Everything You Need to Write an Effective Event Planning Business Plan

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Nick Morpus

1. mission statement, 2. business structure, 3. products and services, 4. target market and marketing plan, 5. finances, examples of event planning business plans, other event planning business information.

You've gathered your resources, assessed the market, found your ideal business partners, and you're well on your way to starting your own event planning business.

But to make this business a reality, you need funding. And in order to secure funding, you need to make the case that your event management business has all the right parts in place so that once you receive funding, your business can take off.

A business plan makes that case for you by giving potential funders all of the information they need to make a decision on whether or not you are worth their time and money.

event_biz_plan

However, your business plan is not only a fundraising tool, it's also a road map you will revisit time and again for business accountability. Your business plan will help keep you on track with clearly defined goals and guidelines for your event planning firm.

I've narrowed down five key aspects of your business plan that you will have to hammer home in order to make the most effective case.

The first step to any business plan is to develop a definitive statement that lays out what your event planning business stands for and hopes to accomplish.

A good mission statement is a short (about one to two sentences) declaration of your beliefs, goals, and values as a company or organization.

Here are a few good examples of mission statements:

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society : Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families.

Make-A-Wish : We grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy.

Sweetgreen: To inspire healthier communities by connecting people to real food.

Other questions you could answer in your mission statement include, what kind of events do you hope to host? Do you want your event planning business to remain local or would you like to see it grow and expand to other areas and states?

Your business plan can only take shape once you have the structure of your company laid out and have identified the key job roles that will serve your business. This assures potential funders that your event planning business is ready to take off and all they need to do is provide the funds that will make it a reality.

Your structure description should include:

Your role within the company

The event planning team that you've assembled along with job titles and job descriptions

What legal form your event planning business operates under ( limited liability company , and S corporation , or a sole proprietorship )

Your prospective vendors and suppliers

Your prospective clients

Not every event planning business is the same. Some cater to large corporate events, while others plan small local events such as weddings and reunions. There are many event types , big and small, such as conferences, seminars, meetings, team building events, trade shows, business dinners, networking events, product launches, and award ceremonies.

These differences in market determine the services and products offered by the event planning business in question. The big question you need to determine for your business plan is how many services you will provide in-house and how many you will have to contract out for from other vendors.

Your products and services overview should address these questions:

What types of events will you plan?

Will you provide in-house catering services or contract out for catering?

Will you provide audio/visual equipment such as lighting and speaker systems for music, or work with outside vendors?

What kind of event marketing services will you provide? Will you provide social media management?

What type of guest invitations and guest correspondence will you offer?

Do you provide venue research or will you have your own venue?

What is your target market and how do you plan on reaching the people in that market?

It's important to know your demographics when marketing your event planning services. If you are targeting weddings, women in their 20s and 30s will be your most likely demographic (however men are more involved in the process than ever ). If you want to focus on conferences and other business-related events, your marketing effort should be geared more towards corporations and nonprofit organizations.

After conducting some demographic research, it's time to put that information to use by drawing up a marketing plan for your event planning business. What will your message be? How will your message be delivered (blog posts, videos, email lists, etc.)?

Want to efficiently manage your marketing plan? You can find the best event marketing software solutions in the Capterra directory.

Marketing strategies:

Social media marketing: As of November 2016 , 69% of all Americans use some sort of social media. This number increased from 11% in 2006. Your business plan should include the steps you will take to build followers and market to customers using Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Snapchat, and Instagram.

Local word of mouth: Although this shouldn't be your main marketing strategy, it's good to show how you will spread the word about your business in your local area. Plan on working with your future vendors and suppliers to spread the word about your event planning services once you've established a relationship.

Traditional marketing: Your business plan can include strategies such as radio advertising, print advertising, and other traditional techniques as long as you think they will benefit your organization and reach your target market.

Finally, your business plan should cover how you plan on financing your event planning business and what kind of revenue you expect once business starts rolling in. This is where a prospective client list will come in handy because it shows that others are willing to pay for your services.

In the finance section of your business proposal, you will list what kind of funding you've already secured (whether from a bank, a friend or family member, or your own savings) and what funding you hope to secure through your business proposal.

Also include all planned expenditures so that potential funders will know what costs to expect for putting on events, and what you will need to hire staff, buy event equipment, lease venues or maintain your own, and market your business and your events. The best way to do this is by including a budget proposal which lists all expenses and forecasted incomes.

Here is a five step guide on building your business budget  from Freshbooks and a few business budget templates to help you get started:

Vertex42 Excel Budget Business Template

Intuit Quickbooks Startup Business Budget Template

Microsoft Office Business Expense Budget

Now that you have the building blocks, here are some sample business plans that you can use as a framework:

Profitable Venture Event Planning Business Template : This template uses the fictional “Tony & Tammy House of Events LLC" event planning business to show the language you should use and information you should include in your own plan.

B Plans Personal Event Planning Business Plan Template : Similar to Profitable Venture, this template is also a fleshed out example of an event planning business plan. The only difference is they also offer an online plug-and-go template as well as writing guidance for as low as $9.95 a month.

What has been the most difficult step in starting your own event planning business? Are there any lessons you've learned? Let me know in the comment section below!

If you've drafted your business plan but are not sure what the next steps are to take, be sure to check out my guide on starting event planning businesses: The Ultimate Guide on How to Start Your Event Planning Business .

Lastly, if you are looking for new ways to step up your events, the Capterra event management blog has the resources to help you make decisions on new software, technologies, and best practices:

4 Event Mobile Apps to Increase Attendee Engagement

The Top 10 Books Every Event Manager Should Read

5 Online Event Planning Classes to Jumpstart Your Career

Top 5 Free Tools to Live Stream Your Event Online

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Nick Morpus is a former Capterra analyst.

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How to Start an Event Planning Business in (2024): Step-by-Step Guide

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Free How to Write an Event Planning Business Plan + Free Template Template

how to start an event planning business

The joy of making special days and big events even more special for the attendees seems exciting right? This is what event planners exactly do.

Whether it’s birthday celebrations, weddings, anniversaries, or corporate galas, the demand for expert event planners is soaring.

Starting an event planning business can be a great move because initially it needs a small investment, and you can make good money out of it.

It is a profitable venture but if are you confused about how to start an event planning business , then let us understand it through this guide.

Get to know the basics of event planning

Before you start getting into the process of starting an event planning business, you should know the basics of event planning, like what would be your responsibilities, what kind of events are there, etc.

So let’s get started:

Event Planning is most often used for purposes like

  • Social Events: Weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, reunions, etc
  • Corporate Events: Seminars, workshops,  conferences, product launches, award ceremonies, gala dinners, etc.
  • Cultural and Art Events: Art cultural celebrations, exhibitions, music festivals, etc

Key responsibilities of an Event Planner include

  • First of all, consult with your client properly before the event to understand their needs, objectives, and preferences.
  • You need to build a team as per the event type, whether it is a corporate or social event.
  • Prepare a budget to ensure that the event’s overall costs stay within the financial constraints of the customer.
  • Choose a venue that aligns with the event’s size, and theme.
  • Oversee the various vendors including florists, caterers, and photographers ensuring that they are all synchronized with the timeline.

After having a glimpse of the basics of event planning business, let’s see what is required next to start your business journey.

Quick Steps to Start an Event Planning Business

  • Conduct Industry and Market Research
  • Identify Your Event Planning Niche
  • Prepare an Event Planning Business Plan
  • Consider Startup and Operations Costs
  • Paperwork and Legal Registration
  • Figure Out Pricing Strategy
  • Get Licenses, Permits, and Insurance
  • Build a Core Team
  • Marketing to Spread the Word

1. Conduct Industry and Market Research

All businesses have competition – that’s what keeps the market in balance.So it is necessary to conduct thorough research of the market to identify your competitors and the current trends.

Moreover, it also helps you understand your target customers, identify market needs, develop marketing strategies, and maintain a competitive edge.

At the primary stage of your research, you may conduct surveys to learn more about your potential clients and their problems.

Now gather information for the secondary research from online resources and industry reports. Compiling and analyzing this data with your primary research will help you highlight the areas that need attention.

Besides identifying your target market, market research is instrumental in strategic planning for the future of your business. It also helps you discover effective growth strategies by setting the targets for your business and making you aware of your competitors.

2. Identify Your Event Planning Niche

Are you aware that knowing a “niche” is a must in the Event Planning Company? A niche is a segment of the market that an event planner focuses on serving.

Identifying your niche involves determining a specific area or target audience within the broader event industry where you can focus and distinguish your services. This allows you to delve into a specific client base and build a reputation for expertise in that particular niche.

Let’s have a look at a few of the common niches and event types:

Social Events

  • Wedding planning
  • Baby Showers
  • Anniversaries
  • Bachelor/Bachelorette Parties
  • Birthday Parties

Corporate Events

  • Award ceremonies
  • Conferences
  • Corporate Meetings
  • Grand Openings
  • Product or Service Launch Party

So you can develop various strategies for your venture after deciding upon any of the following above-mentioned niches as per the demand in the events industry.

3. Prepare an Event Planning Business Plan

Once you know your niche, it’s time to put together your business plan, which is an essential step of any business. A well-structured event planning business plan will help you build a roadmap for your business, by setting out where you want your business to go and how you intend to go there.

This business document will include details about your business, its history, service offerings, management, financial health, and more.

A business plan becomes particularly crucial when one seeks financial support from banks or other institutions. It provides a transparent overview of your plans to attain financial and operational objectives, offering reassurance to funders about the feasibility of loan repayment.

Although, many consider it just a way to peak investors’ interest, a solid business plan can change the entire course of your small business.

Besides these, it also provides a structure for your company’s daily operations, helps you understand the market trend, provides an exit strategy, and also helps to attract key employees.

Not very good at writing? Need help with your plan?

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business plan for an event management

4. Consider Startup and Operations Costs

The next foremost step is determining your financing requirements. You must have an in-depth understanding of your startup and operational costs.

You can estimate your startup costs by listing down the essential startup supplies, insurance costs, licensing requirements, office space, and associated expenses.

The operational costs include venue costs, decoration costs, employee salary, marketing, advertising costs, etc.

5. Paperwork and Legal Registration

Setting up the paperwork and legal registration for your event planning company is an important step to ensure that you are committed to legal norms.

First things first – before you start your event planning business finalize the legal structure and do business as (DBA) name of your business.

Brainstorm different names and pick something that reflects your business idea.

You can also opt for the DBA (Doing Business As) name. It allows the business to operate under another name other than the formal business name.

Register your Business Name

Once you have a name decided, it’s time to register your business entity with the state and local government. This will ensure that your business name is yours and you can do the business using that name.

Register your Business Structure

A business structure describes how a company is legally organized. This is an essential part.

You can choose from different business structures like operating as a sole proprietor (if you’ll be running the company on your own), a partnership, as well as other entities that provide limited liability (which ensures you won’t be held responsible for the company’s debts or other actions).

Get an EIN: Federal Tax ID Number

The process for this can vary, so you can reach out to the office of your state’s Secretary for specific guidance. Moreover, obtaining an Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the IRS Internal Revenue System is essential.

Once you have your EIN, you can open a business bank account, apply for a loan, and separate your personal and business finances.

6. Figure Out Pricing Strategy

The pricing structure depends on the market segment you serve, your potential customers, geographic location, expertise, and most importantly your competitor will help you decide your fees.

How you price your event planning services will impact how often you get requests.

You can determine your pricing structure as follows:

Hourly Rate: Initially, some event planners might charge around $25 per hour, while experienced planners can command rates exceeding $100 per hour. Corporate events tend to bring in rates about 30% higher than social events.

Flat Fee: This is a common approach where you charge a fixed price for your event planning services, often including a percentage of the total fees from vendors.

Percentage of Total Event Budget: Some planners prefer charging a percentage of the overall event budget, which could range from 15% to 20%.

Vendor Commission : A few planners choose to decrease their charges or may charge nothing for their services instead they prefer to make their income solely from commissions received from vendors they work with.

7. Get Licenses, Permits, and Insurance

Licensing and legal requirements are important in starting and running your own event planning business.

Common licenses you need to run this business are:

  • Business License
  • Special Event Permit
  • Liquor license
  • Fire/fireworks permit
  • Health and Safety Permit
  • Seller’s Permit

Insurance: While not a permit or license, having general liability insurance, and possibly professional liability insurance, is highly recommended to protect your business from potential liabilities.

8. Build a Core Team

Hiring employees is a crucial step. The team you set up will be the business’s backbone, helping you effectively manage and execute events.

Here are key roles you need to consider when building your core team:

  • Event Coordinator
  • Marketing and Communication Specialist
  • Sales Representative
  • Logistics Coordinator
  • Administrative Support

You can hire event planners from Zippia, Upwork, Workstream, and also through LinkedIn.

9. Marketing to Spread the Word

You need to build effective marketing strategies to spread the word about your business to attract clients and establish your brand in the competitive world of events. You also need to set some marketing budget.

Here are some key areas to consider:

Target Audience

Who are you trying to reach and cover? Understand their interests, objectives, and event planning needs.

Developing a Strong Brand Identity

First, see what makes your service stand out. Developing a strong USP(Unique Selling Proposition) will help you grow your business by making it recognizable in a competitive market.

Build a professional website

Create a website that is visually appealing, informative, user-friendly, and easy to navigate.

Content Marketing

Be active on social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest, sharing visually appealing content and engaging with your audience.

Showcase your successful events and satisfied clients to demonstrate your capabilities. Post the reviews of your customers on social media accounts.

Now you might be pretty much clear about how to kick-start an Event Planning Business.

To launch successfully, it’s essential to have a deep understanding of your target market, a solid business plan, and a clear grasp of the legal structure and financial aspects of running the business.

You’ve got everything now! What are you waiting for? Let’s start your journey as an event planner.

The Quickest Way to turn a Business Idea into a Business Plan

Fill-in-the-blanks, AI-assistance, and automatic financials make it easy.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What do you need to start an event planning business.

To start an event planning business, you’ll need several key components:

  • Business Plan
  • Market Research
  • Legal Setup
  • Financial Management
  • Branding and Marketing

Do you need a degree to start an event planning business?

Technically speaking, you don’t need an event planning degree to become a professional event planner. However, there are certain qualities, skills, and certificates to help you attract clients when you start the event planning industry.

A degree in a field related to events planning, design, and management may give you an edge. All other skills can be developed over time.

How can I find clients as a new event planner?

You can get your customers through:

  • Building an online presence
  • Collaborations with known faces
  • Referral Programs
  • Advertisement

Should I register my business as an LLC, sole proprietorship, or corporation?

Each structure has pros and cons, so consult with a legal or financial           advisor for the best fit:

  • Sole proprietorship: Easiest to set up, but you have unlimited personal liability.
  • LLC: Offers some liability protection and is relatively simple to manage.
  • Corporation: More complex setup, but provides greater liability protection and tax benefits.

What skills are required to be an event planner?

To become a successful event planner, you may not need formal education, but you do have to master these skills:

  • Communication Skills
  • Networking skills
  • Adaptability
  • Negotiation Skills
  • Budget Management
  • Level-headed and calm under pressure
  • Attentive to details
  • Humble and Responsive to Clients’ Needs

About the Author

business plan for an event management

Shyam Dua is a seasoned tax professional with 40+ years of experience & a mentor at SCORE. He stands out due to his exceptional business planning skills. With a keen eye for detail and a strong financial acumen, Shyam crafts compelling business plans that pave the way to success. A CPA with a philanthropic heart, Shyam's strategic expertise, and dedication make him an invaluable asset in shaping thriving business ventures. Read more

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How to Write an Event Organiser Business Plan (With Examples)

Event Business Plan

If you’re looking to turn your event into a viable and profitable enterprise, you’ll need to devise a solid business plan. Whether your aim is making more money, securing investment and partners, or simply keeping up with your commercial goals, an event business plan is the launchpad of a successful business.

A well-written plan can be an invaluable resource for you, your team , and your event – and writing one need not be difficult. Our systematic and straightforward event business plan step-by-step guide will show you how to create one while providing you with useful examples for budgeting and promotion that you can adapt for your particular market.

How do you write a business plan as an event planner?

From coming up with your blue-sky mission statement to the nitty-gritty details of hosting your event, there are several steps to creating a great event business plan. Read on to get our in-depth tips, see examples and find out exactly what should go into your plan.

In this article, our tips for writing an event business plan are broken down into eight sections. We’ll show you how to:

  • Begin your event business plan with a mission statement
  • Describe your greater vision with a vision statement
  • List the key objectives you want to track
  • Enhance your event business plan with storytelling
  • Detail an event marketing strategy
  • Outline your event’s operational requirements
  • Crunch the numbers for your event budget
  • Conduct a SWOT analysis for your event

1. Begin your event business plan with a mission statement

Your mission statement describes your event in a short sentence or two. It helps to sell your event to important stakeholders and forms the foundation of your marketing. In fact, it’ll also help to keep you focused since every decision you make will ultimately trace back to your mission.

The Macarthur Centre for Sustainable Living (MCSL), a community-focused, not-for-profit organisation with sustainability at its core, is just one example of how a simple mission statement turned into a successful real-life venture.

MCSL has a simple philosophy based on its objective to make a positive difference in environmental sustainability by encouraging the community to adopt sustainable lifestyle choices. Its mission statement sums up how MCSL operates as well as what it stands for:

“To develop MCSL into a regional place of excellence that inspires the community to embrace an environmental conscience.”

This high-level mission statement sells the spirit of MCSL succinctly. Make yours equally inspiring, and keep it as short as possible to make it easy to keep your mission in mind.

2. Describe your greater vision with a vision statement

While a mission statement says what your event is about, a vision statement describes what you hope your event brand will become . It could also be known as your Big, Hairy, Audacious Goal (your BHAG ).

The Cancer Council Victoria uses the mission statement “Prevent cancer. Empower people. Save lives.”

But the foundation’s vision is even more aspirational:

A cancer free future.

What’s your blue-sky vision? You might not cure cancer, but perhaps you want to eventually turn your foodie pop-up into a nationwide series of “locavore” festivals. Perhaps you want to introduce attendees to a new style of dance? Or bring art into the homes of the nation?

Brevity and clarity are also key in this section of your business plan, so you should be able to sum up your vision statement in one short sentence. For example, a lot of businesses these days want their activities to produce no carbon emissions whatsoever, so they might use a vision statement like “net-zero by 2050”.

A good way to come up with your vision statement is to ask yourself what effect you eventually want your event to have more widely. Be as imaginative as you can and also think about why you created your event in the first place. This will help you to produce evocative language, which will have a greater impact on your audience.

3. List the key objectives you want to track

Your key objectives convert your mission statement into on-the-ground action. They are realistic goals that you can achieve in the short term and in the future. Examples might include:

  • Gaining a set number of followers on social media
  • Expanding your event into a different area
  • Pinning down a special guest to make an appearance
  • Selling a certain number of tickets for each event

Make a list of the key tasks and deliverables integral to your event. In the foodie pop-up example above, a few key objectives might be to:

  • Host three foodie pop-ups in your local area this year
  • Find at least ten sponsors – local food purveyors or restaurants
  • Acquire 10,000 followers on Instagram

Make your objectives aspirational but achievable – and definitely measurable . Make records of where you currently are in regard to achieving these goals and attach metrics to each one. Eventbrite offers useful analytic data, which can be used to help you track your return on investment (ROI) and more.

4. Enhance your event business plan with storytelling

Here’s the heart of your business plan: a tangible description of your event. This is important because not only does it tell potential investors what they’re being asked to buy into but it’s also often the first (and only) chance you’ll get to grab a potential attendee’s attention online.

The key here is to provide a text that’s as informative as it is readable. Strike a balance between providing the reader with all the essential details they need, without overwhelming them with information.

Define what makes your event unique and sell your audience on your vision with data that grounds it in reality. For example, if you’ve had a high demand for tickets in the past, let the reader know how many tickets you’ve sold for your events to date.

Craft a succinct event story with our event business plan checklist:

  • Describe your target audience, with research into the market
  • List potential or actual sponsors, investors, and partners who will support and influence your event
  • Lay out the team structure you intend to build – who will get what done?

Your job here is to convince the reader that your event will be successful. Give proof that you can back up your ideas with business acumen.

5. Detail an event marketing strategy

Word of mouth is a timeless marketing channel, but most events don’t sell themselves right away. You’ve already described your mission, your vision, and the event itself, so now you can use this content in your marketing strategy and include additional information:

How will you price your event?

Will you use a flat rate or provide an early bird option at a discount? While the latter might prove a great idea for festivals and conferences, recurring events like workshops would benefit from a different marketing approach. For example, consider providing tiered ticketing options for regular events, giving guests a choice of a standard or VIP ticket with added extras. This can create a buzz of prestige around your event.

What’s your promotion budget?

Knowing what resources you have is integral to marketing your event effectively and securing a good ROI.

Which marketing channels will you use?

Your target audience will determine the direction of your marketing channels. This includes which social media platform you choose to market your event on. For example, if your arts event caters to twenty-somethings, the highly visual environment that Instagram provides will often be a better marketing match than LinkedIn , which is more suited for specialist industry lectures and business networking events.

Making the right choice of channel means that half your work is done because your event will get more exposure with people who are already interested in your sector, generating a higher lead-to-conversion rate.

6. Outline your event’s operational requirements

There are countless logistics that go into even the smallest event. Break your needs into categories: facilities, services, staffing , production, technology, legal, and insurance – just as a starting point!

Then start to anticipate what the real implications are for your event with reference to each of these categories. Depending on your specific event, facilities might include setting up a cloakroom or the hire of portaloos, shower cubicles, or charging points. Services might include anything from catering, rubbish disposal or cleaning, to the cost of basic utilities if they aren’t included in the venue hire. Production might cover contracting performers, printing tickets or wristbands, and transport of sound equipment.

Don’t leave anything out. This exercise will help you with the next step – assigning a cost to each aspect of your event.

7. Crunch the numbers for your event budget

Financial forecasts are essential to showing whether your event will be profitable – and to making your plan a business plan. It’s common to include both an overview of your numbers as well as a full budget spreadsheet, usually as part of an appendix.

Identify all potential income streams, like ticket sales , exhibition space sales, food, or merchandise. If you have funding secured or capital saved, include this as well.

You’ll also need to tally all expenditures , including your operational and promotional costs. These might include venue and equipment hire, paying staff working at the event, and the cost of targeted ads.

Your business plan might serve as a way to win over potential investors. For instance, if your idea for a national yoga teachers’ conference will require an initial cash injection to get it off the ground, show how it will pay for itself in a matter of years in your budget. You should go into detail about cover prices, including any deals you’ve been able to get with suppliers or the venue.

Make sure to illustrate your event’s projected earnings in a simple graph, such as a bar or pie chart. This is an effective and simple of way communicating how you’re making your budget work for you.

8. Conduct a SWOT analysis for your event

SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. This assessment is important because every event carries inherent risks, and it’s a liability to ignore them. You’ll want to identify and acknowledge any risks, and then provide solutions. Let’s take a look at this concept using the example of a fundraising triathlon.

You’ve sold many tickets so far.

You’ve planned the event for the mildest time of year.

You’ve got catastrophe insurance.

There’s high competition from other similar events.

Opportunities

Extra funds can be raised with a cold drinks stall.

The triathlon may need to be called off in the event of bad weather, eg a thunderstorm.

Event business plan FAQs

How do i start an event organising business.

You could start by writing an event management business plan. See the above section, “Outline your event’s operational requirements,” to get an idea of what managing an event involves.

What is a business plan in event management?

A business plan is where you convince investors that your idea for turning your event into a business is not only viable, but also profitable. This will include presenting the necessary figures detailing why your business will offer a good ROI. Check out the sections “Enhance your event business plan with storytelling” and “Crunch the numbers for your event budget” for more tips on how to write an event planning business plan.

How do you write a business plan for an event?

The above steps in this article explain how, but try looking for an event business plan example online if you’d like to see how it’s done.

What is an event planning proposal?

A proposal is a resumé of how you plan to execute your event, written with key stakeholders as the audience.

Set your event business plan in motion

To dive deep into the details of creating an event business plan, and to learn how to compile these sections into an effective document, download our free templates for planning, organising, and hosting your event.

Create your free event listing today

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about the author

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Hannah Phelvin-Hartley

Hannah Phelvin-Hartley specialises in producing content for the lifestyle, education, engineering and automotive, politics, human rights and legal sectors. She can translate from Italian, Spanish and French into English. In her free time, Hannah can usually be found cooking, reading, practising Yoga and dancing.

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How to Start an Event Management Company: Business Plan Template

Every new business start-up needs a business plan. Without one, it’s easy to lose focus and you may find it difficult to attract investors, so it’s important to sit down to write one. The good news is that writing a business plan doesn’t have to be a difficult task. Chances are you’ve already got most of the information you need, and all that’s left to do is put pen to paper. 

In this article, we will explain what a business plan is and why you need one if you’re looking to start an event management company. We will also cover what you should include in a business plan for events management and provide you with a free, downloadable template that you can adapt and use for starting your business.

What is a Business Plan?

When first looking into how to start an event management company, it’s very likely that you were advised to write a business plan.

A business plan is simply a short document that sets out your event management company’s objectives. It helps you and your potential investors to clearly see what the business’ aims are (both financial and non-financial) and details how you’re going to ensure you achieve these goals.

Businessman writing up a business plan

What is Event Management?

Event management involves planning and organising a wide range of events, from a brand’s new product launch, to a client’s birthday party. Rather than planning an event themselves, an individual, corporation, organisation or brand will hire an event management business to take on this responsibility for them. That business will then manage every aspect of the event, from planning to execution and evaluation. 

Some of the key responsibilities involved in managing an event are: 

  • Learning about the client and what they want from their event. 
  • Identifying the target audience. 
  • Coming up with an event concept or theme. 
  • Organising guest lists, menus, seating and transport. 
  • Organising a venue based on the client’s needs. 
  • Hiring staff, including hospitality and entertainment.
  • Arranging guests, such as guest speakers.
  • Creating event schedules. 

an event manager creating a business plan in a notebook

Event managers must be excellent communicators, with lots of creativity, as well as having organisation and problem solving skills to ensure events run smoothly and exceed the client’s expectations.

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Why Do You Need a Business Plan?

Any new business needs funding, staff and publicity to get off the ground and stand out from the competition. Writing up a business plan is a fundamental step toward achieving this. 

A business plan will clearly set out to potential investors why your business is going to be successful and, ultimately, why they should invest in you. The more they invest, the more staff you can hire to help build your business.

Additionally, event management companies need lots of resources to make events run smoothly, such as technology and transport, and these should all be factored into the business plan.

You may also decide at this point to specify what kind of events you want your business to plan, the types of client you will be working with and exactly what services your business will offer. By being specific, you are communicating to investors that you have a clear view of what you think your business will achieve. This can also help you determine branding and marketing strategies to appeal to your target market. 

It’s important to outline your marketing strategy in your business plan. Event management is a highly competitive industry, meaning you need to optimise marketing and publicity as quickly as possible in order to create publicity and distinguish yourself from your competitors. 

Most importantly, having a business plan will keep you on track. When you’re starting out with a new business, it can be easy to become overwhelmed with all the possible directions you could take your business in. Your business plan will help focus your direction and ensure that you stay on track with your business goals, helping you avoid wasting valuable time and money.

an event manager with a bride

What to Include in a Business Plan for Event Management

A business plan doesn’t need to be a long or complicated document. For a small event planning company, a side or two of A4 paper will suffice. Your aim is simply to write down all the key information about your business in a clear, logical order. 

The topics to include in your event management company business plan are: 

  • The name, address and contact details for your business.
  • Information on the management of the business.
  • Your company’s Mission Statement : a sentence summarising the overall aim of your company. 
  • Your start-up costs : do you need to buy any equipment or hire transport? Do you need to pay anyone a wage? Have you got insurance? 
  • Your business objectives: what will you sell and who is your target customer? 
  • The everyday costs of the business : how much will you spend on a weekly or monthly basis? Include all overheads and outgoing costs, such as wages and petrol. 
  • Funding and financial projections : where do you plan to get the money from to start the business? What are your projected profits/losses for the next month, year, two years, etc.? How will you maintain the cash flow? 
  • Where you will operate from : include where you will be based, plus information on any overhead costs associated with the business premises. 
  • What will be the business’ operating hours? Will you work on the business full-time? What will your working hours be? 
  • Does your business have any local competition? What is your unique selling point (USP) that makes you stand out from the crowd? 
  • Your pricing strategy : what are you going to charge for your service? Will you charge per event or per head?
  • How will you be paid for your service? Do you plan to issue invoices, ask for a deposit or ask people to pay in full upfront?

Download an Event Management Business Plan PDF Template

To get started, simply download our free, one page business plan template using the button below. This template is just a guide, so feel free to add your own headings on a second page to ensure that all information relevant to your business is recorded in one place. 

Starting up any new business will come with challenges but by having a clear and concise business plan in place from the start, you are putting yourself in the best position to achieve future success for your events management business.

Further Resources:

  • Starting a Business With No Money: Making Things Work Without A* Finances
  • What’s the Difference Between Trade Marks, Copyrights, Patents and Trade Secrets? 
  • 10 Elements to Consider When Organising a Corporate Event
  • 42 Tips for Producing a Memorable Small Business Event
  • Project Management Quiz
  • Business Essentials Courses

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How to Write an Event Business Plan (+Checklist)

An event business plan is a handy document to help you focus your efforts as an event organiser. But it’s also a great tool for selling your event idea to potential investors.

Read this guide to learn about all the different sections you should include in your event business plan to make it useful and compelling.

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1. Business structure

The structure of your event company and team will go a long way to persuade investors. It doesn’t matter how great your event proposal is if there isn’t a team to make it a reality.

Here’s what you should include in the description of your business structure:

  • You and your role as the event organiser
  • The event team you’ve recruited (plus their titles and job descriptions)
  • What kind of company you’re running (sole trader, partnership, or limited company)
  • Which vendors and suppliers you intend to work with
  • Your company history and any past achievements

Tip: If your business structure is more complex, use this guide to help you write a description.

2. Event description

The event description is the meat of your business plan. It’s where you really try to sell the concept to potential investors. Take great care to include as many details as possible.

Here’s what you need to address in the event description:

  • Mission statement : describe the overall aim of the event and what you hope to achieve before, during, and after the event.
  • Objectives and timeline : outline the tasks that need to be done, when they need to be done, who will do them, and how they plan on doing them in order to achieve the overall aim of the event.
  • Event programme : describe the programme of the event in detail and provide an overview of the kind of content you intend to provide to the event attendees.
  • Target audience : tell investors which demographic you’re trying to reach ( include your buyer personas ), why your event would appeal to them, and how you plan on marketing it.
  • Stakeholders : include any key stakeholders in the event, what their level of involvement is, and how the event will benefit them.

You can also include a bit of history of the event if you’ve organised a similar event in the past. Include all positive results, as well as your plans for expanding on them in the future.

3. Development plan

The event description should compel your potential investors to support the current event. Expand on it with a development plan for the future, and they’ll have dollar signs in their eyes.

  • Future vision:  show the big picture by describing your vision for the event going forward. Will it be even bigger next year? Will it expand to other countries?

Event business plan: Show that you have a vision for the future.

  • Strategic development : outline how you plan on making the future vision happen, what the timeline will look like, and who will be involved in the development.
  • SWOT analysis : show investors that you’ve thought everything through by providing them with an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of your vision.

Tip: If you don’t have prior experience with it, learn how to conduct a SWOT analysis for events .

4. Event requirements

Use the event requirements to outline what you’ll need to make the event happen. It’ll give investors an idea of how many resources you need and show them you’ve been thorough.

Here are some of the many things you’ll need for your event:

  • Facilities : list the venue, catering, travel, accommodation, parking, power, and WiFi.
  • Equipment : include sound, lighting, and staging equipment for any performers or speakers.
  • Staffing : describe any event, service, security, entertainment, and medical staff you need.
  • Legal : outline all the difference licences and insurance policies you need for the event.
  • Budget : include some ballpark figures of how much all of the above will cost.

Tip: Read our guide on which event insurance policies you need .

5. Marketing plan

Investors are not the only people you need to sell the event to. Your target audience also has to know about it. In turn, your investors will want to know how you plan on getting the word out.

Event business plan: Create a detailed marketing plan.

Here are some considerations you should make when formulating your marketing plan:

  • Positioning : define your USPs and how you will position your event in relation to your competition.
  • Ticketing : outline how much your tickets will cost and how you plan on distributing them.
  • Promotion : specify which channels (such as email, direct mail, SEM , and social media) you will use to promote the event and reach your audience.
  • Public relations : identify the media outlets you will reach out to and how you will persuade them to feature your event.
  • Budget : estimate how much it will cost to promote the event as a whole.

Tip: You can download this event marketing template to help outline your plan.

6. Financial plan

It takes money to make money, but anyone investing theirs in your event will want to know if you can manage it. Write up a financial plan for how you’ll manage the event budget.

Outline all your possible sources of income from the event:

  • Merchandise
  • Exhibition space sales
  • Sponsorships

Then list all your predicted expenditures:

  • Equipment rental
  • Speakers and entertainers
  • Photography
  • Signage and decoration
  • Apps and software

Event business plan: Show investors that you can manage the budget.

Tip: Read our guide on how to plan an event budget to help you estimate the cost of your event.

7. Wrapping it up

Now that you’ve covered all the important sections in your event business plan, it’s time to wrap it up and make it look nice.

Here are the sections you should include before and after the sections we’ve just covered:

  • Front cover : include the event name and logo, the title of your business plan, and your contact details.
  • Contents : create a table of contents that outlines all the different sections of your event business plan.
  • Executive summary : write the entire business plan in a condensed format that covers all important details but only takes a few minutes to read.
  • Appendices : include appendices in the back if you have any additional notes, reports, or research that’ll complement your business plan.

Tip: You can read this guide on how to format a business plan to give you a framework.

Event business plan checklist

Just to recap, here are the sections you need to include in your event business plan:

  • Front cover : title, event name, and logo.
  • Table of contents : page numbers for each section.
  • Executive summary : a condensed version of your business plan.
  • Business structure : the type of company and staff details.
  • Event description : objectives, programme, and target audience.
  • Development plan : future vision, strategy, and SWOT analysis.
  • Event requirements : facilities, equipment, staffing, and legal.
  • Marketing plan : positioning, ticketing, promotion, PR, and budget.
  • Financial plan : incomes and expenditures.
  • Appendices : additional research, graphs, and notes.

It’ll take some time to formulate your event business plan, but you’ll be happy you did it once it’s ready. It will not only be useful for potential investors, but also for you and your event team.

Remember that your event business plan should be a living document. Update it every time there are any new developments.

If you’re still hungry for more, then watch this video on how to write up a business plan:

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How to Start an Event Management Company If you have the knack for putting together an event, connecting with people and arranging talks and pitches, then you might want to consider starting an event management business

By Shreya Ganguly • Jan 17, 2020

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

You're reading Entrepreneur India, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

We all have participated in events at some point, be it large scale or small scale, personal or professional. While the participation is fun and enjoyable, organizing one requires a lot of effort. Venue hunting, inviting the guests, arranging for logistics, food, etc takes a lot of time. This need has opened up huge business opportunity in the event management space in India.

According to EY-EEMA (Event and Entertainment Management Association) report, the Indian events and activation industry is expected to cross INR 10,000 crore mark by 2020-21. The report revealed that the industry was at INR 5,631 crore in 2016-17 and has been growing at a 16% CAGR.

Businesses share an important bond with the events management space as holding big scale conferences, workshop, pitches take a huge amount of work. If you have the knack for putting together an event, connecting with people and arranging talks and pitches, then you might want to consider starting an event management business.

How To Get Started

Sandeep Lodha, CEO, Weddingz.in explained that it is very important to understand that events are extremely important for the organizing brand. Events bring in connections and partnerships on the table, it is also a big source of marketing for the brand. So if you are looking to start up their business in this space, you need to genuinely identify a problem existing in the space and retrofit a methodology to solve the problem.

According to Mazhar Nadiadwala, Managing Director, Dome Entertainment, these are some important things to keep in mind before you start up:

  • You need to create a robust business plan with a strong vision
  • You should understand your niche and define your core competencies,
  • Make sure to have a marketing and PR Plan
  • Create different proposals or pitches for your prospective clients and vendors – Elevator pitches, pitches for occasional meets, pitches in conferences meet etc.
  • Start networking and meet groups and institutions who can give you some business
  • Focus on hiring good managers who believe in your vision.
  • Keep in mind, you need to start small, go big

Investments

If you are worried about investments, then rest assured because you can begin your events management business with low monetary investment. To get started all you need is a good laptop, which can cost up to INR 35,000. Major investment will be a strong team comprising of 5-6 skilled workers, which will be your recurring monthly cost of INR 1-1.5 lakh. According to Ruchi Garg, CEO and co-founder of Venuelook, you will also need a working capital investment of around INR 1–3 lakh per month to take care of running costs. However, the costs may differ depending upon the kind of event services you are offering.

Once you start getting clients, you may go out for raising funds for scaling up your services.

We recommend that you reinvest at least 10 per cent of all receipts back towards capital goods required for events as it is a good way to consolidate the business in the first 10 years of operations.

According to experts, for any event management company, the basic revenue is generated from the agency fees which generally range between 10-20 per cent depending upon your negotiation with the client. Apart from this, the revenue generation depends upon the type of event and the kind of services offered.

If you are only helping in co-ordination, you can charge good agency fees. But if you are the one completely responsible for the production and overall execution of the event, you might also hike up the price of the equipment and materials needed for the event, which will generate more revenue for the company. The range may change depending on the field of event one specializes or depends on the clients willingness to spend.

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How to Write an Event Organiser Business Plan (With Examples)

business plan for an event management

If you’re looking to turn your event into a viable and profitable enterprise, you’ll need to devise a solid business plan. Whether your aim is making more money, securing investment and partners, or simply keeping up with your commercial goals, an event business plan is the launchpad of a successful business.

A well-written plan can be an invaluable resource for you, your team , and your event – but writing one need not be difficult. Our systematic and straightforward event business plan step-by-step guide will show you how to create one, while providing you with useful examples for budgeting and promotion that you can adapt for your particular market.

How do you write a business plan as an event planner?

From coming up with your blue-sky mission statement to the nitty-gritty details of hosting your event, there are several steps to creating a great event business plan. Read on to get our in-depth tips and examples and to find out exactly what should go into your plan.

In this article, our tips for writing an event business plan are broken down into eight sections. We’ll show you how to:

  • Begin your event business plan with a mission statement
  • Describe your greater vision with a vision statement
  • List the key objectives you want to track
  • Enhance your event business plan with storytelling
  • Detail an event marketing strategy
  • Outline your event’s operational requirements
  • Crunch the numbers for your event budget
  • Nail SWOT analysis with this business plan event example

1. Begin your event business plan with a mission statement

Your mission statement describes your event in a short sentence or two. It helps to sell your event to important stakeholders and forms the foundation of your marketing. In fact, it’ll also help to keep you focused since every decision you make will ultimately trace back to your mission.

Mercato Metropolitano (MM), a sprawling community market and event space with good food at its core, is just one example of how a simple mission statement turned into a successful real-life venture.

Andrea Rasca of MM has a simple philosophy based on food being a human right that’s part of an adequate standard of living according to the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It sums up how MM operates as well as what it stands for:

“Adequate means food needs to be accessible to all people, at all times, and in any circumstances. It has to be nutritious – to enrich you – and it has to be locally or culturally compatible.”

This high-level mission statement sells the spirit of MM succinctly. Make yours equally inspiring, and keep it as short as possible to make it easy to keep your mission in mind. The Waste Not Supper Club , for example, summed up their mission statement – “Waste Not” – in just two words and integrated it into the name of their event.

Following a UN report urging a move to more sustainable diets, the Umbrella Cafe in Kent started running the Waste Not Supper Club to use up not only their leftover food but other people’s as well. Guests receive a three-course vegan or vegetarian evening meal at a pay-as-you-feel price. All the dishes are made from unwanted ingredients sourced by FareShare Kent , an organisation that teams up with supermarkets and local farmers to make use of their “wonky” veg and overstocked food.

2. Describe your greater vision with a vision statement

While a mission statement says what your event is about, a vision statement describes what you hope your event brand will become . It could also be known as your Big, Hairy, Audacious Goal (your BHAG ).

The Susan G. Komen Foundation uses the mission statement “Save lives by meeting the most critical needs in our communities and investing in breakthrough research to prevent and cure breast cancer.”

But the foundation’s vision is even more aspirational:

A world without breast cancer.

What’s your blue-sky vision? You might not cure cancer, but perhaps you want to eventually turn your foodie pop-up into a nationwide series of “locavore” festivals. Perhaps you want to introduce attendees to a new style of dance? Or bring art into the homes of the nation?

Brevity and clarity are also key in this section of your business plan, so you should be able to sum up your vision statement in one short sentence. For example, a lot of businesses these days want their activities to produce no carbon emissions whatsoever, so they might use a vision statement like “net-zero by 2050”.

A good way to come up with your vision statement is to ask yourself what effect you eventually want your event to have more widely. Be as imaginative as you can and also think about why you created your event in the first place. This will help you to produce evocative language, which will have a greater effect on your audience.

3. List the key objectives you want to track

Your key objectives convert your mission statement into on-the-ground action. They are realistic goals that you can achieve in the short term and in the future. Examples might include:

  • Gaining a set number of followers on social media
  • Expanding your event to a different area
  • Pinning down a special guest to make an appearance
  • Selling a certain amount of tickets for each event

Make a list of the key tasks and deliverables integral to your event. In the foodie pop-up example above, a few key objectives might be to:

  • Host three foodie pop-ups in your local area this year
  • Find at least ten sponsors
  • – local food purveyors or restaurants
  • Acquire 10,000 followers on Instagram

Make your objectives aspirational but achievable – and definitely measurable . Make records of where you currently are in regard to achieving these goals and attach metrics to each one. Eventbrite offers useful analytic data, which can be used to help you track your return on investment (ROI) and more.

4. Enhance your event business plan with storytelling

Here’s the heart of your business plan: a tangible description of your event. This is important because not only does it tell potential investors what they’re being asked to buy into but it’s also often the first (and only) chance you’ll get to grab a potential attendee’s attention online.

The key here is to provide a text that’s as informative as it is readable. Strike a balance between providing the reader with all the essential details they need, without overwhelming them with information.

Define what makes your event unique and sell your audience on your vision with data that grounds it in reality. For example, if you’ve had a high demand for tickets in the past, let the reader know how many tickets you’ve sold for your events to date.

Craft a succinct event story with our event business plan checklist:

  • Describe your target audience, with research into the market
  • List potential or actual sponsors, investors, and partners who will support and influence your event
  • Lay out the team structure you intend to build – who will get what done?

Your job here is to convince the reader that your event will be successful. Give proof that you can back up your ideas with business acumen.

5. Detail an event marketing strategy

Word of mouth is a timeless marketing channel, but most events don’t sell themselves right away. You’ve already described your mission, your vision, and the event itself, so now you can use this content in your marketing strategy and include additional information:

How will you price your event?

Will you use a flat rate or provide an early bird option at a discount? While the latter might prove a great idea for festivals and conferences, recurring events like workshops would benefit from a different marketing approach. For example, consider providing tiered ticketing options for regular events, giving guests a choice of a standard or VIP ticket with added extras. This can create a buzz of prestige around your event.

What’s your promotion budget?

Knowing what resources you have is integral to marketing your event effectively and securing a good ROI.

Which marketing channels will you use?

Your target audience will determine the direction of your marketing channels. This includes which social media platform you choose to market your event on. For example, if your arts event caters to twenty-somethings, the highly visual environment that Instagram provides will often be a better marketing match than LinkedIn , which is more suited for specialist industry lectures and business networking events.

Making the right choice of channel means that half your work is done because your event will get more exposure to people who are already interested in your sector, generating a higher lead-to-conversion rate.

6. Outline your event’s operational requirements

There are countless logistics that go into even the smallest event. Break your needs into categories: facilities, services, staffing , production, technology, legal, and insurance – just as a starting point!

Then start to anticipate what the real implications are for your event with reference to each of these categories. Depending on your specific event, facilities might include setting up a cloakroom or the hire of portaloos, shower cubicles, or charging points. Services might include anything from catering, rubbish disposal, cleaning, or the cost of basic utilities if they aren’t included in the venue hire. Production might cover contracting performers, printing tickets or wristbands, and transport of sound equipment.

Don’t leave anything out. This exercise will help you with the next step – assigning a cost to each aspect of your event.

7. Crunch the numbers for your event budget

Financial forecasts are essential to showing whether the event will be profitable – and to making your plan a business plan. It’s common to include both an overview of your numbers as well as a full budget spreadsheet, usually as part of an appendix.

Identify all potential income streams, like ticket sales , exhibition space sales, food, or merchandise. If you have funding secured or capital saved, include that as well.

You’ll also need to tally all expenditures , including your operational and promotional costs. These might include venue and equipment hire, paying staff working at the event, and the cost of targeted ads.

Your business plan might serve as a way to win over potential investors. For instance, if your idea for a national yoga teachers’ conference will require an initial cash infusion to get it off the ground, show how it will pay for itself in a matter of years in your budget. You should go into detail about cover prices, including any deals you’ve been able to get with suppliers or the venue.

Make sure to illustrate your event’s projected earnings in a simple graph, such as a bar or pie chart. This is an effective and simple of way communicating how you’re making your budget work for you.

8. Conduct a SWOT analysis for your event

SWOT stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. This assessment is important because every event carries inherent risks, and it’s a liability to ignore them. You’ll want to identify and acknowledge any risks, and then provide solutions. Let’s take a look at this concept using the example of a fundraising triathlon.

You’ve sold many tickets so far.

You’ve planned the event for the mildest time of year.

You’ve got catastrophe insurance.

There’s high competition from other similar events.

Opportunities

Extra funds can be raised with a cold drinks stall.

The triathlon may need to be called off in the event of bad weather, e.g. a thunderstorm.

Event business plan FAQs

How do i start an event organising business.

You could start by writing an event management business plan. See the above section, “Outline your event’s operational requirements,” to get an idea of what managing an event involves.

What is a business plan in event management?

A business plan is where you convince investors that your idea for turning your event into a business is not only viable but profitable. This will include presenting the necessary figures detailing why your business will offer a good ROI. Check out the sections “Enhance your event business plan with storytelling” and “Crunch the numbers for your event budget” for more tips on how to write an event planning business plan.

How do you write a business plan for an event?

The above steps in this article explain how, but try looking for an event business plan example online if you’d like to see how it’s done.

What is an event planning proposal?

A proposal is a resumé of how you plan to execute your event, written with key stakeholders as the audience.

Set your event business plan in motion

To dive deep into the details of creating an event business plan, and to learn how to compile these sections into an effective document, download our free Event Plan Template .

Plan and host your events with Eventbrite.

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Hannah Phelvin-Hartley

Hannah Phelvin-Hartley specialises in producing content for the lifestyle, education, engineering and automotive, politics, human rights and legal sectors. She can translate from Italian, Spanish and French into English. In her free time, Hannah can usually be found cooking, reading, practising Yoga and dancing.

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  5. Free Template: How to Create a Winning Event Plan

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  6. Event Planning Business Plan

    business plan for an event management

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Write an Event Planning Business Plan + Free Template

    Build your business plan faster and easier with AI. Start planning now. Plans starting from $7/month. 2. Write an Executive Summary. An executive summary is the first and foremost section of your event planning business plan. It provides a brief introduction to the entire business plan.

  2. Event Planning Company Business Plan (2024)

    Emily's Event Planning. Established in 2017, Emily's Event Planning is now a well-known event planner in the Des Moines, Iowa area. The company provides event planning services for large corporate events, weddings, and birthday parties. Emily's Event Planning is most well-known for its picturesque venue choices.

  3. How to Start an Event Management Business: The Guide

    An event management business plan (use the free template we made below) Approval for a tax business structure that suits your financial needs; General business liability insurance; These documents cover all the basics. But as you gain more experience, you might want to add on things like home-based insurance or upgrade to a new tax entity once ...

  4. Event Planning Business Plan Template & Guide [Updated 2024]

    Your operations plan should have two distinct sections as follows. Everyday short-term processes include all of the tasks involved in running your event planning business such as interviewing clients, making arrangements, keeping the store/studio clean, etc. Long-term goals are the milestones you hope to achieve.

  5. Event Planning Business Plan Example

    Explore a real-world event planning business plan example and download a free template with this information to start writing your own business plan. ... Management Team. Jeff Organizer, Founder and President, has a degree in Business from the University of Washington. After college, Jeff spent five years working for Andersen Consulting.

  6. Writing A Successful Event Planning Business Plan + Template

    The executive summary of an event planning business plan is a one to two page overview of your entire business plan. It should summarize the main points, which will be presented in full in the rest of your business plan. Start with a one-line description of your event planning company. Provide a short summary of the key points in each section ...

  7. Everything You Need to Write an Effective Event Planning Business Plan

    3. Products and services. 4. Target market and marketing plan. 5. Finances. You've gathered your resources, assessed the market, found your ideal business partners, and you're well on your way to starting your own event planning business. But to make this business a reality, you need funding.

  8. Writing Event Planning Business Plan: Step-by-Step Guide

    Show a clear understanding of your market, industry trends, and potential challenges. 7. Operational Plan. Writing an operational plan for your event management business plan involves detailing the day-to-day operations, logistics, and processes that ensure the successful execution of events.

  9. Event Planning Business Plan

    The recipient of this business plan hereby acknowledges and agrees that this document and its contents are confidential and proprietary to [Sender.Company].The recipient shall not, without the express written consent of [Sender.Company], share, disseminate, or disclose any part of this event planning business plan, in whole or in part, to any third party, including but not limited to ...

  10. PDF Event Planning Business Plan Template

    Use this template to create the business plan for your new event management business. 1. The Basic Business Information. This is a concise summary (generally a page) and quick reference guide illustrating the key points from the business and financial plan. Offer an explanation describing how the business will function.

  11. How to Start an Event Planning Business in 2024: Step-by-Step Guide

    Prepare an Event Planning Business Plan. Consider Startup and Operations Costs. Paperwork and Legal Registration. Figure Out Pricing Strategy. Get Licenses, Permits, and Insurance. Build a Core Team. Marketing to Spread the Word. 1. Conduct Industry and Market Research.

  12. Free Event Planning Business Plan Template + Example

    Follow these tips to quickly develop a working business plan from this sample. 1. Don't worry about finding an exact match. We have over 550 sample business plan templates. So, make sure the plan is a close match, but don't get hung up on the details. Your business is unique and will differ from any example or template you come across.

  13. How to Write an Effective Event Business Plan

    Crunch the numbers for your event budget. Conduct a SWOT analysis for your event. 1. Begin your event business plan with a mission statement. Your mission statement describes your event in a short sentence or two. It helps to sell your event to important stakeholders and forms the foundation of your marketing.

  14. Events Business Plan Examples

    The same applies to your business. Check out these sample business plans for event planning, wedding consultants, special event planners, and other event management businesses. Then use what you learn to write the plan for your own business. Explore our library of Events Business Plan Templates and find inspiration for your own business.

  15. How to Start an Event Planning Business? The Complete Guide

    An event management business involves the planning, organizing, and execution of various events, ranging from weddings and corporate conferences to festivals and private parties. Event planners play a crucial role in ensuring that these occasions run smoothly, leaving a lasting impression on clients and attendees alike.

  16. Starting an Event Management Company

    What to Include in a Business Plan for Event Management. A business plan doesn't need to be a long or complicated document. For a small event planning company, a side or two of A4 paper will suffice. Your aim is simply to write down all the key information about your business in a clear, logical order. The topics to include in your event ...

  17. How to Write an Event Business Plan (+Checklist)

    Just to recap, here are the sections you need to include in your event business plan: Front cover: title, event name, and logo. Table of contents: page numbers for each section. Executive summary: a condensed version of your business plan. Business structure: the type of company and staff details.

  18. How to Start an Event Management Company

    Keep in mind, you need to start small, go big. Investments. If you are worried about investments, then rest assured because you can begin your events management business with low monetary ...

  19. How to Write an Event Organiser Business Plan (With Examples)

    Detail an event marketing strategy. Outline your event's operational requirements. Crunch the numbers for your event budget. Nail SWOT analysis with this business plan event example. 1. Begin your event business plan with a mission statement. Your mission statement describes your event in a short sentence or two.