How to Make a Resume in 2024 | Beginner's Guide

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For most job-seekers, a good resume is what stands between a dream job and Choice D. Get your resume right, and you’ll be getting replies from every other company you apply to.

If your resume game is weak, though, you’ll end up sitting around for weeks, maybe even months, before you even get a single response.

So you’re probably wondering how you can write a resume that gets you an interview straight up.

Well, you’ve come to the right place!

In this guide, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about how to make a resume, including:

  • The 8 Essential Steps to Writing a Resume
  • 11+ Exclusive Resume Tips to Up Your Resume Game
  • 27+ Real-Life Resume Examples for Different Professions

….and more!

So, let’s dive right in.

How to Make a Resume (The Right Way!)

Before we go into detail about how you should make a resume, here’s a summary of the most important steps and tips to keep in mind:

how to write a resume

  • Choose a resume format carefully. In 99% of cases, we recommend the reverse-chronological format .
  • Add the right contact details. Leave your headshot out and make sure to include your job title , a professional email address, and any relevant links. (E.g.: your LinkedIn profile , online portfolio, personal website, etc.).
  • Write an impactful resume summary. Unless you’re an entry-level professional, always go for a resume summary. If you do it right, it’s your chance to get the hiring manager to go through the rest of your resume in detail.
  • Pay attention to your work experience section. Take your work experience section from OK-ish to exceptional by tailoring it to the job ad, making your achievements quantifiable, and using action verbs and power words.
  • Add the right skills for the job. Keep this section relevant by only including the hard and soft skills that are required for the position.
  • Keep your education short and to the point. Your most recent and highest degree is more than enough for a strong education section. You only need to add more details here if you’re a recent graduate with barely any work experience.
  • Leverage optional resume sections. Optional sections like languages, hobbies, certifications, independent projects, and others can set you apart from other candidates with similar skills and experience.
  • Include a cover letter. That’s right, cover letters matter in 2024, and the best way to supplement your resume is by adding an equally well-crafted cover letter to your job application. To make the most of it, check out our detailed guide on how to write a cover letter .

To get the most out of our tips, you can head over to the resume builder and start building your resume on the go as you read this guide.

New to resume-making? Give our ‘7 Resume Tips’ video a watch before diving into the article!

#1. Pick the Right Resume Format

Before you start filling in the contents of your resume, you have to make sure it’s going to look good. 

After all, the first thing hiring managers notice is what your resume looks like, and then they start reading it. So, this is your best chance to make a great first impression.

Start by choosing the right resume format.

There are three types of resume formats out there:

  • Reverse-chronological. This is by far the most popular resume format worldwide and, as such, it’s the best format for most job-seekers.
  • Functional. This resume format focuses more on skills than work experience. It’s a good choice if you’re just getting started with your career and have little to no experience in the field.
  • Combination. The combination resume format is a great choice for experienced job-seekers with a very diverse skill set. It’s useful if you’re applying for a role that requires expertise in several different fields and you want to show all that in your resume.

So, which one should you go for?

In 99% of cases, you want to stick to the reverse-chronological resume format . It’s the most popular format and what hiring managers expect to see. So, in the rest of this guide, we’re going to focus on teaching you how to make a reverse-chronological resume.

reverse chronological resume

Fix Your Resume’s Layout

With formatting out of the way, let’s talk about your resume’s layout , which determines the overall look of your resume. 

Does it look organized or cluttered? Is it too short or too long? Is it boring and easy to ignore, or is it reader-friendly and attention-grabbing?

Here are some of the best practices you should apply:

  • Stick to one page. You should only go for a two-page resume if you have decades of experience and you’re sure the extra space will add significant value. Hiring managers in big companies get hundreds of applications per job opening. They’re not going to spend their valuable time reading your life story!
  • Add clear section headings. Pick a heading and use it for all the section headers so the hiring manager can easily navigate through your resume.
  • Adjust the margins. Without the right amount of white space, your resume will end up looking overcrowded with information. Set your margins to one inch on all sides so your text fits just right on the page.
  • Choose a professional font. We’d recommend sticking to a font that’s professional but not overused. For example, Ubuntu, Roboto, or Overpass. Avoid Times New Roman, and never use Comic Sans.
  • Set the correct font size. As a rule of thumb, go for 11-12 pt for normal text and 14-16 pt for section titles.
  • Use a PDF file. Always save your resume as a PDF file, unless the employer specifically requests otherwise. Word files are popular, but there’s a good chance they’ll mess up your resume’s formatting.

Another thing you need to consider in terms of your resume’s layout is whether you’re going for a traditional-looking resume template or something a bit more modern :

traditional vs modern resume

If you’re pursuing a career in a more traditional industry, like law , banking , or finance , you might want to stick to the first.

But if you’re applying to a tech company where imagination and innovation are valued, you can pick a more creative resume template .

Want to Save Time? Use a (Free) Resume Template

Anyone who’s ever tried creating a resume from scratch knows how boring the formatting can be.

Before you can even start filling in the contents, you need to tweak the margins, adjust font sizes, and make sure everything fits into one page while still looking good.

What if you could skip past all that and still create a compelling resume?

Try one of our free resume templates . They’re pre-formatted, so all you have to do is fill in the contents.

They’re also created in collaboration with recruiters from around the globe, ensuring that the templates are visually appealing and ATS-friendly!

See for yourself how one of our templates compares to a resume created in a standard text editor:

novoresume vs text editor

#2. Add Your Contact Information

Now that we’ve got all the formatting out of the way, let’s get into what your resume is all about— the information you put on it .

The first thing you want to do when filling out the contents of your resume is to add your contact information .

This section is pretty straightforward but crucial. Your contact details belong at the top of your resume in a designated resume header , so the hiring manager can easily find them.

Even if everything else about your resume is perfect, that all flops if you misspell your email address or have a typo in your phone number. If the hiring manager can’t contact you, it’s a missed opportunity.

So, double-check, and even triple-check your contact information section and make sure everything is factually correct and up-to-date.

Must-Have Information

  • Full name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top of your resume.
  • Email address. Stick to an address that’s professional and easy to spell, like a combination of your first and last name. (E.g.: [email protected])
  • Phone number. Add a reliable number where the hiring manager can easily reach you.
  • Location. Add your city and state/country. If you plan to relocate for the job or want a remote position, specify it on your resume.

Optional Information

  • Job title. Add your professional title underneath. Write it down word for word, whether it’s “Digital Marketing Specialist” or “Junior Data Scientist.” Just don’t make up job titles like “Marketing Wizzard” or “Data Manipulator.” They’re not quirky; they’re just unprofessional. 
  • LinkedIn profile . We recommend that you include a link to your updated LinkedIn profile since over 77% of hiring managers use the platform when evaluating a candidate. 
  • Relevant links. Include links to personal websites or any social media profiles that are relevant to your field. For example, a developer could include a Github profile, while a graphic designer could link their Behance or Driblle account, and so on.
  • Date of birth. Unless this is specifically required in the job ad, the hiring manager doesn’t need to know how old you are. It’s not important for their decision-making, and at worst, it might lead to age-based discrimination.
  • Unprofessional email address. Your quirky, old high school email address doesn’t belong on your resume. Instead of [email protected] , go for a [email protected] type of address.
  • Headshot. (USA, UK or Ireland) Depending on the country where you’re applying, it might even be illegal to include a picture of yourself on your resume . While it’s the norm to include a picture in most of Europe and Asia, always check the regulations for each specific country or industry you’re applying to.

All clear? Good! Now, let’s look at what a great example of a resume's contact information section looks like:

professional resume contact section

#3. Write a Resume Headline (Summary or Objective)

It's no secret that recruiters spend an average of less than seven seconds on a resume .

When you receive hundreds, if not thousands, of applications daily, it's physically impossible to spend too much time on each.

So, what the hiring managers do to go through resumes more effectively is to skim through each resume and read it in depth only if it piques their interest.

This is where the resume headline comes in.

Placed right next to (or underneath) your contact information, this brief paragraph is the first thing the hiring manager is going to read on your resume.

Now, depending on how far along in your career you are, your resume headline can be either a resume summary or a resume objective.

resume summary professional

So, how do you choose between a resume summary and a resume objective? Here’s all you need to know:

Resume Summary

A resume summary, as the name suggests, is a two to three-sentence summary of your career so far. If done right, it shows that you’re a qualified candidate at a glance and gets the hiring manager to give you a chance.

Here’s what your resume summary should include:

  • Your job title and years of experience.
  • A couple of your greatest professional achievements or core responsibilities.
  • Your most relevant skills for the job.

Here’s an example of a well-written resume summary: 

Experienced Java Developer with 5 years of experience in building scalable and efficient applications. Contributed to a major project that enhanced application performance by 25%. Strong background in Spring Framework and microservices. Aiming to apply robust coding skills to develop innovative software solutions at XYZ Tech Solutions.

Unless you’re a recent graduate or amid a career change, we recommend you stick to a resume summary. Otherwise, a resume objective might be a better option for you.

Resume Objective

A resume objective is supposed to express your professional goals and aspirations, academic background, and any relevant skills you may have for the job.

It communicates your motivation for getting into a new field, so it’s the go-to headline for recent graduates and those going through a career change. As with a resume summary, a resume objective should be brief—around two to four sentences long.

So, here’s what it would look like if you’re a student:

Hard-working recent graduate with a B.A. in Graphic Design from New York State University seeking new opportunities. 3+ years of practical experience working with Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, creating illustrations and UX/UI design projects. Looking to grow as a designer and perfect my art at XYZ Design Studio.

Or, on the other hand, if you’re going through a career change, it might look more like this:

IT project manager with 5+ years of experience in software development. Managed a team of developers to create products for several industries, such as FinTech and HR tech. Looking to leverage my experience in managing outsourced products as a Product Owner at Company XYZ.

#4. Prioritize Your Work Experience

The most important part of your resume is your work experience.

This is where you get to sell yourself and show off your previous accomplishments and responsibilities.

If you manage to master this section, you’ll know most of what’s there to know about how to make a resume.

There are plenty of good practices for writing your work experience . But before we dive into all the nits and grits, let's start with the basics.

The standard format for each work experience entry is as follows:

  • Job title/position. Your job title goes on top of each work experience entry. When the hiring manager looks at your resume, you want them to know, at a glance, that you have relevant work experience for the job.
  • Company name/location/description. Mention the name of the employer and the general location, such as the city and state/country where you worked. In some cases, you may also want to briefly describe the company, like when the organization isn’t particularly well-known.
  • Dates employed. Add the approximate timeframe of your employment at each company. You don’t need to give exact dates since the standard format for this is mm/yyyy.
  • Achievements and responsibilities. This is the core of each work experience entry. Depending on your field, you want to list either your achievements or responsibilities. List them in bullet points instead of paragraphs, so they’ll be easier to read.

Here’s a real-life example:

how to list work experience on a resume

Your work experience entries should always be listed in reverse chronological order , starting with your most recent job and working your way back into the past.

Now that you know how to list your experience, we’re going to show you how to write about it in a way that makes you stand out from the competition, starting with: 

Are you a student with no work experience? We’ve got you covered. Check out our guide to writing a resume with no experience here.

Focus on Achievements Whenever Possible

One of the most common resume mistakes is only listing responsibilities in your work experience section.

Here’s the thing—in most cases, the hiring manager knows exactly what your job responsibilities are.

For example, if you’re a sales manager, your responsibilities would be:

  • Reach out to potential clients over the phone or email.
  • Maintain relationships with existing company clients and upsell relevant products.
  • Tracking and reporting on leads in CRM.

Coincidentally, this is also the same list of responsibilities for every sales manager out there. So, 90% of all other resumes probably mention the same thing.

To stand out from the competition, you want to focus on writing achievements in your resume instead. These can be how you helped your previous company grow, reach quarterly quotas, and so on.

Let’s compare how responsibilities hold up next to achievements for the same job:

  • Exceeded sales team KPIs by 30%+ for 3 months straight.
  • Generated over $24,000 in sales in 1 month.
  • Generated leads through cold-calling
  • Managed existing company clients

Keep in mind, though, that in some fields, there just aren’t that many achievements you can mention. Let’s say you’re a warehouse worker .

Your day-to-day responsibilities probably include:

  • Loading, unloading, and setting up equipment daily.
  • Packaging finished products and getting them ready for shipping.
  • Assisting in opening and closing the warehouse.

In fields like this, it’s pretty hard to distinguish yourself through achievements, so it’s okay to stick to responsibilities instead. You can still make them shine by following the rest of our advice about listing your work experience.

Keep in mind, though, that in some fields, there aren’t that many achievements you can mention. Let’s say you work in a warehouse. Your day-to-day responsibilities probably involve:

  • Loading, unloading and setting up equipment on a daily basis.
  • Package finished product and get it ready for shipping.
  • Assist in opening and closing the warehouse.

In such fields, it’s pretty hard to distinguish yourself, so it’s totally OK to stick to responsibilities instead.

Tailor Your Resume to the Job

Tailoring is what sets an amazing resume apart from an okay one.

Hiring managers don’t need to know about every single job you’ve ever worked at or every single skill that you have.

They only want to know about your jobs, experiences, or skills that are relevant to the role you’re applying for.

For example, if you’re applying for a job doing Google Ads, you don’t need to talk about your SEO internship from eight years ago.

By focusing your resume on whatever is important for the specific role, you’re a lot more likely to stand out and catch the hiring manager’s attention.

Let’s take a look at an example of a job ad:

how to tailor your resume to the job ad

As you can see, we’ve highlighted the most important requirements.

To tailor your resume accordingly, you just need to mention how you meet each of these requirements in your resume.

You can highlight your relevant achievements and qualifications in different parts of your resume, such as:

  • In your resume summary, where you should recap your years of experience.
  • Throughout your work experience section, where you should list achievements and responsibilities that reflect your social media marketing experience.
  • In your education section, where you can let the hiring manager know you have the degree that they’re looking for.

Include the Right Amount of Work Experience

If you’ve got over a decade’s worth of work experience, you’re probably wondering whether all of it belongs on your resume. In most cases, you’d end up writing a novel if you listed everything you’ve ever done, and that’s not how long a resume should be .

If you’re new to the job market, on the other hand, you probably don’t have any experience, and you’re wondering what you could even add to this section.

So, here’s how much information your resume should include, depending on your level of experience:

  • No experience. If you’re looking for your first job , you won’t have any work experience to fill this section with. So, you can either keep it empty and focus on all the other sections or fill it up with any experience gained in student organizations, extracurricular activities, volunteering, and other projects.
  • Entry-level. List all your work experience so far. While some of it won’t be relevant, it can still show the hiring manager that you do have some actual work experience.
  • Mid-level. Only mention relevant work experience to the position you’re applying for. There’s no need to waste space on jobs that aren’t related to what you’re after.
  • Senior-level. List up to 15 years of relevant work experience, tops. If your most recent experience is as a marketing executive , the hiring manager doesn’t care how you started your career as a junior marketing specialist 23 years ago.

Consider Applicant Tracking System (ATS) Software

Did you know that over 70% of resumes don’t even make it to the hiring manager ?

Most companies these days use ATS to evaluate hundreds of resumes instantaneously and automatically filter out the ones that don’t meet their criteria.

For example, if a resume doesn’t mention a specific skill or isn’t formatted correctly, the ATS will automatically reject it.

ats system statistic

Fortunately, there are some easy ways to make an ATS-friendly resume .

Here are a couple of tips to help you get past those pesky robots:

  • Stick to one page. Sometimes employers set a limit on how long a resume should be. This means that if your resume is longer than one page, it might get automatically disqualified.
  • Incorporate keywords. Tailoring your resume to the job helps a ton with beating the ATS. Just carefully read the job description to find hints for what the ATS will be looking for. Then, whenever you find keywords related to your responsibilities and achievements, make sure to include them in your work experience section.
  • Use an active voice. Passive voice is too vague and unclear, so make sure to use active voice as much as possible when describing your previous jobs. (E.g.: “Managed a team of ten people,” instead of “ A team of ten people was managed by me.” )
  • Leverage powerful action words. Instead of starting each of your sentences with “was responsible for," make your work experience impactful by using words that can grab attention. Saying that you “spearheaded” or “facilitated” something sounds a lot more impressive than “helped.”

Want to make sure your resume formatting passes the ATS test? Choose one of our tried and tested ATS-friendly resume templates , and you’ll be good to go! 

#5. List Your Education

The next section on your resume is dedicated to your academic qualifications. Let’s start with the basics!

Here’s how you should format the education section on your resume :

  • Program Name. Your major and degree type should be listed. (E.g.: “B.A. in Business Administration” )
  • University Name. Add the name of the institution. (E.g.: “New York State University” )
  • Dates Attended. Use a mm/yyyy format for the dates you attended. (E.g.: “08/2008 - 06/2012” )
  • Location. If your university is less well-known, you can also add the location. (E.g.: “Stockholm, Sweden” )
  • GPA. Use the appropriate grading system for the country you’re applying to work in. (E.g.: In the USA, it would be “3.9 GPA” )
  • Honors. Add any honors and distinctions you’ve been given. (E.g.: Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, Summa Cum Laude )
  • Achievements. You can mention interesting papers you’ve written, projects you’ve done, or relevant coursework you’ve excelled in.
  • Minor. “Minor in Psychology”

Pretty simple, right? Now let’s see what an education section looks like in practice:

education on resume

This example includes all the necessary information, plus an eye-catching award and relevant classes this candidate has taken.

Resume Education Tips

Now that you know how to list your education on your resume, let’s take this section to the next level.

Just follow these expert tips:

  • If you’re making a resume as a student and don’t have any work experience yet, you can list your education section at the beginning of the page instead of work experience.
  • You can add your expected graduation date if you’re still pursuing your degree.
  • If you already have relevant work experience, just keep this section short and sweet. Recent graduates can expand on their education more and add optional information like projects, classes, academic achievements, etc.
  • Always list your degrees in reverse chronological order, starting with your highest degree on top. Your highest and most recent degree is usually enough, so if you have a Master’s degree that’s relevant to the job, there’s no need to mention your earlier degrees.
  • Don’t add your high school degree to your resume if you already have a university degree. It doesn’t have as much weight, and you can use the space for something else.
  • Only mention your GPA if you had an impressive academic career. Anything below a 3.5 GPA doesn’t need to be on your resume.

Are you in the process of applying for college? Check out our guide to writing a college application resume to wow that admissions officer!

#6. Emphasize Your Know-How in the Skills Section

After your work experience, your skills are the first thing the hiring manager is going to look for. In fact, together, work experience and skills make up 90% of the hiring decision .

So, this is the place where you want to mention all the know-how that makes you the perfect candidate for the job.

There are two types of skills you can include when writing your resume:

  • Hard Skills. These are measurable abilities. What you can list here can be anything from coding in Python to knowing how to cook Thai cuisine.
  • Soft Skills. Also known as personal skills, these are a mix of communication skills , personal traits, career attributes, and more. They can include leadership, critical thinking, and time management , just to name a few.

Your resume should always cover both hard skills and soft skills . Here’s an example in action:

How to List Skills in Your Resume

Now, let’s discuss how you should list your most important skills on your resume.

There are a few essential steps you need to follow:

Always List Hard and Soft Skills Separately

Your resume should be easy and neat to navigate. The hiring manager shouldn’t have to waste time looking for a specific skill because you didn’t separate it into the appropriate subsection.

So, just create separate categories for your hard and soft skills.

Depending on your field, you could customize the name of your “hard skills” subsection to something like “technical skills," “marketing skills," or something else related to your field.

Let’s look at an example of what skills look like on a project manager’s resume :

Methodologies & Tools

  • Agile Methodology
  • SCRUM Framework
  • Waterfall Project Management
  • Microsoft Project
  • Critical Path Method (CPM)
  • Earned Value Management (EVM)
  • Risk Management

Soft Skills

  • Team Management
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Negotiation

Tailor Your Skills to the Job

You might have some awesome skills, but the hiring manager only needs to know about the ones that are relevant to the job.

For example, if you’re applying for a job as an accountant, your gourmet chef skills shouldn’t be on your resume.

Look at the job ad and list at least two to three essential skills you have that are required for the role. Remember—there’s no need to list every skill you have here; just keep it relevant.

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree or higher in Graphic Design or a related field.
  • Tech-savvy, with some background in CMS systems such as WordPress.
  • Thrives in a stressful environment and juggles multiple tasks and deadlines.
  • Strong organizational and time management skills.
  • Excellent communication skills.
  • Self-reliant, with the ability to manage their own work.
  • A can-do attitude and an outside-the-box thinker.
  • Proficient in Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Keynote, and Pages.
  • Basic understanding of Office software such as Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook.

So, the must-have hard skills here are Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Keynote, and Pages. Other good computer skills to have are WordPress or similar CMS systems.

While you can also mention Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook, it’s pretty much assumed that you know how to use them since they’re required for most office jobs.

List Hard Skills with Experience Levels

For each hard skill you list on your resume, you should also mention your proficiency level. This tells employers what they can expect from you and how much training you might need.

  • Beginner. You have some experience with the skill, whether it’s from some entry-level practice or classroom education.
  • Intermediate. You’ve used the skill in a work environment with good understanding.
  • Advanced. You’re the go-to person for this skill in your office. You can coach other employees, and you understand the skill at a high level.
  • Expert. You’ve applied this skill to more than a handful of different projects and organizations. You’re the go-to person for advice about the skill, not just in your office but even amongst some of the best professionals in your field.

Just make sure to never lie about your actual skill level. Even if you get the job, once you need those skills you exaggerated, it will be pretty awkward for both you and your employer.

Include Transferable Skills

These are the types of skills that are useful for almost any job out there.

Transferable skills can be both soft skills (e.g.: teamwork, creativity, problem-solving skills, and others) and hard skills (MS Office Suite, HTML, writing, etc.)

Whatever job you’re applying to, chances are you have transferable skills from your experience that can come in handy one way or another. So, feel free to include them, even if they’re not specifically required for the position.

Not sure which skills to mention on your resume for your specific field? Check out our list of 101+ essential skills for inspiration!

#7. Leverage Optional Resume Sections

The sections we’ve covered so far are must-haves for any resume. They’re the bread-and-butter for any job application, and if you get them right, you’ll land any job you apply to.

But if you have some leftover space, there are a few optional sections you can choose from to give your resume a boost!

other important resume sections

Are you bi-lingual? Or even better  – multi-lingual? You should always mention that on your resume!

Even if the position doesn’t require you to know a specific language, it can still come in handy at some point. At the end of the day, it’s always better to know more languages than less.

To list languages in your resume , just write them down and assign them the appropriate level:

  • Intermediate

You can also use the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) or the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scales.

As a given, you should never lie about your language skills. You never know—your interviewer might turn out to be fluent in the language or even be a native speaker!

Hobbies and Interests

If you want to spice up your resume, hobbies and interests could be just what you need.

While this section isn’t a game-changer, it can help the hiring manager see who you are as an individual.

For example, if you listed “teamwork” as one of your skills, hobbies like team sports can back up your claim.

And who knows? Maybe you and your interviewer have some hobbies or interests in common!

Volunteering Experience

If you’re the type of person who devotes their free time to helping others while expecting nothing in return, chances are that you’re the type of employee who’s in it for more than just the money. 

Seeing volunteer experience on your resume tells hiring managers that you’re a loyal employee who’s after something meaningful.

Several studies show that listing your volunteer experience can boost your chances of getting hired, especially if you have little to no work experience.

Certifications

Hiring managers love candidates who invest in themselves, and that’s exactly what they see when you list certifications on your resume .

If you value continuous learning and strive to expand your skill set, that’s always a plus.

Certifications can also show employers how much expertise you have.

For example, if you’re a Microsoft Cloud Engineer and you specialize in Microsoft Technologies, you should definitely include all essential certifications on your resume, such as the Azure Solutions Architect Expert one.

Awards and Recognitions

There’s no harm in showing off a little on your resume. After all, you want to be a candidate that shines above the rest.

So, if you’ve received any awards or recognitions that make you stand out in your field, make sure to add them.

For example, if you’ve been recognized for your contributions to data science or received a hard-to-come-by scholarship , mention it in your resume. Just keep your entries here relevant to the field you’re applying to.

Publications

Whether you’re a freelance writer or a distinguished academic, publications are always impressive.

If you have any published works (online or in an academic journal), you can add them to your resume. Just make sure to include a link so the hiring manager knows where to check your work!

Are you looking for a career in academia? Check out our guide to writing the perfect academic CV to get started!

Working on side projects can show off your passion for your field. Whether they’re university class projects or part-time entrepreneurial endeavors, they’re relevant.

For example, if you worked on a mock software product as part of a university competition, it shows you went through every step of product creation, from ideation to creating a marketing strategy.

This project also shows off your organizational skills , and if you mention it in your resume, you stand a better chance of landing the job you had your sights set on.

But projects can also be personal, not academic. For example, you might manage an Etsy store where you sell hand-made arts and crafts to customers online. This is a great opportunity to highlight your creativity, management, and customer service skills .

Overall, hiring managers love employees who do cool work in their free time, so projects are always a great section to add to your resume.

Looking to kickstart your career? Check out our guide on how to get an internship for useful tips and real-life examples!

Extracurricular Activities

Every college freshman knows that extracurricular experience can make a difference in their application.

Especially if you don’t have a lot of experience outside of school, extracurricular activities are a great way to show potential employers your skills and give them insight into you as a person. Different clubs and after-school projects can help you gain real-life skills and considerably increase your chances of landing your first job after college.

For example, joining a student government organization can hone your leadership skills and teach you how to work as part of a team.

For example, if you’re part of a student government or public speaking club, these activities can help you hone your leadership and presentation skills.

11+ Expert Resume Tips

You’ve got the gist of how to make a resume. Now, it’s time to make it really stand out from the crowd!

Follow these exclusive resume tips to take your resume game to the next level:

  • Match the professional title underneath your name to the job title of the position you’re applying for. Hiring managers often hire for several roles at once, so giving them this cue about what role you’re after helps things go smoother.
  • Mention any promotions from your previous jobs. Use the work experience entries for them to focus on the achievements that helped you earn them.
  • Describe your achievements using Laszlo Bock’s formula : accomplished X as measured by Y by doing Z . This way, your work experience can go the extra mile and show the hiring manager what you can bring to the table.
  • Always list your achievements and responsibilities in concise bullet points. This makes your resume more reader-friendly, and it’s more likely that the hiring manager will see your impressive achievements at a glance.
  • Don’t use personal pronouns like “I” or “me,” and don’t refer to yourself by name. Stick to a slightly altered third person, like “managed data integrity at XYZ Inc.” instead of “he managed data integrity at XYZ Inc.”
  • Name your resume sections correctly, or it might get rejected by the ATS. Swapping out quirky names like “career history” or “expertise” for “work experience” and "skills" makes it easier for the hiring manager to find what they’re looking for, too.
  • Prioritize important keywords instead of adding all of them. Make sure the relevant skills, qualifications, and experiences you add all make sense in context, too. Your goal is to get past the ATS and impress the hiring manager.
  • Focus on transferable skills if you don’t have a lot of relevant work experience. Any extracurricular activities or personal projects can help you stand out here.
  • Add a strategic pop of color to headings, bullet points, or key elements you want to highlight. It can help your resume stand out, but don’t overdo it—you want the information to be more impressive than the color palette.
  • Don’t include the line “references available upon request.” Hiring managers already know they can request a list of references from you, so there’s no need to waste valuable space on it.
  • Make sure your resume is optimized for mobile viewing. Most hiring managers use their mobile phones as often as desktop computers, so save your resume to a PDF file and make sure your formatting stays intact across any device.
  • Rename the resume file you plan to send so it includes your name and the name of the position you’re applying for. It’s a small detail that can turn into a crucial mistake if you forget it.
  • Read your resume out loud when you’re done. This is a great way to catch awkward phrases or spelling mistakes you might have missed otherwise.
  • Use a tool like DocSend to track your resume. You’ll get a notification any time someone opens your resume, and you can see how long they spend reading it.

FREE Resume Checklist

Are you already done with your resume? Let’s see how it holds up!

Go through our checklist for perfecting your resume and see where you stand!

professional resume writing checklist

If you missed some points, just go through your resume one more time and perfect it.

And if you ☑’d everything—congrats! You’ve learned all there is to know about writing a resume, and you’re good to go with your job search.

Need to write a CV instead of a resume? Check out our step-by-step guide on how to write a CV with dozens of examples!

9 Resume Templates for Different Industries

Looking to create an effective resume without dealing with the formatting hassle? Just choose one of the templates below.

#1. Traditional Resume Template

Traditional Resume Template

Good for traditional industries like finance, banking, law, and manufacturing.

#2. Modern Resume Template

Modern Resume Template

Good for both contemporary and forward-looking industries, including entrepreneurship, medical technology, and engineering.

#3. Creative Resume Template

Creative Resume Template

Good for creative industries, including entertainment, design, and architecture. 

#4. Minimalistic Resume Template

Minimalistic Resume Template

Good for experienced professionals in basically any industry who want to let their achievements do the talking. 

#5. IT Resume Template

IT Resume Template

Good for any IT-related profession like software development, cyber security, and DevOps engineering.

#6. Tech Resume Template

Tech Resume Template

Good for the tech industry and everything it encompasses.

#7. College Resume Template

College Resume Template

Good for college students and recent graduates alike.

#8. General Resume Template

General Resume Template

Good for multiple industries, including HR, education, and customer service.

#9. Executive Resume Template

Executive Resume Template

Good for senior professionals across different industries, including hospitality, marketing, and logistics.

17+ Resumes for Different Jobs

Knowing how to write a resume is one thing, but making a resume that stands out is something entirely different. Without inspiration, even top career experts might stumble on a roadblock or two.

Check out the following effective resume examples for specific jobs to get a better sense of what a good resume looks like:

#1. Nurse Practitioner Resume Example

Nurse Practitioner Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a nurse resume here.

#2. Data Scientist Resume Example

Data Scientist Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a data scientist resume here.

#3. Business Analyst Resume Example

Business Analyst Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business analyst resume here.

#4. Digital Marketing Resume Example

Digital Marketing Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a digital marketing resume here.

#5. Software Engineer Resume Example

Software Engineer Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a software engineer resume here.

#6. Construction Project Manager Resume Example

Construction Project Manager Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a construction project manager resume here.

#7. Customer Service Resume Example

Customer Service Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a customer service resume here.

#8. High School Resume Example

High School Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a high school resume here.

#9. Student Resume Example

Student Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a student resume here.

#10. Server Resume Example

Server Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a server resume here.

#11. Actor Resume Example

Actor Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing an actor resume here.

#12. Web Developer Resume Example

Web Developer Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a web developer resume here.

#13. Engineering Resume Example

Engineering Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineering resume here.

#14. Computer Science Resume Example

Computer Science Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a computer science resume here.

#15. Architect Resume Example 

Architect Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a data analyst resume here.

#17. Remote Job Resume Example

Remote Job Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a remote job resume here.

#18. Sales Associate Resume Example

Sales Associate Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a sales associate resume here.

#19. Receptionist Resume Example

Receptionist Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a receptionist resume here.

Want to see more examples? Check out our compilation of 80+ resume examples for different fields .

  • Administrative Assistant Resume
  • Bartender Resume
  • DevOps Engineer Resume
  • Executive Assistant Resume
  • Flight Attendant Resume
  • Graphic Designer Resume
  • Paralegal Resume
  • Pharmacist Resume
  • Recruiter Resume
  • Supervisor Resume

Next Steps After Your Resume

Now that we’ve covered everything you need to know about how to make a resume, it’s time to talk about the rest of your job application.

After all, your resume is only the first step in your job search. To land the job you deserve, you also need to write a captivating cover letter and ace that upcoming interview. Here’s how:

#1. How to Write a Convincing Cover Letter

The companion piece to every resume is the cover letter.

Most job-seekers flinch when they hear that they have to write a cover letter. What do you even mention in a cover letter, anyway? If you were good at writing cover letters, you’d be applying for a job as a writer !

In reality, though, writing a cover letter is very simple once you know its purpose.

Think of your cover letter as a direct message to the hiring manager. It’s your chance to briefly explain why you’re such an awesome fit for the position. And with a few cover letter tips to point you in the right direction, you’ll write the perfect cover letter for your job application.

Just follow this structure:

cover letter structure for resume

  • Add the contact details. Include the same contact information as on your resume, plus additional contact details for the hiring manager, including their name, job title, the company’s name, and location.
  • Introduce yourself. Start your cover letter by mentioning who you are, what your work experience is, and why you’re interested in the position. Mention a standout achievement or two, relevant skills, and what you’d like to do for the company you’re applying for.
  • Explain why you’d excel at the job. Find the requirements in the job ad that you meet, and elaborate on how you fulfill the most important ones. Research the company so you know what you like about it, and mention it in your cover letter. Make sure to convey your enthusiasm for the job and confidence that you’ll be a great fit for their team.
  • Wrap it up politely. Conclude your cover letter by recapping your key selling points and thanking the hiring manager for their time. Then add a call to action, such as “Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at the provided phone number so that we can discuss my application in greater detail.” Then, add a closing line and follow it with your full name.

Sounds easy, right? Here’s a real-life example to drive the point home:

cover letter example for resume

Do you need more help perfecting your cover letter? Learn what the most common cover letter mistakes are and check out cover letter examples for all professions here.

#2. How to Ace Your Next Interview

Once you’ve perfected both your resume and cover letter, there’s only one thing left.

It’s time for the final step—the dreaded job interview.

Whether you’re an extrovert or an introvert, you probably hate the interviewing process. No matter how experienced you are, it can be nerve-wracking. Sitting there while someone’s prodding into your past experiences and judging you isn’t fun.

But did you know that most interviewers ask the same questions?

That’s right—all you have to do is learn how to answer some of the most common interview questions, and you’ll be an interview away from landing your dream job!

Just check out our complete guide to the 35+ Job Interview Questions and Answers and learn how to ace your next interview.

FAQs on How to Make a Resume

Do you still have some questions about making a resume? Check out the answers to the most frequently asked questions below!

#1. What does a good resume look like in 2024?

For your resume to look good in 2024, make sure it’s organized and clean and isn’t longer than one page.

Be sure to include information that adds value to your application—leave out the focus on your relevant work experience and skills that you can back up, and list as many achievements as possible. 

If you’re using a resume template, choose one based on your industry. Conservative industries like law, banking, and business require more traditional resume templates. But if you’re going for an industry like design, architecture, or marketing, you can go for a creative resume template . 

Remote work is also big in 2024, so if that’s what you’re after, tailor your resume to match the job you want.

#2. How do you make a resume in Word?

The best way to create a resume in Word is to use a pre-designed Microsoft Word template. To access them, you should: 

  • Open MS Word
  • Click “file” from the menu bar 
  • Select “new”
  • Type “resume templates” in the search bar 

That said, Word resume templates are generic, hard to personalize, and overall not very stylish.

Want a resume that looks good and is extremely easy to make? Check out resume templates to get started!

#3. How do I write a resume for my first job?

If you’re writing your first-ever resume for an entry-level position, the hiring manager won’t expect you to have any work experience.

However, you can make up for your lack of experience with your skills and academic achievements.

For example, you can take advantage of extracurricular activities, internships, volunteering experiences, and other non-professional experiences. You can use them to highlight the skills you’ve gained and what you’ve achieved so far.

So, your first job resume should have a resume objective, emphasize your education, and replace your work experience with any internships, volunteering, independent projects, or other experiences.

#4. How to make a resume on Google Docs?

You can make a resume on Google Docs by choosing one of their templates and filling it in on the go.

All you have to do is go to your Google Drive’s template gallery, choose your preferred template, fill in your information, and your Google Docs resume is ready to go! 

That said, Google Docs templates aren’t the most user-friendly choice. You don’t have much flexibility with the layout and formatting isn’t that easy. For example, you tweak a section to the slightest, and the whole resume becomes a mess.

If you want an easier option, check out our resume builder !

#5. What kind of resume do employers prefer?

Typically, employers prefer one-page-long resumes that follow the reverse chronological format. 

Hiring managers receive hundreds of resumes every day, so they don't have the time to read three-page resumes. Try one of our one-page resume templates so you don’t go over the recommended resume length.

Meanwhile, the reverse-chronological format is the most popular because it draws attention to your most recent jobs and professional achievements, which is the #1 most important thing hiring managers look at when evaluating a resume.

#6. How many jobs should you put on your resume? 

You should only include relevant job positions on your resume.

This means that your work experience section should be tailored to the job you are applying for. If you’ve worked five different jobs and they can all add value to your current application, then you should include all five. 

If, on the other hand, you’re applying for, say, a customer service position and some of your past jobs don’t have anything to do with customer service, you should skip them.

#7. Should I put my address on my resume? 

You can put your location (city, state, or country) on your resume, but you don’t need to put your entire physical address.

Putting a physical address on a resume was the norm back when companies would contact you via mail. In today’s world, everyone communicates via email, which is why adding a correct and professional email address to your contact information section is far more important than putting your physical address. 

So, just include your location or-–if you’re a remote worker—specify you prefer to work remotely by writing “working remotely from [location].”

#8. What information should I leave out of my resume?

As a general rule, you shouldn’t include your birthday or your headshot on your resume. This norm varies from country to country but it applies to the USA, Canada, and UK.

If you have plenty of achievements to list under your work experience, then you can leave your basic work responsibilities out of your resume. 

In your education section, you should only include your highest and most recent degree. So, if you hold a Ph.D., you can list that and your Master’s degree and leave your Bachelor’s degree and high school diploma out.

Finally, leave out any skills that aren’t relevant to the job you’re applying for.

#9. Is a resume a CV?

Depending on where you are, a CV (Curriculum Vitae) and a resume might be completely different things.

In most of the world, though, including Europe and Asia, they are used interchangeably for the same document. Both CVs and resumes are one to two pages long, and list skills and experiences relevant to the position you’re applying for.

Sometimes more detailed resumes that go over one page are referred to as CVs. These are typically only used by senior professionals, executives, CEOs, etc.

In the USA, however, a CV is a completely different document. Typically, CVs are detailed and comprehensive documents that highlight your entire academic and professional history. They’re often used for academic, scientific, or research positions, which is why this type of CV can also be referred to as an academic CV.

You can create your CV using one of our CV templates !

#10. Should I write my own resume?

Yes, you should always write your own resume.

Your resume is your opportunity to show the hiring manager your communication, writing, and presentation skills . Employers also evaluate you based on how effectively you can convey information about yourself, and there’s no one that can represent you better than yourself.

Writing your own resume lets you introduce yourself authentically. You have the best understanding of your skills and experiences, and you can personalize them to make your resume stand out.

And, as a bonus, the experience of writing your resume yourself can be reflective and insightful, so it might help you understand your professional journey and career goals better.

#11. Can a resume be two pages?

Generally, we strongly recommend that your resume stick to one page.

Hiring managers go through hundreds of resumes every day, and keeping your resume to one page increases the odds that they’ll see your qualifications faster.

In some cases, like when you have a lot of relevant experience, your resume can go over two pages. But this exception is reserved for senior professionals with over a decade of relevant experience and tons of skills and achievements that simply can’t fit on one page.

#12. Is a simple resume okay?

Absolutely, a simple resume is often more than okay—it's preferable.

Before your resume even gets to the hiring manager, a complicated layout could get it rejected by the applicant tracking system (ATS). A simple resume template can help get your application straight to the hiring manager.

A clean layout can also make sure that your resume is easily readable and looks professional. This can focus the hiring manager's attention on your work experience and skills without excessive clutter or flashy colors to distract them.

Key Takeaways

And that’s a wrap!

If you’ve followed all of our advice until now, congrats! You’re probably an expert on how to make a resume.

To recap, let’s go through some of the most important lessons we’ve learned so far...

  • Use the right resume builder to make the process as smooth as possible. You don’t want to mess around with formatting for hours before even starting to work on your resume!
  • Focus on your achievements over responsibilities. This can help you stand out from all the other applicants, especially if you back your claims up with data.
  • Include all the must-have sections, like the resume summary, work experience, education, and skills. Then leverage optional sections if you have leftover space.
  • Tailor your resume for the job you’re applying for. Everything listed on your resume should be relevant to the specific job you’re applying for, and you should write a new resume for every new job application.
  • Take the time to perfect your cover letter. It’s just as important as your resume, so make sure you pay as much attention to it!

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  • Resume and Cover Letter
  • How to Make a Resume:...

How to Make a Resume: Beginner's Writing Guide with Examples

30 min read · Updated on May 22, 2024

Marsha Hebert

Your dream job is one resume away!

Your resume is arguably the most important financial document you'll ever own. And before you think, “Yeah – right” let's consider for a moment. Without a resume, you don't get the job, so you can't pay bills, support a family, go to the big game, have that weekend trip, or plan for retirement. Your resume is the doorway to your future, so let's make sure it's perfect.

Part of making it perfect is remembering that it's a targeted career marketing document – not a chronicle of your life. So, how do you write a resume? In this beginner's writing guide, we'll show you how to make a resume and provide examples of what each section should look like. 

Grab a cup of coffee and strap in, because you're about to learn everything you need to know about how to make a new resume!

Table of contents:

The purpose of a resume

Avoid rejection by the ATS

What is your career target?

Build your personal brand, what should your resume look like, how to make a resume – the layout.

How long does it take to put together a resume?

A major resume no-no: typos

How to make your resume more professional

Theory in practice – resume examples

The most basic purpose of a resume is to sell your skills , achievements , and qualifications to prospective employers. This one document can financially make or break you. Let's take a quick look at what being unemployed costs you per day (assuming a five-day workweek):

If you make $40,000 per year, you lose about $155 every day that you're out of work

If you make $50,000 per year, you lose about $190 every day that you're out of work

If you make $75,000 per year, you lose about $288 every day that you're out of work

If you make $100,000 per year, you lose about $385 every day that you're out of work

Clearly, finding out how to make a resume for a job is critical so that you can properly sell your skills, qualifications, experiences, and achievements to prospective employers. 

The job market is tough and highly competitive; you have to stand out in a sea of qualified candidates by creating a compelling narrative that tells a story of value, keeping in mind that your resume is supposed to do a few things for you:

Introduce you to a new company

Underscore how your experiences and education are relevant

Showcase how your skills and competencies will benefit the new company's team

Win interviews

Avoid rejection by the ATS 

What do you know about applicant tracking systems? Job seeking can be compared to throwing your resume into a black hole. You can go through 100 listings on any job search website and complete the online application with zero results. 

Ever had that happen? It's okay, it happens to everyone at some point or another! 

The problem is that you're probably not putting the correct keywords into your resume. When you hit “Submit” on an online application, it isn't magically emailed to the hiring manager. 

Oh, no! 

It goes through a computer system that scans your resume for specific keywords that can be found in the job description posted by the company. And, just so you know, approximately 90% of companies use ATS scans , including everything from mom-and-pop shops to Fortune 500 companies. 

The companies use these programs because they just don't have time for a human to go through all the resumes they receive. Depending on the job opening, a company can get between  250 and 500 applicants . Can you imagine being the person who has to sift through all those resumes? 

Here is where the ATS steps in. It's designed to weed through candidates to narrow the applicant pool, so that the human hiring manager has a more reasonable resume load to go through. It ranks the remaining candidates in order based on how much of a match they are for the position that's open. 

Being overlooked by the ATS is one of the number one reasons job seekers get ghosted by companies.

Once your resume makes it through the ATS and gets into the hands of a hiring manager, don't think they're going to sit down and read each one. Who has that kind of time? You should expect that the first round of resume sorting will consist of them flipping through the stack to pick the ones that stand out within about 6 seconds of glancing at them. 

PRO TIP: Put your resume on a table, stand up, and look at it from a little distance. Is it eye-catching? Can you tell the position you're seeking just by glancing at it? Set a timer if you have to, but no more than 10 seconds.

Speaking of eye-catching, don't make the same mistake as a lot of your rival job seekers by being too generic with your resume. It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that being non-specific will open doors to more opportunities. The problem is that the hiring manager won't be able to tell exactly where you'll fit within their organization. 

The first step in winning an interview is being sure that your resume actually makes it into the hands of a human being at the company you apply to. Start by defining what you want to do.

So the first, and most important, step in crafting the perfect resume is to narrow down your target career path. The more specific you are with this first step, the more response you'll receive from hiring managers because they'll be able to tell exactly how you fit within their organization. There are four areas to focus on as you begin to chart your career path:

Industry: Do you want to work in private sector, nonprofit, government, or public roles?

Geography: This one is more in-depth than choosing rural vs urban. It also includes whether you want to work in a dynamic or static environment.

Company size: You may not think it, but having an idea about whether you want to work in a small company or one with thousands of employees is important. 

Role: Saving the best for last, you have to know what position you want.

On the surface, it may seem like these things are only important for the job search aspect of landing a new position, but you have to know what voice to write your resume in, too. Part of that is knowing your audience. When you understand your audience, you can build a personal brand that resonates with what they're looking for in a new staff member.

Now that you've gotten your target career path nailed down, the next step is to brand you. Think of yourself as a product and your resume is the packaging. Companies spend a lot of time on their branding and packaging - you have to do the same thing.

The best place to start is with a  career assessment . Taking one of these tests can help you to identify your strengths, what sets you apart from others, and key themes of your professional identity. Just like Nike and Coca-Cola have timeless taglines and catchphrases that succinctly define what they have to offer to consumers, your personal brand has to tell a concise, yet compelling, story. This is where your resume comes in.

Your resume isn't just a piece of paper you give to a hiring manager or upload to a website that says, “I'm interested in this job.” Your resume is a personal marketing tool. You shape that tool with words that describe your experiences and achievements, to impress and grab the attention of the hiring manager. 

Unlike Nike's “Just Do It” phrase, your personal brand isn't something you build and forget. It is fluid and should be revisited and refined as you gain new skills, experiences, and achievements. Weave the elements of your brand into every section of your resume.

There is a common misconception that entry-level resumes look different than executive resumes. The reality is that the only difference is how much content is available to write about. 

Obviously, someone who has little to no experience will have a  short resume  – generally one page. 

When you start to get up to 10 years of experience, then you've earned the second page, so go ahead and use it. 

It's not incremental though

Just because you have 20 years of experience doesn't mean you can have a three-page resume. As you work through how to make a resume, remember that a three-page resume should be avoided, unless you have a lot of career extras like publications, research, patents, publications, or public speaking engagements to talk about. 

Other than the number of pages, your resume should use the same format and layout no matter if you're applying to a job as someone fresh out of college or seeking to be the CEO of a company. 

Chronological resume 

The  reverse-chronological  is the most popular, traditional, and well-known resume format. Its focus is placed on achievements from your career history and is defined by listing your work history starting with your current or most recent job and working backward 10-15 years. 

Employers like this type of resume because it tells them what, when, and where you worked. It's best to use this if your work history is steady and shows growth and development. If you're looking to make a career change, have had frequent job changes, or if you're seeking your first job, this may not be the best format to use.

Pro Tip: You could also get lost in the ATS if your  resume is over-designed . Many resume writers will tell you that you need to stand out in the sea of sameness by adding some personality to your resume through design. While that's true, you need to avoid heavily formatted resumes which are often rejected by computer scanners as being illegible.

Functional resume 

This resume type focuses more on skills and experiences rather than on your work history. It's more of a “what you know and how you apply that knowledge” than a simple list of where you got the knowledge. It plays down gaps in work history and makes frequent job changes less noticeable. If it isn't done properly, though, it can be confusing for the hiring manager to read and understand. There's also a bit of a stigma behind it, because employers know that job seekers use this style to downplay job-hopping. So, the first thing they do when they get a functional resume is check employment dates. If you can avoid using this style, it's best to do so.

Combination resume 

There is another resume format that focuses on skills first and then experience last. It's the combination resume, which is sometimes called a hybrid resume. This is the most complex resume type and the best resume for mid-career professionals who are transitioning into another career or for people who have special skills and a strong track record of accomplishments. These types of resumes do take a long time to read and some hiring managers won't take the time unless they're looking to fill a hard-to-fill position.

Curriculum Vitae

Curriculum Vitae (CV) is Latin and means “course of life.” It's a little different from a resume, but some positions require a CV over a resume. The first thing you would notice is that a CV is significantly longer than a resume.  A resume is a self-branding document meant to portray your experience and achievements in a concise and easy-to-read format. A CV goes much further into the depth of your education and accomplishments (think publications, awards, and honors) and even has a section for you to include "Areas of Interest."

The best way to describe a CV is that it's a career biography. The biggest significant difference is that a CV is arranged chronologically in a way that gives a complete overview of your full working career. It also doesn't change based on the career or position for which you're applying.

Layout 

To make things easier for the hiring manager to digest the content of your resume, it should be laid out in a specific way to ensure that the right information is in the right place. 

Hiring managers don't  READ  resumes. They skim through until they find something that piques their interest and then they stop to read

Contact information

Title 

Professional summary , core competencies, experience , education and credentials , awards, certificates, and volunteer work .

Since the reverse-chronological resume is the one that the majority of people will use to apply for jobs, and because it's the format that hiring managers want to see, we'll focus this article on showing you how to make a resume using that style. 

Current contact information 

Location | Phone | Email | LinkedIn | Portfolio (if applicable)

You can be creative and use bold font in your  contact information  and even put a border under it to separate it from the body of your resume. 

  • Name: Be sure to list your name the same across all professional documents (e.g., resume, cover letter, thank you note, LinkedIn profile). Don't get hung up with whether to use your legal name (i.e. the name on your birth certificate or driver's license). Write your name in the manner you want people to address you. Also, if you use any abbreviated credentials after your name (e.g. Jane Smith, MD), remember to include them on all professional documents.  You can also include any shortened versions of your name in quotations (e.g. Christopher "Chris" Smith). Just make sure to list it the same way everywhere you put your name.
  • Address: It is no longer customary to include your full address on your resume. There have been instances of discrimination against job seekers based on their address. As far as your address is concerned, all you need is the City, State, and Zip Code. A lot of people leave off the Zip Code; however, hiring managers can query the ATS for all resumes within a radius of a Zip Code. If you exclude the Zip Code or put something like, "Greater New York Metro Area," your resume won't be included in the query.
  • Phone and email: Put the telephone number and email address where you can easily be reached. Also, be sure that your email address is professional. Using something like [email protected] just won't cut it. The best idea is to use some form of your name. If you're paranoid about having your name in your email address, then you can use some form of the type of position you seek, like [email protected].
  • LinkedIn URL: You don't have to spell out the entire URL on the contact line. You can put the words “LinkedIn URL” and hyperlink those words. Before you include your LinkedIn URL, be sure that your LinkedIn profile is optimized for the career you want - because you can bet if they have access to it, the hiring manager will look at it. 
  • Portfolio: If you're applying for a position like Graphic Designer or Software Designer, you may have a portfolio of work that you want to make available to someone reviewing your application for employment. Include a hyperlink to the portfolio in your contact information. 
  • Headshot / photo: There is no reason to include a  headshot on your resume . Actually, it's seen as taboo and could be the thing that gets your resume rejected, because the hiring manager might assume you think you can get the job based on your looks. However, there are some exceptions, like if you're applying to be a model or actor. 

Do you want a hiring manager to be able to tell immediately what type of candidate you are? Put a title at the top of your resume. Center the text on the line, put it in bold font, and put a blank space above and below. The white space and the small amount of words will help it to jump off the page and immediately be noticed. It will also be the first step in helping you stand out in the sea of sameness.

Also, be sure the title on your resume mirrors the title on the job description that you're applying to, but add a bit of panache to it so that it's not too boring. For example, instead of writing “Financial Services Associate,” write “Client-Centric Financial Services Associate Dedicated to Customer Engagement and Revenue Growth.” Just remember to keep it on one line. 

The very next thing on the page should always be your Professional Summary. But how do you write a summary for a resume?

It's a three to five-sentence statement about you. Where you've been in your career, where you're going, and how you'll use your experience to get there. 

While the professional summary is sometimes referred to as the resume objective , you must remember that the days of writing a  resume objective are dead . Never, ever include an objective on your resume. They are a waste of space and don't relay any information that markets you as the best candidate for an open position. 

Let's take a look at an example of each:

Sales Representative seeking a challenging position that will use my skills and provide opportunities for growth in a dynamic and rewarding company. 

As you can see, the objective is very inward-facing and only talks about what you want out of your career. It provides no value to the hiring manager and eliminates any possibility for them to be able to tell what you bring to the table for them. 

Professional Summary:

Ambitious sales professional offering 10+ years' experience in customer retention and aggressive revenue growth. Conquers goals and quotas through a keen awareness of the human buying motive that allows for quickly overcoming objections. Used historical data and consumer trends to reach new customers and grow territory by 24%. Innate ability to work independently or as a member of a cross-functional team.

The best use of resume space is to write a summary of your career. The effectiveness of this summary comes from the fusing of three things:

Relevant keywords – customer retention, revenue growth, and quotas 

Hard and soft skills – overcoming objections and working independently

An achievement – 24% territory growth

With this professional summary, the hiring manager will be able to tell in an instant what you have to offer their team. 

Even though the skills section of your resume is small, it packs a powerful punch! The skills you list in this section highlight your key abilities and show potential employers what you bring to the table. 

It should contain approximately 12 ATS-friendly keywords and phrases that align with the keywords in the job description. Meaning, this is a fluid section that will need to be  tailored to every job  that you apply to. Technically speaking, your entire resume should be customized to align with each job description. That's one thing that will help you get past the ATS. 

Be sure to include a good mix of  hard and soft skills  because prospective employers not only want to know that you can perform the tasks related to your job (hard skills), but they also want to gain a clear understanding of how you'll fit within the culture of the company (soft skills). 

Tips for building your Core Competencies section:

Include skills that are relevant to the job that you're applying to

Avoid creating a laundry list of everything you know how to do – be selective so that the section is more impactful

Group similar competencies together using categories – technical skills, soft skills, and languages

Prioritize your top skills based on their relevance to the job you want

Update frequently

Be consistent with the formatting

Here is a sample Core Competencies list that contains both hard and soft skills:

Core Competencies

Project Management | Data Analysis | Cross-Functional Collaboration | Digital Marketing Strategy | Python Programming | Customer Relationship Management (CRM) | Negotiation | Team Leadership | Business Development | Financial Modeling | Articulate Communication

This section is meant to show how your career history lends itself to the skills you have that make you the perfect candidate for a given job. There are some general rules of thumb on how to make a resume with a great professional experience section:

Don't go further back than 10 to 15 years

Use no more than 3 to 5 bullets per work listing

Incorporate at least 5 measurable achievements per 10 years of experience (the more the better)

Use stacking for companies where you held more than one role

10-15 Years

The 10-15 years of experience is the most relevant – you can list more than that, but avoid using bullet points for roles over 10 years old. Begin by listing your most recent position first and work your way backward to your oldest position, within that 10-15-year range. If you have 30 years of experience, you can use achievements or skills you learned during that time as talking points during the interview. Listing those older experiences on your resume will only dilute the content.

As you write out your bullet points, keep two words in mind: “so what?” The hiring manager is going to be thinking it, you might as well be thinking it, too. Every time you write something on your resume, think, “So what? Why am I writing this? What value will it bring to my new employer? Will this be THE THING that lands me an interview?"

Achievements

Remove “Responsible for…” from your resume-writing vocabulary. That's because it's crucial that you talk about what you achieved, instead of just what your responsibilities were. Let's face it, there are a lot of things that people are “responsible for” that never get done. So, be sure to talk about things you actually accomplished, as that will be the proof the hiring manager needs to take the next step and call you for an interview.

1. Use numbers whenever possible

The best way to call attention to your career accomplishments is to use numbers. Numbers add credibility to your claims and provide a clear picture of what you bring to the table. 

Don't write this:

  • Conducted cold calls to expand client base

Write this instead:

  • Increased sales by 15% by making approximately 20 cold calls per day to expand the client base

The latter makes an unmistakable assertion that you had a positive impact, not only in your role but on the company as a whole. You can take it a step further and talk about things like problem-solving skills and how you addressed challenges to lead to team success. These types of  soft skills are highly valued by employers  and could be the thing that lands you an interview.

PRO TIP: Use the  CAR method  for building achievement statements into your resume.

2. Use action words to convey accomplishment

A lot of people make the mistake of copying bullet points from the job descriptions of the roles they've held. This practice makes you sound detached from achievements and focuses more on responsibilities. Using passive language is too generic and doesn't allow a hiring manager to see what you'll be able to accomplish in the new role. 

It's better to use action language to show that you're an achiever rather than a doer. Here are some examples of action words you can use on your resume: 

Worked with others: Advised, Aided, Assisted, Chaired, Coached, Collaborated with, Consulted with, Helped, Instructed, Interacted with, Mentored, Motivated, Supported

Communicated: Addressed, Advertised, Answered, Briefed, Corresponded with, Debated, Explained, Facilitated, Informed, Interpreted, Interviewed, Persuaded, Responded to

Analyzed data: Assessed, Appraised, Audited, Calculated, Computed, Estimated, Evaluated, Forecast, Inspected, Measured, Researched, Surveyed, Tested

Operated equipment: Installed, Maintained, Programmed, Ran, Serviced, Used

Worked with money or contracts: Administered, Appropriated, Authorized, Balanced, Controlled, Directed, Enforced, Financed, Funded, Governed, Invested, Monitored, Oversaw, Purchased

Organized something: Arranged, Assembled, Catalogued, Compiled, Coordinated, Itemized, Routed, Scheduled, Stocked, Tracked

Created: Composed, Customized, Designed, Directed, Established, Founded, Illustrated, Originated, Shaped

Researched: Analyzed, Collected, Criticized, Detected, Diagnosed, Evaluated, Tested

How to make your professional experience section: The formula

There's a formula for writing your professional experience section in a way that focuses on achievements. You'll start by asking yourself these questions about every job you've had:

What was the name of the company?

What was the title of your role?

What dates were you employed? (*Hint: use the MM/YYYY format for your dates)

What did you do every day? (*Example: Leveraged management skills to direct operations of 5 separate but concurrent projects by delegating tasks to staff based on employee acumen and monitoring / controlling budgets)

What is one thing you did at the company that you're really proud of?

What is another thing you're really proud of?

What is one more thing you did that you're really proud of?

When you put all of that together, it should look like this:

Company Name | MM/YYYY to Present

Position Title

Balanced competing priorities on multiple and concurrent projects and program management initiatives using data-driven strategies in Agile environments. Managed key accounts, onboarded new accounts, and oversaw organizational process adoption for nursing facilities, emergency departments, and pharmacies.

Developed $2M Provider Incentive Program that increased community provider partnerships

Saved $800K by using Six Sigma skills to implement DMAIC approach

Coached and mentored 2 direct reports, creating an open environment of communication that facilitated future-facing decision-making

Many people will create separate sections for education history and certifications. That's not necessary. You can include all of it in one section. You can also include extras like  relevant coursework , projects, and achievements. These extras can be truly beneficial for your application if you have little to no work experience. 

There are some general rules of thumb for the education section: 

Spell out acronyms (BS, MS, PhD) and school abbreviations

It is no longer customary to include graduation dates unless you're still in school or graduated within the last year

Never include high school, unless you're still in high school - listing high school doesn't say “ I finished high school, ” it says, “ I didn't go to college .” 

List your degree first and then your school, unless you've obtained multiple degrees at the same institution. 

Here's what a regular education section looks like:

EDUCATION AND CREDENTIALS

Master of Business Administration (MBA) | ABC University

Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) | XYZ University

Six Sigma Black Belt | Council for Six Sigma Certification

If you don't have a lot of experience and need to include some relevant coursework or major projects to inject relevant keywords into your resume, then this is what that would look like:

Relevant coursework:  Marketing, Operations Management, Accounting, Corporate Finance

Capstone project:  Let a team of 4 to execute a market analysis project to expand the Brooms and Handles company into new regions. Used market and consumer analysis data to identify gaps and achieve a 15% projected revenue increase and a 20% increase in customer satisfaction within the pilot program. 

You can include educational information about a degree program even if it's still in progress. Here's what that would look like:

Expected completion:  05/2024

Capstone project:  Let a team of 4 to execute a market analysis project to expand the Brooms and Handles company into new regions. Used market and consumer analysis data to identify gaps and achieve a 15% projected revenue increase and a 20% increase in customer satisfaction within the pilot program.

It is important to list what you do outside of work and school. It helps to demonstrate that you're a well-rounded person. 

Were you the president of a fraternity or sorority? 

Did you get involved with showing new students around campus? 

Have you headed a sales team that produced top awards? 

Were you an employee of the month? 

Do you speak multiple languages?

Did you volunteer for an organization?

Did you perform some major research that ended up being published?

All of these extras allow prospective employers a sneak peek into your life outside of work. They can also go a long way to breaking the ice during an interview, especially if something you do outside work is important or interesting to the hiring manager. 

Keep in mind to list only those volunteer positions, projects, or affiliations that are related to your career goals. 

How long does it take to make a resume?

If you're going to use the resume wizard that MS Word has, you can slap your information together in a day or two. It will get to employers. The bad thing is that it probably won't get a whole lot of attention. 

The "just right resume" can take weeks, because of how much background work goes into it. You'll write it, rewrite it, and write it again, and may even have multiple versions. Ultimately, the exact amount of time that goes into putting your resume together depends on your level of experience, how complex your history is, and the specificity of the job you're applying to. 

Entry-level resumes take the least amount of time, simply because there's less information to include

Mid-level resumes take a few days because of the amount of detail in your work history

Executive resumes, or those for specialized positions, can take weeks - especially if you have to do some digging to come up with accomplishments from your previous positions

Updating an existing resume that's well-maintained can be done in just a few hours

While the time spent can seem like a lot, if you're truly marketing yourself for that “just right” position, do you want your resume to say “This was thrown together in a couple of hours using a template” OR do you want it to say “I know this document is important and a significant amount of time was spent on it to make it perfect?”

The first and foremost thing that will get your resume tossed in the garbage can are typos. The number of resumes with errors that are turned in every day to employers across the globe is so astounding that it bears discussing. 

You must proofread your resume!

The major problem with typos and grammatical boo-boos is that your eyes will read what you intended to type. So, after you've read through your resume a few times and think it's perfect, get a friend to read it. Make sure the friend is one of those brutally honest types. It's better to get it back marked all over with bright red ink so you can fix it before you send it out, than to send it out and then realize there's a mistake in it.

How to make your resume seem more professional

Lazy words: Do you see words like "etc" or “other duties as required” on your resume? Delete them immediately. If you take shortcuts in the language of your resume, hiring managers will wonder if you'll be taking shortcuts at work. 

Cookie cutter resumes: Your resume has to stand out. Because of that, you should avoid throwing something together that you find a sample of online. Make it yours, make it represent you. Many people rely on the resume wizard that comes loaded with MS Word and, while that is a good tool to use to help you remember the sections to include, it shouldn't be the end-all-and-be-all of your resume design. 

Specificity: You've had three jobs in the last 10 years and you've listed every detail of everything you've done during your tenure at those jobs. That makes you a Jack (or Jackie) of all trades, but a master of nothing. You have to be specific to the job for which you're applying. What value do you bring to that employer for that job? What achievements can you highlight?

Tailoring: Considering the rampant use of ATS by companies big and small, you have to take the time to customize your resume so that it gets past those scanners. Remember to use relevant keywords from the job descriptions throughout your resume. 

PRO TIP: You can check to see how to make your resume better! Have it checked against an ATS and get a free, personalized, and  professional resume review . 

Theory in practice – 10 resume examples

It's one thing to have someone tell you how to make a resume, it's another thing to see an example – proof that all of this information can come together in a practical way that makes sense. 

1. Software Engineer resume example

Click here for an example of a Software Engineer resume.

2. Data Scientist resume example

Click here for an example of a Data Scientist resume.

3. Cybersecurity resume example

Click here for an example of a cybersecurity resume.

4. Digital Marketing Manager resume example

Click here for an example of a Digital Marketing Manager resume.

5. Nurse Practitioner resume example

Click here for an example of a Nurse Practitioner resume. 

6. Finance Director resume example

Click here for an example of a Finance Director resume. 

7. Attorney resume example

Click here for an example of a Attorney resume.

8. Administrative Office Assistant resume example

Click here for an example of an Administrative Office Assistant resume. 

9. Information Technology Expert resume example

Click here for an example of an Information Technology Expert resume. 

10. Chief Executive Officer resume example

Click here for an example of a CEO resume. 

Now you know how to make a resume for your next job!

It may seem like it takes a lot of work to make a good resume, but if you've followed along this far there are a few things that should be ingrained in you that will help you write a professional resume:

Know what you want to do – be specific

Make your resume with the right format 

Use a standard layout, whether you are writing your first resume or 50th

Use action words to make your resume stand out

Quantify your achievements to prove that you have what it takes to succeed in a new role

Tailor your new resume to each job

Double and triple-check for errors, typos, and grammar mistakes

If you're still unsure how to make a perfect resume, TopResume has you covered. Our team of  professional resume writers  has the know-how and experience to write a resume for you that will win interviews.

Recommended reading: 

Resume Tricks That Don't Work

What Does Your Resume Really Say About You?

Bad Resume Advice You Should Completely Ignore

Related Articles:

Do Hiring Managers Actually Read Cover Letters?

How to Create a Resume With No Education

Why You Lose When You Lie on Your Resume: Learning From Mina Chang

See how your resume stacks up.

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Your Step-by-Step Guide to Making the Perfect Resume (With Examples!)

person on laptop

Your resume is arguably the most valuable piece of paper for your career. But this document can be daunting for many. Maybe you’re not sure how to fit in all your information onto one page. Maybe you’re not sure about the right way to format and write your resume. Maybe you don’t even know what the heck a resume is!

Whatever your concern, we’ll break down everything you need to know about making the perfect resume, from scratch.

What Is a Resume?

What are employers looking for in a resume.

  • Pick Your Format
  • Start With Your Basic Information
  • Add in Your Work Experience
  • Consider Including Volunteer Work or Other Experience
  • Don’t Forget Your Education
  • Top It Off With Some Skills and Interests
  • Write a Resume Summary Statement (if Relevant)
  • Tailor It to the Job (and the ATS)
  • Edit and Refine It

What Are Some Examples of a Good Resume?

A resume is a summary of your career, whether yours is just getting started or has been going on for years. Coming in at around one page in length (two only under specific circumstances), it showcases the jobs you’ve held and currently hold, the responsibilities you’ve taken on, the skills you’ve developed, and the qualities you bring to the table as an employee. Together, those things make it super easy for any hiring manager to see your qualifications and fit for a role.

For all the work you may put into writing one, hiring managers actually spend very little time—mere seconds in many cases—looking at your resume. But despite this sad fact, it’s safe to say that creating a great resume (rather than hastily throwing one together) still matters.

“If you miss the mark, your resume may never be read. Even worse, you might be removed from the applicant pool by a computer before a human even knows you exist,” says Muse career coach Heather Yurovsky , founder of Shatter & Shine. So you want to get it right because, as she explains, isn’t the goal to “spend less time looking for a job and more time in a role you love?”

You might be wondering if you can lean on your LinkedIn profile instead of writing a resume. The answer, sadly, is no. Most hiring managers still expect you to submit a resume, even if they also look at your LinkedIn. Even if you don’t need a resume for a job you’re applying for now, you’re going to need one at some point in your career—they’re not anywhere close to going out of style. So it’s best to always have one at the ready should an opportunity pop up.

And although LinkedIn has plenty of benefits, a resume has one clear advantage: While your LinkedIn is usually a broader picture of your career trajectory, your resume gives you the opportunity to tailor your career story to a specific role or company (more on that later).

Oh, and you’ve probably heard of something called a CV? It’s slightly different from a resume , and usually more common with academics and job seekers outside the U.S.

Hiring managers look for three things on your resume, “What did you do? Why did you do it? And what was the result?” says Muse career coach Martin McGovern , owner of Career Therapy. “If you can answer all three of these questions in...your resume bullet points, you’re going to be on the right track.”

Clear, easy-to-understand language is key. “The truth is that most resumes make no sense. They are stuffed with jargon, they are too technical, and they are filled with redundancies. Try to read a resume that isn’t yours and you will quickly realize that it feels like an alien wrote it,” McGovern adds. Put yourself in the shoes of a recruiter who has no idea how your role works—how can you make your resume accessible to them?

The hiring manager also cares about more than just you and you alone—they care about you in relation to them. “Hiring managers want to see if a candidate matches the requirements” of the role they’re hiring for, Yurovsky explains. “Your resume should paint this picture so the hiring manager not only knows what day-to-day responsibilities you can handle, but why you, above other[s], bring value to their organization.”

How Do You Write a Resume?

Whether you’re someone who’s never written a resume in your life, or you need a nice, thorough refresher on the process of creating one, follow these steps to go from a blank page to a complete—and dare I say beautiful—document.

Related: This Free Worksheet Makes It Easy to Create (or Update) Your Resume

1. Pick Your Format

Before you start typing one single thing, you have to decide what you want the overall resume to look like.

Resume builders can be helpful for this step—they’ll take all your basic information and organize it for you, eliminating some of the legwork. You can also use a pre-made outline, such as one of these free Google Docs templates .

But it’s often safest to start with a clean slate all on your own and eventually upgrade to a more advanced layout. (If you'd still like a place to write all the relevant information before you get started, check out our resume outline .) This allows you to course correct, edit and re-edit, and choose a resume format that best fits your particular situation (after all, not everyone has a career trajectory that’s easy to compartmentalize).

In general, you’re most likely to cover and/or include sections on the following:

  • Your work experience
  • Your non-work experience, including professional organizations, community involvement, or side projects
  • Your education and certifications
  • Your skills (specifically hard skills) and interests

So how do you format and organize all of that information?

By far the most common (and safest, if you’re not sure which route to take) option is reverse chronological order . This means you organize your experiences from most recent to least recent. So your work experiences would go above your education, and your current role would go above previous roles you’ve held. This of course has its exceptions—maybe you went back to grad school between jobs, or your most recent role is irrelevant to the job you’re applying for. So the whole page may not be exactly in reverse chronological order depending on your situation. It’s just a guideline.

There’s also something called a functional or skills-based resume . This is used pretty rarely, mainly with career changers and those with limited or complicated work histories. It gets its name because it’s primarily about listing your skills rather than experiences, and showcases them above your work history and education.

You can also opt for a combination resume , which is a mix between a reverse chronological resume and skills-based resume. It highlights your skills at the top, but allows just as much room below to cover your job and school experience.

Use caution when choosing these two formats: “Combo and skills-based [resumes] can be hard to follow, because [they force] the reader to hunt for connections between your skills and experience, and [don’t] provide the full context of your work,” says Muse Career Coach Angela Smith , founder of Loft Consulting. “I’ve also heard a lot of recruiters say that they automatically discount skill-based resumes because they feel the candidate is trying to hide something. I don’t necessarily believe that, but I think it’s important for job-seekers to know that perception is out there.”

2. Start With Your Basic Information

Your contact information should always go at the top of your resume. In this header you’ll want to include anything that could be helpful for a recruiter to get in touch with you. Usually, this means adding in:

  • Your full name (preferably the name you use across the web)
  • Your phone number
  • Your personal email address

You might also choose to include other basic information, such as your LinkedIn or personal website URL, your GitHub (for technical roles), your social media profiles (if relevant to the job), or your address. If you’re looking to move for a job, you may choose to leave out your address or write “open to relocating” to better your chances of getting an interview.

The key is to make this part as clear as possible. If a hiring manager can’t reach you, there’s no point in perfecting the rest of your resume.

3. Add in Your Work Experience

This section will most likely be the bulk of your resume. Even if you’re changing careers, employers still want to see where you’ve worked, what you’ve done, and the impact of that work to get a sense of your background and expertise.

Your “Work Experience” might be one entire category, or you might choose to break it up into “Relevant Experience” and “Additional Experience” to highlight the jobs that are most important for hiring managers to focus on. Either way, you’ll almost always want to have your most recent experience at the top and your older experience down below.

Within your work experience, you’ll want to include each official job title, the company (and possibly its location), and the years you worked there. Below that, you’ll add in two to four bullet points explaining what you did in that job, the skills you built and exercised, the tools you used, and the results of what you did. If you accomplished a lot during your time there, focus on the responsibilities that made the most impact or you’re the most proud of, as well as the ones that best align you with the job you’re applying for (more on that in the following sections). It’s key here to list, if relevant, quantitative as well as qualitative accomplishments.

For example, you might write:

Associate Accountant, Finances and Co., Ann Arbor, MI September 2017 – Present

  • Manage billing and invoicing for more than 50 clients, ensuring the deadlines and needs of our enterprise partners, including Big Company and Super Star Org, are met
  • Collaborate closely with sales, account management, and project management teams on project setup, maintenance, and invoice management
  • Assist in the streamlining of invoicing guidelines and procedures through documentation and the implementation of new software, resulting in an average two-week decrease in total time spent per client

Your resume bullets should be in past tense if you’re referring to past jobs and present tense if you’re talking about your current roles. In addition, your bullets should always start with a strong action verb that best describes what you did. And if you have examples of your work, consider hyperlinking them here as well.

If you have a ton of experience and this category is starting to run long (read: over one page), consider kicking out your oldest jobs unless they’re super relevant to the job you’re applying for, or extra impressive for your field.

Not sure where to start? “It’s helpful to do a brain dump and create a document that has everything and anything you consider as experience or an achievement,” says Yurovsky. From there, she explains, you can start to whittle down what is and isn’t important. And you can refer to this document later if you ever decide to update your resume for a specific role.

Need more specific advice on listing your work experience on your resume? Check out these additional resources:

  • When you’ve held multiple jobs at the same company: 2 Jobs, 1 Company: How to Show Multiple Positions on Your Resume
  • When you’re not sure what your accomplishments are or how to explain them: Resume Revamp: How to Turn Your Duties Into Accomplishments
  • When you want to spruce up a boring or insignificant job: How to Make Your Most Boring Jobs Sound More Interesting on Your Resume
  • When you’re considering fudging a job title: The Answer to “Can I Change My Job Title on My Resume to Make It More Accurate?”
  • When you’ve had a bunch of short-term gigs: How to List Temporary Jobs on Your Resume

4. Consider Including Volunteer Work or Other Experience

Anything you’ve done that’s not work experience—your side gig, volunteer work, special projects—can be hosted under clearly-labeled sections (“Volunteer Experience” or “Activities,” for example). Depending on how robust your work experience is, these things may be worth including, particularly if they’ve helped you level up your skill set or better align you with your dream job. Plus, they make you look that much more well-rounded, passionate, and hardworking.

If you’re a recent grad, you might also build out a section for on-campus activities, such as clubs, organizations, or leadership experience. This can be a great supplement if you’re lacking in the jobs department. You can frame these just as you would professional jobs—including your title, the organization’s name, and bullets describing what your role was and what you accomplished.

Read More: This Is Exactly How to List Volunteer Work on Your Resume

5. Don’t Forget Your Education

If you’re still in school or just graduated, your education can go at the top of your resume, but for pretty much everyone else, this goes near the bottom. Most people include their school, graduation year (for folks less up to about a decade out of school), major, and degree. Brand-new grads might also write in their GPA, honors and awards, study abroad, thesis, or other notable achievements. But keep this section super simple, as you don’t want it to take up too much space over your work experience.

It’s possible you have unique education experience, such as taking an online course or certification. If you did this specifically as a way to boost yourself within your industry, definitely include it. Again, list everything more or less reverse chronologically—so a grad school degree would go above an undergrad degree, and a more recent relevant online course would go above that.

Learn more about the ins and outs of listing your education on your resume:

  • How to (and How Not to) List Education on Your Resume
  • How to List Online Courses on Your Resume the Right Way (Because Yes, There Is a Wrong Way)

6. Top It Off With Some Skills and Interests

The skills section of a resume gets a bad rap, but it’s just as important as the rest of the stuff you include. It’s a quick list a recruiter can scan to see if your skill set aligns with what they’re hiring for. And it’s super ATS-friendly (ATS stands for “applicant tracking system,” the robot that in some cases reads your resume before a human does) because it allows you to add in keywords the machine is scanning for.

Usually this section goes at the bottom of your resume, but in special cases—such as a skills-based resume or when someone’s switching fields—you may place it further up.

What exactly do you throw in here? You’ll want to list any hard skills and applications you’re familiar with (Photoshop, SEO, JavaScript, to name a few examples), and, if relevant, your level of expertise. Avoid including soft skills here, like time management or public speaking—save those for your bullet points instead.

Be strategic when filling in your skills. Don’t list things you actually couldn’t do at a high competence level (I’m looking at those of you who say you’re “great” at Excel), and maybe nix skills that are completely irrelevant to the job you want. For example, you may not even need to include Excel if you’re applying for say, a design position, unless it’s listed as a job requirement.

Maybe you’re thinking, I’m a really good volleyball player, but that’s not a “skill,” right? No, it’s not, but it is a hobby. Adding in a hobby section at the bottom of your resume is underrated, and frequently a smart choice. It can be a great conversation starter with a hiring manager, and it can show that you’re a good culture fit—or a culture add—for the company. Also, it’s just a nice way to add in some of your personality. So tack on a bullet point listing out some of your interests, such as hiking, rowing, or crafting (no more than five to seven work-appropriate verbs), and you’re all set here.

7. Write a Resume Summary Statement (if Relevant)

You may have heard of a resume summary statement . They’re not super common, but they can be useful to include near the top of your resume if you’re looking to add clarity or context to your resume. If you’re a career changer, you might find a summary statement helpful in explaining your leap and tying your experience to your new path. Or if you’re a more experienced professional, you can use a summary statement to highlight a theme that brings your career trajectory together.

Overall, you probably won’t need a summary statement if your career is pretty linear and your bullet points do a great job of emphasizing what you have to offer in terms of skills and experience. But if you think it makes sense to include one, “Take the time to think about what the person reading your summary wants to know before you write it,” says McGovern. “Good summaries explain why you do what you do and how it can help. For instance: Merging a background in ABC, I help companies improve XYZ through 123. Summaries shouldn’t be any more complicated than that.”

So, taking McGovern’s example, you might say:

Merging a background in social media marketing and PR with seven years in the consumer tech space, I help companies improve their internal and external communication and brand awareness through data-driven, quality content and strategies that align with the modern trends of the space.

Yurovsky adds that “you don’t want your summary statement to be a dense paragraph with too much information. You want it to be easy to read, concise, and memorable. Almost like a tagline.”

Read More: 3 Resume Summary Examples That’ll Make Writing Your Own Easier

8. Tailor It to the Job (and the ATS)

Once you have your resume written out—you’ve broken down your work experience, tagged on some activities and additional experiences, and listed out your skills—it’s important to go back to the job description (or multiple job descriptions, if you’re applying to several similar jobs) and make sure that what your resume says matches up with the kind of candidate the employers are looking for. In other words, tailor it .

Let’s explain further. You’ll want to begin by tackling the ATS . This means combing the job description to see if individual words and phrases line up. What skills are they asking for, and have you listed them (so long as you actually have them)? What words are they using to describe their ideal hire, and do you use similar language in your resume?

Next, take a bird’s-eye view. If you were the hiring manager for the role, where on your resume would your eyes be drawn to? And what would you be looking for? Whatever you think will be most important for the recruiter, make sure it’s near the top of your resume, or otherwise emphasized.

Finally, dig into the role and responsibilities of the job. Does your resume reflect similar experience? If not, is there a way you can spin it so that it’s clear you’re capable of doing the job (and doing it well)?

These articles can help you if the word “tailoring” makes you start to sweat:

  • What It Really Means to “Tailor Your Resume”
  • Your Guide to Making Unrelated Experience Look Relevant on Your Resume
  • A Cool Trick: How to Spin 1 Resume Bullet 5 Different Ways

9. Edit and Refine It

Please, please don’t just write your resume and shoot it out without giving it a second glance. Hiring managers may not spend hours browsing it, but if there’s one thing that sticks out more than anything else it’s a glaring typo.

The best approach? Write a rough draft, then leave and come back to it later with fresh eyes to give it an edit.

Cover the basics: Is your contact information correct and updated? Are you using the right verb tenses? Does everything look consistent and accurate in terms of spelling and grammar?

Then do some cutting if your resume’s quite long. It’s no longer a hard-and-fast rule that all resumes must be only one page—but consider it a smart guideline for most applicants, especially if you've got less than 10 years work experience. The exception is if you’re very senior or very established in your career; in this scenario, a two-page resume isn’t completely out of the question. Everyone else, read this article for advice on how to cut your resume down.

Formatting-wise, it’s key to consider a couple things. First, what font are you using , and is it legible (for a human and a robot)? When in doubt, go with one of these simple, but sleek, options: Arial, Arial Narrow, Calibri, Cambria, Garamond, or Helvetica.

Second, are you going to save it as a Word document or PDF ? Neither option is wrong, although a PDF helps ensure that your formatting is maintained, no matter what type of computer the hiring manager uses to open the document.

Third, is your resume formatted in a way that it’s skimmable? If it’s feeling crowded or overrun with words, read this: 12 Tiny Changes That Make Your Resume Easy for Recruiters to Skim .

Once you’ve given it a few good looks, it may be worth sending it to a friend or colleague (or even a career coach ) to get a second opinion. Don’t just have them edit it for spelling and grammar—they should dig into your bullets and offer feedback on whether or not your resume is showing you in the best possible light (it’s smart to also send them the job description for something to compare it to).

Here’s the thing: Your resume won’t ever look exactly like someone else’s, nor should it. How you choose to format it, organize your information, and talk about specific experiences depends not just on your career path, but on your field, the job you’re applying for, the company that job is at, and more.

So there isn’t a universal way to do a resume. But there are common themes. To give you some context as to how yours might turn out, here are three examples of different kinds of resumes.

The Most Popular: A Reverse Chronological Resume

As previously mentioned, a reverse chronological resume is preferred by many coaches and HR experts, mainly because it’s super readable. When everything’s in a clear order, it’s easy to skim and even easier to draw lines between experiences.

Who it’s good for: Just about everyone—from students applying to internships all the way up to senior-level executives (with an optional resume summary statement)

Download an Example Chronological Resume for a Software Engineer

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The Unorthodox Route: A Functional or Skills-Based Resume

Rather than listing out your experience in reverse chronological order, a functional or skills-based resume has bullet points that reflect how each of your skills is demonstrated by the work you’ve done over the course of your career. At the bottom, you’ll include everything else, such as your education, job history, professional achievements, community involvement, and other technical skills. This is a good option if you have a somewhat all-over-the-place work history and want to tie everything together neatly.

Who it’s good for: Career changers whose work experiences may not appear to be relevant and people with an abundance of temporary jobs or gaps in their work histories.

Download an Example Functional Resume for a Project Manager

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The Creative Angle: An Infographic Resume or Resume Website

This resume type is characterized by how it’s formatted visually. You may choose a reverse chronological order or skills-based style to organize your information, but also use graphics, colors, unique fonts, and even multimedia elements to help that information pop. Keep in mind that any creative resume is still likely subject to an ATS—and certain elements may be unreadable by a robot. So consider going this route only if you know a human will be reading your resume (and that said human might enjoy it).

Who it’s good for: People applying to creative roles (designers, editors, writers, marketers, video producers, for example), startups, or fun companies, or to jobs where a creative resume is encouraged, if not required.

Download an Example Infographic Resume for a Designer

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Not a designer but want your resume to look just as pretty as this example? Check out these articles:

  • 5 Sites to Create an Awesome Infographic Resume (Even if You’re the Least Creative Person Ever)
  • How to Build a Resume Website That Will Impress Every Hiring Manager Who Sees It
  • 5 Digital Tools That Will Make Your Resume Infinitely More Beautiful

Your resume is a living, breathing document. So while you won’t go through this whole process every time you apply for a job, you should be thinking about all these things as you go to update your resume for your next career step. You might decide later on to switch up the order, or remove or add things, or even get creative and try out a whole new format. If you’re not getting the calls back you expect, you may decide to scrap it and start over —and that’s totally OK.

Regardless of where this piece of paper goes and how it grows, when you give it the care and attention it deserves, you set yourself up for success. And you’ll make it that much more likely that you’ll land an interview and get the chance to prove to the hiring manager—over the phone or in person—what you’ve got to offer.

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  • Services & Software

Article updated on June 30, 2024 at 5:00 PM PDT

Best Resume Writing Services for 2024

Whether you need to build a new resume from scratch or want some professional advice, we’ve curated the best websites, apps and services to make you stand out.

Our Experts

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  • She received the Renau Writing Scholarship in 2016 from the University of Louisville's communication department.

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  • Apple software beta tester, "Helps make our computers and phones work!" - Zach's grandparents

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CNET’s expert staff reviews and rates dozens of new products and services each month, building on more than a quarter century of expertise.

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Even if you've written a resume before, the job market is constantly changing, and it can be hard to keep up. Having a fresh resume ready when you aren't searching can make a huge difference if you need it in a pinch. New formats, new terms, factoring in keywords and making sure your experience is not only up to date but relevant to the job you're applying for can be stressful. Take the pressure off with the best resume writing services.

Some of what you'll need to include in your resume will depend on the industry you want to work in. While it can vary, employers will likely look at your education, work history and skills. We’ve combed through dozens of resume services looking at the most helpful features across a variety of needs. We looked especially closely at the number of custom templates, the amount of guidance the service offered, the ease of navigation and the robustness of the service's privacy policy. Each of these templates and professional writing services will help you create a complete resume that best reflects your skills and experience at an affordable price.

What’s the best resume builder website?

The best resume template and builder should give you a variety of options to customize your resume. Resume.com has many options and customization features that make it a useful tool for almost any candidate applying to any job. You can upload and edit an existing resume, customize an available template from its collection or let the service guide you through creating one from scratch. Resume.com also offers helpful guidance throughout your resume creation process, making sure you include and optimize all your content. Once you’re happy with your resume, you can download it for free in multiple formats.

Depending on where you’re at in the job application process, you might need more guidance than a template. These professional writing services will pair you with experienced writers and coaches to help you craft and perfect resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters and more. These services include more personalized coaching and features, but they tend to be more expensive. We’ve collected a range of options for your budget and needs. Because your resume likely includes your contact information and some personal information, we've also included information about each service's privacy policy.

Best resume templates and builders of 2024

a woman works on a laptop next to a sheet of paper with resume written on it

A well-constructed resume can help you stand out during a job search.

  • Can create new resume or customize templates
  • Many free features, guidance while writing
  • Integrated with Indeed job search site
  • Difficulty unsubscribing from paid services

Best free resume builder

Resume.com is a free resume writer offering dozens of templates for creating your resume or cover letter, as well as job boards and career advice. You have the option to upload and edit an existing resume, create a new one, or customize one of the sample resumes offered on the site. It's intuitive and easy to use, and it creates a professional-looking final product.

When starting from scratch, you'll go section by section, entering your education, employment history, hobbies and interests, professional skills, languages and references. Resume.com provides question prompts and tips for guidance, as well as career-specific examples you can add if you're struggling to find the right words. You can also choose to forgo any of these sections, rearrange sections and add custom ones depending on what you need. As you update and save each section, you can see how it will appear on the page on your resume preview to the right. You can also change the template, font style and size, or spacing at any time and see it update in real-time in the preview. 

Once you're done, you can download your new resume (in PDF, DocX, RTF or TXT format), create a custom URL or print it out. You also have the option to upload it to Indeed, a job search site that partners with Resume.com . The account you make will work with both Indeed and Resume.com . On the privacy side, the site does collect user information. If you want to delete your account, simply click your profile icon and then Account . Clicking Close My Account deletes your account and your data. If you didn't make an account, you can still choose Delete Guest Data . You can also request your data, and the company will send you an email with what it has collected. 

On the review site Trustpilot , Resume.com only has 38 reviews, but of those, 53% of them awarded the site four or five stars. Some negative reviews speak of difficulty unsubscribing from paid services, so read carefully as you use the free aspects of this service . 

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  • Guided help writing work experience descriptions
  • Cover letter and CV help
  • Easy to change layout and color styles
  • Must pay to download resume

Best option for your first resume

Resume genius.

The website Resume Genius says you can "make a professional resume in 12 minutes." We tested it out and indeed had a solid first draft of an easy resume completed in about 10 minutes. Resume Genius takes you step-by-step through the process, prompting you with questions about your education and work experience to help you fill out the applicable sections. Resume Genius is particularly helpful because you can search for a job and see prewritten text for the description that you can add or edit. When finished, you can easily toggle between different templates to see what looks best for the final product. You also have the option to directly share your resume with Indeed or Resume Library. 

The site can also help you build cover letters and curriculum vitae. After you input all your information, you can choose different layout styles and colors. It's easy to move through, but you have to do it in order and fill in all the information before continuing. Resume Genius also offers examples of resumes, CVs and cover letters for specific jobs, as well as recommended jobs near you. You can download the resume you create for $3 (which starts a 14-day trial for Resume Genius Pro), or $8 (which kicks off a monthly subscription plan). If you fail to cancel your trial before the 14 days are up, you'll be billed $24 every four weeks, according to the site. 

On Trustpilot at the time of this publication, the site has 4.6 out of 5 stars based on more than 38,000 reviews. Note that if you register on the site, Resume Genius does collect personally identifiable information and may share it with third parties for advertising and other purposes, according to its privacy policy. The account deletion process is buried in the Terms of Service . According to Resume Genius, complete data erasure can take up to 30 days, but they may retain "certain information in accordance with privacy laws."

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  • Easy to customize
  • Free downloads
  • Optional paid extra assistance with Indeed professionals
  • Unclear how to delete personal information

Easiest resume builder to use

Indeed resume builder.

It's free to create a resume or post your current resume on Indeed. If you're building a new one, you can choose between eight templates. The resume sections are highlighted and when you click, each section expands specific text fields. You can swap templates at any time without losing your work, as well. There are also options for toggling sections on and off, in addition to rearranging them. When you're finished, you can download a free PDF of your work history.

Indeed Resume Builder also offers optional professional advice for your new resume. After you download the resume you created, you'll get a prompt and can click Get Resume Help From a Real Person. Fill out a short questionnaire about what type of help you want and upload your resume (it's OK if you haven't built one). This service usually costs $89 unless you've applied to at least 10 jobs using your Indeed resume. According to Indeed, if you haven't received an interview request within 60 days of receiving your new resume, you can request a one-time rewrite. 

For $19, you can take a quiz and get feedback from a professional to get you started. You can also use Indeed's automated instant report system for free. The system returns quick tips to improve your resume. 

Indeed's privacy policy says that it does collect and share user data with third-party providers to connect job seekers with employers and improve services. According to Indeed's privacy policy, you can request an account or personal data deletion and request that your data not be shared while your account is active. CNET reached out to Indeed for more information and we'll update when we hear back.

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  • Guides resume creation
  • Free resume downloads
  • Paid tier offers interview advice and cover letter builder
  • Have to pay for additional downloads

Most affordable paid resume builder

Cv engineer.

CV Engineer is an easy-to-use smartphone app that creates a professional-looking resume. With 16 templates to choose from, you can tap to enter information into all of the usual sections and add custom ones. When you tap on each section, you can tap through the bottom toolbar to get advice on what type of information to add, as well as view resume examples to show you how the section could look. 

CV Engineer lets you send or download your first completed resume for free, but upgrading to CV Engineer Pro for a one-time payment of $6 gives you access to unlimited downloads. A Scan My CV feature is also included, which can detect common mistakes and suggest improvements, such as places where you can add more information. The Pro version also offers interview advice and a cover letter builder. 

You can download CV Engineer from the Apple App Store and Google Play Store . CV Engineer does collect personal information and can share it with Google Play Services and Firebase Analytics, according to its privacy policy. The app is free to download and ad-free.

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  • Strong privacy policy
  • Example resumes available
  • Only one layout available
  • Little guidance during creation

Best free iOS resume builder

Resume star 2: pro cv designer.

Resume Star 2 isn't the most visually stunning resume design app for iOS, but it gets the job done. To use, tap each section of the resume, fill in your information and it will fill in a traditional template (you only get one layout). The app offers some example resumes you can start with and edit as needed, including job-specific ones for a: cashier, dental hygienist, receptionist, waitress, mechanic and senior manager.

You can add or delete any sections you like without needing to hit save every time you add information, and you can see your resume update as you go. The autosave feature makes it easy to toggle quickly between the different sections as well. At the end, you'll have a basic resume ready to go. The app's interface doesn't offer as much guidance about how to write your resume or what types of information to include. If you need extra help, tap the information icon in the bottom left and choose the Resume Writing Guide. This will open up a crash course on resume writing in your mobile browser. It also includes a job search feature. 

The app collects payment via donations after you use the service -- you don’t have to pay if you don’t want to. The app connects to iCloud, and you can export your resume as a PDF to any location on your device(s). If you are happy with the service, you can choose the $6 "helped a bit" tier, a standard donation of $10, or the "really helped me" tier for $25. 

Resume Star 2 has a 4.8 out of 5 rating, and more than 1,800 ratings in the App Store . The first version, Resume Star: Pro CV Maker, which is the same except for the iCloud connection, had a 4.9-star rating and more than 16,000 reviews. The site does not collect personally identifiable information without user consent, which seems to make it one of the more secure options available.

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  • 42 templates to choose from
  • Easily customizable
  • Little to no guidance during creation

Best free Android resume writing service

Intelligentcv resume builder app.

Intelligent CV's Resume Builder App offers 42 resume templates and allows you to change font colors. Each resume section appears on a list, and you can move through sections in whichever order you choose, save and go on to another. You also have the option to add, delete or rearrange sections such as education, experience and skills. There’s a Help icon in each section for a little bit of extra guidance. Once you're finished, you can download your document for free as a PDF, which you can then save on your device or send via email or text. 

On the downside, the app is ad-supported and ads for other resume creators do pop up, which can get confusing. The app also offers less guidance than some of the other services, which means it's not a great option if you're new to resumes.

Resume Builder App has one of the strongest privacy policies of the bunch. The app does not collect personally identifiable information , though third-party services (including Google Play services and analytics firms) may collect information. The app has 4.6 out of 5 stars and more than 424,000 Google Play Store ratings and is free to download.

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  • Easy-to-use interface
  • Inclusive premium package

Best range of professional tools

VisualCV has an easy-to-use interface that lets you build your resume in the way that works best for you. After signing up, you can upload an existing resume, begin with a prewritten sample or start entirely from scratch. You can use the basic editor to input information in a list form, the visual editor to edit directly on the resume and preview mode to see changes made on either version in real time. Revision history is also available. 

The free basic edition allows you to select from over a dozen professional templates to create, edit and download one resume as a PDF. You can also create one free cover letter and apply to jobs through its job search feature.

To download or share additional resumes, you’ll need to buy VisualCV Pro for $15 a month quarterly or $24 a month monthly. Upgrading unlocks more templates, unlimited creations, downloading, career tracking and the ability to build a personal resume website. The website URL goes through VisualCV but can be shared online. 

In terms of privacy, VisualCV's policy says that it does not sell, trade, rent or license personal information to third parties. As of publication, VisualCV has 4 out of 5 stars on Trustpilot but only 131 reviews.

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Best professional resume writing services of 2024

Depending on where you’re at in the job application process, you might need more guidance than a template. These professional writing services will pair you with experienced writers and coaches to help you craft and perfect resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters and more. 

As these services include more personalized coaching and features, they tend to be more expensive. We’ve collected a range of options depending on your budget and needs. Best professional resume writing services of 2024.

  • Resume writing and career coaching
  • Builds your resume from the ground up
  • Quick turnaround
  • More expensive options

A premium option for a tailored resume

Resumespice.

Suppose you're totally lost and are willing to invest several hundred dollars into your job search. In that case, ResumeSpice is a resume writing and career coach service created by recruiters that connects you with a "resume expert" to build your CV from scratch. 

Once you choose, you'll fill out a short questionnaire and schedule a phone consultation with a resume expert to discuss your experience, job search and career goals. The expert will take that information and turn around a personalized resume draft within two business days. You can review the draft and request any changes, and you'll get the final version in PDF and Word formats. 

An entry-level resume costs $479, a professional resume costs $589 and an executive resume costs $699. In addition to these packages, you can also add a cover letter, LinkedIn profile, interview coaching or other services to help you be more competitive in the job market.

resumespice

  • 60 day interview guarantee
  • Industry-specific advice
  • Variety of packages
  • Limited non-resume add-ons

A 60-day interview guarantee

Resumewriters.com.

ResumeWriters.com offers a guarantee: If you don't get a job interview with a potential employer within two months of getting your new resume, they'll rewrite it for free. The service claims that in the 20 years and tens of thousands of resumes completed under this guarantee, it averages fewer than five requests for rewrites per year. 

To use the resume writing service, submit your current resume or career information on the site, and an experienced resume writer will contact you to assess your materials and plan out what you need. You'll get a first draft back within 72 hours and can work with the writer on revisions until you're satisfied with the result. 

ResumeWriters offers student, professional, executive and career-change resume services, as well as CV services for those conducting their job search in fields specific to the military, IT and research. The resume services cost $170 for students and $200 for the professional level, with a cover letter, one-on-one consultation and LinkedIn profile. The career change level ($250) is a comprehensive package that includes everything plus a post-interview follow-up letter, and the highest tier is the executive package that guarantees applicants its most experienced writers for $300.

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  • ATS screening
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Longer turnaround time (3-7 business days)

A fast pass through HR screening software

Zipjob’s professional resume writers optimize your resume to get through the applicant tracking system (ATS) software used by the majority of employers to automatically scan and sort resumes. An expert writes your resume and scans it through the ATS to ensure it will make it through to the hiring manager's desk. 

To use the service, upload your resume or fill out a form to start from scratch. You'll be matched with a professional resume writer who will work with you to improve it and will then scan the final product to make sure it passes through the screening algorithms. Depending on which package you choose, your resume will be ready in three to seven days. 

You can choose from three packages: Launch (resume writing and unlimited revisions for $139), Fast Track (adds a cover letter and a 60-day interview guarantee for $189) or Premium (adds a top resume writer, LinkedIn profile optimization, future resume updates and expedited delivery for $299).

zipjob

  • Career coaching
  • Industry-specific feedback
  • Ability to customize packages
  • Longer turnaround time (3-5 business days)

An executive resume solution

Find my profession.

Find My Profession offers professional resume writing services as well as career coaching. Every resume gets reviewed by two different consultants. 

You'll find packages that include entry-level, professional, C-level and executive resume writer services, as well as federal. In each, you can choose a base, premium or VIP package depending on your needs. For example, the professional resume package starts at $595 for a resume compatible with automated systems. You can also add help with a cover letter for an additional $119 or a LinkedIn profile for $399. 

You'll get the first draft of your resume within three to five business days after you consult with a writer. Or, upgrade to a priority service for another $149 to get it within 48 hours.

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How we tested resume sites and services

When we evaluated the different resume templates and builders, we looked at how each site or app allowed you to create new resumes, browse templates or upload and edit existing resumes. We also looked at how easy or hard it would be to customize different templates and sections, how much guidance was available, how user-friendly it was to navigate, plus reading and understanding each company’s privacy policies.

Some of our picks are free, some enlist the help of professional writers and some require a subscription or one-time payment. When it comes to premium or paid services, we evaluated how inclusive its packages were compared to basic or free versions. In many cases for the professional writing services, these paid tiers included more guidance and additional job search support like a cover letter and LinkedIn editing, suggested jobs to apply to and interview coaching.

Factors to consider when choosing a resume writing service

This was a key factor when compiling this list. Whether you’re looking for a free service to boost your current resume or interested in professional editing services, there’s something for everyone’s price range.

Ease of use

When looking at each website, we looked at how easy it was to navigate, browse templates and add, edit or remove different sections. We also considered whether you can download and share your resume for free and in what format.

Customization options

Customization options were essential, as everyone’s resume is going to look different. Having easy user control over your resume helps you create a resume that meets your industry’s standards and showcases your professional experiences.

Privacy policies

Privacy policies were the final important factor to consider, as many of these are websites and apps that can collect and store your personal information. All of the services and websites included on this list have decent privacy settings, and we noted which ones have exceptionally clear use cases and account deletion policies.

Resume writing FAQs

What is a resume builder.

A resume builder is a company that has a website or app that helps you create and customize your resume. You can use pre-existing templates or create your own from scratch.

What is a resume writing service?

A resume writing service is a company that pairs you with a coach or writer to work with you to create, perfect and tailor your resume, cover letters and other job application materials. These tend to be more inclusive packages and therefore more expensive than simple resume template websites.

What is the best resume format to use?

The best format for your resume is going to depend on the job you are applying to, along with your work experience. Resume templates can help you format and include all the necessary information like your education, work experience, skills and contact information.

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How to Make a Resume: 11 Easy Steps for 2024

Stephen Greet

Step 1: Choose Your Resume Format

Step 2: choose a simple resume template, step 3: decide your resume length.

  • Step 4: Include Your Contact Information

Step 5: Describe Your Work Experience

When looking for your dream job, chances are others are, too. That’s why you want to make sure your AI cover letter and resume get noticed.

Starting from scratch is time-consuming and can result in improper formatting that won’t pass the initial ATS, which means your document may never reach a human.

Avoid frustration and know your resume will pass the ATS and grab the eye of a recruiter by using our  AI resume builder . By filling in your information, you’ll have a great resume to showcase your talents in a way that’s appealing to recruiters.

You’ll also save yourself time, potentially up to three hours, over using resume templates for Word or Google Docs . Because relevancy is key to employers when skimming these documents, you’ll need a separate resume for each job you apply for. Our resume maker lets you create multiple resumes quickly. 

While a resume should be a marketing tool to land an interview, it’s hard to know where to start. We’ve boiled it down to 11 steps to make it easier and faster to create the perfect resume for the role you want.

Real Estate Agent Resume

Get started customizing your own resume by clicking on this real estate agent resume below:

Real estate agent resume resume example with 12 years experience

Resume format  refers to the way you display pertinent information in your document. You’ll want to include contact information, a job title, work history, skills, education and any other information that will show the potential employer not only how your previous employment qualifies you for the job, but how you will be an asset to their company.

The way you set up this information can make it easier or more difficult for the recruiter. There are multiple ways you can format your resume, but there are three styles that are most common among job seekers.

  • Reverse-chronological format  is the preferred style for recruiters as it highlights your most recent relevant employment and accomplishments that relate to the new position. It’s also the best format to pass through ATS.
  • Functional format  is good if you have little work experience or employment gaps. It’s great for emphasizing skills for an entry-level position, but it can highlight a lack of actual work experience.
  • Hybrid format  is a way to show how your transferable skills relate to the new position, which can be beneficial if you’ve switched fields a time or two over the years.

Resume format comparisons

You may be tempted to choose a resume format based on your experience and the type of job you’re applying for. Just remember that recruiters will only spend about seven seconds skimming your resume before deciding if you deserve additional consideration or if you’ll be passed over without reading further to see if you’re a good fit for the position.

While each format has its pros and cons, nearly anyone can benefit from choosing the reverse-chronological format because it’s well known, and recruiters know exactly where to look for specific information, making their job much easier. When potential employers can see that you’re possibly a good fit in a quick skim, they’re more likely to read further.

Understandably, there are times when you might feel that it’s in your best interest to use one of the other popular resume formats. The other two styles may not pass through ATS, they can be confusing for recruiters who are searching for something in particular, and they definitely raise red flags regarding your work history. If your document passes through ATS and the recruiter can’t find what they’re looking for quickly, you can expect that your resume won’t get a second glance as it makes its way to the circular file. That’s why it’s always a good choice to put yourself in the shoes of the recruiter when formatting your resume.

You don’t want all of your hard work creating the perfect resume to go to waste. Even if you have little or no actual job experience, gaps in your career or various fields of work, the reverse-chronological resume format can be made to work to your advantage. Using a resume builder makes it easier to utilize applicable skills from other areas, such as volunteering, internships, military experience, and even hobbies you pursue on a regular basis.

Young lady sitting at her laptop trying to select a simple resume template

While format is how you present your information, a resume template is a pre-made guide you can use to input your information in the format you choose. It can be tempting to select a template that uses pictures, diagrams, or complex patterns to portray your unique style, but these features just get in the way and won’t make it past the ATS. It’s best to choose a simple resume template as the words you choose will be what sets you apart from other applicants.

Simple doesn’t mean that your resume will look bland and devoid of character. On the contrary, a resume that’s formatted in a simple layout will pass through ATS with ease and will draw the recruiter’s attention to specific areas of focus for enhanced readability.

Resume template tips

Our simple  free resume templates  make it easy for you to add or remove information and manipulate sections for personalization without affecting the overall layout of your resume. If you choose to work with a resume template through a word-processing program, like the creative  Google Docs templates  we just designed, making changes can throw everything off kilter, often causing you to have to start from scratch to correct the problem.

Pros of BeamJobs resume templates

While it’s tempting to include as much of your work-related experience and skills in your resume, keep this information to one page [1] . Knowing this from the start helps you consider only relevant information and decide on ways to keep the information short and sweet. Recruiters have a limited amount of time they can spend reading resumes from quite possibly hundreds of candidates, so a one-page resume is generally the best choice.

A one-page resume

Resume length tips

However, if you’ve worked in the same field for more than 10 years, you might find you need to use two pages to show a progression in duties and responsibilities in your field. Additionally, if you’re a high-level executive, scientist or professor, you may need additional room to provide enough information for a potential employer to gain a full understanding of how you’re the best candidate for the position. If you must use two pages, be sure that the second page is full for consistency.

You might notice that some employers ask specifically for a resume, a CV or they use resume and CV interchangeably. Whereas a resume is meant to be short and to the point, a curriculum vitae, or CV, is designed to provide more in-depth information. There are a few  differences between a resume and a CV :

Resume vs CV

Step 4: Include Your Contact Information in a Header

A young man at his laptop thinking about what contact info to include in his resume

The contact information section is the easiest part to complete, so its importance is often overlooked.

Resume contact header

This is the meat of your resume and the part that’s the most important to potential employers. If you’re wondering what type of information to include in your work history section, a good way to get some ideas is to check out some  resume examples  for your field of expertise and years of experience.

Resume work experience tips

When crafting your document, be sure to include specific information from the job ad but only if you actually have that experience. Because the ATS will automatically search for appropriate keywords and phrases, you can readily find what employers are searching for in other resumes and the ad for the job you’re applying for. Also, look at other ads for similar positions to find industry-specific keyword information to include.

What details should I include about my job?

While recruiters may not take time to read every aspect of your previous work history, there’s some information that’s expected to be included in your resume. As with every other section of your document, make sure the spelling is correct and that there are no errors as this can ruin your chances of getting hired.

Resume job details

What do I write in my job description bullet points?

This is the area in your resume where you can get creative to help you stand apart from other applicants. If you simply list your job duties, your resume will look just like those of everyone else. Additionally, if you’re applying for a position with a similar title, the recruiter already knows the job duties for that position. You want to show the potential employer why you should be chosen for the position. You’ll need to provide specific examples that show a measurable impact.

Resume job description bullet points

5 ways to quantify your impact

Numbers represent facts that can’t be denied. When you put numbers on what you’ve accomplished, this stands out in the eyes of recruiters and builds your credibility.

Quantifying job impact on resume

What if I don’t have work experience?

If you don’t have any work experience or have just a little under your belt, don’t worry. You’re not alone. There are many cases where you may not have actual paid work experience. If you’re a student or recent graduate, it’s understood that you’ve likely spent your time and focus on completing your studies rather than dividing your time between school and employment. In the same manner, you may be a homemaker or military personnel who is trying to enter or re-enter the job market, or you may be changing fields.

Resume non-work experience

Volunteer work, freelancing, and odd jobs can be set up just like a paid position in reverse-chronological order along with any work history. Include the company name or use self-employed, the job title, dates of service and location.

Other activities or projects are a little trickier to add to the work experience section, so it’s important to include the appropriate information. Start with the project name, the company or who the activity was completed for and the date of the project. Use the list of bullets to describe the project and the role you played. As with other paid employment, quantifiable information stands out more than generalized statements.

Here are some examples: If you completed a successful project using software such as Java, SQL, or Python, you’ll want to describe this when applying for a technical position. Leadership skills are highly desirable and transferrable, so you’ll want to include any team projects that you spearheaded. If you excelled in a public speaking course, this could be relevant for a position where you’ll have a lot of face-to-face interactions with the public.

Begin by making a master list of your activities and projects. Now choose those that fit in with the job you’re applying for. You’ll go back to the master list to make it easier to find what you need when applying to other positions. Get inspired with more ideas by looking at  resume samples  like the one below that focus on projects and other types of experience.

Projects-based Resume Example

High school resume example

Step 6: Add Your Skills

Three colleagues with a laptop and pad device discussing their skills

The skills section lets you showcase the abilities that make you a perfect match for the job. When considering  skills for your resume , only include those hard and soft skills that are relevant to the job position you’re applying for. The posted ad will most likely let you know at least some of the skills that the company is seeking in an applicant, so you can start with those. If there’s not enough information, look at similar job ads from other companies to fill in the gaps. Better yet, call the company and ask directly. Who knows? You may speak with the job recruiter, making a solid first impression through your initiative to do a little sleuth work.

Resume skills tips

Hard skills include your know-how and experience that are specific and quantifiable. Soft skills, on the other hand, are those you develop yourself through life experiences. Some hard skills you might want to include involve any software or technical skills you may have, such as bookkeeping, scheduling, content management systems, UX/UI design, foreign languages, data analysis, or even your typing speed. Soft skills employers find desirable consist of time management, leadership, active listening, communication, responsibility, and problem-solving.

Only include skills you actually have. For example, if the job ad states you must be proficient in Jira, don’t include this if you’ve only dabbled in it. You may have to complete a skills test as a part of the interview process, or you could be fired if you’re found out.

Rather than stretch the truth, consider taking online courses or refreshers to stay current with the latest trends. If you don’t have enough of the skills the company is seeking in the job posting, it’s probably wise to look for a position requiring more of the talents you possess.

Step 7: Include Your Education and Certifications

Portfolio with certificates & degrees and phone displaying a check signifying a valid certification

Your education and degrees should be listed in reverse-chronological order just like your work history. If you’ve completed higher education, there’s no need to add high school. Begin with the program name or degree obtained, followed by the name of the institution, the city and state where the institution is located, and the dates you attended. Alternatively, you can just use the year you graduated.

You can include your education even if you’re still in school. Follow the graduation date with “expected” or “anticipated” in parentheses. If you didn’t finish your education, whether high school or college, simply list “years attended” followed by the dates. College coursework you’ve completed that’s related to the position can be listed as well if you’re a recent grad.

Optionally, if you’ve recently graduated, you may wish to add a minor, your GPA if it’s 3.2 or higher, honors, achievements, projects, publications, or extracurricular activities if any of this information is relevant to the position or if you don’t have much in the way of work experience. This extra information gives recruiters more information on why they should choose you over other candidates.

Any certifications or licenses you hold should go in this section if they’re relevant to the job. This is a good opportunity to make sure your certifications and licenses are up to date. Because they vary from state to state and even between different companies within the same field, make sure you don’t disqualify yourself from the position by letting your certifications or licenses lapse.

Step 8: Decide Whether to Include an Objective or Summary

A desktop monitor and laptop screen showing resumes with an objective and a summary respectively.

The resume objective or summary can either make the recruiter want to continue reading or pass you over for another applicant, so it’s important to capture employers’ eyes quickly with this section.

Resume objective and summary differences

It’s best to save the objective or summary until after you’ve written your job bullet points, skills, and education sections, so you can draw information from these. Be sure to select appropriate keywords and phrases to use in the introduction to tie everything together into the position you want. Use the job description to decide on the specific wording combined with your expertise to make it easier for recruiters to make a match. Take a look at some  resume objective examples  or  resume summary examples  to inspire you.

Step 9: Decide Whether to Add Other Resume Sections

Young lady leaning over various panels, adding extra sections

Now that you’ve completed the bulk of your resume, it’s time to really stand out. There are some additional resume sections you can add to emphasize your qualifications for the position.

Optional resume sections

You’ll want to include additional sections if you have limited work experience, are currently in school or recently graduated, are applying in a highly competitive field, or need to provide more information to show how you’re qualified for the job. Additionally, other sections can be used as a way to fill up excessive white space for a more balanced appearance for your resume.

While it can be tempting to include as much additional information as possible, you don’t want to stuff your resume with unnecessary information. Not only does this crowd your document and make it look messy, but it also makes it difficult for recruiters to sift through. Carefully work through any additional sections you’re considering when  outlining your resume , so you can be sure you’ll strengthen what you’ve already included in as further proof that you deserve the position.

Step 10: Tailor Your Resume for the Job

Two hands adjusting components on a panel.

It can’t be stated enough: You must tailor your resume to the specific position that you’re applying for. Don’t forget to search the job description for keywords that you can use in your previous employment bullet points, skills section, and resume objective or summary. You may even need to change your wording in the education and additional sections so they fit.

It’s important to write your resume for the position you want as listed in the job posting to make sure you pass through ATS and then draw the recruiter’s attention once the document reaches human eyes. Even if you’re applying for a single position across the board, you’ll need to create a new resume for each different company because they may all have different requirements and keywords. While this may seem like a lot of work, you don’t want it to look like you’re sending out mass-produced documents to just anyone and everyone.

At this point, you’ll also want to consider the type of field you’re in. If you’re applying to a highly professional position, you’ll want to keep your wording in line and focus on your expertise. Choose a traditional layout for your resume. However, if the position is with a casual startup in its early stages of operation, you can likely include more creativity because the recruiter may be looking for someone innovative and imaginative. In this case, choosing a more modern layout can help you stand out above other applicants.

Make sure your resume fits the bill by using our  free resume checker . You’ll get valuable information and tips on how to improve your document to help you stand out.

Takeaway : Create multiple resumes. Since you’ll need a document that’s specifically tailored to get noticed, you’ll want a separate one for each position you’re applying for.

Step 11: Triple-Check for Spelling and Grammar

Two colleagues check a resume for spelling and grammar

Your resume is a snapshot of you and your abilities. Make sure there are no errors. Proofread your document; then, do it again. Set it aside for a while or overnight, and come back to it to check for errors a final time. It’s wise to have a friend, coworker, or family member go through it as well. It’s hard to catch your own mistakes, especially after you’ve spent so much time writing and rewriting your document.

If there are errors, recruiters may assume you’ll make even more mistakes on the job. It’s imperative to put yourself in the shoes of hiring personnel. They have to look through potentially hundreds of resumes for each position, perhaps reading the same information over and over again. They’re looking for any reason to say no rather than yes just to reduce their workload. Don’t let spelling or grammatical errors give them that reason.

As an added benefit, you can choose one of our resume templates or use our resume builder to take the guesswork out of the format and layout for your document. You can easily make changes without messing up the appearance of your entire document. Once again, take advantage of our AI-powered  resume tool  to help you make the most of active voice, verb choice, quantifying your impact, and consistency, so you can quickly proofread your material.

How to Write a Resume in 2024

A young lady at her laptop writing her resume

Writing a resume in 2024 is much different than in years past. Instead of creating a single document that you personalize with a cover letter, recruiters want to see that you have what they’re looking for with a quick skim. Additionally, ATS will search for relevant keywords, so it’s vital to tailor your resume to each specific position by looking at the job posting, similar positions, and completed resumes within your field.

Take a look at how to write each section of your resume, and be sure to include all of the necessary information. If anything is lacking, your resume could end up in the recycle bin before it’s even fully read by a recruiter. In the same manner, don’t add irrelevant information because it detracts from what’s important. Keep your resume to a single page.

Do your research. Specific keywords and phrases can determine if you get past the initial scan or not. The actual job posting contains valuable information that you should use to your advantage. Consider your experience that’s not related to paid employment for additional emphasis or if your work history is sparse. Always be honest with your abilities and what you’ve done because recruiters will check.

Find ways to stand out over other applicants with a simple resume design. You can use a premade template, but choose one that’s easy to personalize. To avoid layout blunders when making changes or passing through ATS, our resume builder will keep everything in its place. Finally, proofread your document. Get help from a third party, and use a  resume checker .

[1] The Muse. (2016, August 10). 20 Basic Resume Writing Rules That’ll Put You Ahead of the Competition.  Forbes .

[2] Caine, A., Gal, S. & Akhtar, A. (2020 November 19). We asked a career expert to build the perfect resume. Here’s a template you can use to update your CV and land a dream job.  Business Insider .

[3] Gallo, A. (2014, December 19). How to Write a Resume that Stands Out.  Harvard Business Review .

[4] Sweetwood, M. (2016 April 19). 13 Social Media Power Tips for Getting the Job You Want.  Entrepreneur .

[5] Jackson, A. E. (2018 October 22). 21 Words to Never Include in Your Resume.  Glassdoor .

Create my free resume now

Resume Help

To get a job in a foreign company, or in a company with foreign management, each applicant is simply obliged to write a resume that meets international standards. Resume writing today has become as time-consuming a process as writing a report. Trying to write a resume on their own, many job seekers make a lot of mistakes, and only a site with resume help can help write a CV correctly.

Resume writing is not as difficult as it is said on the Internet

Many applicants are accustomed to the fact that the resume should contain only the previous job and position. In the modern world to CV put forward absolutely other requirements. Website resumehelpservice.com will help in customized resume writing for each client. After all, the summary of the new sample already contains as many as 7 points.

It is mandatory to specify personal data at the beginning of the resume, and then there is a goal, Job Objective. Customer service resume takes into account all your needs: who you see yourself in the company in the future, and even plans for personal growth. Resume help is not just a set of standard phrases about your prospects, it really is also an aid in realizing the benefits of a career in a large company.

Writing a resume using resumehelpservice.com -the first step to success

After the mandatory first points in the CV, you still need to specify education and work experience. The name of some educational institutions is difficult to translate into English without errors, and writing a resume using resumehelpservice.com will help you avoid absurdities during translation.

Using resume help you will avoid all the mistakes that make novice job seekers. For example, in the enumeration of professional skills when compiling customer service resume, it is necessary to mention those that do not directly relate to the position. When writing a resume, you can specify and possession of multimedia programs, even if now this skill is not relevant.

Customized resume writing for everyone individually and with a creative approach

Customer service resume will allow each potential employee to create a resume that will emphasize the strengths. Getting quality resume help, you can be sure that the employer will be fully satisfied with the information received. After all, during resume writing, such items as Hobbies and recommendations will be indicated.

With customer service resume, your CV will display information from previous employers with the most flattering reviews. And the opinion of other people when resume writing is very important even for ordinary HR, not to mention more senior management. Working on customized resume writing, it is also worth mentioning Hobbies. Sports will tell you that you are persistent and purposeful, and collecting will emphasize your perseverance. Just use resume help – and your dream job will become even closer.

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7 Best Resume Writing Services (+ Which Are Worth It)

Sarah Colley

3 key takeaways

  • There's a wide range of professional resume writing services ranging from executive to budget.
  • While job seekers often pay per resume with a professional writer, AI resume builders allow you to quickly create and optimize several versions to each job, presenting a more cost-efficient alternative.
  • Teal’s AI Resume Builder is unlike most resume writing services in that it allows you to tailor your resume to every single job application using keyword matching and scoring. 

One of the biggest questions surrounding resume writing services is whether or not they’re worth it. 

The answer: it varies.

If you’re new to the job market and your resume is fairly simple, or you are working with a lower budget, you might not need a dedicated resume writer.

But if you’re looking to tailor you’re resume for the job, while meeting ATS (applicant tracking systems) readability standards , then you might need a professionally-written resume. 

This article compares some of the best resume writing services, where you can hire them, and how to choose the right one for you.

Struggling to land interviews with your resume? Get started with Teal’s AI Resume Builder for free.

Types of resume writing services

While the goal of professional resume writing services is to create a resume that’ll land you a job, each type of resume service goes about it differently.

Resume writing services from a company

Larger companies that employ hundreds of freelance resume writers are a popular choice for many job seekers with a decent budget and a longer timeline with their applications.

The benefit of this type is the company is optionality. Some may even have in-house writers dedicated to your specific industry or role and can provide insights into previously successful resumes. 

Some resume writing services are large enough that they don’t dedicate one person or team to your account. Instead, you’ll have multiple people working on your resume, and the communication between them might not be stellar. They also might keyword stuff rather than weaving them in naturally.

One job seeker from Reddit shared their experience using a professional resume writing service: 

“I went with a resume writing service, and they clearly outsourced it to a country where English is not the most commonly spoken language. It was terrible and rife with errors. Luckily, I got my money back.”

Specialized resume writing services

These are services dedicated either to your industry or career level, such as executive resume writing services, which often offer career training as well. 

These services often have a directory of writers they vet and certify to write resumes for their specific industries, so you know you’re getting a professional. Typically, you’ll have a dedicated writer or team rather than subcontracted writers, editors, and reviewers.

Cons of specialized resume writing services

While they’re more tailored and often include specific skills to help you land more interviews, they tend to be more costly. You might also have deal with delays in your ability to apply, as you go through a series of interviews with the service to ensure they’re truly capturing your work experience.

Resume writers

You can, of course, hire a professional resume writer that is unaffiliated with any company. These writers often work for themselves as a freelancer or small business, and have niched down into one particular area of resume writing.

Cons of working with a professional resume writer

While they might have specialized industry knowledge, they're likely not familiar with the nuances of modern hiring tech or recruiting. They could just be a good writer that passed a training program to become certified in resume writing.

Teal’s Director of Talent, Mike Peditto, echoes this with his statement:

"Some resume writers rely on a bit more of an outdated style that puts a large focus on visual appeal above the user experience of the reader. They often rely heavily on graphics, charts, tables or other design tactics that not only may get lost in an ATS, but also tend to focus on the items a recruiter doesn't need to see right away. This can be be more distracting than valuable to somebody quickly doing a pass through of the resume looking for key information."

Building a resume with a resume builder

A resume builder is a tool that allows you to create and customize your resume again to match the position you’re applying for. 

This can be advantageous, since you understand your work history and industry better than anyone else. You also know which skills you want to highlight more depending on the role and how well you match it. 

Another benefit is cost per resume. You can create as many resumes as you’d like, allowing you to tailor the resume to every single application. Whereas most services will provide you with one polished resume that isn’t tailored to a specific role, unless you’ve requested such. 

Cons of using a resume builder

If your writing skills aren’t strong, you might not fully highlight your skills and experience without the help of AI features, not available in every resume builder. And while AI will assist in the writing, you will still want to personalize it. Teal gives you the best of both worlds with AI writing and ability to pull keywords from the job description, allowing you to better tailor each resume at scale.

match resume to job keywords

You also might need to rely on templates to ensure you’re using the correct formatting to meet standards for an ATS.

7 top resume writing services

Calling anything “the best” is subjective to the criteria. Our criteria for determining the best writing services includes:

  • Speedy delivery
  • Good pricing
  • Writing skills commensurate with your level of education, expertise, and career

No recruiter or hiring manager is going to spend ages pouring over the details of your resume. But they will still notice typos, glaring grammatical errors, and formatting inconsistencies. 

Worse, your resume won’t get a second glance at all if your experience and skills don’t jump off the page and scream, “I’m the one for the job”. 

So, you need a professional resume service that understands your work history and how to highlight your experience, for the right price, so you can apply before the window of opportunity closes. 

Below are nine of the best resume services available right now:

  • Best executive resume writing service
  • Best resume writing services online
  • Best-rated resume writing services
  • Best affordable resume writing services

Best AI-powered resume builder

Best specialty resume writing services.

  • Best resume writing service with additional professional packages
  • Best resume service with quick turnaround time

Best executive resume writing service: Executive Resume Writers

TopResume is one of the most well-known resume writing services for executives. However, the negative experiences around their services have been widely recounted in online reviews and forums. 

If you want a true executive service, consider Executive Resume Writers.

Executive Resume Writers homepage

Their clients have found work at Capital One, Dell, Google, Humana, Salesforce, Morgan Stanley, and dozens of other recognizable corporations.

They’re professional resume writers have written for a wide range of executive titles, from VP & Managing Director to President and CEO. 

Executive Resume Writers review

Industry specializations

  • Arts & Entertainment
  • Financial Services
  • Hospitality
  • Information Services
  • Manufacturing
  • Other Industry
  • Professional and Technical Services
  • Public Administration
  • Real Estate
  • Retail Trade

Other services offered

Beyond their expertise in writing resumes for the executive level, they also offer: 

  • LinkedIn optimization
  • Interview preparation
  • Career coaching

Cost: While Executive Resume Writers doesn't explicitly list their pricing, they do offer a range of $2,000 to $5,000.

Best-rated resume writing service: TopStack

Searching for professional resume writing services with the best ratings compared to the number of ratings and reviews, you find that TopStack lives up to its name by coming up top. They have a 4.8 star rating with 1,968 reviews on Trustpilot—more than any other resume writing service (excluding AI resume builders).

Topstack 5-star review on Trustpilot

They have an incredibly simple process from filling out your initial intake form to assigning you to one of their experienced, US-based writers within 1-2 days. If you need to expedited the order, they’re able to accommodate if you alert them to this. 

Once assigned, they give their writers 48 hours to turn in a first draft. You may get up to two revisions of your resume after you’ve paid for your first draft. 

TopStack does not name list their staff publicly. Instead, they state they have experts in every single industry :

“Our team of 100+ professional writers have worked with clients in all industries and at all experience levels. In the (very) rare event that we don't have someone with experience writing in your field, we'll reach out to you after placing an order.” 

Other services

  • LinkedIn profile development
  • Cover letters
  • Personal recruiting
  • Career consulting

TopStack offers four different payment options. Their most basic package is $139, and their most expensive is $1149, paid on a monthly basis as it includes a personal recruiter that’ll go beyond the call to find you a job.

TopStack pricing

Best affordable resume writing service: ZipJob

ZipJob is one of the most affordable resume writing services that still offer professional writers and a decent turnaround of three to seven days. They back up their services with a guarantee that you land an interview within 60 days.

What sets them apart, aside from the low price, is that they grant you unfettered access to your professional resume writer.

ZipJob 5-star review on Trustpilot

ZipJob employs a roster of over 100 professional resume writers that have worked in Fortune 500 recruiting, career coaching, HR, and job placement, aside from resume writing. 

ZipJob has specialists in over 65 industries, including:

  • Free resume review
  • LinkedIn profile optimization

Cost: $139 to $299

Best resume writing service by offering: Let’s Eat, Grandma

While the name might bring on a laugh, Let’s Eat, Grandma is all serious when it comes to resume writing packages. 

Their most affordable service is fairly basic, offering a 30 minute one-on-one consultation, well-crafted resume, and two revisions. Their most extensive package of the four includes nine services, such as executive career coaching and unlimited revisions.

Let's Eat, Grandma 5-star review on Trustpilot

If you’re working on a shorter timeline for applying to positions, they might not be your best choice, as you’ll receive your first draft in about a week and the two revisions after an additional week.

But if you’re looking for a resume writing service that offers more than the average service, with true professionals at a decent price (and aren’t on a time restraint), Let’s Eat, Grandma is a great option. 

While they do not list their industries, it’s safe to assume they work with a wide range of clients.

  • Executive resume
  • Value proposition letter
  • Digital guide to cold emails & thank-you notes
  • Executive LinkedIn profile rewrite
  • Access to a dedicated customer success representative
  • 10 days of unlimited revisions
  • 4x the talk time with your writer
  • 60-minute executive career coaching session
  • Guaranteed senior writer for executives
  • Job search strategy meeting
  • Career roadblock office hours
  • Strategic applicant guide
  • LinkedIn profile rewrite
  • Resume critique

Cost: $439 to $1,899

Let's Eat, Grandma pricing

Best resume service by speed: The Job Sauce

The Job Sauce doesn’t use their quick turnaround as a selling point but, nonetheless, they get you in front of an assigned writer within one business day. The work is fast yet skilled, and even their most basic package comes packed with bonus features.

Members get an industry-specific writer, a LinkedIn best practices guide, and lifetime webinar access. If you upgrade to the more premium package, you get services like training in salary negotiation and clarity coaching.

The Job Sauce 5-star review on Trustpilot

Industry specialization

They don’t list the industries they serve, but they do mention that they provide an industry-specific writer. 

‍ Other services

  • Upgraded results-driven resume
  • Applicant tracking systems optimized
  • LinkedIn best practice guide
  • Industry-specific professional writer
  • Quick turnaround time
  • Lifetime webinar access
  • Premium assessments
  • Two 60-minute calls
  • Clarity on next steps
  • Interview coaching
  • Job offer coaching

Cost: $369 to 799

When it comes to specialty resume writing services, it only makes sense to highlight a few different services, considering the wide range of specializations.

Find My Profession is a great federal resume writing service that happens to specialize in C-Suite resume writing services.

Find My Profession 5-star review on Trustpilot

ResuMeds is a top choice resume writing service for medical professionals. They’re fairly priced with a rate of $100 to 225 and have a turnaround time of three days.

iCareer Solutions offers professional resume writing services for IT, fintech, and software professionals. They won first place for Information Technology Resume Writing in the 2019 TORI Awards (Toast Of the Résumé Industry) from Career Directors International (CDI).

  • Medical professionals
  • C-suite executives
  • Federal employees
  • IT professionals
  • Software engineering
  • Data analytics
  • Programming
  • System analytics
  • Cover letter writing
  • LinkedIn makeover
  • Professional bio
  • Networking resume
  • Resume distribution
  • US recruiters listing

Cost: $100 to 1500

Want the advantages of a specialized resume writing service without the service cost and wait time? Teal’s match scoring makes it easy to compare your resume to a job description . 

While hiring a professional resume writing service is a great option for those with a higher budget, more technical needs, and less-confident writing skills, they aren’t the only option for creating a high-powered resume. 

An AI-powered resume builder like Teal is a great option if you're applying to multiple jobs and need to tailor every resume to the job descriptions. 

The AI identifies the keywords as well as soft and hard skills within a job description, highlighting them for you and scoring your resume based on how well it matches.

Teal keyword matching

Teal’s AI Professional Summary considers both the job you’re applying for and your work experience to tailor a professional resume that highlights the ten percent of you that's 100 percent relevant to each job.

A lot of resume writers and job seekers make the mistake of simply listing their responsibilities and tasks on their resume, versus the outcomes they’ve produced. The AI achievements feature in Teal is the answer to that. This feature pulls out specific accomplishments, such as cutting spend for your company or reducing expenses by 20 percent. 

Industry specialties

Teal is an online resume building tool usable by any job seeker in any industry, for any level of experience. 

  • Job Application Tracker
  • Resume Checker
  • Cover letter Generator
  • LinkedIn Profile Review
  • Autofill Job Applications
  • Resume Bullet Point Generator
  • Professional Bio Generator
  • Career Personality Test
  • Career Goal Tracker
  • Networking CRM
  • Job Search Chrome Extension
  • Job Application Email Templates
  • Resume Templates
  • Resume and Cover Letter Examples

Cost: Free to $9 per week

Is it worth paying for resume writing service?

From looking at loads of reviews and services, it’s easy to tell that the answer doesn’t just depend on your situation, but on the service you choose.

The larger resume services that promise the lowest prices and the fastest turnarounds tend to make customers feel scammed. Customers have largely noted that their work was outsourced and the writers didn’t incorporate feedback or understand their work history. 

In this case, using an AI resume builder like Teal helps you not only tailor one resume, but hundreds.

Frequently Asked Questions

What companies provide the best-rated resume writing service.

TopStack is highly rated with a 4.8-star rating on Trustpilot. Executive Resume Writers are known for their success with high-level positions at companies like Google and Morgan Stanley. ZipJob offers affordable and professional resume writing with a 60-day interview guarantee.

What are the pros and cons of paying for resume writing?

Pros include professional writers crafting tailored, ATS-friendly resumes. Cons include the risk of poor quality from outsourced services and higher costs. Additionally, there's no job guarantee.

What is the best resume writer service?

Executive Resume Writers are ideal for high-level positions. TopStack is great for general professional resumes with positive customer feedback. ZipJob is best for budget-friendly, professional resume writing.

Paying for a resume service can increase your chances of passing ATS and impressing recruiters. The value depends on the quality of the service chosen. High-rated services are more likely to deliver worthwhile results.

How much does a resume writing service cost?

Basic services start around $139, like those from ZipJob. Mid-range services, such as TopStack, range from $139 to $1,149. High-end executive services can cost between $2,000 and $5,000. In comparison, AI resume builders like Teal start at $9/week.

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Build & write Best Resume / CV & Application Covering Letter [Free Online Course] - TechCracked

Build & write Best Resume / CV & Application Covering Letter

Help for CV / Resume building and writing for job search using LinkedIn Profile ; Formats for Resume and Letter writing

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  • Sample Resume CV
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Are you facing challenges in getting a job because of your CV (Resume) not getting shortlisted for the job interviews? Do you not only want to learn a new way to write a more Targeted Effective Resume but also get help in writing one for yourself?

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When I was working with IIM Udaipur as a Career Advisor many students approached me for their CV not getting short listed. As I started digging deeper with them for the reasons, I started discovering what would make it happen. Things like right and appealing format, CV customized to meet the JD requirements started surfacing as the critical thing needed to get the CV shortlisted. But biggest realization was the preparing a Great CV takes a lot of good feedback on what will make it great. It is like playing cricket; you need to work on it, keep taking feedback till you get it right! And that is the focus of this course- to not only tell how to prepare a great CV but help you do it!

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Software Tester Resume: Expert Tips and Examples

A Software Tester is crucial in ensuring that software is bug-free and meets technical and user requirements. Your future success in this role hinges on your skills and experiences. Learn how to list your certifications on your Software Tester Resume. This blog will help you showcase your skills and experiences for future success.

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In the world of Software Development, Software Testing stands as a trusted ally—a vigilant guardian that ensures software products perform flawlessly. Like a skilled debugger, it hunts down bugs, fine-tunes performance, and ensures seamless User Experiences. 

But how did we arrive here? Back in 1948, Software Testing emerged alongside development, initially focused on bug fixes. Fast-forward to the 1980s, and testing evolved beyond isolated bugs—it now thrives in real-world scenarios. As software’s dominion expands across industries, the Software Tester’s role remains pivotal. 

Imagine your Software Tester Resume as meticulously crafted code—a blueprint for your career ascent. Let’s unravel the secrets to creating an ideal resume that opens doors to thrilling opportunities in the ever-evolving world of Software Development. Ready? Let’s dive in!   

Table of Contents

1) How to add a Software Testing certification onto your CV? 

a) Choose the Right Format 

b) Highlight Your Skill 

c) Showcase Your Projects 

d) Use Action Verbs 

e) Proofread and Review 

2) Relevant Certifications to Add on Resume  

3) Avoid Misusage on Resumes 

4) Conclusion 

How to add a Software Testing certification to your CV?  

Creating an impactful resume requires attention to detail and an unwavering focus on showcasing your strengths. Here are some essential tips to keep in mind:  

Software Testing Courses 

Choose the Right Format  

Align your resume format with the type of Software Testing job you’re seeking. 

a) For Manual Testing roles, a chronological format highlighting work experience and achievements is ideal.  

b) For Automation Testing roles, a functional format emphasising skills and projects works best.  

c) Alternatively, a combination format blending both approaches can be effective. 

Here’s an example:  

Work Experience

Senior Software Tester, XYZ Corp. (2020 - Present)

Project lead on automated testing using [Software Testing tool name] for Banking software.

 

 

Spearheaded functional testing for healthcare software.  

Consider this example of a functional resume format:  

 

: Proficient with [Software Testing tool names]. 

: Experience with [Data analysis tools]. 

Here’s an example of a hybrid resume format: 

 

1) Manual Testing: Exceptional debugging skills with various manual testing tools. 

2) Automated Testing: Proficient in scripting automated tests using [Software Testing tool names].  

 

1) Lead Software Tester, [Company name]. (2017- Present) 

2) Managed the transition from manual to automated testing process, increasing efficiency by 50%.

Highlight your Skills  

Include Software Testing skills relevant to the job description.  

a) List tools, frameworks, methodologies, techniques, languages, and platforms.  

b) Mention certifications, courses, or training that demonstrate your expertise. 

c) Use keywords and phrases from the job description to align your skills with the employer’s expectations.   

Consider this format for highlighting your skills:  

 

1) Automated testing tools 

2) Manual testing 

3) Test case creation 

4) Knowledge of Agile/Scrum 

5) Performance testing 

6) Debugging 

7) Knowledge of SQL databases 

 

1) Analytical thinking 

2) Attention to detail 

3) Problem-solving 

4) Effective communication 

5) Time management 

6) Team collaboration 

7) Adaptability

Showcase your Projects  

Highlight your Software Testing experience and achievements through your projects.  

a) Include those from previous or current jobs, freelance work, volunteer work, or personal projects.  

b) Describe each project’s scope, goals, challenges, and results, and emphasise your role, responsibilities, and contributions.  

c) Use metrics to quantify your impact and value. 

Use Action Verbs  

Utilise action verbs to describe your Software Testing skills and achievements, showcasing your initiative, leadership, and problem-solving abilities. 

a) Examples include tested, debugged, automated, verified, validated, designed, implemented, documented, reported, or improved. 

b) Avoid passive or vague verbs like worked, involved, or responsible. 

Proofread and Review  

Before sending your resume, proofread and review it for spelling, grammar, punctuation, and formatting errors. 

a) Ensure clarity, conciseness, and consistency.  

b) Utilise online tools, peer feedback, or professional services to refine your resume.  

c) Tailor it to each job application, highlighting Software Testing skills that match specific requirements. 

Consider this example for highlighting strong work experience and key projects:  

 

XYZ Tech 

2018 - Present 

1) Developed and executed comprehensive test cases that increased defect detection by 30%. 

2) Spearheaded a cross-functional team in the integration of automated testing processes for [Project name], reducing manual testing hours by 45%. 

3) Championed the use of [Software Testing tool name] for automated testing, improving test efficiency by 40%. 

 

: Led the implementation of automated tests, reducing manual testing effort by 45%. 

: Coordinated a team of 5 testers for end-to-end testing of [project], ensuring 99% accuracy before go-live.

Looking to expand career opportunities and your reputation as a Sofware Testing Professional? Sign up for our ISTQB Advanced Test Automation Engineer Course now!  

Relevant Certifications to Add on Resume  

When adding certifications to your resume, choose those that are widely recognised and respected in the industry. Some notable Software Testing certifications include:  

In-demand Software Tester Certifications

ISTQB Certified Tester Foundation Level (CTFL) – International Software Testing Qualifications Board  

a) Offers broad understanding of key Software Testing principles and practices 

b) Establishes a strong foundation for a Software Testing career 

c) Covers fundamental topics such as Test design and Risk management 

Certified Software Test Engineer (CSTE) – Quality Assurance Institute (QAI)  

a) Enhances skills in software quality testing. 

b) Focuses on critical areas like Test planning, Execution and Management. 

c) Designed for experienced professionals. 

d) Validates expertise and commitment to quality standards. 

Advanced Level Test Analyst (CTAL-TA) – International Software Testing Qualifications Board  

a) Suitable for those holding a CTFL certificate and seeking advanced knowledge. 

b) Covers complex aspects of Software Testing such as Test analysis and Defect categorisation. 

c) Ideal for specialisation in Analytical testing roles and User-oriented testing roles. 

Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst (CTAL-TTA) – International Software Testing Qualifications Board  

a) Focus on the technical aspects of Software Testing 

b) Covers critical technical areas such as Non-functional testing and Test automation 

Perfect for professionals aiming to become experts in technical testing challenges 

Mobile Application Testing (CMAP) – International Software Testing Qualifications Board  

a) This certification specialises in mobile application testing. 

b) Covers mobile-specific topics such as Testing techniques, Tools and Platform-specific challenges. 

c) Essential for roles in mobile software development and testing. 

d) Keeps you ahead in the fast-evolving mobile field. 

Make your mark in the world of Software Development with our Certified Software Testing Professional (CSTP) Training - Sign up now!    

Avoid Misusage on Resumes  

While crafting your resume, you need to avoid common pitfalls that often hinder resumes from catching the attention of employers. The most common among them involves misrepresenting Software Testing skills on a resume. This can backfire, damaging your credibility and professional reputation.  

Employers rely on accurate depictions of a candidate's abilities to make informed decisions on recruitment. Exaggerating expertise in this technical field can lead to underperformance and missed project goals 

Here are three examples of how Software Testing skills might be improperly reflected on a resume: 

Summary Section  

Claiming to be an "Expert in all forms of Software Testing, capable of single-handedly ensuring flawless software performance in all projects" when only experienced with basic manual testing methods. 

Experience Section  

Stating involvement in "Leading a team in implementing cutting-edge automated testing protocols for a software project," despite only having observed the process. 

Achievements Section  

Listing "Dramatically increased software deployment speed by 70% through innovative test automation strategies" without having directly contributed to or measured these improvements. 

Conclusion  

Creating a standout Software Tester Resume involves showcasing a blend of your technical skills, certifications, and practical experiences while maintaining a professional and error-free format. By following the examples and expert tips provided in this blog, craft a resume that captures the attention of hiring managers. 

Unlock your potential as a Software Tester with our ISTQB Software Testing Foundation Training – Sign up now!    

Frequently Asked Questions

The following common testing strategies include Black Box Testing (Tests the software's functionality without focusing on the internal code structure), White Box Testing (Tests the internal code structure and logic) and Unit Testing (Tests individual components of the software to ensure that they are functioning as intended). 

Key challenges include communication issues, lack of resources or limited resources, dealing with changes, time constraints, missing documentation. Additional challenges include inadequate testing, unstable environment and compatibility issues. 

The Knowledge Academy takes global learning to new heights, offering over 30,000 online courses across 490+ locations in 220 countries. This expansive reach ensures accessibility and convenience for learners worldwide. 

Alongside our diverse Online Course Catalogue, encompassing 17 major categories, we go the extra mile by providing a plethora of free educational Online Resources like News updates, Blogs , videos, webinars, and interview questions. Tailoring learning experiences further, professionals can maximise value with customisable Course Bundles of TKA . 

The Knowledge Academy’s Knowledge Pass , a prepaid voucher, adds another layer of flexibility, allowing course bookings over a 12-month period. Join us on a journey where education knows no bounds. 

The Knowledge Academy offers various Software Testing Courses , including the ISTQB Software Testing Foundation Course and Certified Software Testing Professional (CSTP) Course. These courses cater to different skill levels, providing comprehensive insights into Software Tester Roles And Responsibilities .  

Our Programming & DevOps Blogs cover a range of topics related to Software Testing, offering valuable resources, best practices, and industry insights. Whether you are a beginner or looking to advance your Software Testing skills, The Knowledge Academy's diverse courses and informative blogs have got you covered. 

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An infographic showing the four elements of a great prompt: Goal, Context, Source, and Expectations.

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    Create Resume. Choose a resume format carefully. In 99% of cases, we recommend the reverse-chronological format. Add the right contact details. Leave your headshot out and make sure to include your job title, a professional email address, and any relevant links.

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    3. List your name and contact information. To start writing your resume, create an eye-catching resume header that quickly highlights your contact information and job title. Your name should always be the largest element on your resume to make it stand out, so use a font size larger than 20 points.

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    Check the spelling of proper nouns — think: company names, addresses, etc. — and make sure you have the current contact information for any references you've chosen to add. These things might have changed since you last applied for a job. And lastly, be sure to look for common resume pitfalls before you press send.

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    To make a resume that fully demonstrates your experiences and goals, it's important to be strategic with the language, format, and sections you include. In general, there are three broad steps to making your resume: Identifying keywords and important skills. Choosing a format. Writing each section. In this resume guide, we'll offer tips and ...

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    10 resume writing tips. Here are a few key resume-writing tips to help you organize and design your resume. 1. Look for keywords in the job posting. The best place to start when preparing to write a resume is to carefully read the job postings that interest you. As you apply for different jobs, study each job description for keywords that show ...

  6. 40+ Resume Tips to Help You Land a Job in 2024

    Here's some resume tips and tricks for this section: 21. Put experience first, education later. Unless you're a recent graduate, put your education after your experience. Chances are, your last couple of jobs are more important and relevant to you getting the job than where you went to college. 22.

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    Use a standard layout, whether you are writing your first resume or 50th. Use action words to make your resume stand out. Quantify your achievements to prove that you have what it takes to succeed in a new role. Tailor your new resume to each job. Double and triple-check for errors, typos, and grammar mistakes.

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    Related: Resume samples and templates to inspire your next application. 2. Include your name and contact information. Your resume should begin with your name and contact information, including your professional email address and phone number. You have a choice about whether or not to include your mailing address.

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    List your relevant skills. Add additional sections that will prove your skills and be relevant to the job offer. Include a cover letter, adding even more relevant information and achievements. Proofread and send your resume in the correct format. But first, let's take a look at a great example of how to create a resume.

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    Here's how to write a job resume in Microsoft Word: Open Microsoft Word on your computer and select "New Document" to create a new document. In the search bar, type "resume" and browse through the available templates. Select the template that best suits your needs.

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    5. Don't Forget Your Education. If you're still in school or just graduated, your education can go at the top of your resume, but for pretty much everyone else, this goes near the bottom. Most people include their school, graduation year (for folks less up to about a decade out of school), major, and degree.

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    Image description. Follow these steps to build your resume: 1. Add your contact information. The first item on your resume should be your first and last name, a phone number and an email address. Consider also including additional contact information so potential employers have several ways to reach you.

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    Before you decide on using a builder, you should research the best resume builder websites and find one that fits your budget. 11. Avoid buzzwords. "Go-getter", "results-driven", "synergize" - a lot of job seekers think using buzzwords like these on their resume will magically impress employers.

  14. Zety

    You can choose from 18 sleek templates and easily modify the design, layout, colors, and fonts to create a unique and professional-looking resume. Additionally, Zety offers pre-written content tailored to different job positions, saving users valuable time compared to crafting their resumes from scratch. Yuri Kruman.

  15. Resume Help

    Resume Help. Learn the ins and outs of writing a resume. From formatting to fonts, we cover every topic. Cover Letter Help. Cover letter writing is a skill that will help you outshine other applicants. Our guides can teach you that skill. Interview Help. You're one step away from getting the job. Win over hiring managers with our expert ...

  16. Best Resume Writing Services for 2024

    An entry-level resume costs $479, a professional resume costs $589 and an executive resume costs $699. In addition to these packages, you can also add a cover letter, LinkedIn profile, interview ...

  17. How to Make a Resume: 11 Easy Steps for 2024

    Step 3: Decide Your Resume Length. While it's tempting to include as much of your work-related experience and skills in your resume, keep this information to one page [1]. Knowing this from the start helps you consider only relevant information and decide on ways to keep the information short and sweet.

  18. Resume Help: Writing Services, Tips and Examples

    A Resume Builder is a high-tech tool that will help you make a high-quality resume, from design options to text content. It's automated, so resume creation is streamlined and easy; just follow the prompts. It can shave the time it takes to write a resume down to a few minutes!

  19. Resume writing help

    How to Write a Resume Career Summary. Nine Tips to Writing a Winning Employment History. Put Your Education to Work on Your Resume. Showcase Marketable Skills in Your Resume Skills Section. Round Out Your Resume with Additional Information. Dig Deep for Resume Accomplishments. Use Numbers to Highlight Your Accomplishments.

  20. Resume Writing 101: Tips for Creating a Resume (With Examples)

    Resume example Consider this sample resume to help you create your own: June Smith 15 Main St., Chicago, IL 11000 | [email protected] | 901-555-1212 Objective Experienced office manager seeking an opportunity to thrive at a mid-sized company Summary of Qualifications • 12 years of experience as an office manager at a small graphic design firm • Deep knowledge of employee management ...

  21. Resume Help

    Website resumehelpservice.com will help in customized resume writing for each client. After all, the summary of the new sample already contains as many as 7 points. It is mandatory to specify personal data at the beginning of the resume, and then there is a goal, Job Objective. Customer service resume takes into account all your needs: who you ...

  22. 7 Best Resume Writing Services (+ Which Are Worth It)

    3 key takeaways. There's a wide range of professional resume writing services ranging from executive to budget. While job seekers often pay per resume with a professional writer, AI resume builders allow you to quickly create and optimize several versions to each job, presenting a more cost-efficient alternative.

  23. Free Online Resume Builder

    Our builder software helps you create a resume that highlights your qualifications and lands you more interviews. Try Our Builder. Applying for jobs is hard, but our resume builder makes it easy. Download free templates, read expert writing guides, and try our software today.

  24. 251 Resume Skills that Score Interviews

    To write a great resume, it helps a lot to pick a format first. You should choose a resume format based on your work experience level, i.e., how many years you've been doing your job. There are three main resume formats: Chronological formats are the most commonly used resume formats, and they give the most focus to your work experience.

  25. Build & write Best Resume / CV & Application Covering Letter [Free

    Help for CV / Resume building and writing for job search using LinkedIn Profile ; Formats for Resume and Letter writing. This course includes: 2 hours on-demand video; Assignments; 13 articles; 16 downloadable resources; Access on mobile and TV; Full lifetime access; Certificate of completion

  26. 10 Best Resume Builders to Create A Great Resume

    Let's Eat, Grandma - Best Resume Builder for Range of Career Service. Star Rating: 4/5. Let's Eat, Grandma is an inventive and progressive tool for creating impressive resumes. The platform ...

  27. Physician Resume Example (With Tips)

    Tips For Writing A Physician Resume You can create an impressive physician resume through a meticulous approach and some strategic planning. Let us go through some tips that can help you during this process: Use action verbs Action verbs can help create an impact in demonstrating your experience. Try to use them liberally throughout your resume ...

  28. Professional Resume Writing Services

    Create your resume. Change country. 🇺🇸 United States. Help Center. Start of main content ...

  29. Software Tester Resume: Writing Tips and Examples

    Avoid Misusage on Resumes . While crafting your resume, you need to avoid common pitfalls that often hinder resumes from catching the attention of employers. The most common among them involves misrepresenting Software Testing skills on a resume. This can backfire, damaging your credibility and professional reputation.

  30. Cooking up a great prompt: Getting the most from Copilot

    Following up on your prompts help you collaborate with Copilot to gain more useful, tailored responses. Generating content ideas. Lead with broader requests, then give specific details about the content. ... Ask Copilot to write a story, then guide it by giving more specific, relevant details . Solving technical problems. Present a technical ...