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2010: Marks & Spencer, Marketing for Sustainable Consumption: Case Study

Marks & Spencer | Marketing for Sustainable Consumption

Marks & Spencer has put sustainability at the heart of its business.

Key insights

  • For Marks & Spencer (M&S) going green has meant not just transforming every part of its business but trying to change the attitudes and behaviour of its 25 million customers.
  • A carefully-planned, three-stage approach has worked by convincing, not cajoling, people to do the right thing and change behaviour.

M&S is one of the UK’s leading retailers, selling clothing, food and homeware. In 2006 the company became determined to put sustainability at the heart of its business. It set out to transform every aspect of the company, from sourcing products to relationships with suppliers, shoppers and the wider world.

To succeed, it would have to change the attitudes and behaviour of every one of its 25 million shoppers. Since its inception it has passed through three distinct steps. The first step, ‘Look Behind the Label’ raised awareness and approval of a whole range of initiatives — and the brand itself.

The second step, ‘Plan A’, involved a more thorough reappraisal of M&S, and set out a five-year plan involving 100 commitments. After only a year, it had reached many of its goals and achieved significant recognition from opinion leaders. But it still didn’t change the average shopper’s behaviour.

It was the third step, ‘Doing the Right Thing’, that accomplished this by ‘normalising’ the aims of Plan A and expressing them in a way that seemed right and proper to mainstream people. In a relatively short time the measured attitudes of a million shoppers had changed, moving from a passive, defeatist approach towards a more actively sustainable, optimistic one.

Facing a changing world

For well over a century, and long before words like ‘sustainability’ entered the vernacular, M&S had been quietly practicing a whole range of ethical business practices. For example:

  • A hundred years of long-term, mutually-beneficial relationships with suppliers.
  • Fifty years of smoke-free shopping.
  • Forty-five years of energy-efficient thermostatic fridges.
  • ‘A returns’ policy unmatched for generations.
  • Free-range eggs long before most people knew or cared what the phrase ‘free-range eggs’ actually meant.

But times had moved on. By the early years of the 21st century things had reached the point where, without drastic action, it would be hard to imagine any kind of decent future for forthcoming generations. For M&S it was time to do something more about sustainability.

In 2006, it took a long, hard look at its ethical and sustainable activities as a whole, and set out to ‘move them up a gear’ and to gather support behind them. Its aims were to change the business from root to branch, and through this to help change lives and, in as far as it was able, to do what it could to help change the world for the better. This was never going to be a quick fix.

Nor, realistically, was it ever going to be something that could be fully achieved completely, or to everyone’s complete satisfaction. A journey is the best way of looking at it. By the end of 2009 it had been a journey that had passed through three distinct steps. Each step moved M&S and its partners towards a better place — although there was still a long way to go, and there probably always will be.

Listening to the customers A number of studies had been conducted into what consumers thought about sustainability and the environment, and, broadly speaking, they coincided. Generally, 20% didn’t care and weren’t interested. The rest (80%), said they did care — to some degree — and to some degree thought that being ‘green’ was the ‘good’ or ‘right’ thing to do.

However, only a minority (10%) actively went out of their way to do something about it. The main bulk said they might do something if it was easy and didn’t involve making sacrifices (35%) or that they didn’t see what difference it would make anyway (35%) (Figure 1). Making millions of shoppers less defeatist, and more willing, was never going to be an easy task.

Embarking on a long journey

Step One, 2006: Look Behind The Label

The first step was about raising awareness and encouraging approval. For socially and environmentally-aware consumers ‘Look Behind the Label’ drew attention to a range of things M&S was doing, from sourcing Fairtrade to environmentally-friendly textile dyes (Figures 2 and 3).

This programme resulted in increased awareness and approval of M&S initiatives, particularly among opinion formers and the ethically-aware.

Highlights included:

  • Voted Britain’s Greenest Supermarket by consumers and most popular with socially/environmentally-aware shoppers.
  • Evidence collected by Citigroup analysts suggested that ‘Look Behind the Label’ was the most successful campaign M&S had ever run.
  • Compassion in World Farming’s Good Egg Award for free-range eggs.
  • Top of the Marine Stewardship Council League for sustainable fishing.
  • RSPCA Good Business Awards for best fashion retailer.

But the company felt there was more to be done. ‘Feel good’ awareness and approval among people who are already concerned about ethics and the environment was a good thing, but it didn’t always translate into tangible change in the world. What needed to be done was to move people from just feeling something to actually doing something — from awareness and approval to engagement and commitment.

Step Two, 2007/8: Plan A

The next stage was about engaging and attracting commitment. In 2007, after a process involving stakeholders both from inside and outside the business, M&S set out its new plan: 100 commitments, in five ‘pillars’, to be accomplished in five years. It was called Plan A because, the argument went, there was no Plan B. It was to encompass all of the big issues in the business and across the entire value chain. The end of all this would be a transformation of M&S itself, its business practices, its relationships with customers and suppliers and its dealings with the world at large. Few, if any, major retailers had ever done anything like this before.

The pillars of Plan A were:

  • Climate change: to make M&S’s operations carbon-neutral.
  • Reducing waste: to have zero waste going to landfill through reducing and recycling bags and packaging.
  • Sustainable raw materials: to source the most sustainable and renewable materials available.
  • Being a fair partner: to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in the supply chain and their families and communities.
  • Health: to help thousands of employees and customers choose a healthier lifestyle.

Plan A had to be much more than a ‘feel good’ campaign. It required engagement and commitment from M&S itself and from customers. It meant making difficult decisions. People who had become accustomed to getting as many plastic carrier-bags as they liked for free would suddenly find themselves having to bring their own shopping-bags from home (like their mothers used to do) or else pay 5p a bag. They would be expected to see the point of it, and think it a good thing, rather than a rip-off or a nuisance.

The achievements of the initial phase of Plan A were notable because it began the process of bringing about tangible change, including:

  • Reduced 10,000 tons of packaging.
  • Diverted 20,000 tons of waste from landfill.
  • Saved 40,000 tons of CO2.
  • Saved 387 million food carrier bags (an 83% reduction).
  • Used 1,500 tons of recycled polyester (equivalent to 37 million bottles).
  • Organic food sales 2007/8 up 40% compared to 2006/7.
  • Saved 100 million litres of water.
  • Generated £15 million for charities, including £1.6 million raised for Breakthrough Breast Cancer and £600,000 raised to educate 15,000 children in Uganda.

In addition, recognition from opinion-formers continued to grow. Not only did the company receive a whole range of environmental and ethical awards but it managed to get significant opinion-former involvement in the Plan A Climate Change Quilt project. Over 5,000 people contributed to the website, including message patches from Twiggy, Myleene Klass, Jemima Khan, Geri Halliwell, Tom Aikens, Philip Glenister, Noemie Lenoir, Zac Goldsmith and Sir lan Botham, as well as top executives from charities such as WWF and Oxfam.

But there was more to be done. Plan A had created extremely high levels of engagement and commitment among both staff and internal audiences and ‘Green Crusaders’, while it made people in general feel better about the company. However, what it didn’t do was to get enough mainstream customers to change their attitudes and behaviour significantly. A lot of people still didn’t understand Plan A. They suspected that the 5p carrier bag policy was a cunning way of benefiting M&S — despite the fact that the profit was donated to an environmental charity. More needed to be done to change mainstream attitudes and behaviours.

Step Three, 2009: Plan A: Doing The Right Thing

This was about going mainstream and getting to those people who weren’t the active, committed Green Crusaders and who felt happier being comfortable, fitting in and doing what’s generally considered to be normal, acceptable and right. But ‘normal, acceptable and right’ is a moving standard. Twenty years ago people sat with their children in buses and train carriages filled with a thick fog of cigarette smoke and no-one thought twice about it. Twenty years ago, people bought battery eggs, and anyone who made a fuss about free-range was thought to be a bit odd.

2008 awards and recognition for Plan A

  • World Environment Centre Gold Medal for International Corporate Achievement in Sustainable Development 2008
  • British Renewable Energy Awards Pioneer Award
  • Property Executive Sustainability Award for Excellence (Pollok Store)
  • Retail Interior Award — Green Store of the Year (Bournemouth)
  • RSPCA 2008 Awards — Cosmetics winner; Ongoing Commitment to Change Award; Fashion Winner; Best Large Retailer and Food Winner; Best Supermarket Award

2009 awards and recognition for Doing the Right Thing

  • Joint winner 2009 Consumer Focus ‘Green to the Core’ supermarket league table
  • Retail Leadership Award 2009, Greener Package Awards
  • Fashion Commitment Award 2009, RSPCA Good Business Awards
  • 2009 Winner Environmental Investigation Agency’s supermarket refrigeration table
  • 2009 Winner Pesticide Action Network UK supermarket pesticide league table
  • 2009 Most Ethical Retailer, Cosmopolitan Magazine Awards
  • High Street Recycling Champion 2009, Letsrecycle.com Awards
  • Environmental Initiative of the Year in the 2009 International Wine Challenge Awards
  • Top 100 in Ethisphere World’s Most Ethical Companies
  • Regular analysis from CIU department showing M&S as the most ethical/green retailer

M&S needed to find out how to:

  • Normalise Plan A. That meant re-framing or re-positioning the commitments so that they would be seen by the public at large as the ‘default’ choice of normal, right-thinking people like you and me, rather than the active hobby-horse of rainbow-clad people with dreadlocks who lived in yurts and constructed their own wind-turbines out of bits of old bicycles.
  • Talk about the benefits. It had to be made into a win-win situation, not seen as a puritanical sacrifice. Ethical food and ethical fashion should stimulate someone’s desires first and their conscience second.

The ‘normalising’ idea, when it came, came from consumers themselves. In research, the same phrase kept coming up time and time again: Doing the Right Thing. As in, “l just want to do the right thing.” There are any number of people who might, or might not, decide to take part in something called ‘Plan A’, but there are very few people who don’t want to be seen to ‘do the right thing’.

To put it another way, the thrust of the argument behind the campaign changed from objectivist (“It’s a fact that we need to deal with these issues.”) to approbationalist (“All right-thinking people think this is a good thing to do, and they’d feel good about you for doing it.”).

This made it feel a lot more friendly and normal. Then there was the job of making it seem not just normal and friendly but desirable, and for this there was a deliberate communications policy of always using ‘Doing the right thing’ in combination with examples of the benefits and pleasures offered by M&S quality (Figures 4 and 5).

This third stage resulted in the following achievements:

  • Began the process of changing mainstream attitudes and behaviour, resulting in a less defeatist attitude, with a million more shoppers willing to do something (Figure 6).
  • Continued reduction in carrier-bag usage, doing away with 400 million bags and raising £1.2 million for its partner, environmental regeneration charity Groundwork.
  • Over a million people donated M&S clothes to Oxfam and collected their voucher. 3.2 million M&S garments were recycled and £2 million raised for Oxfam.

M&S set out on a journey whose aim was to build a better business that improved lives, changed attitudes and behaviour and made the way we live better and more sustainable. Although it is a journey possibly without end, the first three steps achieved remarkable results.

The Oxfam Clothes Exchange programme This was the UK’s largest clothes recycling initiative. Customers were encouraged to donate their old M&S clothes to Oxfam, in return for which they got a £5 voucher. People felt virtuous for having done the right thing, pleased with their £5, and good about M&S quality after learning that the clothes they donated had a high value to Oxfam on account of being so well-made and long-lasting.

Entries for the 2013 Awards for Excellence are now open, now is the time to choose the category you would like to enter .

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Marks and Spencer: Plan A Harvard Case Solution & Analysis

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marks and spencer plan a case study

Marks & Spencer began a comprehensive approach to sustainability (waste reduction, carbon emissions, fair trade), called Plan A. Does he offer a competitive advantage? "Hide by David E. Bell, Nitin Sanghavi, Laura Winig Source : Harvard Business School 23 pages. Publication Date: 05 January 2009 . Prod. #: 509029-PDF-ENG

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Marks And Spencer Plan A Case Study Solution Analysis

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Marks And Spencer Plan A Case Study Solution Analysis. Get Marks And Spencer Plan A Case Study Analysis Solution. Contact us directly at buycasesolutions(at)gmail(dot)com if you want to order for Marks And Spencer Plan A Case Solution, Case Analysis, Case... More

Marks And Spencer Plan A Case Study Solution Analysis. Get Marks And Spencer Plan A Case Study Analysis Solution. Contact us directly at buycasesolutions(at)gmail(dot)com if you want to order for Marks And Spencer Plan A Case Solution, Case Analysis, Case Study Solution. David E. Bell, Nitin Sanghavi, Laura Winig Less

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Study Solution Analysis Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Study Solution Analysis. Our tutors are available 24/7 to assist in your academic stuff, Our Professional writers are ready to serve you in services you need. Every Case Study Solution & Analysis is prepared from scratch, top quality, plagiarism free. Authors: David E. Bell, Nitin Sanghavi, Laura Winig Get Case Study Solution and Analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A in a FAIR PRICE!! Steps for Case Study Solution Analysis: 1. Introduction of Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Solution The Marks and Spencer Plan A case study is a Harvard Business Review case study, which presents a simulated practical experience to the reader allowing them to learn about real life problems in the business world. The Marks and Spencer Plan A case consisted of a central issue to the organization, which had to be identified, analysed and creative solutions had to be drawn to tackle the issue. This paper presents the solved Marks and Spencer Plan A case analysis and case solution. The method through which the analysis is done is mentioned, followed by the relevant tools used in finding the solution. The case solution first identifies the central issue to the Marks and Spencer Plan A case study, and the relevant stakeholders affected by this issue. This is known as the problem identification stage. After this, the relevant tools and models are used, which help in the case study analysis and case study solution. The tools used in identifying the solution consist of the SWOT Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, PESTEL Analysis, VRIO analysis, Value Chain Analysis, BCG Matrix analysis, Ansoff Matrix analysis, and the Marketing Mix analysis. The solution consists of recommended strategies to overcome this central issue. It is a good idea to also propose alternative case study solutions, because if the main solution is not found feasible, then the alternative solutions could be implemented. Lastly, a good case study solution also includes an implementation plan for the recommendation strategies. This shows how through a step-by-step procedure as to how the central issue can be resolved. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] 2. Problem Identification of Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Solution Harvard Business Review cases involve a central problem that is being faced by the organization and these problems affect a number of stakeholders. In the problem identification stage, the problem faced by Marks and Spencer Plan A is identified through reading of the case. This could be mentioned at the start of the reading, the middle or the end. At times in a case analysis, the problem may be clearly evident in the reading of the HBR case. At other times, finding the issue is the job of the person analysing the case. It is also important to understand what stakeholders are affected by the problem and how. The goals of the stakeholders and are the organization are also identified to ensure that the case study analysis are consistent with these. 3. Analysis of the Marks and Spencer Plan A HBR Case Study The objective of the case should be focused on. This is doing the Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Solution. This analysis can be proceeded in a step-by-step procedure to ensure that effective solutions are found. In the first step, a growth path of the company can be formulated that lays down its vision, mission and strategic aims. These can usually be developed using the company history is provided in the case. Company history is helpful in a Business Case study as it helps one understand what the scope of the solutions will be for the case study. The next step is of understanding the company; its people, their priorities and the overall culture. This can be done by using company history. It can also be done by looking at anecdotal instances of managers or employees that are usually included in an HBR case study description to give the reader a real feel of the situation. Lastly, a timeline of the issues and events in the case needs to be made. Arranging events in a timeline allows one to predict the next few events that are likely to take place. It also helps one in developing the case study solutions. The timeline also helps in understanding the continuous challenges that are being faced by the organisation. 4. SWOT analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A An important tool that helps in addressing the central issue of the case and coming up with Marks and Spencer Plan A HBR case solution is the SWOT analysis. The SWOT analysis is a strategic management tool that lists down in the form of a matrix, an organisation's internal strengths and weaknesses, and external Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] opportunities and threats. It helps in the strategic analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A Once this listing has been done, a clearer picture can be developed in regards to how strategies will be formed to address the main problem. For example, strengths will be used as an advantage in solving the issue. Therefore, the SWOT analysis is a helpful tool in coming up with the Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Study answers. One does not need to remain restricted to using the traditional SWOT analysis, but the advanced TOWS matrix or weighted average SWOT analysis can also be used. 5. Porter Five Forces Analysis for Marks and Spencer Plan A Another helpful tool in finding the case solutions is of Porter's Five Forces analysis. This is also a strategic tool that is used to analyse the competitive environment of the industry in which Marks and Spencer Plan A operates in. Analysis of the industry is important as businesses do not work in isolation in real life, but are affected by the business environment of the industry that they operate in. Harvard Business case studies represent real-life situations, and therefore, an analysis of the industry's competitive environment needs to be carried out to come up with more holistic case study solutions. In Porter's Five Forces analysis, the industry is analysed along 5 dimensions. • These are the threats that the industry faces due to new entrants. • It includes the threat of substitute products. • It includes the bargaining power of buyers in the industry. • It includes the bargaining power of suppliers in an industry. • Lastly, the overall rivalry or competition within the industry is analysed This tool helps one understand the relative powers of the major players in the industry and its overall competitive dynamics. Actionable and practical solutions can then be developed by keeping these factors into perspective. 6. PESTEL Analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A Another helpful tool that should be used in finding the case study solutions is the PESTEL analysis. This also looks at the external business environment of the organisation helps in finding case study Analysis to real-life business issues as in HBR cases. • The PESTEL analysis particularly looks at the macro environmental factors that affect the industry. These are the political, environmental, social, technological, environmental and legal (regulatory) factors affecting the industry. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • Factors within each of these 6 should be listed down, and analysis should be made as to how these affect the organisation under question. 7. VRIO Analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A This is an analysis carried out to know about the internal strengths and capabilities of Marks and Spencer Plan A . Under the VRIO analysis, the following steps are carried out: • The internal resources of Marks and Spencer Plan A are listed down. • Each of these resources are assessed in terms of the value it brings to the organization. • Each resource is assessed in terms of how rare it is. A rare resource is one that is not commonly used by competitors. • Each resource is assessed whether it could be imitated by competition easily or not. • Lastly, each resource is assessed in terms of whether the organization can use it to an advantage or not. • The analysis done on the 4 dimensions; Value, Rareness, Imitability, and Organization. If a resource is high on all of these 4, then it brings long-term competitive advantage. If a resource is high on Value, Rareness, and Imitability, then it brings an unused competitive advantage. If a resource is high on Value and Rareness, then it only brings temporary competitive advantage. If a resource is only valuable, then it’s a competitive parity. If it’s none, then it can be regarded as a competitive disadvantage. 8. Value Chain Analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A The Value chain analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A helps in identifying the activities of an organization, and how these add value in terms of cost reduction and differentiation. This tool is used in the case study analysis as follows: • The firm’s primary and support activities are listed down. • Identifying the importance of these activities in the cost of the product and the differentiation they produce. • Lastly, differentiation or cost reduction strategies are to be used for each of these activities to increase the overall value provided by these activities. Recognizing value creating activities and enhancing the value that they create allow Marks and Spencer Plan A to increase its competitive advantage. 9. BCG Matrix of Marks and Spencer Plan A The BCG Matrix is an important tool in deciding whether an organization should invest or divest in its strategic business units. The matrix involves placing the Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] strategic business units of a business in one of four categories; question marks, stars, dogs and cash cows. The placement in these categories depends on the relative market share of the organization and the market growth of these strategic business units. The steps to be followed in this analysis is as follows: • Identify the relative market share of each strategic business unit. • Identify the market growth of each strategic business unit. • Place these strategic business units in one of four categories. Question Marks are those strategic business units with high market share and low market growth rate. Stars are those strategic business units with high market share and high market growth rate. Cash Cows are those strategic business units with high market share and low market growth rate. Dogs are those strategic business units with low market share and low growth rate. • Relevant strategies should be implemented for each strategic business unit depending on its position in the matrix. The strategies identified from the Marks and Spencer Plan A BCG matrix and included in the case pdf. These are either to further develop the product, penetrate the market, develop the market, diversification, investing or divesting. 10. Ansoff Matrix of Marks and Spencer Plan A Ansoff Matrix is an important strategic tool to come up with future strategies for Marks and Spencer Plan A in the case solution. It helps decide whether an organization should pursue future expansion in new markets and products or should it focus on existing markets and products. • The organization can penetrate into existing markets with its existing products. This is known as market penetration strategy. • The organization can develop new products for the existing market. This is known as product development strategy. • The organization can enter new markets with its existing products. This is known as market development strategy. • The organization can enter into new markets with new products. This is known as a diversification strategy. The choice of strategy depends on the analysis of the previous tools used and the level of risk the organization is willing to take. 11. Marketing Mix of Marks and Spencer Plan A Marks and Spencer Plan A needs to bring out certain responses from the market that it targets. To do so, it will need to use the marketing mix, which serves as a tool in helping bring out responses from the market. The 4 elements of the marketing mix are Product, Price, Place and Promotions. The following steps are required to carry out a marketing mix analysis and include this in the case study analysis. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • Analyse the company’s products and devise strategies to improve the product offering of the company. • Analyse the company’s price points and devise strategies that could be based on competition, value or cost. • Analyse the company’s promotion mix. This includes the advertisement, public relations, personal selling, sales promotion, and direct marketing. Strategies will be devised which makes use of a few or all of these elements. • Analyse the company’s distribution and reach. Strategies can be devised to improve the availability of the company’s products. 12. Marks and Spencer Plan A Strategy The strategies devised and included in the Marks and Spencer Plan A case memo should have a strategy. A strategy is a strategy that involves firms seeking uncontested market spaces, which makes the competition of the company irrelevant. It involves coming up with new and unique products or ideas through innovation. This gives the organization a competitive advantage over other firms, unlike a red ocean strategy. 13. Competitors analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A The PESTEL analysis discussed previously looked at the macro environmental factors affecting business, but not the microenvironmental factors. One of the microenvironmental factors are competitors, which are addressed by a competitor analysis. The Competitors analysis of Marks and Spencer Plan A looks at the direct and indirect competitors within the industry that it operates in. • This involves a detailed analysis of their actions and how these would affect the future strategies of Marks and Spencer Plan A . • It involves looking at the current market share of the company and its competitors. • It should compare the marketing mix elements of competitors, their supply chain, human resources, financial strength etc. • It also should look at the potential opportunities and threats that these competitors pose on the company. 14. Organisation of the Analysis into Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Study Solution Once various tools have been used to analyse the case, the findings of this analysis need to be incorporated into practical and actionable solutions. These solutions will Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] also be the Marks and Spencer Plan A case answers. These are usually in the form of strategies that the organisation can adopt. The following step-by-step procedure can be used to organise the Harvard Business case solution and recommendations: • The first step of the solution is to come up with a corporate level strategy for the organisation. This part consists of solutions that address issues faced by the organisation on a strategic level. This could include suggestions, changes or recommendations to the company's vision, mission and its strategic objectives. It can include recommendations on how the organisation can work towards achieving these strategic objectives. Furthermore, it needs to be explained how the stated recommendations will help in solving the main issue mentioned in the case and where the company will stand in the future as a result of these. • The second step of the solution is to come up with a business level strategy. The HBR case studies may present issues faced by a part of the organisation. For example, the issues may be stated for marketing and the role of a marketing manager needs to be assumed. So, recommendations and suggestions need to address the strategy of the marketing department in this case. Therefore, the strategic objectives of this business unit (Marketing) will be laid down in the solutions and recommendations will be made as to how to achieve these objectives. Similar would be the case for any other business unit or department such as human resources, finance, IT etc. The important thing to note here is that the business level strategy needs to be aligned with the overall corporate strategy of the organisation. For example, if one suggests the organisation to focus on differentiation for competitive advantage as a corporate level strategy, then it can't be recommended for the Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Study Solution that the business unit should focus on costs. • The third step is not compulsory but depends from case to case. In some HBR case studies, one may be required to analyse an issue at a department. This issue may be analysed for a manager or employee as well. In these cases, recommendations need to be made for these people. The solution may state that objectives that these people need to achieve and how these objectives would be achieved. The case study analysis and solution, and Marks and Spencer Plan A case answers should be written down in the Marks and Spencer Plan A case memo, clearly identifying which part shows what. The Marks and Spencer Plan A case should be in a professional format, presenting points clearly that are well understood by the reader. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] 15. Alternate solution to the Marks and Spencer Plan A HBR case study It is important to have more than one solution to the case study. This is the alternate solution that would be implemented if the original proposed solution is found infeasible or impossible due to a change in circumstances. The alternate solution for Marks and Spencer Plan A is presented in the same way as the original solution, where it consists of a corporate level strategy, business level strategy and other recommendations. 16. Implementation of Marks and Spencer Plan A Case Solution The case study does not end at just providing recommendations to the issues at hand. One is also required to provide how these recommendations would be implemented. This is shown through a proper implementation framework. A detailed implementation framework helps in distinguishing between an average and an above average case study answer. A good implementation framework shows the proposed plan and how the organisations' resources would be used to achieve the objectives. It also lays down the changes needed to be made as well as the assumptions in the process. • A proper implementation framework shows that one has clearly understood the case study and the main issue within it. • It shows that one has been clarified with the HBR fundamentals on the topic. • It shows that the details provided in the case have been properly analysed. • It shows that one has developed an ability to prioritise recommendations and how these could be successfully implemented. • The implementation framework also helps by removing out any recommendations that are not practical or actionable as these could not be implemented. Therefore, the implementation framework ensures that the solution to the Marks and Spencer Plan A Harvard case is complete and properly answered. 17. Recommendations and Action Plan for Marks and Spencer Plan A case analysis For Marks and Spencer Plan A, based on the SWOT Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, PESTEL Analysis, VRIO analysis, Value Chain Analysis, BCG Matrix analysis, Ansoff Matrix analysis, and the Marketing Mix analysis, the recommendations and action plan are as follows: Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • Marks and Spencer Plan A should focus on making use of its strengths identified from the VRIO analysis to make the most of the opportunities identified from the PESTEL. • Marks and Spencer Plan A should enhance the value creating activities within its value chain. • Marks and Spencer Plan A should invest in its stars and cash cows, while getting rid of the dogs identified from the BCG Matrix analysis. • To achieve its overall corporate and business level objectives, it should make use of the marketing mix tools to obtain desired results from its target market. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

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Marks and Spencer: Plan A

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