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News + Resources

Everything you need to know about The Hub 2.0

Here’s everything you need to know about how to access The Hub 2.0, from where to find your new login to how to reset your password.

We have answers to your most frequently asked questions about the brand-new Foursquare Hub 2.0 . Review this helpful list of videos to learn how to:

  • Reset your password
  • Look up a church
  • Look up an individual
  • Remit extension tithe + restricted donations
  • Prepare + edit an FMCR report

Still have questions? Reach out to your district for assistance.

FAQ’s about The Hub 2.0

Updated September 2023

I have not logged into Hub 2.0 yet, where do I log in? Login here . We recommend you save this as a bookmark on your internet browser for easy access. You can also log into the Hub by navigating to www.foursquare.org and selecting “quick links” to surface the Hub login link.   

Can I share my login with someone else? Definitely not! User credentials provide specific permissions based on the user’s ministry role. It is a breach of security requirements to share your login credentials with anyone else and may provide that person access to sensitive information such as ministry and personal banking information. If you have executive-level privileges for a church or ministry and wish to empower another leader on your team to perform these functions, you must contact your district or support office (FMI, Chaplains, etc.) to request this access.   

Are users having trouble logging into The Hub 2.0? We use a ticketing system to assist any users who are having trouble with Hub 2.0 and track the issues. Based on our data, most of the login issues (95%) are not system-related. The primary issues have been:  

  • Need to activate a new user who used shared credentials in The Hub 1.0
  • Security features in the user’s internet browser need to be disabled to allow the full functionality of The Hub. Read more about browser settings here
  • Using an outdated login name from the Hub 1.0. Note: All logins to The Hub 2.0 must be formatted as [email protected]
  • The password reset is not working because we do not have your current email on file or are using your email as your username (see point above)
  • User needs updated permissions (contact the district support team)
  • Duplicate user profiles associated with different email addresses
  • Non-technical questions

I’m having trouble logging into The Hub 2.0, where do I go for help?  

  • Make sure your internet browser version and settings are correctly configured
  • For first-time users, start with the quick tutorials at the bottom of this page
  • For issues with permissions (i.e., need access to fill out an FMCR), please contact your district or admin support team to update permissions
  • For technical issues, please submit a ticket by emailing your question to: [email protected]

General questions

What features of The Hub 2.0 are currently available? As of April 1, 2023, all new FMCR data and church payments should be entered into The Hub 2.0, which is now operating on the Salesforce platform. Users may use the search bar to look up other ministries or users and obtain their ministry’s public contact information. As of September 1, 2023, churches will have access to additional reports, including The Missional Investment Funding Eligibility Report. This report allows authorized users to preview whether all reporting and payment criteria are met and access links to quickly correct errors or discrepancies.  

What additional features will be available in the future? You will see expanded options in the report’s menu in the coming months.  Many of the same reports that were available in the previous version of The Hub will be available in the new system, along with several new reports that will be helpful for church leaders.  

When will historical data from the previous database be visible? The data migration will be happening progressively over the month of September. Different data sets will be migrated in a planned sequence, and this information will become visible once the migration is complete. While certain types of old data will not be visible in the new system, all the historical data has been archived and will be available for queries soon.  Information can be retrieved now upon request.  

Who do I contact if my permissions need to be updated? Please contact your  district or admin support team (FMI, Chaplains, etc.)   to ensure that your ministry appointment is current and that you have the correct permissions. If you need additional permissions, please have your church supervisor provide approval process to your  district or admin support team.  

Who do I contact if I need technical support? If technical difficulties persist after reviewing the FAQs, reach out to  The Hub team .    

Foursquare monthly church report questions

After entering both the missional and financial sections on the Foursquare monthly church report (FMCR), how do I get a printable copy? The printable PDF display of your FMCR is now available. A menu option will appear so you can generate this report so long as both the missional and financial portions of the report are approved.  

On the new FMCR design, there are no specific lines for “missions expense.” Where should I log these expenses in the new report? Expenditures for missions that come from donor-restricted missions should be included in the field for “donor restricted expenses.” Any missions-related expenditures from unrestricted general funds should be logged under “ministry expenses.”  More detail about your total annual missions expenditures (from all fund sources) will be requested in the December report.  

On the new FMCR design, there are no specific lines for “administrative expense.” Where should I log these expenses in the new report? Expenditures for administration can be included in “other expenses.”  

Do I need to include the value of physical assets on the new FMCR? No. The new report only asks for information about liquid assets (bank accounts and monetary investments).  

In Hub 1.0, many churches were accustomed to reporting the  extension tithe payment  associated with the  previous month’s income  in the current month’s Foursquare Monthly Church Report. Is this acceptable? No. It was necessary to adjust the FMCR reporting process during the system transition. Previously, some churches used the “cash basis” reporting method in The Hub 1.0 system, reporting the extension tithe as an expense in the month it was paid (i.e., calculated from the preceding month’s income) rather than reporting the extension tithe due for the current month. By contrast, many churches have used the “accrual method,” recording the extension tithe due  as a bill to be paid  at month’s end, thus reflecting it as an expense in the financial statements before the payment is distributed.

The accrual method provides a more precise financial statement, which is used for all financial statements audited for compliance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Standardizing how all churches report their extension tithe using the accrual method is preferable because it aligns the tithe expense with the tithable income for the same period. It also makes it much easier for churches to reconcile their eligibility for missional investment funding (i.e., extension tithe return). Going forward, The Hub 2.0 will offer a missional investment funding eligibility report, which will use the FMCR reports to list the tithable income for each month of the year, along with the extension tithe due for that month and whether the payment has been processed. This report will make it easier for church leaders to reconcile their church’s eligibility at a glance.  

How do I keep extension tithe payments in alignment with the month the extension tithe was collected? T here are two primary ways to reflect the extension tithe payments to the month associated with the collection of those tithes:

  • According to the Accrual Accounting Method: QuickBooks  | Aplos  
  • According to the Cash Accounting Method: QuickBooks  | Aplos  

Navigating the invitation email

How to reset your password in The Hub 2.0.

Find a Foursquare church in The Hub 2.0

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Remit your church’s extension tithe + restricted donations in The Hub 2.0

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Filterable spreadsheets of vaccine effectiveness studies included in the weekly summary tables. Separate spreadsheets are available for primary series and booster dose studies.

This table summarizes the vaccine effectiveness data for COVID-19 studies conducted globally. This table is updated weekly. 

This plot summarizes the available laboratory evidence on the ability of COVID-19 vaccines to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern.

These forest plots summarize available COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness against Omicron variant by vaccine and population of special interest, and for second booster dose and duration of effectiveness. These forest plots are updated weekly.

The VIEW-hub report displays data and figures on the introduction, use, and coverage status of typhoid conjugate, human papillomavirus, pneumococcal, rotavirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and inactivated polio vaccines both globally and in the

The Vaccine Economics Research for Sustainability and Equity (VERSE) project evaluated the status of vaccine coverage and equity status in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2013. Note: This resource is in French.

In partnership with the Asian Development Bank , IVAC developed factsheets and newsletters summarizing key measures for COVID-19 vaccines.

The Vaccine Economics Research for Sustainability and Equity (VERSE) project evaluated the status of vaccine coverage and equity status in South Africa in 2016.

The Vaccine Economics Research for Sustainability and Equity (VERSE) project evaluated the status of vaccine coverage and equity status in Rwanda in 2019.

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Reporthub tutorials.

ReportHub is an online reporting platform developed by iMMAP that fills the gap in reporting operational data across organizations by streamlining the information flow between clusters, partners, and the humanitarian country team -HCT in support of the Humanitarian Response Plan -HRP.

Find below iMMAP's YouTube playlist on ReportHub with 10 tutorials.

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Three New Best Practices in the 2024-2025 Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices for Hospitals

ISMP has released its 2024-2025 Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices for Hospitals , whose purpose is to identify, inspire, and mobilize widespread, national adoption of consensus-based Best Practices to address recurring problems that continue to cause fatal and harmful errors despite repeated warnings in ISMP publications. The Best Practices , which are reviewed by an external expert advisory panel and approved by the ISMP Board of Directors, represent high-leverage error-reduction strategies, many of which have already been successfully adopted by hospitals. While the Best Practices might be challenging for some organizations to achieve, they are all practical and realistic, and their value in reducing medication errors is grounded in scientific research and/or expert analysis of medication errors and their causes. Their implementation can vastly improve medication safety and reduce the risk of significant patient harm. While these Best Practices were created for hospitals, some are applicable to other healthcare settings. ISMP also offers a version for community pharmacy .

New Best Practices for 2024-2025

Initially introduced in 2014 with six Best Practices , the Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices for Hospitals are updated every 2 years. The 2024-2025 list now comprises 22 Best Practices , including three new Best Practices described below.

New Best Practice  20: Safeguard against wrong-route errors with tranexamic acid.

New Best Practice  21: Implement strategies to prevent medication errors at transitions in the continuum of care.

  • Include asking about allergies and associated reactions, prescription, and over-the-counter medications (including herbals and dietary supplements), and non-enteral medications.
  • List the drug name, dose, route, frequency, indication, and time of last dose.

New  Best Practice  22: Safeguard against errors with vaccines administered in the inpatient and associated outpatient settings.

Additional Changes for 2024-2025

Where additional information and/or changes were made to other Best Practices , the addition/modification is italicized in the specific Best Practice listed below (refer to the full document to review the complete Best Practice statements):

Best Practice  7: Segregate, sequester, and differentiate all neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBs) from other medications, wherever they are stored in the organization.

Best Practice  8: Administer all* medication and hydration infusions via a programmable infusion pump utilizing dose error-reduction systems. 

*Unless the rate of the infusion exceeds the delivery limits of the infusion pump. 

Best Practice  11: When compounding sterile preparations, utilize workflow management systems. 

*See ISMP Guidelines for Sterile Compounding and the Safe Use of Sterile Compounding Technology  

Best Practice  15: Verify and document a patient’s opioid status (naïve versus tolerant*) and type of pain (acute versus chronic) before prescribing and dispensing extended-release and long-acting opioids.

* Adult opioid-tolerant patient: Opioid tolerance is defined by the following markers: Patients receiving, for 1 week or longer, at least: 60 mg oral morphine/day; 25 mcg transdermal fenta NYL /hour; 30 mg oral oxy CODONE /day; 8 mg oral HYDRO morphone/day; 25 mg oral oxy MOR phone/day; 60 mg oral HYDRO codone/day; or an equianalgesic dose of another opioid, including heroin and/or non-prescribed opioids.

Best Practice  17: Safeguard against errors with oxytocin use.

Best Practice  19: Layer numerous strategies throughout the medication-use process to improve safety with high-alert medications.

Prior Survey Results

Between February and March 2022, ISMP conducted a brief survey to obtain a baseline measurement of the three new Best Practices added in the 2022-2023 edition. Prior to releasing the 2024-2025 Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices for Hospitals , ISMP conducted an additional survey between May and June 2023 to measure the progress with implementing the existing 2022-2023 Best Practices . These results were presented at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting on December 5, 2023. An overview of the survey findings is provided in Table 1 .

Table 1. Percentage of respondents reporting full implementation of the 2022-2023 Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices for Hospitals* compared to previous years (2022 and 2021).

Table-1-part-1

More than five hundred (n=509) respondents participated in our 2023 Best Practices survey. Almost one-tenth (9%) of the hospitals that participated indicated they have 500 beds or more; 11% have 300-499 beds; 38% have 100-299 beds; 30% have 26-99 beds; and 12% have 25 beds or less. Overall, 87% of responding hospitals reported having one or more part- or full-time medication safety officer(s) (MSO). 

Comparing the 2023 survey findings to previous survey findings in 2022 and 2021, the number of respondents reporting full compliance with the Best Practices increased for nearly all items. Of note, regarding Best Practice 17, safeguard against errors with oxytocin use, in 2022 86% of hospitals reported full implementation regarding provision of oxytocin in a ready-to-use form and around one-third (36%) responded that they boldly label both sides of the infusion bag to differentiate oxytocin bags from plain hydrating solutions and magnesium infusions. This question and results were aggregated in the 2023 survey, with 66% reporting full implementation of both components. 

We were pleased to see that several of the Best Practices had large upsurges in hospitals reporting full implementation. This included components from Best Practice 2 (require a hard stop verification [or clarification if a hard stop is not possible] of an appropriate indication for daily methotrexate orders, and provide education to patients discharged on oral methotrexate), Best Practice 3 (weigh patients as soon as possible on admission/encounter), Best Practice 11 (independently verify the ingredients and amount/volume prior to adding them to compounded sterile preparation containers), Best Practice 15 (verify/document a patient’s opioid status and pain type before prescribing/dispensing extended-release or long-acting opioids), and Best Practice 16 (require a medication order prior to removing any medication from an ADC including those removed via override, and monitor ADC overrides to verify appropriateness).

Hospitals and health systems should focus their medication safety efforts over the next 2 years on these new and any not fully implemented 2024-2025 Best Practices . The rationale for recommending the Best Practices , along with related ISMP publications and guidelines for additional information, can be found in the full document . Related documents that might be helpful to hospitals include Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and an Implementation Worksheet to help hospitals identify gaps in the implementation of these Best Practices and develop an action plan to address vulnerabilities.

Survey to Measure Baseline Implementation of New Best Practices

ISMP is conducting a brief survey to obtain a baseline measurement of the current level of implementation of the new Best Practice statements. We would sincerely appreciate your participation in this survey, regardless of whether you have implemented any of the Best Practices . Please complete the online survey by April 19, 2024 , by clicking here . 

Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). Three new best practices in the 2024-2025 targeted medication safety best practices for hospitals.  ISMP Medication Safety Alert! Acute Care.  2024;29(4):1-6.

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Report your progress

The SME Climate Hub Reporting tool enables committed SMEs to report on their emissions

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The SME Climate Hub reporting tool is provided as a free resource to enable SMEs to create a climate report summarizing their annual greenhouse gas emissions, including the actions they are taking and the impact of their emissions reduction efforts. The tool is designed specifically for SMEs and the report and its data can be integrated into annual business reports, shared on company websites, or directly distributed to customers and funders. The tool is based on the  SME Climate Disclosure Framework , developed by the CDP, the Exponential Roadmap Initiative and Normative.

Reporting on progress

The importance of reporting.

Reporting on key actions and initiatives a company is taking to reduce its emissions is important for understanding what the company is doing to meet its targets and the impact of its initiatives on the company’s emissions.

The reporting tool

The SME Climate Hub reporting tool is provided as a free resource to enable SMEs to create a climate report summarizing their annual greenhouse gas emissions, including the actions they are taking and the impact of their emissions reduction effort.

Sharing progress publicly

The report and its data can be integrated into annual business reports, shared on company websites, or directly distributed to customers and funders.

Reporting in line with requirements

01 required fields.

The tool highlights mandatory fields which are required in order to disclose progress in line with the SME Climate Commitment and United Nations’ Race to Zero starting line criteria .

02 Optional fields

The tools also includes non-mandatory fields, aiming to support SMEs climate strategies and highlighting key areas like getting a loan and articulating the impact of green products or services.

03 Uploading external reports

SMEs can also upload their own Sustainability reports, confirming that they have provided a report which is publicly available and fulfils requirements.

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Find the answers to your questions

What are the reporting requirements for companies that have joined the sme climate hub and un race to zero.

An important part of the SME Climate Commitment is to disclose progress on a yearly basis. To continue as SME Climate Hub committed companies and members of the United Nations Race to Zero campaign, SMEs are required to publicly report on progress against short-term and long-term targets as well as actions taken, through an annual climate report.

In what form can businesses report their emissions to the SME Climate Hub?

Businesses can use the SME Climate Hub’s free reporting tool, developed specifically for SMEs. The tool helps complete a report summary, which is submitted to the SME Climate Hub and can be shared with various stakeholders.

When should SMEs provide their first climate report?

SMEs that joined from January 2022 onwards shall provide their first progress report within 12 months of making the SME Climate Commitment. If they need more time to complete their report, they can send an email to [email protected] to be granted an extension of up to 6 months. SMEs that joined the SME Climate Hub in 2020 or 2021 must provide their first report by July 2023.

What will happen if an SME does not provide a climate report?

SMEs who fail to provide their report will no longer be counted amongst SME Climate Hub committed businesses and will be removed from the SME Climate Hub website and the UN Race to Zero website. As highlighted above, the SME Climate Hub will provide committed SMEs with reasonable time to meet the reporting requirements.

What are the mandatory reporting requirements?

The SME Climate Hub reporting tool contains mandatory questions, in line with SME Climate Hub requirements, which are anchored in the United Nations Race to Zero starting line criteria:

  • Report on own emissions – Scope 1 & 2
  • Comments on significant value chain emissions – Scope 3 Plan and actions to reduce own and value chain emissions – Scope 1, 2 and 3
  • Comments on progress – explanations of deviation from the target trajectory to halve emissions by 2030, and information about the actions being taken in order to reach the target and any help required to remove blockers
  • Up-to-date information for the most recent calendar year (or financial reporting year)

What are the optional reporting requirements?

The SME Climate Hub reporting tool also includes highly recommended but non-mandatory questions, which provide an opportunity to report on the company’s overall climate strategy and progress. Non-mandatory questions include:

  • Quantification of value chain emissions (Scope 3)
  • Management and strategy
  • Climate solutions (solutions which enable the business’s customers to avoid or remove emissions)

Will the report be publicly accessible?

The data provided through the SME Climate Hub reporting tool will be made public through the SME Climate Hub website. Note that sensitive company information such as contact details will not be disclosed. Participating SMEs will be able to access their full report and data through their SME Climate Hub dashboard.

Will the SME Climate Hub check the quality of the report?

The SME Climate Hub will automatically check that the mandatory data has been provided if the company reports through the SME Climate Hub reporting tool.  SMEs are responsible for the quality of their own data. The SME Climate Hub does not take responsibility for reviewing the content in the reports but will select sample reports to review at a high level, including reports produced through the SME Climate Hub reporting tool and other public reports submitted. These reviews are for internal quality control only and will not constitute external review or verification.

What happens if there are errors or missing data in the report?

The quality of the data is the responsibility of the business completing the report. If an SME identifies significant errors or missing data after completing their report through the SME Climate Hub, they will be able to send an email to [email protected] and request a change-out of the previous report to a corrected version.

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Read our research on: Immigration & Migration | Podcasts | Election 2024

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Race and lgbtq issues in k-12 schools, what teachers, teens and the u.s. public say about current curriculum debates.

Demonstrators outside a school board meeting in Glendale, California, on June 20, 2023. (David McNew/Getty Images)

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand how public K-12 teachers, teens and the American public see topics related to race, sexual orientation and gender identity playing out in the classroom.

The bulk of the analysis in this report is based on an online survey of 2,531 U.S. public K-12 teachers conducted from Oct. 17 to Nov. 14, 2023. The teachers surveyed are members of RAND’s American Teacher Panel, a nationally representative panel of public school K-12 teachers recruited through MDR Education. Survey data is weighted to state and national teacher characteristics to account for differences in sampling and response to ensure they are representative of the target population.

For the questions for the general public, we surveyed 5,029 U.S. adults from Nov. 9 to Nov. 16, 2023. The adults surveyed are members of the Ipsos KnowledgePanel, a nationally representative online survey panel. Panel members are randomly recruited through probability-based sampling, and households are provided with access to the Internet and hardware if needed. To ensure that the results of this survey reflect a balanced cross section of the nation, the data is weighted to match the U.S. adult population by gender, age, education, race and ethnicity and other categories.

For questions for teens, we conducted an online survey of 1,453 U.S. teens from Sept. 26 to Oct. 23, 2023, through Ipsos. Ipsos recruited the teens via their parents, who were part of its KnowledgePanel. The survey was weighted to be representative of U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 who live with their parents by age, gender, race and ethnicity, household income, and other categories. The survey on teens was reviewed and approved by an external institutional review board (IRB), Advarra, an independent committee of experts specializing in helping to protect the rights of research participants.

Here are the questions used for this report , along with responses, and the survey methodology .

Throughout the report, references to White, Black and Asian adults include those who are not Hispanic and identify as only one race. Hispanics are of any race. The views and experiences of teachers and teens who are Asian American or part of other racial and ethnic groups are not analyzed separately in this report due to sample limitations. Data for these groups is incorporated into the general population figures throughout the report.

All references to party affiliation include those who lean toward that party. Republicans include those who identify as Republicans and those who say they lean toward the Republican Party. Democrats include those who identify as Democrats and those who say they lean toward the Democratic Party.

Political leaning of school districts is based on whether the majority of those residing in the school district voted for Republican Donald Trump or Democrat Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.

Amid national debates about what schools are teaching , we asked public K-12 teachers, teens and the American public how they see topics related to race, sexual orientation and gender identity playing out in the classroom.

A pie chart showing that about 4 in 10 teachers say current debates about K-12 education have had a negative impact on their job.

A sizeable share of teachers (41%) say these debates have had a negative impact on their ability to do their job. Just 4% say these debates have had a positive impact, while 53% say the impact has been neither positive nor negative or that these debates have had no impact.

And 71% of teachers say teachers themselves don’t have enough influence over what’s taught in public schools in their area.

In turn, a majority of teachers (58%) say their state government has too much influence over this. And more say the federal government, the local school board and parents have too much influence than say they don’t have enough.

Most of the findings in this report come from a survey of 2,531 U.S. public K-12 teachers conducted Oct. 17-Nov. 14, 2023, using the RAND American Teacher Panel. 1 The survey looks at teachers’ views on:

  • Race and LGBTQ issues in the classroom ( Chapter 1 )
  • Current debates over what schools should be teaching and the role of key groups ( Chapter 2 )

It follows a fall 2022 survey of K-12 parents that explored similar topics.

This report also includes some findings from a survey of U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 ( Chapter 3 ) and a survey of U.S. adults ( Chapter 4 ). For details about these surveys, refer to the Methodology section of this report. Among the key findings:

  • 38% of teens say they feel comfortable when topics related to racism or racial inequality come up in class (among those who say these topics have come up). A smaller share (29%) say they feel comfortable when topics related to sexual orientation or gender identity come up.
  • Among the American public , more say parents should be able to opt their children out of learning about LGBTQ issues than say the same about topics related to race (54% vs. 34%).

What do teachers think students should learn about slavery and gender identity?

A diverging bar chart showing that most teachers think students should learn that the legacy of slavery still affects Black Americans today.

We asked public K-12 teachers what they think students should learn in school about two topics in particular:

  • Whether the legacy of slavery still affects the position of Black people in American society today.
  • Whether a person’s gender can be different from or is determined by their sex at birth.

For these questions, elementary, middle and high school teachers were asked about elementary, middle and high school students, respectively.

The legacy of slavery

Most teachers (64%) say students should learn that the legacy of slavery still affects the position of Black people in American society today.

About a quarter (23%) say students should learn that slavery is part of American history but no longer affects the position of Black people in American society. Just 8% say students shouldn’t learn about this topic in school at all.

Majorities of elementary, middle and high school teachers say students should learn that the legacy of slavery still has an impact on the lives of Black Americans.

Gender identity

A diverging bar chart showing that most elementary school teachers say students shouldn’t learn about gender identity at school.

When it comes to teaching about gender identity – specifically whether a person’s gender can be different from or is determined by their sex assigned at birth – half of public K-12 teachers say students shouldn’t learn about this in school.

A third of teachers think students should learn that someone can be a boy or a girl even if that is different from the sex they were assigned at birth.

A smaller share (14%) say students should learn that whether someone is a boy or a girl is determined by their sex at birth.

Views differ among elementary, middle and high school teachers. But teachers across the three levels are more likely to say students should learn that a person’s gender can be different from their sex at birth than to say students should learn gender is determined by sex at birth.

Most elementary school teachers (62%) say students shouldn’t learn about gender identity in school. This is much larger than the shares of middle and high school teachers who say the same (45% and 35%).

What parents and teens say

Parents of K-12 students are more divided on what their children should learn in school about these topics.

In the 2022 survey , 49% of parents said they’d rather their children learn that the legacy of slavery still affects the position of Black people in American society today, while 42% said they’d rather their children learn that slavery no longer affects Black Americans.

When it comes to gender identity, 31% of parents said they’d rather their children learn that gender can be different from sex at birth. An identical share said they would rather their children learn gender is determined by sex at birth. Another 37% of parents said their children shouldn’t learn about gender identity in school.

Teens, like parents, are more divided than teachers on these questions. About half of teens (48%) say they’d rather learn that the legacy of slavery still affects the position of Black Americans today. Four-in-ten would prefer to learn that slavery no longer affects Black Americans.

And teens are about evenly divided when it comes to what they prefer to learn about gender identity. A quarter say they’d rather learn that a person’s gender can be different from their sex at birth; 26% would prefer to learn that gender is determined by sex at birth. About half (48%) say they shouldn’t learn about gender identity in school.

For more on teens’ views about what they prefer to learn in school about each of these topics, read Chapter 3 of this report.

Should parents be able to opt their children out of learning about certain topics?

Most public K-12 teachers (60%) say parents should not be able to opt their children out of learning about racism or racial inequality in school, even if the way these topics are taught conflicts with the parents’ beliefs. A quarter say parents should be able to opt their children out of learning about these topics.

In contrast, more say parents should be able to opt their children out of learning about sexual orientation or gender identity (48%) than say parents should not be able to do this (33%).

On topics related to both race and LGBTQ issues, elementary and middle school teachers are more likely than high school teachers to say parents should be able to opt their children out.

How teachers’ views compare with the public’s views

A diverging bar chart showing that 54% of Americans say parents should be able to opt their children out of learning about LGBTQ issues.

Like teachers, Americans overall are more likely to say parents should be able to opt their children out of learning about sexual orientation or gender identity (54%) than to say they should be able to opt their children out of learning about racism or racial inequality (34%).

Across both issues, Americans overall are somewhat more likely than teachers to say parents should be able to opt their children out.

For more on the public’s views, read Chapter 4 of this report.

How often do topics related to race and LGBTQ issues come up in the classroom?

A horizontal stacked bar chart showing that topics related to racism and racial inequality come up in the classroom more often than LGBTQ issues.

Most teachers who’ve been teaching for more than a year (68%) say the topics of sexual orientation and gender identity rarely or never came up in their classroom in the 2022-23 school year. About one-in-five (21%) say these topics came up sometimes, and 8% say they came up often or extremely often.

Topics related to racism or racial inequality come up more frequently. A majority of teachers (56%) say these topics came up at least sometimes in their classroom, with 21% saying they came up often or extremely often.

These topics are more likely to come up in secondary school than in elementary school classrooms.

How do teachers’ views differ by party?

As is the case among parents of K-12 students and the general public, teachers’ views on how topics related to race and LGBTQ issues should play out in the classroom differ by political affiliation.

  • What students should learn about slavery: 85% of Democratic and Democratic-leaning teachers say students should learn that the legacy of slavery still affects the position of Black people in American society today. This compares with 35% of Republican and Republican-leaning teachers who say the same.

A diverging bar chart showing that teachers’ views on parents opting their children out of learning about race, LGBTQ issues differ widely by party.

  • What students should learn about gender identity: Democratic teachers are far more likely than Republican teachers to say students should learn that a person’s gender can be different from the sex they were assigned at birth (53% vs. 5%). Most Republican teachers (69%) say students shouldn’t learn about gender identity in school.
  • Parents opting their children out of learning about these topics: 80% of Republican teachers say parents should be able to opt their children out of learning about LGBTQ issues, compared with 30% of Democratic teachers. And while 47% of Republican teachers say parents should be able to opt their children out of learning about racism and racial inequality, just 11% of Democratic teachers say this.

A majority of public K-12 teachers (58%) identify with or lean toward the Democratic Party. About a third (35%) identify with or lean toward the GOP. Americans overall are more evenly divided: 47% are Democrats or Democratic leaners, and 45% are Republicans or Republican leaners .

  • For details, refer to the Methodology section of the report. ↩

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Table of contents, ‘back to school’ means anytime from late july to after labor day, depending on where in the u.s. you live, among many u.s. children, reading for fun has become less common, federal data shows, most european students learn english in school, for u.s. teens today, summer means more schooling and less leisure time than in the past, about one-in-six u.s. teachers work second jobs – and not just in the summer, most popular.

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Patients Association: Patient experience of diagnostics report (13 February 2024)

  • PUBLISHED 5 hours ago
  • TYPE Reports and articles
  • CONTENT TYPE Pre-existing
  • COPYRIGHT STATUS Original author
  • PAYWALLED No
  • ORIGINAL PUBLICATION DATE 13/02/24
  • SUGGESTED AUDIENCE Everyone
  • Tests / investigations
  • Accessibility
  • Health inequalities
  • Health Disparities

This report by the Patients Association analyses the opinions and experiences of diagnostic testing services of more than 1,000 NHS patients. It highlights that patients view diagnostics as a fundamental part of the NHS—and one that should be prioritised. Most respondents (93%) want testing capacity to be invested in over the coming years so that patients can receive tests and diagnosis more quickly. Patients place such importance on diagnostics that 60% would consider paying for the tests they need if they faced a long wait on the NHS.

Key findings

  • More than nine out of ten (93%) respondents want testing capacity to be invested in over the coming years so that patients can receive tests and diagnosis more quickly.
  • More than nine out ten (91%) want investment in diagnostics and new technology to be prioritised.
  • Three out of five (60%) would consider paying privately if they faced long waits on the NHS.
  • More than 3 in 4 (77%) would be happy to test themselves at home.  
  • Four out of five (82%) want more discussion of testing options when being referred. 
  • Around nine out of ten (88%) want a realistic timeline for receiving results.
  • A third (36%) reported their physical health declined while waiting for tests. 
  • A third (34%) said their mental health declined while waiting for tests.

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Louisiana's legislature begins a special session on crime

The state's new Republican governor wants legislators to examine a series of issues following years of Democratic control.

LEILA FADEL, HOST:

As in many states, people in Louisiana are worried about rising crime.

A MARTÍNEZ, HOST:

Yeah. And the state legislature opened a special session this week to consider dozens of bills meant to address that. But the proposed measures also threaten to undo some of the state's recent criminal justice reforms, including a controversial proposal that would make it easier to carry out death sentences.

FADEL: WRKF's Molly Ryan covers the Louisiana state government and joins us now from Baton Rouge. Hi, Molly.

MOLLY RYAN, BYLINE: Hi.

FADEL: So we mentioned this proposed legislation that would make state executions easier. What's in that bill?

RYAN: So basically there's been a bill that's been filed that would expand the methods of execution in Louisiana to include electrocution and nitrogen gas hypoxia. Right now, only lethal injection is allowed. But it's been hard to source those drugs. And Louisiana hasn't executed anyone since 2010. There's currently around 60 people on Louisiana's death row. Here's the state's new Republican governor, Jeff Landry, opening the session yesterday and inviting family members of murder victims to come to the Capitol.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF LANDRY: Capital punishment is lawful. And we intend to fulfill a legal duty to resume it for the justice of these families.

RYAN: But there's also a lot of opposition to this bill from lawmakers. And even TV and film producers are talking about possibly boycotting the state as a filming location if this passes because they don't want to see the state resume executions.

FADEL: So, you know, some pretty significant opposition there. What other measures might come out of this special session? And are there similar concerns?

RYAN: Yeah, well, there are several bills that look to limit parole eligibility and cut back on the reduced sentences that incarcerated individuals can earn for good behavior. There's also a bill that would lower the age in Louisiana at which someone can be tried as an adult from 18 to 17. And there are several bills that would increase penalties for certain crimes, like carjacking and distributing fentanyl. So overall, the governor and lawmakers are looking to just get much tougher in terms of dealing with crime. And these items have all raised concerns from Democrats and Louisiana's Legislative Black Caucus, which said that these bills will disproportionately affect Black men. They also said that the bills are reactive and don't address the root issue of crime, so they don't think it will help anything.

FADEL: Now, Molly, Louisiana made big changes in its criminal justice system since 2016. And these bills would undo some of that work. Why go back on those policies now?

RYAN: There's a lot of angst in Louisiana about crime, like there is in a lot of the country. And crime rates in Louisiana are relatively high compared to other places in the country but have dropped in some of the state's biggest cities. And Louisiana's new GOP governor, Jeff Landry - he campaigned on a platform that would get tough on crime and promised voters on the campaign trail that he would call this session. So that's a big reason why we're here. These policies are likely to be popular with a lot of Republican voters in Louisiana. But as I mentioned before, others are worried that these bills won't address the root issues of crime, like mental health and education.

FADEL: WRKF's Molly Ryan in Baton Rouge. Thank you so much, Molly.

RYAN: Thank you.

Copyright © 2024 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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