How to Write a Speech Choir Piece

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What is a speech choir ? Speech choirs are performance groups that recite poems and speeches in unison, often with elements of choreography and costuming to help bring the literary pieces to life.

What makes a good piece for a speech choir ?

  • original and unique in its message
  • awe-inspiring and captivating
  • short and snappy
  • melodic and rhythmic

Workshop Outline

  •   Task 1: Map Your Territory
  •   Task 2: Draw a Blueprint

  Task 3: Build the Structures

  •   Task 4: Refine the Architectural Details
  •   Task 5: Invite the Nobles

Task 1: Map Your Territory

  • Think about what one great message you want to express in your piece.
  • Write it in one sentence, e.g., It is impossible to be completely righteous in this imperfect world, but we can be the kindest if we want to.

Task 2: Sketch Your Blueprint

  • The Façade (Introduction)
  • The Gateway (Getting Serious)
  • The Great Hall (Climax/Revelation)
  • Th Exit Tunnel (Conclusion)
  • Describe your plans in short sentences.
  • Façade (Intro): In the first stanza, I’ll talk about righteousness. I’ll emphasize that everywhere, people say they are righteous.
  • Gateway (Getting Serious): In the second stanza, I’ll talk about the opposite case. People don’t usually say that they are kind. Kindness comes from the lips of others.
  • Great Hall (Climax/Revelation): I’ll reveal here that I prefer to be kind than be righteous. I’ll also present here the one big message that I have about kindness.
  • Exit Tunnel (Conclusion): I will state here that if we are caught to choose between being kind and being righteous, we better choose being kind.
  • Start to write the stanzas based on your plans. Don’t mind your grammar and other technicalities yet.

I am but a righteous man.

I know what’s right. You are but wrong. I know what’s right.

Task 4: Refine the Architectural Details

  • This time, you need to get more serious about the creative aspects of the piece – the figures of speech and the sound patterns, among others.
  • Check, as well, your grammar, punctuation marks, spellings, etc.

Task 5: Invite the Nobles

  • Let your classmates and your teacher see your work.
  • Listen to their suggestions for its improvement. Decide after whether to apply them or not.
  • Submit your work after.

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Impromptu Speech Questions. Here is a list of 50 questions that can be used for an impromptu speech activity.…

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  • Download the “I’ll follow you” speech (found here, in our text section) and print a class set. Have these ready to pass out near the end of the session.
  • Take a set of 25 index cards and a dark medium-tipped marker and break Puck’s speech into 21 small pieces (have a few extra cards in case you mess up), like this:

I’ll follow you/ I’ll lead you about,/ around Through bog/ through bush/ through brake/ through briar;/ Sometime a horse I’ll be/ sometime a hound, A hog,/ a headless bear,/ sometime a fire,/ And neigh/ and bark/ and grunt/ and roar/ and burn/ Like horse/ hound/ hog/ bear/ fire/ at every turn!

  • That should come out to 23 cards. Stack them in order and have them ready when you begin.
  • Find an open space in which the class can sit in a circle on the floor (no chairs). If this is impossible, you can work from seats, but it’s not quite the same!
  • If the students are not familiar with the basic story of Midsummer, give them a quick outline, focusing mostly on the fairy world. Here is a rough approximation of the sort of introduction we might give in a first session. It looks long on the screen or on paper, but when you deliver it with zip and keep it rolling, you can do it in 3-4 minutes, depending on how many questions you want to ask, how many interjections you want to allow…

“Today we’re going to perform a bit from Shakespeare’s play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. What do you think that title means? (Brief discussion.) This play is set in the ancient city of Athens, Greece, long ago. In the play a number of the people in Athens, for reasons we’ll find out later as we learn more about the story, run off into the woods just outside Athens.

  • At this point you choose a starting point in the circle and begin handing out the cards, in order, saying as you do so: “You’re each getting a small section of the Puck speech. Begin looking at it and memorizing it. If you don’t know what you words mean, or how to say them, we’ll get to that in a minute.” If you have more than 23 students, have the students work in pairs. If you have fewer than 23, some students will get a second card; tell the one with a second card to put it behind the first.
  • Ask the students to read from card #1 in order around the circle, in a loud clear voice.
  • The first reading is likely to be slow, halting. “Remember how that sounded, the pace of it, for later…” Correct any pronunciations as the kids go around the circle. “Does anyone need help understanding their word?” Discuss the meaning of these words quickly:
  • Do a second read-around: “A bit louder this time, a bit more energy – remember, this is one character speaking, and he’s trying to scare somebody.”
  • “Okay, let’s do it again – twice as loud again, and come in a bit quicker after your neighbor.”
  • “Okay, now: Everybody hop up. I want you to crouch as if you are ready to spring out from behind some bushes. As you say your words, leap forward a few feet and use your hands (demonstrate). Okay, everyone in the ‘ready’ position (model)!” By now, the fluency and volume and expression should be growing
  • “Now let’s see if we can bring more expression to some of our lines.” Discuss what sounds might be made by these various Puck-creatures. Suggest adding the energy of that sound – a hound baying, for example – to the word; or the energy of a fire to “fire!” If one or two parts are lagging, suggest a boost from the others – “When she does ‘hog!’ I want all of you to make a wild grunting sound for a second.”
  • “Now, I want you to see if you can do it without your card, and even a bit louder and quicker. Ready position…” Collect the cards if everyone is ready. By now the piece is memorized.
  • The piece has been growing stronger and more intense with each reading. Now we are ready to really perform it. Instruct the kids: “Now we are going to perform it. This entire room is our stage. When I say ‘go,’ you have 10 seconds to find someplace from which you can jump out to scare these guys. Imagine you’re hiding behind a bush or a rock. So don’t lie down, because you need to spring up quickly. Spread out so you’re not near anyone, and you don’t need to be in the circle order. Ready… go!”
  • With students settled and hiding, do the scene with you as ‘the person being scared.’ Shout out with mock fear at anything that’s really done well. Then: “Okay, that was better. Can we make it more scary? Shall we try it again? Tell you what – if you guys think you can make it really scary, I’ll turn the lights out this time (shouts of glee…). Okay, ready position… begin!”
  • Now, if you have time, layer in some fun details. “Everyone, this time take some kind of position as if you have transformed into part of the woods. You are a tree, or a bush, or a creature. Don’t move a muscle. I’ll walk through, and pretend I’m creeped out but I can’t see anything move. Make little insect noises. Then, when the person with the first card is ready, you begin it on your own and the others follow.” Try this once or twice more and see if you can get one really good one out of them without stumbling or miscues.
  • The final performance: “Okay, everyone come in close, without talking. Huddle up. Squeeze in tight. This time, close your eyes. Now do it in a whisper, like this (model a loud stage whisper, spooky and breathy). Don’t move a muscle. Let the words do it all. Ready… go.”
  • Have everyone sit in the circle again. “Look at how far you came in 30 minutes! That was a real performance. That’s how Shakespearean actors build a scene. How many of you think you memorized the whole speech just from what we did? Who can come up here and BE Puck, with all the movement and expression, and scare us?” Ask for volunteers. Give them a few prompts if necessary, but break into applause if they slow down, so the moment doesn’t drag on too long.
  • “Okay, for extra homework tonight: Here’s a copy of the entire speech we did. Take this home. I want to see who can memorize it and come in tomorrow and BE Puck for the class.”
  • The next day, come back to it. And a few brave students will take the first halting steps towards performing. Applaud each person who gets up and tries it. And come back to the group performance again when you can – make it part of the class repertoire!
  • About the NEL Curriculum

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Objectives of using Speech Choir

The speech choir experience – 1. getting teachers ready.

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The Speech Choir Experience – 2. Familiarising children with the text

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The Speech Choir Experience – 3. Choreographing the performance

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The Speech Choir Experience – 4. The performance

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The Speech Choir Experience

  • An opportunity for children to:
  • gain confidence in speaking and communicating as a group before an audience 
  • work cooperatively with one another towards a common goal 
  • A new strategy which teachers can use to enhance children’s learning 

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how to make a speech choir script

VST choir with actual words

  • Thread starter Morodiene
  • Start date Dec 22, 2015

Morodiene

Senior Moment

  • Dec 22, 2015

;)

Senior Member

This seems to be the best one at the moment: https://www.virharmonic.com/voices_of_prague -Hannes  

Orchestrata

pmcrockett

I've not used any of the options besides EWQLSC, so I can't comment on how it compares, but I can echo Orchestrata's insane amount of tweaking comment. You can run it with the defaults that it gives you for the words you enter, but the results won't sound good enough to be worth using. Each syllable consists of multiple consonant and vowel sounds which for best results must be manually layered, balanced, faded, and timed. Any given syllable may have to be redone to fit new contexts and will need to be tweaked for each choir section because the sections don't behave exactly the same. And even though the votox pronunciation system for syllable construction can give you a pretty good idea of how to write a word so the choir will pronounce it, you'll still need to blend in other unrelated consonant and vowel sounds to depurify the words so they'll sound natural instead of stilted. And all of this needs to be done with the VST's cramped/clumsy editor. You can get some really impressive results if you're good at it and willing to put in the time, but it will certainly take a lot of work to do an entire oratorio. Being an opera singer will give you a bit of a leg up on the programming, though, because you already understand how singers deal with words -- a lot of the problems I hear in people's use of EWQLSC involve weird enunciation that you just wouldn't hear from a choir, and people can't fix it because they don't know what an actual choir sounds like.  

Rex282

Best Service Mystica & Cantus get BOTH for $199(2 for 1)!!....they sound great,have a shared word builder..what's not to love. http://www.bestservice.de/en/best_service.html  

NYC Composer

NYC Composer

I have SC, and I'd echo the comments made- however, I can rarely understand the words sung by an actual choir in a hall either, so.  

NYC Composer said: I have SC, and I'd echo the comments made- however, I can rarely understand the words sung by an actual choir in a hall either, so. Click to expand...
Rex282 said: Best Service Mystica & Cantus get BOTH for $199(2 for 1)!!....they sound great,have a shared word builder..what's not to love. http://www.bestservice.de/en/best_service.html Click to expand...

:)

Orchestrata said: I've always had a soft spot for Symphonic Choirs; it's a good, flexible option. That being said, it takes an insane amount of tweaking to get anything resembling real words, especially when the choir is exposed. I always walked away frustrated. I keep meaning to go back to it and give it a fresh go - it may simply have been inexperience, or subsequent updates to Word Builder may have helped - but haven't got round to it. Curious to know if others have had better luck than me. For general choir sounds, though, it's lovely. Voices of Prague seems like a good avenue of investigation, too. That being said, I'm not convinced that choir sampling is at the point where you'll be able to translate the piece you've written faithfully, especially if the choir is exposed and you have a specific text you're trying to convey (I get the idea a lot of the better demos are written "for the samples"). But, again, that may well be my own shortcomings. Would love to hear what you end up with, and your thoughts on the experience. Click to expand...
FWIW, my favorite choir VST is 8Dio Requiem Pro, but I do tend more towards the hybrid/epic side of things Click to expand...

X-Bassist

Just an idea, but some of my clearest words in a choir have come from combining Symphonic Choirs with Realivox Blue. Both have decent wordbuilders and Blue seems to add a touch more realism because the pronunciation is better. Checkout the walkthrough at the bottom of their page: http://realitone.com/blue/ Both are SC and Blue are not too difficult, although SC can be a little confusing at first, after about 20 minutes of working on it you get the idea and can really get it to do almost anything. This video from Nick really helps explain: Just keep in mind the word builder is built into SC now, so you access it with a button next to settings instead of a separate app (which is why Nick's windows are side by side in the video). Also I recommend getting the expansion (VOTA) as the cost is reasonable (especially when on sale) and gives you an extra loud dynamic that is very useful in bigger pieces. Cheers! -XB  

X-Bassist said: Just an idea, but some of my clearest words in a choir have come from combining Symphonic Choirs with Realivox Blue. Both have decent wordbuilders and Blue seems to add a touch more realism because the pronunciation is better. Checkout the walkthrough at the bottom of their page: http://realitone.com/blue/ Both are SC and Blue are not too difficult, although SC can be a little confusing at first, after about 20 minutes of working on it you get the idea and can really get it to do almost anything. This video from Nick really helps explain: Just keep in mind the word builder is built into SC now, so you access it with a button next to settings instead of a separate app (which is why Nick's windows are side by side in the video). Also I recommend getting the expansion (VOTA) as the cost is reasonable (especially when on sale) and gives you an extra loud dynamic that is very useful in bigger pieces. Cheers! -XB Click to expand...

Saxer

  • Dec 23, 2015

If you are a singer and you need choir: sing it. You probably know female singers too. If you record each part (at least) three times you will have a little choir that you can easily fill up with any choir library sound (even ooohs and aaahs will do) to make it sound larger.  

TGV

SC is capable of good results, but frustratingly hard to work with. It's very inconsistent, so you're compensating with all kinds of CC tricks and WordBuilder settings for every other phoneme. I've done a mockup of Mozart's Ave Verum that took me around 80 hours. This is a mockup using Voices of Prague of a piece I wrote: the text comes from a French carol (d'ou viens tu, bergere; where do you come from, shepherd), the music was an improvisation over a Spanish carol (ya viene la vieja; here comes the old one). The mockup costs a lot less time, even though I had to work my way around a few lacking phonemes. My advice: avoid hair pulling and go VoP.  

Morodiene said: This is one I was looking into. I don't mind epic, that's definitely present in my oratorio (which is about End Times, so you get the idea). How about words though? Can you do enough with Requiem to make some semblance of English words? Click to expand...
Saxer said: If you are a singer and you need choir: sing it. You probably know female singers too. If you record each part (at least) three times you will have a little choir that you can easily fill up with any choir library sound (even ooohs and aaahs will do) to make it sound larger. Click to expand...
TGV said: SC is capable of good results, but frustratingly hard to work with. It's very inconsistent, so you're compensating with all kinds of CC tricks and WordBuilder settings for every other phoneme. I've done a mockup of Mozart's Ave Verum that took me around 80 hours. This is a mockup using Voices of Prague of a piece I wrote: the text comes from a French carol (d'ou viens tu, bergere; where do you come from, shepherd), the music was an improvisation over a Spanish carol (ya viene la vieja; here comes the old one). The mockup costs a lot less time, even though I had to work my way around a few lacking phonemes. My advice: avoid hair pulling and go VoP. Click to expand...

Yepp, I do that rather often but more in a pop style (kind of football stadion doubling refrains). But I see no reason why that shouldn't work in a classical context. To get a bigger group image: don't double too exact and don't record too close to the mic.  

Saxer said: Yepp, I do that rather often but more in a pop style (kind of football stadion doubling refrains). But I see no reason why that shouldn't work in a classical context. To get a bigger group image: don't double too exact and don't record too close to the mic. Click to expand...

Just a few steps back to avoid bass boost and too much breath of the voices. The mixing is the same as for any orchestral instrument.  

Saxer said: Just a few steps back to avoid bass boost and too much breath of the voices. The mixing is the same as for any orchestral instrument. Click to expand...

how to make a speech choir script

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What is Choral Reading / Choral Speaking?

Like Readers Theater, “Choral Reading” involves students as they read-aloud and orally interpret, but does not require them to memorize their reading parts.

Unlike Readers Theater “Choral Speaking” requires a group of students to orally interpret and recite from memory.

In my grandmother’s day, “Choral Speaking” was all the rage! When I was a little girl, I remember attending many wonderful Choral Speaking concerts at grandma’s K-12 one-room schoolhouse in Ohio. I also remember that when grandmother died, our family received many many cards and letters from past students, now grown up, who remembered her as THE BEST TEACHER THEY EVER HAD!

What happened to Choral Speaking? For years it seemed to have disappeared from our elementary schools. Choral Speaking gave way to more “modern” activities: creative drama, play building, cooperative grouping, video watching. But a recent search on the internet found a number of hits for the term: choral speaking. The idea seems to be gaining popularity again, especially at speech contests and festivals.

The scripts or speaking pieces on this web site belong to YOU. Please change them in any way to suit your individual needs. Words and phrases may need fine-tuning to accommodate a particular reading level. Assignment of printed speaking or reading sections/lines may not be right for your group or situation. Please feel free to invent, create, edit, imagine, omit, add, and change. The purpose of this collection is to make materials available to teachers who want to motivate ORAL READING and CHORAL READING/SPEAKING.

Sincerely, Lois Walker - Scripts for Schools Founder

Click Here for a Teacher’s Guide: Choral Speaking in the Elementary Classroom.

TEACHING READING?

Can “Choral Reading” be used as a teaching tool to model fluency and expression?

Yes! Students read the script text chorally. With teacher joining in, children are provided a model for fluency and expression. This approach works best with stories told in rhyme, plays with predictable text, text with repetitive refrains, and text without too much solo dialog text.

Click Here for Article: The Importance of Using Multiple Methods of Reading Instruction

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Psalm 104: A Choral Reading for 10

This is a drama script for 10 speakers based on Psalm 104 from the NRSV.

The chorus stands in the front. For the first half line, the speakers begin speaking alone, as if speaking to themselves. Individuals join until a loud cacophony is heard. Then, the reading resumes.

ONE, adding until ALL are speaking [disorganized, repeating]:  Bless the Lord, O my soul.

ALL:  O Lord my God, you are very great. The following lines speed up, gaining momentum, excitement, and volume, and suddenly slowing down at the end. This dynamic, rhythmic change occurs after each pause.

TWO:  You are clothed with honor and majesty,

THREE:  wrapped in light as with a garment.

FOUR:  You stretch out the heavens like a tent,

FIVE:  you set the beams of your chambers on the waters,

TWO:  you make the clouds your chariot,

FOUR:  you ride on the wings of the wind,

FIVE:  you make the winds your messengers,

THREE:  fire and flame your ministers.

SIX:  You set the earth on its foundations, so that it shall never be shaken.

SEVEN:  You cover it with the deep as with a garment; the waters stood above the mountains.

EIGHT:  At your rebuke they flee; at the sound of your thunder they take to flight.

NINE:  They rose up to the mountains, ran down to the valleys to the place that you appointed for them.

TEN:  You set a boundary that they may not pass, so that they might not again cover the earth.

ONE:  You make springs gush forth in the valleys; they flow between the hills,

giving drink to every wild animal; the wild donkeys quench their thirst.

THREE:  By the streams the birds of the air have their habitation; they sing among the branches.

NINE:  From your lofty abode you water the mountains; the earth is satisfied with the fruit of your work.

FIVE:  You cause the grass to grow for the cattle,

SIX:  and plants for people to use, to bring forth food from the earth,

SEVEN:  and wine to gladden the human heart,

EIGHT:  oil to make the face shine,

NINE:  and bread to strengthen the human heart.

TWO:  The trees of the Lord are watered abundantly, the cedars of Lebanon that he planted.

FOUR:  In them the birds build their nests;

SIX:  the stork has its home in the fir trees.

FIVE:  The high mountains are for the wild goats;

THREE:  The rocks are a refuge for the hyrax.

TEN:  You have made the moon to mark the seasons; the sun knows its time for setting.

ONE:  You make darkness, and it is night, when all the animals of the forest come creeping out.

SEVEN:  The young lions roar for their prey, seeking their food from God.

EIGHT:  When the sun rises, they withdraw and lie down in their dens.

FOUR:  People go out to their work and to their labor until the evening.

ONE, TWO, TEN:  O Lord, how manifold are your works!

ONE, TWO, FOUR, EIGHT, TEN:  In wisdom you have made them all;

ONE, TWO, FOUR, SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN:  the earth is full of your creatures.

Small pause.

SIX:  Yonder is the sea,

SIX, SEVEN:  great and wide,

SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT:  creeping things innumerable are there,

FIVE:  living things both small

FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE:  and great.

NINE:  There go the ships,

TEN:  and Leviathan that you formed to sport in it.

TWO, THREE:  These all look to you to give them their food in due season;

FOUR:  when you give to them, they gather it up; when you open your hand, they are filled with good things.

ONE:  When you hide your face, they are dismayed;

TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE:  when you take

FIVE:  away their breath, they die and return to their dust.

SIX:  When you send forth your spirit,

ONE, SIX, TEN:  they are created;

TEN:  and you renew the face of the ground.

ONE, TWO:  May the glory of the Lord endure forever;

THREE, FOUR:  may the Lord rejoice in his works—

FIVE:  who looks on the earth and it trembles, who touches the mountains and they smoke.

SIX, SEVEN:  I will sing to the Lord as long as I live;

SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT:  I will sing praise to my God while I have being.

NINE:  May my meditation be pleasing to him, for I rejoice in the Lord.

TEN:  Let sinners be consumed from the earth, and let the wicked be no more.

ALL(quietly, meditatively): Bless the Lord, O my soul. (louder) Praise the Lord!

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Ten Things You Should Do if You Want to Write Choral Music

Throughout my entire composing duration, I’ve always found my experiences writing for choir to be my most gratifying—and not just from a money-making standpoint. There’s something special about writing for a choir. It’s at once grand and simple, and something about human voices makes both the works themselves and their performances more vulnerable than writing instrumental music. Whenever I need to be reminded how much I love composing, I usually default to writing another choral piece.

On multiple occasions, I’ve been approached by a student or peer asking me how to “go about” writing for choir, either in the context of an instrumentalist who wants to expand their composition portfolio or a vocalist who wants to take a stab at composition. The conversation is usually summed up by saying, “I’ve never done this before, and I’m not sure where to start.” In those conversations, I’ve often defaulted to the following ten pointers that I think even people who are already writing choral pieces should keep in mind for developing their skills. There’s a lot of subpar music for choir out there, and by keeping the following pointers in mind we can avoid being lumped into that category and really make our compositions stand out of the pack!

1. Start “text hunting”

This tip might sound like the biggest no-brainer. To write a choral piece, you typically need to have a text to set. And yet there are many people out there who want to write choral pieces and still haven’t given any regard to this matter.

The type of text you want to set can have a profound impact on how you want to go about starting your new choir piece. Are you setting a poem? Prose? Excerpts from a speech? Something sacred? Something silly? Something avant-garde? I’ve seen choral works setting everything from Shakespearean sonnets to Trump’s Twitter feed, and each requires its own style and nuance to set convincingly.

Before so much as writing a single note, I’d suggest having at least ten texts selected that stand out to you for some reason or other. I keep both a folder in my desk drawer and a Bookmarks tab on Chrome of texts that I want to set when the occasion arises. Right now it’s filled with various feminist poetry that I think could be really cool for writing epic works for women’s choir (an ensemble that often gets shafted in the realm of good literature).

Wondering where to go about finding these texts? Start by visiting poetry websites or checking out an anthology from the library. Just make sure you have the rights to the text you want to set! The last thing you want to happen is being sued by Robert Frost’s estate or whoever owns the NIV translation of the Bible. Public speeches, works that are clearly listed as “public domain,” or anything written before 1923 is a pretty safe bet.

2. Join a choir (if you haven’t already)

If you’ve spent most of your time in the past writing for instruments, you might not realize just how different of a beast writing for voices can be. Ranges are limited, the amount of time spent in any particular range can be finicky, and some intervals are trickier to sing than others. What any other particular voice part is doing can have a huge influence on the feasibility of something as simple as a half-step motion! And the surest way to get a sense for what it’s like to write for voice is—you guessed it!—to use your own on a regular basis.

Now you might be thinking to yourself something along the lines of, “but I can’t sing!” If you’re one of those people, you may want to consider joining a community choir that doesn’t need an audition. Some examples of those would be glee clubs, non-auditioning groups at your university (usually men’s or women’s choruses), your local church choir, most gay men’s choruses, etc. Being part of a non-auditioning group can provide a level of enlightenment all its own, and can also help you become familiar with your own voice enough to know its limitations—which will, in turn, give you some insight on the limitations of other people’s voices as well.

If that still intimidates you, or if you’re concerned you don’t have the time, consider asking your local choir director if it’s possible to sit in and observe some rehearsals. Even if you yourself aren’t singing, you can still learn tons just by watching. Pay attention to where the choir is having its biggest difficulties. Where is the director stopping and fixing mistakes, and what mistakes are being fixed more than others? What sections are tiring out the choir members? When do people need to breathe, and do they get the opportunity to? Finding the answer to all of these questions can really hone your choral composition skills.

3. Start by writing arrangements

If learning how to compose is like learning how to swim, writing a choral piece from scratch with a text that you’ve never seen set can feel a bit like getting thrown into the deep end of a pool while wearing ankle weights: all in all, it’s a surefire way to make life more difficult than it has to be. Luckily, you can start learning how to creatively compose for choir by making new arrangements of existing tunes and melodies, where the heaviest of the composing load has already been done for you.

There are two ways I can think of to go about this, both with their own perks. The first is to look for older, classical melodies (folk tunes, church hymns, drinking songs, etc.) that you might want to arrange. Once you’ve found a tune that you want to set, start thinking of ways you can adapt it for choir that would make it stand out from what’s been done before. What are different ways you can harmonize the melody? How do you want to go about transitioning from one verse to another? Can you add a descant line to it? How are you going to start and end the arrangement? All of these questions, and more, can make the difference between a blasé transcription and the next Erb/Gould Shenandoah .

The second approach is to take up arranging for an a cappella group. For those of you who are (somehow) not aware, a cappella groups take existing pop songs and set them in a way that all of the instrument parts, including percussion, are sung or beatboxed by the group members. Some of the settings are straightforward adaptations (most anything by Straight No Chaser), and others get markedly creative in their interpretation (most anything by Pentatonix). Most universities—and even some high schools—have a cappella groups these days, and they’re usually hungry for new arrangements, so feel free to seek your closest one out!

4. Take a poetry class

If you can’t tell me what “dactylic hexameter” is off the top of your head, there’s still more for you to learn about analyzing text. And if you’re a student who can fit that course in as an elective, making sure you have a good teacher for it, it could very well be the most advantageous course you ever took to hone your choral writing. This, in my humble opinion, should be required of any college student majoring in composition, particularly if they ever want to write for a chorus. It was hands down the most valuable elective I ever took while I was working on my bachelor degree. It’s also one of the easiest tips to overlook because text analysis is often something we take for granted—you don’t notice it unless it’s done badly.

In order to convincingly set a text, you need to know how to analyze the text as its own entity. How does the text sound when it’s spoken out loud? What’s its pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables, more commonly known as the text’s rhythm and meter ? The rhythm and meter of a text will have a profound influence on the rhythm and meter of the music, and you don’t want the two to be in conflict!

Does the text have a rhyme scheme, and if so do you want the rhyme scheme to be reflected in the musical phrasing? Is it organized in stanzas, quatrains, couplets, etc., and how will that influence your sense of form? How can you use the melody you write to bring out the important words of the text? All of these are important questions you must consider when marrying your music with the text, and it’s hard to answer those questions if you don’t know how to go about asking them in the first place.

(If you were curious, strict dactylic hexameter is a line of text with eighteen syllables, the first of every three syllables being more stressed than the others. For example: “Union of meter in music and rhythm of prose can be beautiful.” If you chant it as quickly as you can, you’ll notice you’re speaking in 6/8 time. These are the things literature/music geeks like me think about.)

5. Attend and observe a worship service that uses music

This is particularly important if you ever want to write sacred music (not solely Christian, but any faith tradition), and it can also be beneficial for expanding your horizons as a secular composer. The music used in most worship services puts the text at the forefront for somewhat obvious reasons. It might be a sung prayer, a sung line of Scripture, or a chanted litany. Either way, the text is an integral part of the worship, and the music is ideally used to enhance it and then stay out of its way. It’s one of the reasons sacred music remains some of the best literature for choruses, and why even secular choirs tend to keep it in their repertoire.

But lest you think because you’re already a religious person you’re off the hook on this one… you should most certainly attend at least one worship service for a religious sect outside of your practicing faith (I find that to be a good general life rule, really). When I was commissioned for my art song Mourner’s Kaddish, I relied heavily on my experience attending a Shabbat service at synagogue to get a sense of how the text could be set. I am not Jewish—I was raised as a Protestant Christian—and the music for a Shabbat service was a brand-new experience for me. It made me slightly more comfortable with the challenge of setting an important Jewish text in its native Hebrew.

One such service to consider attending, especially if you aren’t a religious person yourself and don’t want to feel intrusive, is a Choral Evensong service at an Anglican or Episcopalian cathedral. The service is usually about an hour long, comprised mostly of music in a wide variety of formats, traditions, and time periods. Participation as a congregation member can be minimal if you so choose so that you feel almost as if you’re attending a particularly sacred “concert” of sorts.

6. Listen to the “greats” and study their scores

I put “greats” in quotes deliberately here, because I am about to mention at least one or two names that I know will have some people up in arms, and might leave off someone’s favorite and have to explain myself otherwise. Nonetheless, there are many composers who have stood the test of time in the choral world over centuries (or are at the very least insanely popular and programmed today) and have written works that are considered staples in the genre. Some of these works are of a grand scale, requiring as many as two hours of spare time to listen to in their entirety. Others of them can be performed with as few as four voices in three minutes. But all of them showcase choral writing at its most accepted and celebrated, and all for different reasons. They can have a very positive influence on your writing style.

For Renaissance writing, start with Palestrina and Gabrielli for their counterpoint and fluid melodic lines. In the Baroque period, Bach is your hands-down go-to, with Handel being a close second. Mozart and Haydn are your standard Classical period references (for pretty much every genre of music as well as choral, it seems). For the Romantic period, Beethoven has his gems, but you would have more emotive material to explore by checking out Mendelssohn and Brahms. The twentieth century gives us Ralph Vaughan Williams, Gustav Holst, John Taverner, Sergei Rachmaninoff, all vastly different and yet easily accessible.  And as for the mainstream contemporary artists being programmed to death today, the list would not be complete without mentioning John Rutter, Arvo Pärt, and Morten Lauridsen.

Oh, and some guy named Eric Whitacre, I hear he’s kind of a big deal.

7. Listen to things no one else has heard of

Of course, you don’t want to be too influenced by the greats. I and a colleague judged a student choral competition recently, and we made it a point to select the winning entry for having its own distinct voice and not sounding too much like another popular artist (three guesses who). We can’t all be Lauridsen or Whitacre, nor should we want to be. They do that job well enough for themselves. We have something all our own to offer to the table, and that can be hard to remember if we’re only listening to the same five or six composers all the time.

To expand your Renaissance horizons, check out some William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, Josquin des Prez, Jean L’Héritier, Jacobus Vaet, Tomas Luis de Victoria, and Thomas Morley. The choral works of Claudio Monteverdi, Henry Purcell, and Giovanni Pergolesi provide a spin on the Baroque period that Bach rarely highlights.  The Classical period can be hard to find new artists from, but you can’t go wrong with William Boyce, Thomas Arne, Thomas Attwood, and Franz Bühler.  The Romantic period has Joseph Barnby, César Franck, and John Bacchus Dykes—names virtually no instrumentalist has encountered before. The twentieth century boasts names like Charles Villiers Stanford, Herbert Howells, Francis Poulenc, Louis Vierne, Krzysztof Penderecki, Alfred Schnittke, and Henryk Górecki.

And contemporary artists? I’ve been on an Ola Gjeilo kick for quite some time, and can’t recommend him enough as a starting point. Aside from that, check out the new rep lists from choral publishers like Alliance Music, Walton Music, and Santa Barbara Music Publishing. That’s always one of the best ways to become well-versed in who’s coming to the fore in the world of choral writing.

8. Talk to vocalists and choir directors and learn from them

If you want to write a piece for violin, usually the first thing you want to do is find a violinist to look through your drafts. If you’re writing a piece for trombone, you want to hunt down a trombonist to learn the ins and outs of the instrument. Likewise, if you’re writing for choir, you should seek out choir directors and vocalists of all voice types to see what they’re most interested in.

Here’s an example: Which voice part usually gets the least interesting parts to sing? If you talk to enough vocalists, you’ll find that the stereotypical answer is the alto. “I’ve gotten very good at singing the same three notes.” That’s partly an occupational hazard of traditional voice leading rules (which we’ll get into here in a second), but it’s also an opportunity to spice up your writing in a way you know the choir will appreciate. I make a conscious effort to give my altos interesting lines to sing, and I’ve been thanked for it every single premiere.

If you want choirs to perform your pieces, then a conversation with choir directors is essential. What kind of pieces are they looking to program next year? What have they really wanted to see but can’t find? How could a piece be tailored to the strengths and weakness of their choir? If you can tailor your work to their expectations, you’ll have instant success.

9. Learn your part-writing rules

Oh, part-writing rules. The bane of every music theory student’s existence. Every time you write parallel fifths, Bach kills a kitten.

No one likes part-writing rules. No student likes following them, and no teacher likes grading students’ half-hearted attempts at following them. But part-writing rules serve a very important purpose: to teach people how to write multiple singable lines at once.

These part-writing rules, be it species counterpoint or four-part voice leading, were modeled on the practices and norms of heavily trained composers. And in the Renaissance, what were these composers typically writing? You guessed it… music for people to sing! When we study part-writing, we are essentially studying the centuries-old art of writing music for voices. It’s why we keep into account things like large leaps, parallel intervals, voice overlap and voice crossing, and so forth. If we don’t know these rules, we often write things that are at best needlessly impractical and at worst flat-out impossible.

It may seem needlessly taxing and boring at first, but I’ve seen students of mine who hear their successful part-writing exercises played on the piano for the first time brighten up and immediately say, “No way! That’s what I wrote?!” It’s as if they can’t believe what they were doing was actually composition. One student reacted by saying, “Wow, that sounds like Bach.” Well, there’s a reason for that… it’s because Bach followed these exact same practices when he was composing his chorales. Half the rules we follow in part-writing came from his example. And being able to write like Bach to the best of any human ability is always a great skill to have.

Besides… think of the kittens.

10. Break your part-writing rules

Would now be a good time to mention that Bach grossly violated every single rule we have ever accredited to his music? If you’re familiar enough with his music, you’ll find part-writing “errors” everywhere you look, starting with voice crossing. The number of times he has his tenors singing higher than his altos makes our no-voice-crossing rules almost laughable.

Part-writing rules are the Pirate’s Code of music theory: they’re more like guidelines anyway. Many teachers I know don’t like referring to them as rules at all, preferring the term “norms.” There’s a reason they’re the norms—because they work. You can’t sound bad when you follow all of these voice leading standards. What you can sound, however, is boring.

I mentioned before that altos usually get the least interesting parts to sing. That’s usually because in your most basic voice leading, the alto line has the least wiggle room and usually moves as little as possible to whichever note best fits the chord—a note that is usually only a few steps away at most. The soprano gets the melody, the bass gets more leaps, the tenor gets that cool harmonization that they can bring out, and the alto… gets what’s left, I guess? At least, that’s what usually happens when you follow part-writing rules to the absolute letter. It can be better to break (or at the very least bend) these rules for the sake of bringing your pieces more interest.

So why learn the rules at all? Again, because the rules work . They may not give the music any magic, but they sure do give it some stability. The trick is, with every rule you break, you need to be aware that you are breaking it and why you are breaking it. In my eight-part writing, you can count on me having some parallel fifths between the two bass parts (look at all those kittens Bach just didn’t kill). It’s because I like that “power chord” sound, and it alludes to some really ancient Medieval organum practices that I thought were on to something. It’s also, sometimes, just the most convenient thing for my basses to do for that given moment, and anything else would distract from that amazing countermelody I just gave the altos.

Did I mention I gave the altos something to do? That probably broke another rule or two somewhere in there.

Nadia Boulanger, who taught many of the twentieth-century instrumental greats such as Aaron Copland and Philip Glass, summed it up best, I think: “To study music we must learn the rules. To create music, we must break them.” Pablo Picasso also had a great take on it: “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”

With these ten things in mind, stepping into the word of composing for choir should hopefully feel at least slightly less intimidating. It can be a long process learning how to write good music for choir, and it will involve a lot of exposure to things you haven’t experienced before. But the end result is beyond rewarding, and definitely worth at least a little peek down the very vocal rabbit hole.

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Songs with words: choosing and interpreting texts for choral composition

Round me falls the night by Annabel Rooney

Round me falls the night

  • By Annabel Rooney
  • June 11 th 2021

Like many aspects of choral composition, choosing the words is a combination of practical and creative considerations. If you want your music to be performed (and most composers do!), thinking about who might sing the words, and on what occasion, is as important as their inspirational qualities.

To date, most of my choral music is sacred, setting words that are chosen because they are suited for liturgical use. The Bible, works of religious poets, and collections of Christmas and Eastertide poems and carols have provided rich sources of lyrics. Looking at the choral output of other composers has led to some interesting poetic discoveries, for example Edward Elgar’s setting of Thomas Toke Lynch’s  How calmly the evening , whilst the poet Alice Meynell was recommended by a friend working on Victorian literature. The gentle tone of her poem  Unto us a son is given  (“Given, not lent”) especially appealed.

It is hard to define what makes a text attractive, and, of course, this is probably different for every composer. But there are some texts which have received numerous musical settings, such as  Drop, drop, slow tears  by the seventeenth-century poet Phineas Fletcher. The expressive words of redemption fit well in the Lenten liturgy, and their character and imagery, in particular the dropping tears, invite musical illustration. The falling thirds at the opening of  William Walton’s setting , for example, immediately evoke teardrops. Popular, too, is George Herbert’s  The Call  (“Come, my way, my truth, my life”). A versatile text which lends itself to a variety of occasions, the emotion is, strikingly, expressed almost entirely in monosyllables, imparting powerful simplicity and directness. Sometimes it may simply be the sound of the words that captivates, as in this excerpt from John Milton’s  On the morning of Christ’s Nativity.  The gentle alliteration is music itself:

“The winds with wonder whist, Smoothly the waters kissed, Whispering new joys to the mild Ocean…..”

Having found words that appeal, practically and creatively, my goal is to write music which illustrates and enhances the words, and is also musically coherent. There may be large-scale structural decisions, such as whether to replicate a strophic structure, or to reprise parts of the text, either in the interests of the musical form, or to give them particular stress. At a more localized level, the meaning and emotion of individual words might be depicted by melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic means. The interest is in deciding what the emphasis and interpretation shall be.

The well-known words of the  Magnificat  provide plenty of opportunities for such contemplation. Their nature (images of motion such as “scattered,” “put down,” and “exalted,” which often attract an appropriate musical illustration), and a knowledge of how other composers have responded to them, make the question ‘What is my response to the  Magnificat ?’ particularly pertinent. Shall I scatter the proud in a musical flourish? Are the rich to be “sent away” in musical emptiness, in descending lines and a thinning texture? Perhaps this could rather be a moment of exultation, focusing not on the literal meaning of the words but on the triumph of justice?

Looking for a text suitable for Evensong, I found William Romanis’  Round me falls the night  by the simple strategy of perusing the “Evening” section of a hymn book. It was immediately appealing to me, and a musical idea came quite quickly. This is not always the case! The opportunity for intense quiet in a “whisper,” in “softly speaking,” and “Earthly sounds are none” contrasts with the potency of “Arms so strong to clasp and hold me.” Soft dynamics and low pitches contrast with  fortissimo  and the highest note of the piece. The light of the Saviour shines through the dark of the night, with a recurring juxtaposition of Db major and A major colouring the work. And it is the plea for the Saviour to keep watch through the night which becomes my focus. His presence is realized musically with repetitions of the phrase “I am near,” and it is with this that the work concludes.

Occasionally I have written my own words, finding that a musical and verbal idea come simultaneously. But generally, I prefer not to start with a blank canvas! Indeed, it is working with another creative form, with a seed from which the compositional idea may grow, which is one of the pleasures of writing choral music.

Feature image by enterlinedesign

Annabel McLauchlan Rooney read music at Christ's College, Cambridge, holding a university instrumental award on the cello. She continued her studies in Cambridge with an MPhil and a PhD on eighteenth-century opera. Rooney started composing seriously in 2011, predominantly writing choral music, and now combines this with performance and instrumental teaching. Her music has been performed by renowned ensembles, including the Choirs of the Chapel Royal, and Exeter and Ely Cathedrals, and broadcast on Radio 3. In 2019, the Choir of Christ's College, Cambridge released an album of Rooney's sacred choral music, As a seed bursts forth.

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Recent Comments

The song means, it is a composition of lyrics(text),tune represented by the most suitable voice or voices and their pronunciation,and the message conveyed to the public and future generation. These are the aspects to be synchronised very carefully with suitable supporting instruments and then made available for the public in a pleasing manners. The lyrics of the song from any place in the world will be closely connected to the culture of the perticular land only. The lyrics must be simple and should have a depth in meanibg shoukd reach the all sorts of the society( should be understood by (uneducated also) . Then only a specific purpose of the whole team work will be successful.

I hope that song makers considers this really essential before making any songs.

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English Compositions

Anchoring Script for Song Performance [With PDF]

In this session, you will learn how you can write an anchoring script for any song performance. Let’s get started. 

Table of Contents

Welcome speech (for local clubs / small events), welcome speech (for big events), honouring the chief guests (for both small and big events), song performance (for local clubs/small events).

  • Song Performance (For Big Events) 

Ending Speech (For Both Small And Big Events)

Feature image of Anchoring Script for Song Performance

Good morning/ good afternoon/ good evening, ladies and gentlemen. I am [name], your host for today’s/ tonight’s event. On the behalf of [name of the organising committee], I warmly welcome you all to this beautiful event.

We are really honoured to have the Honourable [full name], M.L.A., and his wife, Mrs [full name], as our chief guests today. Dear chief guests, special invitees and everyone in attendance, I am very glad to have you all with us today/ tonight and I welcome you with all my heart to witness and enjoy the event.

Today/tonight is going to be a day/night full of music, happiness and joy. We have many wonderful performances lined up. Let us all look forward to the performances with a lot of excitement and anticipation. Thank you.

Hello and a warm good morning / good afternoon / good evening to all! What a beautiful day it is today! The weather is pleasant and the breeze is gentle. We truly couldn’t have chosen a better day for this magical event! People say that music is one of the most magical things in the world. If that is so, we can say that we have some of the best magicians here with us today! From award-winning local bands to renowned folk singers to world-famous playback singers, today our line-up is star-studded.

And I, [name], on behalf of [organising committee name], heartily welcome you all to enjoy this magnificent event. I would like to especially welcome our chief guests, Mr [name], chairman of [company name] and Ms [name], CEO of [company name] to this event. Sir and ma’am, thank you so much for joining us today! 

Before we commence the event, we would like to honour our chief guests and offer them a token of our appreciation. I request our committee head, Mr [name] to please come up on the stage. Now I would like to invite our chief guests to please come up on the stage as well. Thank you, sir and ma’am. I would now request Mr [committee head’s name] to honour our chief guests with the bouquets and mementoes prepared for them. Thank you. [As the ceremony is taking place – everyone claps].

After the Ceremony:

Thank you so much. Respected sirs and ma’am, you all may now take your seats. Please enjoy the rest of the event. Thank you.

Our first performers of today/tonight are [name 1] and [name 2]. These talented youngsters took the nation by storm when they posted their self-written, self-composed, self-shot music videos online. It was viewed millions of times and it made them household names. Today, they will be performing some of their latest compositions. So, let’s put our hands together and welcome them on the stage!

After the Performance:

Oh my! That was magnificent! Such a beautiful melody! You both are truly gifted. Thank you so much. Everyone, please give these talented kids a huge round of applause. Thank you.

Our next performer is someone you already know and love! She is also known as the nightingale of [the locality name] and has been singing since she was 5! Today, our nightingale, [singer name], will be singing [track name 1] and [track name 2] for us. Let’s welcome her on the stage with a huge round of applause!

Wow! No wonder she is called the nightingale! What a melodious voice and what a beautiful performance! [Singer name], you did amazing, as always! Thank you so much. Everyone, please give her a huge round of applause! Thank you.

[The anchor can similarly welcome different acts on the stage and carry on with the show.]

Now, it is time for the final performance of the day/night. Our renowned folk singers, [names], will be singing [folk song names] for us today. Let’s give it up for them!

What a beautiful performance! Folk songs truly make our soul dance! Thank you so much. Everyone, please give these amazing singers a huge round of applause! Thank you.

Song Performance (For Big Events)

“Life is a song. Your thoughts are the music. Now play beautiful music and sing a wonderful song.” – Debashish Mridha

It is now time for the opening act. And for that, we have someone special! The pride of our city, the one who brought so much glory to [city name] by representing us countless times on the national stage – he/she is none other than [singer name]. So, put your hands together and let’s welcome him/her onto the stage with a huge round of applause! 

What a soulful performance! Your voice is a gift! Thank you so much for such a lovely performance. Everyone, please give [singer name] a huge round of applause! Thank you. 

Now, moving on to the next performance we have here with us our beloved Ustaad [name]. Ustaad [name] has been performing for the past 45 years, since the age of 6. It is a pleasure to be able to watch him perform with such intricacy and grace. Today, he will be performing [song name] on his veena. So, please put your hands together and warmly welcome him onto the stage. 

Wow! What a spellbinding performance! You are truly a gift to us! Thank you so much, master. Everyone, please give him a huge round of applause. Thank you. 

Now, it is time for the act all of us have been waiting for with bated breath. Finally, the time has come! The singer known for his divine vocals, the one who is world-renowned for his melodious songs, the one without whose songs a movie is said to be incomplete – with a huge round of applause, let’s welcome the singer, the legend – [singer name]! 

Oh my! So ethereal! I am at a loss for words. What a beautiful performance! You are truly our shining star! Thank you so much! Everyone, please give him a huge round of applause! What a performance! 

Now we have come to the final act of the day/night. This is for all the rock lovers out there! We have here with us the [band name]! I can see your excitement! Yes! It is going to be awesome! So, let’s put our hands together and warmly welcome [band name] onto the stage! 

What an energetic performance! I am sure everyone present here enjoyed it to the core! It was fabulous! Thank you so much, team! Everyone, please give these talented men a huge round of applause! Thank you. 

We have now come to the conclusion of the event. I hope that everyone enjoyed the various song and musical performances. Thank you for attending this event and making it successful. Thank you all for your time, encouragement, enthusiasm, love and support. I would like to especially thank our chief guests who took time out of their extremely busy schedules to attend this event and grace us with their presence.

Thank you so much. Also, a huge thank you to all our singers, musicians and performers. It is you guys who made this possible! To our organisers and sponsors, without you, we wouldn’t have been able to organise this event – Thank you! 

Thank you, everyone! Have a good day/night!”

Note: This is a sample script meant to provide you with a basic idea of how to write an anchoring script for a song performance. Feel free to use this script and edit it as per your needs. 

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Mr Greg's English Cloud

Anchoring Script: School Assembly

Writing an anchoring script for a school assembly can be challenging, but by following these tips, you can create a script that engages your audience and enhances the overall experience of the performance.

Start with a strong opening: The opening of your anchoring script should capture the attention of your audience and set the tone for the rest of the performance. You can start with a quote, a joke, or a powerful statement that sets the stage for the performances to come.

Know your audience: It’s important to know your audience and cater your anchoring script to their interests and preferences. If you’re hosting a dance performance for a more formal audience, you may want to use more formal language and tone. If your audience is younger or more casual, you may want to use more relaxed and informal language.

Keep it concise: Your anchoring script should be concise and to the point. Avoid rambling or going off on tangents. Keep your sentences short and simple, and make sure your script flows smoothly from one performance to the next.

Use descriptive language: Use descriptive language to help your audience visualize the performances. Use adjectives to describe the mood, tone, and style of each performance, and use action verbs to describe the movements of the dancers.

Be prepared: Make sure you’re prepared with all the necessary information about the performances, including the names of the performers, the titles of the performances, and any other important details. Practice your script beforehand to ensure that you’re comfortable with the language and tone.

End with a strong closing: Your closing should leave a lasting impression on your audience. You can end with a final thought, a quote, or a thank you message to the performers and the audience.

Table of Contents

School Assembly Anchoring Script Example 1

Good morning, everyone, and welcome to our school assembly. It’s great to see all of you here today, and we have a fantastic lineup of events to share with you.

To start things off, we have a special presentation by our school choir. They have been rehearsing for weeks and are ready to perform a beautiful rendition of a popular song.

Next, we have a guest speaker who will be sharing their experiences and insights with us. [Name of the speaker] is a renowned expert in their field, and we’re excited to hear what they have to say.

After the guest speaker, we’ll be presenting some awards to students who have excelled in various fields, including academics, sports, and the arts. These students have worked hard and deserve recognition for their achievements.

We also have a fun and interactive game that we’ll be playing, which will test your knowledge and skills in a variety of areas. So get ready to participate and show off your smarts!

Lastly, we have an important announcement to make regarding an upcoming school event. We’ll be sharing all the details, including the date, time, and venue, so make sure to stay tuned.

We hope you enjoy today’s assembly and leave feeling inspired and motivated. We want to thank all the performers, speakers, and award recipients for sharing their talents and achievements with us. And a big thank you to all of you for being here and making this assembly a success.

So without further ado, let’s get started!

School Assembly Anchoring Script Example 2

Good morning, students and faculty! We’re excited to have you all here for today’s school assembly, where we have an exciting lineup of events planned for you.

First up, we have a performance by our school band, who have been rehearsing tirelessly to bring you a selection of popular songs that we’re sure you’ll enjoy.

Next, we have a special presentation by our debate team, who will be showcasing their skills and engaging in a lively debate on a topic that is relevant to our school community.

After the debate, we’ll be announcing the winners of our school’s annual science fair. We have some incredibly talented students who have put in a lot of hard work and dedication to their projects, and we’re excited to recognize their achievements.

We also have a guest speaker who will be sharing some valuable insights on the importance of developing good study habits and time management skills. We’re confident that our students will benefit greatly from their expertise.

Lastly, we have some important announcements to make about upcoming school events, including sports tournaments, cultural festivals, and other activities that we’re sure you’ll want to be a part of.

We hope you enjoy today’s assembly and leave feeling inspired and motivated to continue striving for excellence in all that you do. We want to thank all the performers, speakers, and award recipients for sharing their talents and achievements with us. And a big thank you to all of you for being here and making this assembly a success.

So let’s get started and have a great assembly!

School Assembly Anchoring Script Example 3

Good morning, students and teachers! We’re delighted to have you all here for today’s school assembly, where we have an amazing lineup of events planned for you.

To start things off, we have a performance by our school’s drama club, who will be presenting a short play that explores the theme of friendship and the importance of supporting each other during difficult times.

Next, we have a presentation by our student council, who will be sharing their plans and initiatives for the upcoming academic year. We encourage you all to listen carefully and get involved in making our school a better place.

After the student council presentation, we’ll be recognizing some outstanding students who have gone above and beyond in their academics and extracurricular activities. We’ll be presenting awards for academic excellence, sportsmanship, and community service.

We also have a guest speaker who will be sharing their experiences and insights on the importance of mental health and self-care. We know that the past year has been challenging for many of us, and we hope that their words will provide some valuable guidance and support.

Lastly, we have some important announcements to make about upcoming school events, including fundraisers, field trips, and other activities that we’re sure you’ll want to be a part of.

We hope you enjoy today’s assembly and leave feeling inspired and motivated to make the most of your time here at our school. We want to thank all the performers, speakers, and award recipients for sharing their talents and achievements with us. And a big thank you to all of you for being here and making this assembly a success.

About Mr. Greg

Mr. Greg is an English teacher from Edinburgh, Scotland, currently based in Hong Kong. He has over 5 years teaching experience and recently completed his PGCE at the University of Essex Online. In 2013, he graduated from Edinburgh Napier University with a BEng(Hons) in Computing, with a focus on social media.

Mr. Greg’s English Cloud was created in 2020 during the pandemic, aiming to provide students and parents with resources to help facilitate their learning at home.

Whatsapp: +85259609792

[email protected]

how to make a speech choir script

Public Affairs Council

Speechwriting 101: Writing an Effective Speech

Whether you are a communications pro or a human resources executive, the time will come when you will need to write a speech for yourself or someone else.  when that time comes, your career may depend on your success..

J. Lyman MacInnis, a corporate coach,  Toronto Star  columnist, accounting executive and author of  “ The Elements of Great Public Speaking ,”  has seen careers stalled – even damaged – by a failure to communicate messages effectively before groups of people. On the flip side, solid speechwriting skills can help launch and sustain a successful career.  What you need are forethought and methodical preparation.

Know Your Audience

Learn as much as possible about the audience and the event.  This will help you target the insights, experience or knowledge you have that this group wants or needs:

  • Why has the audience been brought together?
  • What do the members of the audience have in common?
  • How big an audience will it be?
  • What do they know, and what do they need to know?
  • Do they expect discussion about a specific subject and, if so, what?
  • What is the audience’s attitude and knowledge about the subject of your talk?
  • What is their attitude toward you as the speaker?
  • Why are they interested in your topic?

Choose Your Core Message

If the core message is on target, you can do other things wrong. But if the message is wrong, it doesn’t matter what you put around it.  To write the most effective speech, you should have significant knowledge about your topic, sincerely care about it and be eager to talk about it.  Focus on a message that is relevant to the target audience, and remember: an audience wants opinion. If you offer too little substance, your audience will label you a lightweight.  If you offer too many ideas, you make it difficult for them to know what’s important to you.

Research and Organize

Research until you drop.  This is where you pick up the information, connect the ideas and arrive at the insights that make your talk fresh.  You’ll have an easier time if you gather far more information than you need.  Arrange your research and notes into general categories and leave space between them. Then go back and rearrange. Fit related pieces together like a puzzle.

Develop Structure to Deliver Your Message

First, consider whether your goal is to inform, persuade, motivate or entertain.  Then outline your speech and fill in the details:

  • Introduction – The early minutes of a talk are important to establish your credibility and likeability.  Personal anecdotes often work well to get things started.  This is also where you’ll outline your main points.
  • Body – Get to the issues you’re there to address, limiting them to five points at most.  Then bolster those few points with illustrations, evidence and anecdotes.  Be passionate: your conviction can be as persuasive as the appeal of your ideas.
  • Conclusion – Wrap up with feeling as well as fact. End with something upbeat that will inspire your listeners.

You want to leave the audience exhilarated, not drained. In our fast-paced age, 20-25 minutes is about as long as anyone will listen attentively to a speech. As you write and edit your speech, the general rule is to allow about 90 seconds for every double-spaced page of copy.

Spice it Up

Once you have the basic structure of your speech, it’s time to add variety and interest.  Giving an audience exactly what it expects is like passing out sleeping pills. Remember that a speech is more like conversation than formal writing.  Its phrasing is loose – but without the extremes of slang, the incomplete thoughts, the interruptions that flavor everyday speech.

  • Give it rhythm. A good speech has pacing.
  • Vary the sentence structure. Use short sentences. Use occasional long ones to keep the audience alert. Fragments are fine if used sparingly and for emphasis.
  • Use the active voice and avoid passive sentences. Active forms of speech make your sentences more powerful.
  • Repeat key words and points. Besides helping your audience remember something, repetition builds greater awareness of central points or the main theme.
  • Ask rhetorical questions in a way that attracts your listeners’ attention.
  • Personal experiences and anecdotes help bolster your points and help you connect with the audience.
  • Use quotes. Good quotes work on several levels, forcing the audience to think. Make sure quotes are clearly attributed and said by someone your audience will probably recognize.

Be sure to use all of these devices sparingly in your speeches. If overused, the speech becomes exaggerated. Used with care, they will work well to move the speech along and help you deliver your message in an interesting, compelling way.

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How to Write Choir Music

Copley Sutton

Whether you’re an experienced composer or just getting started, our guide to writing choir music will help you transform your ideas into beautiful notes.

Choirs are great, aren’t they? Just a bunch of voices weaving together a tapestry of sound.  Don’t let the overwhelming choir sound intimidate you–they’re pretty easy to write. Shortly, you’ll learn about everything you need to know. We cover where to begin writing a choir song, how to consider your vocal ranges, and even how to pair lyrics with choir music.  

Understanding the basics of music and vocal ranges.

When creating choral music, it helps to understand the basics of music theory, such as chords , chord progressions, and major and minor scales. There are many resources. You can educate yourself online, get a teacher, or use tools like the Simply Piano app to get you up to speed.

Furthermore, knowledge about your singers’ vocal ranges empowers you to write parts that suit their voices. Here’s a summary of the voices in a traditional choir:

  • Bass –E2 – E5
  • Tenor –C3 – C5
  • Soprano –C4 – C6
  • Alto- -F3 – F5

The differences between orchestras and choirs.

It’s helpful to have experience writing for orchestras or bands, but choir music is a whole other thing. You can’t simply think of the voices as more instruments in the orchestra. They have specific needs you have to cater to in your music scores. 

To help you understand, analyze existing choir music. Play it, sing it and compare it to other types of sheet music.

Deciding on the accompanying instruments.

Before you start writing, decide which instruments must accompany the voices. Are you writing for a school choir where a teacher plays along on a piano or an ensemble that performs with a full orchestra? You can also write for an a cappella choir, where you only have to write for the voices. 

how to make a speech choir script

Picking the number of voices for the song.

Personal preferences and the type of choir you write determine how many voices to include. The average SATB choir has the four in the list above, but there are also the following options:

  • All men choirs only have bass and tenor voices.
  • Female-only choirs contain altos and sopranos.

Picking the voices is part of your preparation because it affects your song’s pitch range.

Writing lyrics.

Do you have a famous poem you want to put to music? Or perhaps it’s a completely original work with words flowing from your pen. 

Know what lyrics you want to write music for, so the words and the melodies suit each other and convey the same message. 

Struggling to write an entire song’s words? Then simply settle with a single verse or the chorus, as long as you can pinpoint the song’s heart.

Note: Sometimes, you may start with the melody and then write words for it. This is up to personal preference, or you may want to turn a funky riff on the piano into a full-blown choir song. However, ensure that your lyrics and melodies suit each other in the end.

Creating the melody.

Now it’s time for the notes!

You can write choir music using any instrument you’re comfortable with, whether it’s playing the piano or strumming the guitar. Go at it bit by bit, instead of feeling overwhelmed with penning down the entire song in one go. 

Do you have a catchy tune for the chorus, or does the verse you wrote inspire certain notes?

One of the voices will sing your melody, so write within the specific vocal range. 

Respecting voice ranges.

While you write, respect vocal ranges because it helps the choir sing comfortably and deliver the notes with more power. You can move outside a range at times, but overdoing it–especially by adding too many high notes–strains their voices. They won’t enjoy singing your choir music as much, which affects the quality of the performance.

Creating harmonies.

Next, use the other voices to create harmonies with the main melody line. This is where your knowledge of chord progressions comes in handy. 

Don’t make the other parts too simple. Choir members appreciate an interesting piece, enjoy it more and as a result, sound better when performing. 

Once again, it’s up to personal preference whether you want to write an entire song’s melody and then do the other voices or build the song one verse and chorus at a time. Find a process that feels comfortable to you.

Combining lyrics and melodies.

You have to put together your lyrics and melodies. Knowing how the song goes could help you finish the song’s words. Perhaps your melody shows you that you only need two catchy sentences for the chorus or repetition of a simple phrase as a bridge. This step does require some skill though.

how to make a speech choir script

Understanding note positioning

It’s essential to correctly line up words and notes, so you show singers how you expect them to sing each syllable. For example:

  • Choir members sing the vowel sounds on the note or beat.
  • Your music score must allow enough time to properly pronounce all consonant sounds.
  • Unlike consonants such as ‘t’ and ‘d’ you can lengthen certain consonant sounds, such as M, N, F, V, S, and Sh. 
  • A chorus views a rest as an indication to release the note. 

Minding the breath

One of the major differences between writing music for orchestras and choirs. For instruments like pianos and violins, musicians can go on playing whatever notes you want of them next, without taking a break during the performance. 

A choir member needs enough air to produce the sounds, so your choral music must provide moments for them to breathe. Then, they’re able to take on the next part. Be creative and kind by planning their breaths and releases when you write. 

Tip: If singers must sustain certain notes for an extended period, they can stagger their breathing. 

Hinting at notes to come

For choir members to sing each note on pitch, they may need help from you.

Before a song’s performance, some choirs use tuning forks to find the right starting note. But, throughout the piece, there are other notes to pitch correctly. 

Of course, the accompanying instrument plays the relevant notes of your melody. But, if you know a certain note is difficult to hit or transition to, find a way to help the choir. 

For example, include it somewhere in the score just before the main voice needs to sing it. Their trained ears can pick it out from the musical score and help them sing on pitch. 

Stressing syllables with intention

The syllables you stress the most are powerful in helping you convey your message. Don’t simply assign random notes in the melody to any word or syllable. Move syllables around and make melody changes if necessary, so singers pronounce words correctly while highlighting a certain part of the song’s meaning.

Combine all these techniques, and you’ll have a song that sounds great and is enjoyable to sing.

To make life easier, join a choir if you’ve never been part of one. Understanding the perspective of the choir members goes a long way in helping new writers create stunning choir music. 

A good choir song fits the demographic of the choir. For example, they must understand and enjoy what they’re singing about. Especially for less experienced singers, the song shouldn’t have too many verses to memorize. 

If you can implement discipline and active listening when you’re part of a choir, you’ll be a valuable asset. You must also be willing to focus, work with the team, and have confidence in your skill. 

Traditional choirs have four voice types, namely sopranos, altos, tenors, and bass. A male-only choir may just have baritones, tenors, and bass, while an all-female choir will often only have sopranos and altos. 

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8 Tips to Write an Effective Script for Your Speech or Your Virtual Event

how to make a speech choir script

Average: 5 ( 1 vote)

 Write an Effective Script for Your Speech

With the massive shift to online provoked by COVID-19, virtual events have changed from being a minor subset to being the norm. 

As you make the transition and discover the ins and outs of virtual gatherings, you’ll realize that there is a  key component that you need — a great script for your speech, or indeed, for your event as a whole.

The script is the key pillar of a virtual event. It gives the event structure, keeps everyone organized, ensures that there are no loose ends, and navigates the event to the desired goal. Simply put, the script helps you plan and successfully execute the event.

Whether you are hosting a webinar, conference, or online summit, or whether you are simply a single speaker at an event, follow these tips to write an impressive script.  

1. Start With an Outline

Before you dive into the specifics of the event, create an outline. Having this will make the writing process much easier.

Ask yourself: What does the script need to include? Write down the key elements of the event. Those elements can be:

Introduction

The essential points that the event (or speech) will cover

The outline can help you in two ways: to streamline your writing and to guide proceedings during the event or speech itself.

2. Embrace Conversational Writing Style

No matter who your audience is, the best way to engage them is to use conversational language. The event or speech should feel welcoming and natural. Everyday language will create that atmosphere.

As you write the script, allow yourself to use incomplete sentences or sentence fragments. Scriptwriting isn't technical writing. You are free to use a style, tone, and wording that will make the script engaging and suitable for your type of event.

3. Grab Attention With the First Impression

Composing the greeting can be the toughest part. Everyone knows that first impressions matter, so you want to make them count. 

Here are a few tips that will help you craft an impressive introduction:

Greet the viewers

Be straightforward

Introduce yourself

Give background details to establish trust

Explain the purpose of the event

Address the common questions (e.g. whether the meeting will be available to stream on-demand)

Try to use short sentences for the greeting. Using deliberate pauses can help you push through any stage fright. 

Also, you want to keep the introduction under 2 minutes. To estimate your greeting time, record yourself as you speak. If the introduction lasts longer, then it should make some cuts. 

4. State the Agenda Concisely

The audience will want to know what they can expect from the event. This is the cue for the agenda.

Going through the main points of the event needs to inform but also build up excitement. Therefore, you should keep it short, simple, and direct.

Memorable points are concise points. You want to achieve a balance between revealing enough to spark interest and assuring understanding whilst building anticipation. 

5. Use a Skimmable Format and Structure

You can remind yourself of the schedule by glancing at the script. However, when that glance turns into reading, your audience’s engagement will drop.

The solution to avoiding reading is to write your script in a skimmable format, so you can use it as a guide and to jog your memory.

The best ways of structuring and formatting your script are:

Create headings

Highlight keywords with bold or colored text

Separate different ideas into different sections

Write in small paragraphs

Use all caps to indicate a change of tone or emphasis

Make the font large enough for a quick read

Add plenty of white space

6. Include Case Studies, Statistics, and/or Real Stories

Evoke trust by supporting your claims with real-life examples. These examples can come in the form of case studies, statistics, or stories.

In addition to providing credibility, case studies, statistics, and stories can break up the uniformity of your talk. You will be able to intertwine the theoretical or practical part with storytelling.

If you have a valuable personal story to tell, share it without hesitation. A personal touch such as a story from your own life can help you make a stronger connection with the audience.

7. End the Event or Your Talk With a Powerful Message

Just as you need to make an impression when the event starts, the audience will expect nothing less when the event is finishing. Therefore, you should finalize the script with a message that matters.

You want to leave your audience with a memorable idea, statement, or motivation. One of the ways to do that is to invite them to take action. 

People attend virtual events to learn something of value and apply it for their own purposes. Inspire them to make a change with a strong and inviting message. The best way to wrap up an event is to make the audience feel like they are ready to conquer the world. 

8. Rehearse and Edit Until You’re Satisfied With Results

Once you finish the writing, it is time for the final touches. To assess the effectiveness of your script, you must try it out. You need to see how it feels and how you perform with it in reality.

Rehearse the script and make the changes along the way. The moment you notice an inconsistency or room for improvement, write down the change you need to make. 

If you feel like something is missing, but you can't put your finger on it, don't despair. You can ask someone to revise the script or hire an editor. The editing doesn't need to be too costly if you use academic writing services. Read the Ultius review to get a better idea of how these services work.

Wrapping Up

Follow these tips and you'll finish your speechwriting journey before you know it. Proper guidance is all you need to create a winning script for your virtual event. 

Knowing that your event is planned and organized will take some pressure off you. More pressure can be relieved by rehearsing thoroughly. However, remember that some creative freedom is always welcome. A little improvisation will do no harm. 

About the Author:

Jessica Fender is a professional writer and educational blogger at GetGoodGrade , an aggregator for useful college resources and websites. Jessica enjoys sharing her ideas to make writing and learning fun.

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How to write a speech that your audience remembers

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Whether in a work meeting or at an investor panel, you might give a speech at some point. And no matter how excited you are about the opportunity, the experience can be nerve-wracking . 

But feeling butterflies doesn’t mean you can’t give a great speech. With the proper preparation and a clear outline, apprehensive public speakers and natural wordsmiths alike can write and present a compelling message. Here’s how to write a good speech you’ll be proud to deliver.

What is good speech writing?

Good speech writing is the art of crafting words and ideas into a compelling, coherent, and memorable message that resonates with the audience. Here are some key elements of great speech writing:

  • It begins with clearly understanding the speech's purpose and the audience it seeks to engage. 
  • A well-written speech clearly conveys its central message, ensuring that the audience understands and retains the key points. 
  • It is structured thoughtfully, with a captivating opening, a well-organized body, and a conclusion that reinforces the main message. 
  • Good speech writing embraces the power of engaging content, weaving in stories, examples, and relatable anecdotes to connect with the audience on both intellectual and emotional levels. 

Ultimately, it is the combination of these elements, along with the authenticity and delivery of the speaker , that transforms words on a page into a powerful and impactful spoken narrative.

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What makes a good speech?

A great speech includes several key qualities, but three fundamental elements make a speech truly effective:

Clarity and purpose

Remembering the audience, cohesive structure.

While other important factors make a speech a home run, these three elements are essential for writing an effective speech.

The main elements of a good speech

The main elements of a speech typically include:

  • Introduction: The introduction sets the stage for your speech and grabs the audience's attention. It should include a hook or attention-grabbing opening, introduce the topic, and provide an overview of what will be covered.
  • Opening/captivating statement: This is a strong statement that immediately engages the audience and creates curiosity about the speech topics.
  • Thesis statement/central idea: The thesis statement or central idea is a concise statement that summarizes the main point or argument of your speech. It serves as a roadmap for the audience to understand what your speech is about.
  • Body: The body of the speech is where you elaborate on your main points or arguments. Each point is typically supported by evidence, examples, statistics, or anecdotes. The body should be organized logically and coherently, with smooth transitions between the main points.
  • Supporting evidence: This includes facts, data, research findings, expert opinions, or personal stories that support and strengthen your main points. Well-chosen and credible evidence enhances the persuasive power of your speech.
  • Transitions: Transitions are phrases or statements that connect different parts of your speech, guiding the audience from one idea to the next. Effective transitions signal the shifts in topics or ideas and help maintain a smooth flow throughout the speech.
  • Counterarguments and rebuttals (if applicable): If your speech involves addressing opposing viewpoints or counterarguments, you should acknowledge and address them. Presenting counterarguments makes your speech more persuasive and demonstrates critical thinking.
  • Conclusion: The conclusion is the final part of your speech and should bring your message to a satisfying close. Summarize your main points, restate your thesis statement, and leave the audience with a memorable closing thought or call to action.
  • Closing statement: This is the final statement that leaves a lasting impression and reinforces the main message of your speech. It can be a call to action, a thought-provoking question, a powerful quote, or a memorable anecdote.
  • Delivery and presentation: How you deliver your speech is also an essential element to consider. Pay attention to your tone, body language, eye contact , voice modulation, and timing. Practice and rehearse your speech, and try using the 7-38-55 rule to ensure confident and effective delivery.

While the order and emphasis of these elements may vary depending on the type of speech and audience, these elements provide a framework for organizing and delivering a successful speech.

Man-holding-microphone-at-panel-while-talking--how-to-give-a-speech

How to structure a good speech

You know what message you want to transmit, who you’re delivering it to, and even how you want to say it. But you need to know how to start, develop, and close a speech before writing it. 

Think of a speech like an essay. It should have an introduction, conclusion, and body sections in between. This places ideas in a logical order that the audience can better understand and follow them. Learning how to make a speech with an outline gives your storytelling the scaffolding it needs to get its point across.

Here’s a general speech structure to guide your writing process:

  • Explanation 1
  • Explanation 2
  • Explanation 3

How to write a compelling speech opener

Some research shows that engaged audiences pay attention for only 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Other estimates are even lower, citing that people stop listening intently in fewer than 10 minutes . If you make a good first impression at the beginning of your speech, you have a better chance of interesting your audience through the middle when attention spans fade. 

Implementing the INTRO model can help grab and keep your audience’s attention as soon as you start speaking. This acronym stands for interest, need, timing, roadmap, and objectives, and it represents the key points you should hit in an opening. 

Here’s what to include for each of these points: 

  • Interest : Introduce yourself or your topic concisely and speak with confidence . Write a compelling opening statement using relevant data or an anecdote that the audience can relate to.
  • Needs : The audience is listening to you because they have something to learn. If you’re pitching a new app idea to a panel of investors, those potential partners want to discover more about your product and what they can earn from it. Read the room and gently remind them of the purpose of your speech. 
  • Timing : When appropriate, let your audience know how long you’ll speak. This lets listeners set expectations and keep tabs on their own attention span. If a weary audience member knows you’ll talk for 40 minutes, they can better manage their energy as that time goes on. 
  • Routemap : Give a brief overview of the three main points you’ll cover in your speech. If an audience member’s attention starts to drop off and they miss a few sentences, they can more easily get their bearings if they know the general outline of the presentation.
  • Objectives : Tell the audience what you hope to achieve, encouraging them to listen to the end for the payout. 

Writing the middle of a speech

The body of your speech is the most information-dense section. Facts, visual aids, PowerPoints — all this information meets an audience with a waning attention span. Sticking to the speech structure gives your message focus and keeps you from going off track, making everything you say as useful as possible.

Limit the middle of your speech to three points, and support them with no more than three explanations. Following this model organizes your thoughts and prevents you from offering more information than the audience can retain. 

Using this section of the speech to make your presentation interactive can add interest and engage your audience. Try including a video or demonstration to break the monotony. A quick poll or survey also keeps the audience on their toes. 

Wrapping the speech up

To you, restating your points at the end can feel repetitive and dull. You’ve practiced countless times and heard it all before. But repetition aids memory and learning , helping your audience retain what you’ve told them. Use your speech’s conclusion to summarize the main points with a few short sentences.

Try to end on a memorable note, like posing a motivational quote or a thoughtful question the audience can contemplate once they leave. In proposal or pitch-style speeches, consider landing on a call to action (CTA) that invites your audience to take the next step.

People-clapping-after-coworker-gave-a-speech-how-to-give-a-speech

How to write a good speech

If public speaking gives you the jitters, you’re not alone. Roughly 80% of the population feels nervous before giving a speech, and another 10% percent experiences intense anxiety and sometimes even panic. 

The fear of failure can cause procrastination and can cause you to put off your speechwriting process until the last minute. Finding the right words takes time and preparation, and if you’re already feeling nervous, starting from a blank page might seem even harder.

But putting in the effort despite your stress is worth it. Presenting a speech you worked hard on fosters authenticity and connects you to the subject matter, which can help your audience understand your points better. Human connection is all about honesty and vulnerability, and if you want to connect to the people you’re speaking to, they should see that in you.

1. Identify your objectives and target audience

Before diving into the writing process, find healthy coping strategies to help you stop worrying . Then you can define your speech’s purpose, think about your target audience, and start identifying your objectives. Here are some questions to ask yourself and ground your thinking : 

  • What purpose do I want my speech to achieve? 
  • What would it mean to me if I achieved the speech’s purpose?
  • What audience am I writing for? 
  • What do I know about my audience? 
  • What values do I want to transmit? 
  • If the audience remembers one take-home message, what should it be? 
  • What do I want my audience to feel, think, or do after I finish speaking? 
  • What parts of my message could be confusing and require further explanation?

2. Know your audience

Understanding your audience is crucial for tailoring your speech effectively. Consider the demographics of your audience, their interests, and their expectations. For instance, if you're addressing a group of healthcare professionals, you'll want to use medical terminology and data that resonate with them. Conversely, if your audience is a group of young students, you'd adjust your content to be more relatable to their experiences and interests. 

3. Choose a clear message

Your message should be the central idea that you want your audience to take away from your speech. Let's say you're giving a speech on climate change. Your clear message might be something like, "Individual actions can make a significant impact on mitigating climate change." Throughout your speech, all your points and examples should support this central message, reinforcing it for your audience.

4. Structure your speech

Organizing your speech properly keeps your audience engaged and helps them follow your ideas. The introduction should grab your audience's attention and introduce the topic. For example, if you're discussing space exploration, you could start with a fascinating fact about a recent space mission. In the body, you'd present your main points logically, such as the history of space exploration, its scientific significance, and future prospects. Finally, in the conclusion, you'd summarize your key points and reiterate the importance of space exploration in advancing human knowledge.

5. Use engaging content for clarity

Engaging content includes stories, anecdotes, statistics, and examples that illustrate your main points. For instance, if you're giving a speech about the importance of reading, you might share a personal story about how a particular book changed your perspective. You could also include statistics on the benefits of reading, such as improved cognitive abilities and empathy.

6. Maintain clarity and simplicity

It's essential to communicate your ideas clearly. Avoid using overly technical jargon or complex language that might confuse your audience. For example, if you're discussing a medical breakthrough with a non-medical audience, explain complex terms in simple, understandable language.

7. Practice and rehearse

Practice is key to delivering a great speech. Rehearse multiple times to refine your delivery, timing, and tone. Consider using a mirror or recording yourself to observe your body language and gestures. For instance, if you're giving a motivational speech, practice your gestures and expressions to convey enthusiasm and confidence.

8. Consider nonverbal communication

Your body language, tone of voice, and gestures should align with your message . If you're delivering a speech on leadership, maintain strong eye contact to convey authority and connection with your audience. A steady pace and varied tone can also enhance your speech's impact.

9. Engage your audience

Engaging your audience keeps them interested and attentive. Encourage interaction by asking thought-provoking questions or sharing relatable anecdotes. If you're giving a speech on teamwork, ask the audience to recall a time when teamwork led to a successful outcome, fostering engagement and connection.

10. Prepare for Q&A

Anticipate potential questions or objections your audience might have and prepare concise, well-informed responses. If you're delivering a speech on a controversial topic, such as healthcare reform, be ready to address common concerns, like the impact on healthcare costs or access to services, during the Q&A session.

By following these steps and incorporating examples that align with your specific speech topic and purpose, you can craft and deliver a compelling and impactful speech that resonates with your audience.

Woman-at-home-doing-research-in-her-laptop-how-to-give-a-speech

Tools for writing a great speech

There are several helpful tools available for speechwriting, both technological and communication-related. Here are a few examples:

  • Word processing software: Tools like Microsoft Word, Google Docs, or other word processors provide a user-friendly environment for writing and editing speeches. They offer features like spell-checking, grammar correction, formatting options, and easy revision tracking.
  • Presentation software: Software such as Microsoft PowerPoint or Google Slides is useful when creating visual aids to accompany your speech. These tools allow you to create engaging slideshows with text, images, charts, and videos to enhance your presentation.
  • Speechwriting Templates: Online platforms or software offer pre-designed templates specifically for speechwriting. These templates provide guidance on structuring your speech and may include prompts for different sections like introductions, main points, and conclusions.
  • Rhetorical devices and figures of speech: Rhetorical tools such as metaphors, similes, alliteration, and parallelism can add impact and persuasion to your speech. Resources like books, websites, or academic papers detailing various rhetorical devices can help you incorporate them effectively.
  • Speechwriting apps: Mobile apps designed specifically for speechwriting can be helpful in organizing your thoughts, creating outlines, and composing a speech. These apps often provide features like voice recording, note-taking, and virtual prompts to keep you on track.
  • Grammar and style checkers: Online tools or plugins like Grammarly or Hemingway Editor help improve the clarity and readability of your speech by checking for grammar, spelling, and style errors. They provide suggestions for sentence structure, word choice, and overall tone.
  • Thesaurus and dictionary: Online or offline resources such as thesauruses and dictionaries help expand your vocabulary and find alternative words or phrases to express your ideas more effectively. They can also clarify meanings or provide context for unfamiliar terms.
  • Online speechwriting communities: Joining online forums or communities focused on speechwriting can be beneficial for getting feedback, sharing ideas, and learning from experienced speechwriters. It's an opportunity to connect with like-minded individuals and improve your public speaking skills through collaboration.

Remember, while these tools can assist in the speechwriting process, it's essential to use them thoughtfully and adapt them to your specific needs and style. The most important aspect of speechwriting remains the creativity, authenticity, and connection with your audience that you bring to your speech.

Man-holding-microphone-while-speaking-in-public-how-to-give-a-speech

5 tips for writing a speech

Behind every great speech is an excellent idea and a speaker who refined it. But a successful speech is about more than the initial words on the page, and there are a few more things you can do to help it land.

Here are five more tips for writing and practicing your speech:

1. Structure first, write second

If you start the writing process before organizing your thoughts, you may have to re-order, cut, and scrap the sentences you worked hard on. Save yourself some time by using a speech structure, like the one above, to order your talking points first. This can also help you identify unclear points or moments that disrupt your flow.

2. Do your homework

Data strengthens your argument with a scientific edge. Research your topic with an eye for attention-grabbing statistics, or look for findings you can use to support each point. If you’re pitching a product or service, pull information from company metrics that demonstrate past or potential successes. 

Audience members will likely have questions, so learn all talking points inside and out. If you tell investors that your product will provide 12% returns, for example, come prepared with projections that support that statement.

3. Sound like yourself

Memorable speakers have distinct voices. Think of Martin Luther King Jr’s urgent, inspiring timbre or Oprah’s empathetic, personal tone . Establish your voice — one that aligns with your personality and values — and stick with it. If you’re a motivational speaker, keep your tone upbeat to inspire your audience . If you’re the CEO of a startup, try sounding assured but approachable. 

4. Practice

As you practice a speech, you become more confident , gain a better handle on the material, and learn the outline so well that unexpected questions are less likely to trip you up. Practice in front of a colleague or friend for honest feedback about what you could change, and speak in front of the mirror to tweak your nonverbal communication and body language .

5. Remember to breathe

When you’re stressed, you breathe more rapidly . It can be challenging to talk normally when you can’t regulate your breath. Before your presentation, try some mindful breathing exercises so that when the day comes, you already have strategies that will calm you down and remain present . This can also help you control your voice and avoid speaking too quickly.

How to ghostwrite a great speech for someone else

Ghostwriting a speech requires a unique set of skills, as you're essentially writing a piece that will be delivered by someone else. Here are some tips on how to effectively ghostwrite a speech:

  • Understand the speaker's voice and style : Begin by thoroughly understanding the speaker's personality, speaking style, and preferences. This includes their tone, humor, and any personal anecdotes they may want to include.
  • Interview the speaker : Have a detailed conversation with the speaker to gather information about their speech's purpose, target audience, key messages, and any specific points they want to emphasize. Ask for personal stories or examples they may want to include.
  • Research thoroughly : Research the topic to ensure you have a strong foundation of knowledge. This helps you craft a well-informed and credible speech.
  • Create an outline : Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval.
  • Write in the speaker's voice : While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style. Use language and phrasing that feel natural to them. If they have a particular way of expressing ideas, incorporate that into the speech.
  • Craft a captivating opening : Begin the speech with a compelling opening that grabs the audience's attention. This could be a relevant quote, an interesting fact, a personal anecdote, or a thought-provoking question.
  • Organize content logically : Ensure the speech flows logically, with each point building on the previous one. Use transitions to guide the audience from one idea to the next smoothly.
  • Incorporate engaging stories and examples : Include anecdotes, stories, and real-life examples that illustrate key points and make the speech relatable and memorable.
  • Edit and revise : Edit the speech carefully for clarity, grammar, and coherence. Ensure the speech is the right length and aligns with the speaker's time constraints.
  • Seek feedback : Share drafts of the speech with the speaker for their feedback and revisions. They may have specific changes or additions they'd like to make.
  • Practice delivery : If possible, work with the speaker on their delivery. Practice the speech together, allowing the speaker to become familiar with the content and your writing style.
  • Maintain confidentiality : As a ghostwriter, it's essential to respect the confidentiality and anonymity of the work. Do not disclose that you wrote the speech unless you have the speaker's permission to do so.
  • Be flexible : Be open to making changes and revisions as per the speaker's preferences. Your goal is to make them look good and effectively convey their message.
  • Meet deadlines : Stick to agreed-upon deadlines for drafts and revisions. Punctuality and reliability are essential in ghostwriting.
  • Provide support : Support the speaker during their preparation and rehearsal process. This can include helping with cue cards, speech notes, or any other materials they need.

Remember that successful ghostwriting is about capturing the essence of the speaker while delivering a well-structured and engaging speech. Collaboration, communication, and adaptability are key to achieving this.

Give your best speech yet

Learn how to make a speech that’ll hold an audience’s attention by structuring your thoughts and practicing frequently. Put the effort into writing and preparing your content, and aim to improve your breathing, eye contact , and body language as you practice. The more you work on your speech, the more confident you’ll become.

The energy you invest in writing an effective speech will help your audience remember and connect to every concept. Remember: some life-changing philosophies have come from good speeches, so give your words a chance to resonate with others. You might even change their thinking.

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IMAGES

  1. English Choral Speaking Script

    how to make a speech choir script

  2. Choral Speaking Script

    how to make a speech choir script

  3. Bata National High School Choral verse script

    how to make a speech choir script

  4. Speech Choir Script

    how to make a speech choir script

  5. Speech Choir Emcee Script

    how to make a speech choir script

  6. Speech choir

    how to make a speech choir script

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Creating a Speech Choir: The Bounty of Authentic Audience ...

    DOI:10.31446/JCP.2018.11 Central States Communication Association Creating a Speech Choir: The Bounty of Authentic Audience Experience for Students Susan Redding Emel Abstract: For most students at my university, classroom experience alone was the choice for formally develop-ing speaking skills.

  2. Speech Choir: 8 Easy Tips in Conducting It

    1. Start with the end in mind and work backwards First, explain to your participants the purpose of the speech choir that you are going to perform. Second, make sure they are aware of the many advantages that come with participating in a Speech Chorus.

  3. How to Write a Speech Choir Piece

    Task 1: Map Your Territory Think about what one great message you want to express in your piece. Write it in one sentence, e.g., It is impossible to be completely righteous in this imperfect world, but we can be the kindest if we want to. Task 2: Sketch Your Blueprint Plan what you want to contain in the following: The Façade (Introduction)

  4. PDF Scripts For Schools

    the same moment. If the body of a choral speech were cut short at any pomt during a performance, each individual voice should be at precisely the same place in the syllable as every other voice. UNITY OF PITCH AND INFLECTION In spite Of differing Individual voice quahues, a speech choir Of voices must

  5. "I'll follow you!": A choral speech

    Take a set of 25 index cards and a dark medium-tipped marker and break Puck s speech into 21 small pieces (have a few extra cards in case you mess up), like this: I ll follow you/ I ll lead you about,/ around Through bog/ through bush/ through brake/ through briar;/ Sometime a horse I ll be/ sometime a hound,

  6. Speech Choir

    Speech choir allows children to recite a verse, story or rhyme in unison with elements of choreography. ... Through this speech choir experience where children perform as a group, it helps to bring the text alive for the children. as they perform it as a group. Objectives of using Speech Choir. Children • Improve their oral skills e.g. pitch ...

  7. "The Road Not Taken" By Robert Frost (Speech Choir)

    Thank you for watching! Like, share, and Subscribe!This speech choir was for our project in World Literature. Even though we only practiced this for a few ho...

  8. Welcoming Remarks and Proceedings of the SPEECH CHOIR ...

    Speech Choir Emcee Script - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. The document summarizes the proceedings of a Speech Choir Competition event held at SMK Seri Serating.

  9. VST choir with actual words

    #1 Hi, I'm new to the forum, and pretty new to the world of VSTs, so please be gentle - I may ask a lot of questions to learn more. I've got about half of an oratorio composed (English text mostly, with some German), and I'm looking for a really good choir sound with actual words, and with a classical sound.

  10. Choir performance

    Acknowledge the audience The reason we perform is so that others can enjoy the music. When the audience shows appreciation, it's important to acknowledge that. We spend most of the time with our backs to the audience, so don't forget to turn, acknowledge the applause, the choir and any musicians who are part of the performance.

  11. Speech Choir: A sample presentation by grade 3 pupil

    Speech choir is a group performance that recite speeches, verses, stories or rhymes in unison with elements of choreography and costuming to help bring the ...

  12. Choral Reading and Speaking

    Like Readers Theater, "Choral Reading" involves students as they read-aloud and orally interpret, but does not require them to memorize their reading parts. Unlike Readers Theater "Choral Speaking" requires a group of students to orally interpret and recite from memory. In my grandmother's day, "Choral Speaking" was all the rage!

  13. Psalm 104: A Choral Reading for 10

    ONE, adding until ALL are speaking [disorganized, repeating]: Bless the Lord, O my soul. ALL: O Lord my God, you are very great. The following lines speed up, gaining momentum, excitement, and volume, and suddenly slowing down at the end. This dynamic, rhythmic change occurs after each pause. TWO: You are clothed with honor and majesty,

  14. Ten Things You Should Do if You Want to Write Choral Music

    That's always one of the best ways to become well-versed in who's coming to the fore in the world of choral writing. 8. Talk to vocalists and choir directors and learn from them. If you want to write a piece for violin, usually the first thing you want to do is find a violinist to look through your drafts.

  15. 5 Simple Ways to Communicate with Your Choir

    1 | Spoken Announcements. Spoken announcements are a natural way to communicate important information quickly and effectively. - 2-3 short-term reminders (e.g. "Don't forget to RSVP for the picnic!" or "Mark your calendars for our Christmas Choir Kickoff next month!") Share these announcements toward the beginning of your rehearsal, or in ...

  16. Songs with words: choosing and interpreting texts for choral

    In 2019, the Choir of Christ's College, Cambridge released an album of Rooney's sacred choral music, As a seed bursts forth. Like many aspects of choral composition, choosing the words is a combination of practical and creative considerations. If you want your music to be performed (and most composers do!), thinking about who might sing the ...

  17. Anchoring Script for Song Performance [With PDF]

    We are really honoured to have the Honourable [full name], M.L.A., and his wife, Mrs [full name], as our chief guests today. Dear chief guests, special invitees and everyone in attendance, I am very glad to have you all with us today/ tonight and I welcome you with all my heart to witness and enjoy the event.

  18. Anchoring Script: School Assembly

    School Assembly Anchoring Script Example 1. Good morning, everyone, and welcome to our school assembly. It's great to see all of you here today, and we have a fantastic lineup of events to share with you. To start things off, we have a special presentation by our school choir. They have been rehearsing for weeks and are ready to perform a ...

  19. Speechwriting 101: Writing an Effective Speech

    Give it rhythm. A good speech has pacing. Vary the sentence structure. Use short sentences. Use occasional long ones to keep the audience alert. Fragments are fine if used sparingly and for emphasis. Use the active voice and avoid passive sentences. Active forms of speech make your sentences more powerful. Repeat key words and points.

  20. How to Write Choir Music

    Choir members sing the vowel sounds on the note or beat. Your music score must allow enough time to properly pronounce all consonant sounds. Unlike consonants such as 't' and 'd' you can lengthen certain consonant sounds, such as M, N, F, V, S, and Sh. A chorus views a rest as an indication to release the note.

  21. 8 Tips to Write an Effective Script for Your Speech or Your Virtual

    The outline can help you in two ways: to streamline your writing and to guide proceedings during the event or speech itself. 2. Embrace Conversational Writing Style. No matter who your audience is, the best way to engage them is to use conversational language. The event or speech should feel welcoming and natural.

  22. How to Write a Good Speech: 10 Steps and Tips

    Create an outline: Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval. Write in the speaker's voice: While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style.

  23. Here's How to Write a Perfect Speech

    1 Tips to write (and live) by Let's start with the 30,000 foot, big-picture view. These are the tenets that will guide you in your speech writing process (and pretty much anything else you want to write). Know the purpose: What are you trying to accomplish with your speech? Educate, inspire, entertain, argue a point?