job seekers  about whether they should attach their cover letter or put it in the body of the email (answer: No one cares, but attaching it makes it easier to share and will preserve your formatting), or what to name the file (again, no one really cares as long as it’s reasonably professional, but when people are dealing with hundreds of files named “resume,” it’s courteous to name it with your full name).

Approaching your cover letter like this can make a huge difference in your job search. It can be the thing that moves your application from the “maybe” pile (or even the “no” pile) to the “yes” pile. Of course, writing cover letters like this will take more time than sending out the same templated letter summarizing your résumé — but 10 personalized, compelling cover letters are likely to get you more  interview invitations  than 50 generic ones will.

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How To Write a Cover Letter in 2024

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Do you want to demonstrate to your prospective employers that you are highly interested in their organization? Then, the best thing you can do is to learn how to write a cover letter! While every job applicant will send a resume, only those genuinely excited about the positions will take the time to write a cover letter.

Approximately 77% of recruiters prefer to hire candidates who submit cover letters, even when it is mentioned as optional. As an HR executive in a reputable company, I consider cover letters to be valuable sources for assessing candidates.

When I was searching for a job in my early days, I enrolled in  KnowledgeHut online training courses to boost my skills and knowledge. Then, I considered cover letters redundant additions to a grueling job hunt. I have already shown my skills and experience gained with my certification. Do I need to reiterate them? Surprisingly, the answer is a BIG YES!

A cover letter is a competitive advantage for your job application, as it explains career gaps, provides prospective ideas, and establishes a connection with the recruiters. Now, are you wondering how to write a cover letter? In this guide, I will walk you through the approach of writing a cover letter that will get you noticed more by employers, inching your way closer to your dream job.

What is a Cover Letter?

Are you seeking a job in this competitive era? The job application process can be long and exhilarating. You find yourself repeatedly attaching your resume and copying the information it contains into the form on the website. Nevertheless, you cannot skip the part of adding a cover letter to your applications.

Now, what exactly is a cover letter? A cover letter is a one-page document that serves as an introduction of yourself to the recruiter. The document comprises a summary of your achievements, qualifications, skills, and personal qualities. It gives you the chance to stay top of mind with the recruiters and prioritize your candidacy for the role.

If you learn how to write a cover letter to accompany your resume, you can demonstrate your passion for the position to the employer, which will help you stand out from the candidates whose applications didn’t have one.

While learning how to write a cover letter,   I wondered to myself – Does my recruiter even read these pieces? Yes!

A recent study from ResumeLab shows that 64% of job vacancies require sample cover letters for job applications. The bottom line is that a cover letter is a valuable tool for your job search collateral. Learn to nail your cover letter, and you could get hired for your dream role.

Why is a Cover Letter Important?

Are cover letters necessary? I hear this question a lot during workshops and on social media platforms. There is much debate on whether cover letters are still relevant. Before you learn how to write a cover letter , let me tell you the fact—cover letters are as important as your resume/CV. Why? Fishbowl by Glassdoor finds that 42% of participants might consider a cover letter a necessary toolkit in a job application.

Here, I have revealed the importance of a cover letter and some benefits .

Impress Employers

Learning how to write a cover letter is the primary benefit. It will allow you to make a fine first impression on employees. A well-crafted cover letter will demonstrate your role-specific strengths and spark recruiters' interest in reading your resume.

Provides Context to your CV

Including a cover letter with your job application adds context to your CV and will help you address employment gaps in your career. Whether you took time to further your education or due to personal responsibilities, a cover letter is the perfect space to mention the reason.

Showcases your Personality

Your CV/resume is a document filled with facts. However, when you learn how to write a cover letter, you can bring your personality and skills to life. You can use the space to demonstrate your positive personal qualities, such as leadership and self-motivation, and other traits that might add value to the organization.

Build a Strong Relationship with the Employer

A compelling cover letter is a powerful tool for building strong relationships with employers. It allows you to demonstrate how your career goals align with the organization's interests. The employer will appreciate your unique blend of experience, skills, and personality, giving a glimpse into how you will make the position and company a better place.

How To Write a Cover Letter

You sit down to write a cover letter, open a document, browse good cover letter examples, and finally search on Google – how to write a cover letter, which possibly brings you here. When I was an active job seeker, I used to break into a cold sweat whenever I sat down and pondered how to write a cover letter.   To ensure your letter is in its best format, I've got easy-to-follow steps plus examples below. Let’s dive in!

Step 1 – Extensive Research

Before you begin with how to write a cover letter,   thoroughly read the job description, the requirements of the job, and about the organization. According to a survey, 49%  of HR managers consider your cover letter to be one of the best ways to draw attention to your CV. I always advise aspirants to check out the job description and consider the following while writing their cover letter:

  • What are the priorities of the company?
  • What are the goals for the role?
  • What accomplishments from your previous roles match the objectives of the current role?
  • What are the company's key phrases?

This will help you customize your cover letter, provide a better narrative to impress the hiring manager and demonstrate that you are a better fit for the role.

Step 2 – Clear Header

In the cover letter, you need to include a clear header with information about yourself. The details should include

  • Your first and last name
  • Phone number
  • Email address
  • Name of the hiring manager, tile, city, and state of the company you're applying for.

In addition, you can also add professional social media accounts like LinkedIn or a link to your portfolio of professional websites.

Step 3 – Address with Proper Salutation or Greetings

While writing your cover letter, make sure to address a real person by their name. It will make the letter personal and show the recruiters that you took time and effort in your research. You can simply make a greeting with ‘Hello (name)’. In certain cases, if you cannot find their name, you can use the following:

  • Dear Hiring Manager,

Step 4 – Engaging Introduction

Now, it's time to write an intro paragraph that should captivate the attention of your reader. In this stanza, you will state who you are, what role you are applying for, and why you have chosen the company.

You can lead this pace by mentioning an impressive accomplishment or featuring a belief statement that matches the values and goals of the employer. In other terms, you can show your passion and enthusiasm to market yourself as a driven candidate.

Step 5 – Explain your Skill Set

Take advantage of this section and prove to the prospective employer how your background and experience make you the best fit for the role. This section is extremely important if you are switching careers. Highlight your relevant achievements in your cover letter and explain how you can help the company address challenges and accomplish goals.

Step 6 – Closing Paragraph

The conclusion section of your cover letter is a call to action for employers. Rather than making an uninspiring finish, paint a picture of what it will be like to work with you. In the middle section, you have already laid out persuasive arguments and undeniable, impressive facts. Use the conclusion section as your final opportunity to describe some of your characteristics.

Step 7 – Closing Salutation

Don’t forget to close the letter using a formal signature. You can use terms like "Sincerely," "Regards," or "Best" for a professional sign-off. You can use your first and last name as your signature.

Step 8 – Proofreading

Proofreading your letter is as important as learning how to write a cover letter.   Make sure it's error-free before you send it to the prospective employer. If possible, ask peers to review it for you, which will help you catch any tangled issues.

Step 9 – ATS Optimization

Nowadays, most recruiters use ATS (Application Tracking System) to screen applications and shortlist suitable candidates. Through the ATS database, your hiring manager will search for specific skills or keywords. Hence, make sure to optimize your cover letter to match the search criteria and secure a position in the list of top candidates. To optimize your cover letter, you should:

  • Carefully read the job description.
  • Take note of relevant skills and keywords.
  • Incorporate the keywords into the cover letter.

Examples of Cover Letter

Whether you want a sample for a cover letter with no experience or for a skilled professional, you can find countless templates in the digital space. These will help you to learn how to highly hone your skills and express your passion for the job. To help you out, I have compiled some good examples of cover letters for your reference.

Sample 1: Sample Cover letter

Sample 2: Cover letter for Graduates

Sample 3: Cover letter with no experience

Sample 4: Cover letter explaining the gap in your CV

Sample 5: Cover letter for career transition

Sample 6: Cover letter for internships

Pro Tips for Writing a Cover Letter

I have read thousands of cover letters in my career. If you think that sounds like a boring one, you are right. What I can tell you is most aspirants are terrible in their cover letters, which squandered their opportunities. A cover letter should be written in the right way to increase your chances of getting an interview.

So, let me give you some pro tips on how to write a cover letter in the right way!

  • Keep it brief – Your cover letter should not be more than one page and include only four paragraphs. Excess or little information will frustrate the employer, leaving a bad impression on your application.
  • Focus on format— Always use standard business letter format when writing cover letters. They should look professional. Don’t underline, italicize, or bold anything that is not consistent information.
  • Be confident— Avoid using phrases like ‘I believe’ or ‘I feel’. Instead, use phrases like ‘I am confident’ or ‘I am positive’ to show your confidence to the employer.
  • Count on customization- Your cover letter should be specific to the job requirements for which you are applying. If you are answering a job position, try to include the relevant keywords in your cover letter. Instead of using the general ‘to whom it may concern’, try to address the letter to the hiring authority.

So, you've found a job vacancy that fits your skills the best. You feel like you will excel in the role, and the company seems like a great platform for which to work. While you plan to customize your resume, don’t forget to learn how to write a cover letter!

A cover letter is your first, maybe your only chance to impress the employer. However, don't let that fact intimidate you. I always consider a cover letter as an opportunity to shine. It gives a glimpse of your success, personality, experience, and enthusiasm, which all play a pivotal part in helping you land the dream job.

When you learn how to write a cover letter,   be honest, genuine, and professional.

While you have learned about how to write a cover letter, have you thought of upskilling yourself for a better career path? I recommend every aspirant to enroll in  Online Free Training Courses ! The certificate program is designed to prepare you for professional examinations or assessments related to our field.

Join the course today and stay ahead of the competition!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Yes, you need to learn how to write a resume cover letter. Experts say cover letters play a vital role in hiring decisions. Most employers consider cover letters an important part of any aspirant’s toolkit. A cover letter is a robust medium where you convey your skills, commitment, and enthusiasm to the recruiter. It will make you stand out from applicants with the same background and experience.

Learning how to create a cover letter is primary. The purpose is to convince the employer that you are a great candidate, encouraging them to read your resume and interview you. The cover letter complements your resume/CV by making it easy for employers to see how your interests and experience suit the position. It offers the prospective employer a glimpse of your passion and skills.

Once you learn how to write a good cover letter, you might ponder its perfect length. Generally, a cover letter should be between half a page and a full page long. Make sure to aim for 250-400 words, encompassing three to six paragraphs. For instance, if you are an entry-level candidate, aiming for 200 words for a cover letter can be ideal. It allows the candidates to provide a concise explanation of their experience, skills, and what they can offer to the organization.

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How To Write a Cover Letter With Examples

Cover Letter Do's and Dont's

Cover letters can help differentiate you from other job applicants and be the determining factor of landing your dream job. By taking the time to craft a custom cover letter, a single sheet of paper can help communicate all the human elements that a resume may fall short of capturing about yourself. 

But what do employers and recruiters have to say about how to write a cover letter? What are the best tips they have to offer for graduate students who are writing a cover letter?

We asked 11 employers for their best cover letter tips. Here is what they had to share.

Let it Set the Stage

In many ways, cover letters should provide background information and context to your resume, while simultaneously addressing how that resume addresses the specific requirements of the job opportunity. The cover letter is your opportunity to "set the stage" and to convince the hiring manager why your specific set of skills, experiences and interests will provide value to their team and its objectives.

Andrew Horrigan '11 BSBA (Management Information Systems), Product Manager at Cisco

Research the Hiring Manager

If possible, find out who the hiring manager is and look them up on LinkedIn. Do your research on the company you're applying for. What's their mission statement and how do they portray their company culture? Hopefully what you're looking for in a job is reflected by those things. Make sure the hiring manager knows that and understands who you are and what drives you. A resume is often about as robotic as things can be. Make sure your cover letter is the opposite—personalize it and let yourself shine through.

Joshua Schlag ’05 BS (Computer Science) ’11 MBA, Digital Marketing Manager at Pyramid Analytics

Utilize Career Development Resources

The University of Arizona and Eller College of Management go to great lengths to make sure students are prepared for their impending career journey. Because cover letters are so important to getting your foot in the door, there are several career development resources online and on campus to take advantage of. The university’s cover letter builder serves as a nice template to get started. And of course, it never hurts to make an appointment with an Eller Career Coach through eSMS to have a professional review your letter before submission. 

Brett Farmiloe, ’06 BSBA (Accounting), Founder, Featured

Discover Past Samples of the Position

Do your research on the company and personalize your cover letter to the role for which you are applying. Don't be afraid to Google, "How to write a good cover letter for X position." Seriously, it helps! There is so much information out there from various perspectives—applicants, hiring managers, etc. Most importantly be yourself and let your personality come through. And don't forget to spell check!

Mariam Nikola '17 MS MIS, Consultant at Point B

Highlight Your Soft Skills

When writing a professional cover letter, there are a couple things you can do to set yourself apart from the pack. First, make sure you tailor your letter to the specific position you are applying for. This should not be a general, "one size fits all" letter—be sure to discuss specific details surrounding the role or the company itself. Secondly, this is an opportunity for you to show a little bit of your personality. Obviously, you want to remain professional, but this is a great time to highlight some of your soft skills that might not be fully conveyed through your resume.  

Brian Ellis ’17 BSBA (Management), Staffing Manager at Randstad Office and Administrative Professionals

Fill in the “Why” Gaps

As a talent advisor, I review a lot of applicants and agree that a cover letter can be a great way to stand apart, if it is done correctly. A great cover letter for me covers the ‘why’ that I cannot understand from just a resume alone. It should clearly state why you are interested in the role, what your goals are for utilizing your graduate degree (if recently graduated) and explain any career pivots reflected on your resume. If you answer those questions in a direct, concise manner it will add value to your application.

Monica Larson , ’11 BSBA (Marketing) ‘20 MBA, Talent Advisor

Tell Your Story

A cover letter is your opportunity to tell your story—tying your experience and personal interests into why you want a position and why you are the best candidate for it. Paint the picture of your journey and what about the position excites you personally and professionally. Similar to your resume, keep it short and sweet. No need to repeat what’s already on your resume. Recruiters and hiring managers don’t have time to comb through a novel, so you need to engage them with as few words as possible while also grabbing their attention.

Kelly Castoro, ’06 BA (Spanish, Portuguese), Project Manager at Squarespace

Tailor Each Cover Letter to the Position You Are Applying

Be sure to research the role and customize your cover letter for each position, relating your experience to the particular role you are applying for. Personalization is key—research who you are sending the cover letter to and address the letter to them directly. End your letter with a call to action, stating you will follow up by phone or email if you haven’t heard from anyone. Follow ups are very important! 

Jessica Rosenzweig, ’15 BSBA (Business Management), Account Manager at PeopleWare Staffing

Communicate Bankability and Personality 

Your cover letter answers two crucial questions; are you bankable and are you someone the company will enjoy working with? Communicate bankability with your knowledge of the company, industry and why your skills, capabilities and interests are a great fit. Share your passion for their mission, culture, brand—whatever excites you about becoming a member of their team.  

When conveyed through a concise, well-formulated, well-worded cover letter, you demonstrate the ability to write an effective business case—communicating that you are a ready professional and worthy teammate who will hit the ground running.

Theresa L Garcia, ’83 BSBA (Human Resources), Senior Change Management and Organization Capability Consultant at Boeing

Keep it Concise but Compelling

A cover letter is your chance to speak directly to the hiring team and tell them why you are not only the best match for the position for which you are applying but also give them additional insight into yourself as an individual that is less visible from your experience.

A great cover letter should be attention grabbing and touch upon the qualities that make you stand out from others in the applicant pool, highlight both your recent and most distinguished accomplishments and drive home why you are the right person for the job. Professionalism is always important, but don’t be hesitant to put your voice into the letter to let your personality shine through. Research the company, understand where they currently are, where they are going and show why you are the right person to get them from point A to point B. Recruiters spend a lot of time reviewing applicants and making yourself stand apart from the crowd is key. Keep it concise but compelling!

Matt Reineberg, ’14 BSBA (Marketing), Senior Talent Acquisition Sourcer at Cox Enterprises

Highlight the “Why”

Why are you applying to this company? Why do you want this position? Your cover letter should aim to answer the why behind applying for the job. Conveying an interest and excitement for working specifically for this job at this company, rather than a desire to get any job anywhere that will give you money, can go a long way. Show the company that they should hire you and your passion over someone that might have the skills needed for the job, but doesn’t care about the work as much as you do. 

Ryan Nouis, Trupath 

Ready to Learn More?

What to Know About Donald Trump’s New $60 Bible

“all americans need a bible in their home, and i have many. it’s my favorite book.”.

who can write a cover letter for me

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Mother Jones illustration; Shealah Craighead/White House/ZUMA

One month after releasing a line of gilded high-tops for $399, Donald Trump revealed on Tuesday a new item: the Bible. “All Americans need a Bible in their home, and I have many,” the former president explained in a video promoting the country singer Lee Greenwood’s version of a King James translation, the “God Bless the USA Bible.”

“It’s my favorite book,” Trump added.

Throughout the rest of the clip, as if daring us into a collective disgust, Trump swerved through random opportunities to rail against bureaucrats and a country under threat—all while hawking a holy text.

But his latest sales pitch also prompted some legitimate questions. Such as: What the hell is going on? And: Excuse me? Here, we try to answer some of the queries.

So, that first question—what the hell—but more formally: What exactly is Trump promoting and how much will it cost me to shell out for this? 

Trump is encouraging his supporters to buy a Bible endorsed by himself and Lee Greenwood. It costs $59.99, without taxes or shipping included. That seems to sit on the more expensive end of Bibles on sale at Barnes & Noble . But those books presumably don’t include copies of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the handwritten lyrics to the chorus of Greenwood’s “God Bless the USA.”

The “God Bless the USA Bible” does include these items .

Trump is in a serious cash crunch . So is he going to make money with this Bible?

According to the book’s official site , the God Bless the USA Bible has nothing to do with Trump’s campaign. It is “not owned, managed, or controlled by Donald J. Trump, The Trump Organization, CIC Ventures LLC, or any of their respective principals or affiliates.” Instead, Trump’s “name, likeness, and image” are being used “under paid license from CIC Ventures LLC.”

Wait, what is CIC Ventures LLC, though?

Okay, so CIC Ventures LLC is, according to the  Washington Post , basically a pipeline to Trump:

In [Trump’s] financial disclosure released last year, he’s identified as the [CIC Ventures LLC’s] “manager, president, secretary and treasurer” and the Donald J. Trump Revocable Trust is identified as a 100 percent owner of the business. The same entity also receives royalties from his book “A MAGA Journey” and speaking engagements.

In case it’s not already obvious: if you look at the company’s documents, you’ll find the principal address for CIC Ventures LLC is 3505 Summit Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida. That is a Trump golf course . Moreover, in a 2022 disclosure, Nick Luna is listed as a manager. Luna was Trump’s personal assistant and body man.

So, I’m sorry, but let me ask again: Is Trump making money off this?

The New York Times reports that “according to a person familiar” (classic) Trump will receive royalties from sales.

You could have just said that.

I wanted to tell you about the other stuff I found. Any other questions?

Yes. Who is Lee Greenwood?

The country singer who wrote “God Bless the USA.” Greenwood is a fierce MAGA guy who otherwise made news after pulling out of an NRA concert in response to the Uvalde, Texas, mass shooting.

Does Greenwood have a Christmas album with an oddly sexual cover?

Yes. Look at this .

Perfect sweater. Anyway, I feel like I’m experiencing deja vu. Hasn’t Trump made headlines before with a Bible?

You’re probably recalling that despicable photo-op when Trump held up a Bible in front of St. John’s Church, which had been a location of racial justice protests in the days prior. There was a complicated saga, afterward, about whether or not Trump deployed the police to clear protesters to get to the church. An Inspector General’s report ultimately concluded that he did not.  

Man, it’s pretty rough remembering all the awful shit we went through with him as president.

Yep. If you ever want to wallow in political depression, check out this quick compilation .

But wait. Wasn’t there another time Trump and the Bible made waves for something far more stupid?

Christian nationalists adore Trump, so there have probably been many times that Trump has referenced the Bible. But you might also be thinking of this incredible clip of Trump attempting to name his favorite verse .

Has a presidential candidate ever partnered on a holy text sale with a country musician?

Not to my knowledge. But this is from a dude who just last week seemed to compare his current legal jeopardy with the persecution of Jesus Christ. Happy Easter!

who can write a cover letter for me

No One Can Parody Donald Trump Better Than Himself

Jackie Flynn Mogensen

In a pairing of photos, there is traffic on the right side of the diptych. On the left, protestors march along the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. One person, who wears a t-shirt with the words "Stop killing your citizens," waves an American flag above his head.

Traffic Blockade Protests Were a Nuisance. Lawmakers Want to Make Them a Felony.

Nia t. evans

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Donald Trump Stoops to Lowest Low Yet With Violent Post of Biden

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In “Quiet on Set,” Justice Isn’t So Simple

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IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Cover Letter That Lands the Job

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  2. Official Letter Format Examples

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  3. Cover letter examples for different job roles in 2020

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  4. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2021

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  5. How to Write a Cover Letter 2020 with Samples

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  6. How To Make A Cover Letter For My Resume

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VIDEO

  1. How To Write A Disruptive Cover Letter 🤔😀👍💪😘

  2. HOW TO WRITE COVER LETTER for CVs RESUMES

  3. How to write Cover Letter for Foreign Job Application

  4. ChatGPT Prompts To Write Cover Letter✅| Cover Letter Hacks

  5. How to write a cover letter: Template & Tips

  6. Cover Letters are dead 🤯 Do THIS instead

COMMENTS

  1. Free Cover Letter Generator: Build a Cover Letter Online

    Here's what you get with our free cover letter generator: 1. Cover letter templates perfect for all kinds of jobs. You'll get a chance to pick the layout from a wide selection of cover letter templates free to customize whichever way you want. Go for what stands out instead of saying yes to the mediocre. 2.

  2. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Respectfully, Kind regards, Best regards, Yours truly, Then, make two spaces below the salutation, and type your full name. For some professional (but optional) flair, sign your cover letter either with a scan of your signature or by using software like DocuSign. 8. Check your cover letter's content and formatting.

  3. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024 + Examples

    Header - Input contact information. Greeting the hiring manager. Opening paragraph - Grab the reader's attention with 2-3 of your top achievements. Second paragraph - Explain why you're the perfect candidate for the job. Third paragraph - Explain why you're a good match for the company.

  4. Cover Letter Builder

    Try our professional cover letter builder and make cover letters that perfectly showcase your qualifications and interest in the role to land more interviews. Build My Cover Letter. The smartest Cover Letter Builder online, featuring software that knows exactly which template you should use. Fill in the blanks, done in 10 minutes.

  5. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    Cover letter format. Your cover letter should be one page long and use a simple, professional font, such as Arial or Helvetica, 10 to 12 points in size. Your letter should be left-aligned with single spacing and one-inch margins. Video: When and Why to Write a Cover Letter - Plus, Top Tips for Formatting.

  6. How to Write a Great Cover Letter in 2024 (+ Examples)

    1. Personalization. Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role. 2.

  7. Cover Letter Generator: Build Your Cover Letter Online in Minutes

    A cover letter builder is a tool that helps write and design your document, making it easier for you to get noticed by employers! It helps you by streamlining the cover letter writing process into a series of easy-to-follow prompts, providing stylish design options and suggesting pre-written content you can use!

  8. Online Cover Letter Generator: Easily Create & Download

    A cover letter generator is an online tool that helps job seekers create a cover letter with professionally made templates and step-by-step guidance. Here are a few benefits of using a cover letter generator: Saves time: All you have to do is answer a few prompts to generate a custom cover letter in a matter of minutes.

  9. How to Write a Cover Letter For Any Job + Expert Tips

    Place your name, city, state, ZIP code, phone number and email address in your cover letter heading. Your email address should be professional like "[email protected]," and not personal like "[email protected]." Include links to your LinkedIn profile or professional online portfolio if you have one.

  10. How to Write a Cover Letter for Any Job [2024 Guide]

    Here's how to write a successful cover letter: 1. Stick to the Proper Cover Letter Format. Your cover letter should follow the best practices for writing business letters. Keep your cover letter short and to the point—in fact, your entire cover letter shouldn't be longer than 350 words.

  11. How to Write a Standout Cover Letter in 2022

    Step 3: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager—preferably by name. The most traditional way to address a cover letter is to use the person's first and last name, including "Mr." or "Ms." (for example, "Dear Ms. Jane Smith" or just "Dear Ms. Smith").

  12. How To Write the Perfect Cover Letter (With Template and Example)

    Here is a cover letter example using the provided template as a foundation: Ryan Jones 555-555-5555 [email protected] August 3, 2020 Alex Martin, Principal Kent High School 123 Main Street Kent, ID 67890 Dear Mr. Martin, My five years of teaching experience in public education plus my excellent communication skills make me an ideal fit for the 11th Grade Chemistry Teacher position at Kent ...

  13. Free Cover Letter Maker

    Maximize the impact that a cover letter can bring to your job application. Emerge atop the crowd of aspiring applicants by writing an impressive introduction of yourself and highlighting your abilities and skills. Start inspired with free and ready-made templates from Canva Docs, then enhance your cover letter with striking visuals from our ...

  14. 60+ Cover Letter Examples in 2024 [For All Professions]

    Consultant Cover Letter Example #10. Digital Marketing Cover Letter Example #11. Graphic Designer Cover Letter Example #12. Administrative Assistant Cover Letter Example #13. Front Desk Cover Letter Example #14. Human Resources Cover Letter Example #15. Sales Agent Cover Letter Example #16.

  15. 200+ Professional Cover Letter Examples for Job Seekers

    Our list of 200+ cover letter examples is perfect for all job seekers, whether you need to write one for a specific life situation (like a career change) or you're looking for an industry-specific sample. Build My Cover Letter. Our free-to-use cover letter builder can make you a cover letter in as little as 5 minutes.

  16. The Best Cover Letter Examples for Any Job Seeker

    Here's an example of a traditional cover letter you could write for this role—keeping things strictly professional but without sounding too boring or jargon-y: Dear Ms. Jessica Sanchez, In my five-year career as a paralegal, I have honed my legal research and writing skills, and the attorneys I've worked with have complimented me on my ...

  17. Cover Letter Format (w/ Examples & Free Templates)

    Your cover letter format is a big part of the impression your job application can make. As such, it's important to get the formatting right. Here are the main points this article covers to achieve that: Make sure to structure your cover letter the right way. Address your cover letter the right way and write an attention-grabbing opening ...

  18. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    So let's talk about how to do cover letters right., First, understand the point of a cover letter., The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just ...

  19. Indeed Career Guide

    Learn how to write a cover letter for your resume, and use our examples and tips to help you get a hiring manager's attention with your own letter. Featured articles. Essential Pharmacy Manager Skills: A Guide for Job Seekers. Mental Health Therapist Skills: A Guide for Job Seekers.

  20. 5 Short Cover Letter Examples (And How to Write Your Own)

    4. Use short words rather than long phrases. Without realizing it, we sometimes write unnecessarily long phrases on professional documents when a single word is enough. After you've written your cover letter, go back and reread it. Replace longer phrases with single words (or at least fewer words).

  21. How To Write a Cover Letter in 2024

    How To Write a Cover Letter. You sit down to write a cover letter, open a document, browse good cover letter examples, and finally search on Google - how to write a cover letter, which possibly brings you here. When I was an active job seeker, I used to break into a cold sweat whenever I sat down and pondered how to write a cover letter.

  22. How To Write a Cover Letter With Examples

    Cover letters can help differentiate you from other job applicants and be the determining factor of landing your dream job. By taking the time to craft a custom cover letter, a single sheet of paper can help communicate all the human elements that a resume may fall short of capturing about yourself.

  23. Free Cover Letter Template for Your Resume (Copy & Paste)

    Pantheon. The "Pantheon" cover letter template's bold header projects confidence, making it ideal for executives. 2024. Designed for the modern job seeker, our "2024" cover letter template is perfect for people in any industry. Classic. "The Classic" cover letter template is clean, traditional, and the perfect format to start off your application.

  24. fss.law.harvard.edu

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  25. What to Know About Donald Trump's New $60 Bible

    One month after releasing a line of gilded high-tops for $399, Donald Trump revealed on Tuesday a new item: the Bible. "All Americans need a Bible in their home, and I have many," the former ...

  26. 100+ Positive Words and Adjectives to Describe Yourself

    Short on time or simply don't like writing? Try our cover letter generator and make a cover letter fast. CV Maker Tool. CVs are often longer than resumes. With our CV maker, you can create a CV in the same amount of time. Monday to Friday, 8AM - 12AM (Midnight) and Saturdays and Sundays, 10AM - 6PM EDT (866) 215-9048.