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Grants & funding.

The National Institutes of Health is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world. In fiscal year 2022, NIH invested most of its $45 billion appropriations in research seeking to enhance life, and to reduce illness and disability. NIH-funded research has led to breakthroughs and new treatments helping people live longer, healthier lives, and building the research foundation that drives discovery.

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Grants Home Page

NIH’s central resource for grants and funding information.

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Find Funding

NIH offers funding for many types of grants, contracts, and even programs that help repay loans for researchers.

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Grant applications and associated documents (e.g., reference letters) are due by 5:00 PM local time of application organization on the specified due date.

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How to Apply

Instructions for submitting a grant application to NIH and other Public Health Service agencies.

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About Grants

An orientation to NIH funding, grant programs, how the grants process works, and how to apply.

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Policy & Compliance

By accepting a grant award, recipients agree to comply with the requirements in the NIH Grants Policy Statement unless the notice of award states otherwise.

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Grants News/Blog

News, updates, and blog posts on NIH extramural grant policies, processes, events, and resources.

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Explore opportunities at NIH for research and development contract funding.

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Loan Repayment

The NIH Loan Repayment Programs repay up to $50,000 annually of a researcher’s qualified educational debt in return for a commitment to engage in NIH mission-relevant research.

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Funding Search

Correctness for scientific computing systems (cs2) | nsf 24-571, planning proposals for centers of research excellence in science and technology (crest centers) in computer and information science and engineering (cise) | nsf 24-089.

Encourages planning proposals for a CREST center focused on CISE research at minority-serving institutions to help enhance research capabilities and facilitate the preparation of future competitive CREST proposals.

Mathematical Modeling of Policy Options for Evolving Public Health Challenges (MPOPHC) | NSF 24-088

Encourages research proposals aimed at mathematical modeling of the transmission of respiratory pathogens among human hosts with a focus on policy options for evolving public health challenges.

Non-Academic Research Internships for Graduate Students in Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies (Hydrogen INTERN) Supplemental Funding Opportunity | NSF 24-087

Encourages supplemental funding requests to provide graduate student internship and training opportunities focused on hydrogen and fuel cell technologies to foster the growth of a competitive and diverse research workforce.

NSF-NIH Pathfinder Supplements on Quantum Sensors for Biomedical Science | NSF 24-086

Encourages supplemental funding requests from current NSF recipients to support research activities in quantum sensors and biomedical science.

Research Training Groups in the Mathematical Sciences (RTG) | NSF 24-570

Posttranscriptional and posttranslational modification (ppm) | nsf 24-084.

Encourages proposals on post-transcriptional RNA and post-translational protein modifications and how these modifications influence the properties, interactions, and/or regulation of these macromolecules and their role in cellular and organismal phenotype.

Mathematical Foundations of Artificial Intelligence (MFAI) | NSF 24-569

Leveraging cyberinfrastructure for research data management (rdm) | nsf 24-085.

Invites proposals for Early-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) and conference/workshop proposals that leverage cyberinfrastructure to advance research data management and public access.

Scientific Ocean Drilling Coordination Office for the Division of Ocean Sciences | NSF 24-568

Supports the establishment of a coordinating office that will work with principal investigators to manage the development of a deep-sea drilling program and provide drilling services needed by the ocean science community.

Graduate Research Internships at National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NSF-NIBIB/BETA INTERN) Supplemental Funding Opportunity | NSF 24-083

Invites supplemental funding requests from active NSF recipients to provide graduate students with research internships and professional development opportunities in biomedical engineering.

Molecular Foundations for Sustainability: Sustainable Polymers Enabled by Emerging Data Analytics (MFS-SPEED) | NSF 24-567

  • Letter of intent required
  • Additional upcoming deadlines

Using Long-Term Research Associated Data (ULTRA-Data) | NSF 24-081

Encourages submission of proposals for projects that use/reuse long-term environmental data to advance understanding of ecological and evolutionary questions.

IUCRC Proposals for Research and Thought Leadership on Insurance Risk Modeling and Underwriting Related to Terrorism and Catastrophic Cyber Risks: A Joint NSF and U.S. Department of the Treasury Federal Insurance Office Call | NSF 24-082

Supports the formation of Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers that focus on pre-competitive, use-inspired research and thought leadership on terrorism and catastrophic cyber insurance modeling to strengthen the U.S. financial system and economy.

National Science Foundation Research Traineeship Institutional Partnership Pilot Program | NSF 24-566

Joint national science foundation and united states department of agriculture national institute of food and agriculture funding opportunity: supporting foundational research in robotics (frr) | nsf 24-080.

Invites proposals to a joint NSF-USDA collaboration to advance foundational research in agricultural robotics.

NSF Regional Innovation Engines (NSF Engines) | NSF 24-565

Supports multi-sector coalitions focused on accelerating technology, workforce development and economic growth within a particular region of service.

  • Preliminary proposal required

Expanding Geographic and Institutional Diversity in Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE) | NSF 24-079

Encourages new proposal submissions and supplemental funding requests led by institutions in EPSCoR jurisdictions to support education, research capacity, workforce development and professional development in the social, behavioral and economic sciences.

Enhancing STEM Education, Research Capacity, and Workforce Development in Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Jurisdictions | NSF 24-077

Encourages new proposal submissions to EDU programs and supplemental funding requests to existing EDU awards led by institutions in EPSCoR jurisdictions to support STEM education, research capacity, workforce development and professional development.

Cyberinfrastructure for Public Access and Open Science (CI PAOS) | PD 24-7414

Supports early-stage socio-technical partnerships focused on research data infrastructure ecosystems.

IUSE/Professional Formation of Engineers: Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (IUSE/PFE: RED) | NSF 24-564

Supports fundamental changes to the training of undergraduate engineering students that equip them with the technical and professional skills needed to solve complex societal problems.

Catalyzing human-centered solutions through research and innovation in science, the environment and society | NSF 24-074

Invites planning proposals for interdisciplinary research to create evidence-based solutions that strengthen human resilience, security, and quality of life by addressing seemingly intractable challenges that confront society.

Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) | NSF 24-563

Supports partnerships between institutions of higher education and other organizations with the aim of increasing STEM degrees to underrepresented populations and supporting research on STEM participation and assessment of LSAMP program impacts.

Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology - Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (CREST-RISE) | NSF 24-562

Supports the expansion of research and education capabilities of minority-serving institutions to strengthen their science and engineering graduate programs and the successful production of research doctoral students.

Foundations for Digital Twins as Catalyzers of Biomedical Technological Innovation (FDT-BioTech) | NSF 24-561

Supports interdisciplinary research projects that explore the mathematical and engineering foundations behind the development and use of digital twins in biomedical and healthcare applications.

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About Grants

Did you know that NIH is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world, investing more than $32 billion a year to enhance life, and reduce illness and disability? NIH funded research has led to breakthroughs and new treatments, helping people live longer, healthier lives, and building the  research foundation that drives discovery. Read on for an orientation to NIH funding, grant programs, how the grants process works, and how to apply.

Grants Process Overview

Learn the steps needed for an application to proceed from planning and submission to award and close out. Drill down on each step for guidance that can deepen your understanding of the grants process and help you submit a grant application and manage your grant award. 

Grants Basics

Get Started

Before getting started, learn the basics like why it is important to understand the structure of NIH and how we approach grant funding, what types of organizations and people are eligible to apply, what we look for in a research project, and the types of grant programs we offer. Once you have the big picture move on to learn about planning your application.

How to Apply

How to Apply

How to Apply serves as our comprehensive application guide, providing step-by-step instructions to get you through the grant application process, from completing required registrations, finding a funding opportunity to accessing the application forms and instructions, formatting your application, finding due dates and submission policies, and more. 

Receipt & Referral

Application Referral and Review

Once you submit your application to NIH, we assign your application to a specific study section for review and to a specific NIH Institute or Center for funding consideration. After assignment, the application undergoes a two level peer review process. Explore this page to learn more.

Peer Review

Pre-Award and Post-Award Processes

Applications that do well in review begin the pre-award process. Learn what happens during this process and what types of information you will be expected to provide. Once awarded, grantees must follow the requirements in the NIH Grants Policy statement and provide periodic reports to NIH that help NIH monitor the award.

Forms Library

Forms Directory

Essential NIH forms, instructions and format pages you need to apply for, manage, and close out grant awards. 

This page last updated on: March 17, 2017

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Tips and Tools for Finding and Applying for Research Grants

In this article, we recommend several tools for finding and applying for grants, and we list the top funding databases, both free and subscription-based. There are several services you can employ to ensure your application is strong to increase your chances of securing funding.

Updated on September 22, 2021

researchers investigate tips and tools for grant applications

For many researchers, the prospect of finding and applying for grant funding can seem daunting. The grant review process is rigorous and time consuming, and funding opportunities are not only limited but highly competitive. Thus, knowing where to find available sources of funding is an essential starting point in the process. In this article, we recommend several tools for finding and applying for grants, and we list the top funding databases, both free and subscription-based. Additionally, there are several services you can employ to ensure your application is strong, which may increase your likelihood of securing funding.

Tips for finding and applying for grants

1. Consider the large, well-known sources of funding. Large, well-known funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, can be good starting points in your search for grant funding opportunities. These funding sources are usually free to access and provide an abundance of information about submitting an application. Please see our lists of both free and subscription-based databases below.

2. Reach out to senior researchers and your institution's grant office. Experienced researchers with a strong track record of receiving funding may be able to recommend funding sources and may have examples of successfully funded grant proposals that they are willing to share with you (4). Additionally, your institution likely has a grant office that can point you toward grant opportunities and advise you on every step of the grant application process (4).

3. Cast a wide net. By widening your funding net, you are more likely to ensure financial security for your research. Money lost due to budget cuts can be replaced with smaller awards from a variety of smaller and/or lesser known sources (3) beyond large/government grants.

4. Be in the know. Following news from organizations in your field and regularly searching for novel funding sources will keep you apprised of any otherwise unknown funding opportunities (3).

5. Network with colleagues. Your colleagues may be aware of funding opportunities or may have received grants that you are not aware of. Asking around your network is particularly helpful if your team is multidisciplinary, having diverse experience and points of view (3).

6. Know the funding agency's requirements. Learn as much as possible about the funding agencies and their grant review processes in order to write your proposal according to the organization's specific requirements. Additionally, do not name specific grant reviewers in your cover letter, as this could be construed as a potential conflict of interest (2).

7. Ask questions early. There are typically personnel at grant agencies who can answer questions about the entire grant application process, from initial submission to receiving an award. Taking advantage of this resource can provide you with additional information that may not be available on the grant application or website (4).

8. Consider adding experienced co-investigators. If you are an early-career researcher with limited experience, some grant reviewers may immediately discount your application for that very reason due to the number of applications they receive. By adding co-investigators with long-term experience in your field, you may increase the likelihood of being awarded a grant (2).

9. Demonstrate your expertise and research plan. Clearly and concisely show reviewers that you and your team have the appropriate knowledge and background to conduct the research. Also show that you will work within the stated timeframe and budget. The difference between failure and success is the significance and feasibility of the proposed research, according to anesthesiologist and clinical researcher Peter Nagele (2).

10. Consider employing a grant support service. You can improve the language, conciseness, grammar, and clarity of your proposal with the help of a grant support service . With these services, experienced, professional researchers will help you to strengthen, edit and polish your grant proposal.

Tools for finding grants

Free-access funding databases.

Grants.gov provides a list of all discretionary funding opportunities from 26 US government agencies. Access is free, and the database of available grants is comprehensive with customizable search options. The grants offered by these government agencies cover a broad range of research fields. Eligibility for international applications varies from agency to agency.

National Science Foundation (NSF)

NSF is an independent federal agency that funds approximately 20% of all federally-supported research conducted at American colleges and universities. The current percentage of approval is approximately 28% (1). The NSF specifies that they rarely fund foreign organizations but that they do consider collaborative research between foreign and domestic institutions.

CRDF Global

Formerly known as Newton's List, CRDF Global funds research in civilian-oriented science, entrepreneurship, and the natural and social sciences. According to their site, CRDF Global facilitates international science cooperation by providing a forum for grant seekers and funders. This site is useful for individuals searching for funding opportunities internationally and for organizations marketing grants to an international audience.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Office of Extramural Research

The NIH is the largest funding source for biomedical research worldwide. The database includes a wide range of search options. However, due to limited budgets, funding opportunities with this agency are extremely competitive, with a funding success rate of 18% over the past five years (2).

Spencer Foundation

The Spencer Foundation offers funding opportunities for researchers in the education field. According to their website, the Spencer Foundation provides funding for education-focused research projects, research training fellowships, and additional field-building initiatives. The list of grants is freely accessible on the site, and each funding opportunity provides comprehensive information about the grant and how to apply.

Subscription/fee-based funding databases

Terra Viva Grant Directory

The Terra Viva Grant Directory lists grants for researchers in the agriculture, energy, environment, and natural resource fields. It is free to subscribe to the site; however, unlimited access to the grants database starts at $12/year.

Candid, formerly Guidestar and the Foundation Center, is an international network that connects philanthropists and grant providers with grant seekers. The Foundation Directory by Candid mostly lists funding opportunities for small businesses and nonprofits but also offers grants for scientists and researchers. The subscription pricing includes biennial, annual and monthly options, ranging from $119/month to $200/month.

Sponsored Programs Information Network (SPIN)

SPIN is a widely-used international funding database with over 10,000 funding organizations (1) and database features that make searching for specific grant opportunities easier. An institutional subscription is required to gain access.

Pivot, formerly known as Community of Science, is one of the largest, most comprehensive databases of available funding, which includes over 700 member institutions. Many universities provide institutional access for students and faculty. Check with your institution to see if you are eligible for access.

Grant Resource Center (GRC)

Operated by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), the Grant Resource Center includes a database that is customized for small institutions. According to their site, a subscription to GRC provides access to a comprehensive suite of tools, services, and expertise, which can increase success in securing funding from federal and private grants. Additionally, GRC database search results highlight viable funding sources because the database excludes region-specific solicitations, those with fewer than three awards per year, and those for which higher education institutions are not eligible to apply or partner. Contact GRC for membership information.

Kostos, David. Scientific Research Funding: 10 Grant Application Sources Worth Your Time. JoVE. July 2016. https://www.jove.com/blog/scientist-blog/scientific-research-funding-10-grant-application-sources-worth-your-time/.

Powell, K. The best-kept secrets to winning grants. Nature 545, 399–402 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/545399a .

Tachibana, Chris. Beyond government grants: Widening your funding net. Science. September 2018. https://www.science.org/features/2018/09/beyond-government-grants-widening-your-funding-net .

Yeager, Ashley. Seven ways to boost your chances of funding. American Psychological Association. July/August 2017. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2017/07-08/boost-funding .

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The Ultimate Guide to Researching and Identifying Grant Opportunities

  • February 24, 2023

Grants for Visual Artists

The Ultimate Guide to Researching and Identifying Grant Opportunities for your nonprofit. As a nonprofit organization, securing funding through grants can make all the difference in achieving your mission and goals. However, with the abundance of grant opportunities available, it can be overwhelming to navigate and determine which grants are the best fit for your organization. That’s why it’s important to have a comprehensive approach to researching and identifying grant opportunities that align with your organization’s objectives and needs.

Here is a step-by-step guide to help you research and identify the right grants for your organization, with practical examples.

  • Define your organization’s needs and goals : Before you start your grant search, it’s essential to take a step back and assess your organization’s needs and goals. What specific projects or programs does your organization want to fund? What are your funding needs and priorities? Having a clear understanding of your organization’s needs and goals will help you focus your grant search and determine which grants are the best fit.

For example, if your organization is focused on environmental conservation, you may want to fund a specific project to protect a particular species or ecosystem. In this case, you would be looking for grants that specifically support environmental conservation and species protection.

  • Research available grant opportunities : Once you have a clear understanding of your organization’s needs and goals, it’s time to start researching available grant opportunities.

 Here are a few ways to start your search:

  • Use online grant databases : Websites like Grants.gov, Foundation Center, and Grant Station are great resources for finding a wide range of grants for your organization. You can search by keyword, funding area, and location to find grants that match your organization’s needs.

For example, if you are searching for grants to support your environmental conservation project, you could search for keywords such as “environmental conservation grants” or “species protection grants” on Grants.gov or Foundation Center.

  • Check out grant-making foundations : Many foundations have a specific mission and focus area, and they often grant funds to organizations that align with their goals. Do some research on foundations that share your organization’s mission and focus, and reach out to them to learn more about their grant-making process.

For Instance, if your organization is focused on environmental conservation, you may want to look into foundations such as the Environmental Defense Fund, The Nature Trust, or The Sierra Club Foundation.

  • Ut ilize your network: Ask your colleagues and peers in the nonprofit sector if they know of any grant opportunities that may be a good fit for your organization. Attend networking events and conferences to connect with grant makers and other nonprofit organizations.

For example, you could attend an environmental conservation conference and connect with other organizations working in the same field. They may know of grant opportunities that would be a good fit for your organization.

  • Evaluate grant opportunities : Once you have a list of potential grant opportunities, it’s time to evaluate them to determine which grants are the best fit for your organization. Here are a few key things to consider when evaluating grant opportunities:
  • Eligibility criteria: Make sure your organization meets the eligibility criteria for the grant. Read the grant guidelines carefully to ensure that you understand all the requirements.

For example, if the grant requires that organizations have a certain level of annual operating budget, make sure your organization meets this requirement before applying.

  • Alignment with your organization’s goals and needs : Does the grant align with your organization’s goals and priorities? Will the funds support your organization’s specific projects or programs?

For example, if your organization’s goal is to protect a specific species of wildlife, make sure the grant you are considering specifically supports species protection.

  • Funding amount and duration : What is the amount of funding being offered and how long is the grant period? Is the funding amount sufficient to support your organization’s needs and goals?

For example, if your organization needs $100,000 to complete a project and the grant offers $50,000 for a one-year period, you may need to consider if the grant is sufficient to support your organization’s needs.

  • Reporting requirements : What are the reporting requirements for the grant? Will your organization be able to meet these requirements with the resources it has available?

For example, if the grant requires regular progress reports and your organization doesn’t have the staff or resources to produce these reports, you may need to consider if the grant is a good fit for your organization.

  • Evaluation criteria : What are the evaluation criteria for the grant? How will the grant maker determine if your organization is a good fit for the grant?

For example, if the grant requires that organizations have a strong track record of achieving specific goals, make sure your organization has a strong track record in this area.

  • Prepare and submit your grant application : Once you have evaluated the grant opportunities and determined which grants are the best fit for your organization, it’s time to prepare and submit your grant application.

Few tips to help you prepare a successful grant application:

  • Read the grant guidelines carefully : Make sure you understand all the requirements and criteria for the grant.
  • Tailor your application to the grant: Customize your grant application to the specific requirements and goals of the grant. Show how your organization’s goals and needs align with the grant’s objectives.
  • Provide strong evidence and examples: Provide strong evidence and examples to support your application. Show the grant maker how your organization has made a difference in the past and how the grant will help your organization achieve its goals and make an impact in the future.
  • Get feedback : Ask colleagues, peers, or grant consultants to review your grant application and provide feedback.
  • Submit your application by the deadline : Make sure you submit your application by the deadline. Late applications are often not considered.
  • Evaluate the results of your grant search: After you have submitted your grant applications, it’s important to evaluate the results of your grant search.

                  Here are a few things to consider:

  • Track your applications : Keep track of which grants you have applied for and the status of your applications.
  • Evaluate the results : If your organization is not successful in securing a grant, take the time to evaluate why your application was not successful. Were there areas that you could improve for future applications?
  • Celebrate your successes: If your organization is successful in securing a grant, celebrate this success. Make sure you acknowledge the grant maker and thank them for their support.

In summary, researching and identifying grant opportunities is an important part of securing funding for your organization. By following these steps and using practical examples, you can increase your chances of finding the right grants for your organization and achieve your goals.

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The Basics of Grant and Prospect Research

Kyle h. andrei.

Grant Research

It doesn’t matter how many foundations, individual donors, local and regional governments, and other funders believe in your organization and can donate financial support to it if those donors can’t find you and put you on their radar. Researching grants and prospects is the first step in the process, and navigating the upper levels of major-gift fundraising often requires a different approach than individual gift campaigns.

Grant research involves a certain amount of strategy and thoughtfulness, which no software can provide for you. But a number of tools on the market can facilitate your efforts to identify and research funders and make tracking your results more manageable.

For example, online search databases are essential to help you find new potential grants quickly by listing local and national foundations sorted by interest area, saving you time that would otherwise be spent poring over catalogs and directories. Some Web-based services can also help you locate the people in your area who are likely to make major contributions to your organization.

Foundation Grant Research

At its most basic, grant prospect research essentially consists of two major practices: researching various foundations’ grant cycles and giving histories, and managing your organization’s applications for each foundation. The former is an exercise in Web research—identifying a list of foundations that might give to your organization and locating them online to identify the types of organizations they’ve funded in the past, and with what size grants—and the latter is a matter of tracking and managing data.

Grant Research Tools

When looking up giving histories and grant cycles, websites like the Foundation Center’s Foundation Directory Online  database or  GrantStation  are invaluable. They allow you to search very detailed records of foundations by a variety of criteria, including past grants, focus areas, and giving interests. For example, an animal rescue shelter might identify a list of foundations dedicated to animal welfare or with a history of funding other shelters and animal rescue groups. You can access the Foundation Center database online with a monthly subscription ; the basic package starts around $20 a month, and full access costs around $180 monthly. GrantStation has a yearly subscription for $699, but may also be available at substantial discount through your state association.  GrantStation is also available through TechSoup’s product catalog  for qualified nonprofits and libraries. Alternatively, many regional or local philanthropy centers offer access as a benefit of membership, or free on location in their “grant research libraries.”

In addition, regional associations of grantmakers can be valuable sources of information (visit the Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers  for a full list). Most grantmaker associations, also known as philanthropy centers, will house a publicly available list of foundations specific to a geographic area. Some are print-only, but a number offer online databases as well. You can also find associations of grantmakers centered on a mission area, such as  Grantmakers in Film and Electronic Media , or by other criteria, like the  Association of Small Foundations . Searching member lists for these associations may help identify potential grant prospects.

Federal grants are another key source of funding for many organizations. While you won’t find these grants in private and corporate foundation databases, you can search for U.S. federal grant opportunities at  Grants.gov . State and local grant listings can most often be found on your municipality’s website. A basic Web search is also a great way to find out what grants nonprofits similar to your own have received, and that your organization may qualify for. Many nonprofits list foundation funders on their websites or in annual reports.

Once you’ve identified a list of foundations, you’ll need to determine their giving histories and grant capacities. Tax records are an important source of information on past grantees, overall budget, granting capacity, and the value of past grants. You’ll likely find a lot of this information through the Foundation Center database, but you may also need to search in other places to find everything you’re looking for.  GuideStar  lets you search a database that contains more than 5 million IRS Forms 990—the form the government uses to track financial information about organizations. A number of helpful sites can show you how to find the relevant data in a 990 form, including the  Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York  and this  archived article  at BusinessJournalism.org.

Tools for Managing the Grants Cycle

As you begin to gather information about prospective funders, you’ll need a place to store it. Smaller organizations with limited budgets and nonprofits just starting their grant research may find spreadsheet applications like  Microsoft Excel  or  Google Drive  to be terrific low-budget options for managing foundation prospect lists. If you choose to go this route, create columns to track such information as foundation names, website links, giving interests, and potential giving capacities, as well as dates of RFPs (requests for proposals) and their due dates. If your organization’s internal deadline for proposals is different from the foundation’s deadline, be sure to record both dates.

Most donor management databases, like any of those listed in Idealware’s  Consumers Guide to Donor Management Systems , let you manage your list of foundations just like any other giving prospects, and can track the RFP and proposal dates, the status of your proposals, and your proposal workflows.

In addition, it can be useful to supplement your deadline- and submission-date records with calendaring or task-management software that can function as a to-do list to ensure you don’t miss any deadlines.

Individual Prospect Research

Major gift prospects—typically wealthy individuals in either your geographic area or the community associated with your issue who have the capacity and interest in donating to your organization—can be as valuable to your organization as foundations.

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Before you can start your research, you’ll need to create a list of current and potential donors.

  • Start with your list of current donors. Who has been a good donor in the past? You may find through your research that these people have greater giving capacity than you expected.
  • Ask your board members and other supporters to recommend people for the list.
  • Identify a few key people in your community who aren’t currently on your list but are known to donate to other organizations.

While technology can help you better understand the giving potential of these donors, it can’t help you create this list.

Once you have your prospect list, you’ll need to create a profile for your potential donors that includes their contact and giving information, as well as their financial capacity. Much of this information can be found for free in public records like tax documents, property values, board affiliations, and publicly held stock portfolios. Depending on the size of your prospect list and your staff time capacity, it can be feasible to manually search for these records. Many documents, such as property value records from the assessor’s office, may require you to request this information in person; this is usually free, though there may be a small fee for photocopies. (Some high-level donors may own property in multiple states or municipalities, posing more of a record-gathering challenge.)

Wealth-Screening Services

Rather than searching manually, you could use a wealth-screening database to save staff time, which to many nonprofits is more valuable than the cost of one of these Web-based services—especially for a longer list of donors. Four of the most widely-used wealth-screening databases are  Donor Search ,  WealthEngine ,  LexisNexis Development Professionals , and  Blackbaud’s Target Analytics .

All four allow you to upload a list of potential donors in order to approximate their individual giving potential. This is similar to the process you would use to research individual prospects yourself. These services just pull information from the databases and public records to which you have access. The difference is the staff time you save by being able to run a list of thousands of names at once instead of manually searching one by one, as well as a honed ability to know where to look for detailed information.

While all of these tools tend to be expensive (prices are available only through a quote from the vendors), WealthEngine and LexisNexis cost more than DonorSearch or Target Analytics. Since they usually run on a subscription basis, you can either run large lists all at once, or smaller donor lists as needed. Many of these services will also filter your prospect list to identify the most likely donors, such as your top one percent or top one hundred prospects. Because the information used to create these donor profiles comes from public records, these services tend to use the same sources with minor variations among them. When choosing a tool, it can be helpful to arrange a trial list from the ones you’re considering by using a few names you already have up-to-date profiles on to judge the accuracy of the tools.

Now That You Have Your List…

As with foundation research, you’ll need a place to record and manage your individual prospects. This should be done using a donor management database, which will let you track each prospect and their giving histories, asset pools, giving interests, and the likelihood that they will give again. Many donor databases can also manage pledges and scheduled or recurring gifts, allowing you to keep track of large gifts spread out over a period of months or years—which can be an important source of reliable funding.

Once you’ve compiled a list of feasible prospects and put them through wealth screening, it’s time to start appending the records already in your database. If you’ve used a wealth-screening tool, you’ll find that some of them—WealthEngine or Blackbaud’s Target Analytics, for example—will integrate with your existing donor database or CRM, while others will require you to import the list manually. You also should check over the profiles you get back from these tools—to make sure, for instance, that the John Smith they’ve highlighted as your most likely prospect is the John Smith you think it is—before you import the list wholesale into your system.

It’s important to remember that these prospects are a starting point for cultivating new, high-value donors, not a piggy bank. If you don’t already have a relationship with your top potential donors, find a way to introduce your organization and take the time to build a relationship before soliciting thousands of dollars from them. You also may find from your research that your current long-term donors have greater capacity than you expected. Because you already have a relationship with them, you can consider asking them to increase their contributions.

As you can see, the technology exists to help you find available grants and track their grant cycle, but there still isn’t software to replace the human element—say, to write your proposals for you. And it’s the same with your individual prospects. Wealth-screening services can quickly track down information for your list that would take hours and hours of staff time, but they can’t sit down with each prospect and build a relationship. It’s still essential to have a seasoned fundraiser with the knowledge and capabilities to write good proposals and/or wine and dine potential donors. It’s a good idea to use the high-tech databases and wealth-screening services to help you find the door, but it’s still your job to get your foot in it.

This article was first published by TechSoup, who provided financial support for its creation. The author would like to thank the following nonprofit technology professionals for providing recommendations, advice, and other help: Robert Weiner ; Erin Baltes,  Thomas College ; Carolyn Appleton , Independent Nonprofit Fundraising Executive; Laura Jansen,  Pierce Family Foundation .

Copyright © 2014 TechSoup Global. This work is published under a  Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License .

About the author

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Kyle H. Andrei is a research associate for Idealware, a nonprofit that provides thoroughly researched, impartial, and accessible resources about software to help other nonprofits make smart decisions. Visit www.idealware.org to find dozens of free articles, reports, and trainings about technology topics of interest to nonprofits.

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One way to identify the types of grants for which you are eligible to apply is by choosing your career path . NIH has programs to support stages from undergraduate to established investigator.

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Funding opportunities are located throughout the DBRW website. The ones below represent just a snapshot of opportunities that are specific to the promotion, advancement, and retention of women in biomedical research careers. You are encouraged to contact your Institute or Center (IC) to find information on current opportunities.

NIH provides programs to investigators at various stages and backgrounds to assist in the support of a research project, as well as mentoring and training aimed at advancing the diversity and preparedness of the biomedical research workforce. NIH supplements are awarded to existing grants and serve different purposes.

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More established investigators looking to develop programs that pay it forward and provide training and career opportunities, NIH has myriad Research Education Program (R25) grants—which support research education activities that complement or enhance the training of early-stage investigators—such as:

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There are also funding opportunities that are designed to protect and retain women in biomedical careers.

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Lastly, NIH provides other institutional opportunities to connect well-established investigators with earlier-stage investigators with shared research interests for additional mentoring, training, and career development opportunities.

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Sponsors (including federal, state, foundation, nonprofit, and industry) sometimes limit the number of nominations or proposals (or concept papers, pre-proposals, letters of intent, etc.) that an organization may submit to a particular program/funding opportunity. This information can usually be found in the "Eligibility" section of a funding opportunity announcement.

"Limited submission" opportunities must undergo an internal selection process, which is overseen by the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation (OVPRI) and managed by the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research Development (OSP).

It is necessary to manage limited submission opportunities for several reasons, including: some sponsors will decline without review all Cornell submissions if they receive submissions in excess of the limit.

Note: Some solicitations/programs may also limit an organization's participation as a partner or subawardee in a proposal. For example, the National Science Foundation has several limited submission funding opportunities in which serving as a subawardee in another organization's proposal counts against Cornell's submission limit.

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Tips for preparing competitive applications for internal competitions

  • Read the solicitation and research the sponsor. What is the sponsor's mission? What and who does it aim to fund? Make sure you are eligible to be considered. Align your proposal with the program goals and priorities. Don't simply recycle internal proposals from different competitions - be  thoughtful and specific to the funding opportunity.
  • The internal proposal should be accessible to a broad scientific audience. Members of the internal review panel will have differing levels of familiarity with your specific area of research. Define significant technical terms and avoid using "jargon." Clearly state the problem/need that your proposed project will address. Clearly describe the project objectives, methods, innovation, and impact. Clearly describe the "big picture." If you succeed, what difference will it make? What will be the impact?
  • Read and adhere to all the internal submission requirements, including content and page limits. Proofread and check for typos.
  • If a letter of nomination is required for the internal submission, it should be specific to the funding opportunity/program.

The Cornell Research Advisory Committee (RAC) has developed recommendations for Chairs writing nomination letters for internal competitions for external funding. These can be downloaded as a pdf file:  Tips for writing letters of nominations  (a Cornell netID login is required for access).

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For most limited submissions, prospective applicants/nominees must first apply to an internal competition. Each internal competition call includes a submission deadline, summary of the opportunity, link and/or pdf file for the sponsor's program guidelines, and a list of materials required for the internal review process.

  • Applicants typically must provide a list of all Key Personnel, a 2-3 page project description, and a biosketch/CV for the lead PI. Some competitions require additional materials, such as a letter of nomination from a Department Chair or an estimated budget outline. Internal application requirements vary depending on the program.
  • Unless otherwise noted in an internal competition call, applications must be submitted via  Cornell's web-based internal competition platform (InfoReady). First-time users will need to log-in to set-up an InfoReady account before submitting their first application to the system.
  • It is the PI's responsibility to ensure they meet a sponsor's guidelines and eligibility requirements, and follow the internal submission instructions and submit by the specified due date. Requests for deadline extensions for internal competitions are rarely granted.

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  • For competitions for STEM opportunities, the Faculty Senate's Research Advisory Committee (RAC)  reviews internal applications. The RAC selects to move forward the submission(s) that has the best opportunity for success based on its responsiveness to the sponsor's program objectives and selection criteria, and scientific and scholarly strength.
  • For competitions for Humanities and Social Sciences, ad hoc review panels are convened.
  • For opportunities where the submission limit is on the number of applicants per individual department (e.g., Sloan Research Fellowships), the internal selection is coordinated by departments or colleges rather than OSP. This information is included in the announcements that are disseminated to campus.

"Shortfuse" Limited Submissions and Expedited Reviews

While we strive to provide ample preparation time to applicants for internal competitions, sometimes a sponsor’s proposal submission timeline necessitates a short internal timeline. For these "short fuse" opportunities there is expedited internal review and selection process wherein prospective applicants have a very short time (usually 3 to 7 days) to submit an internal Letter of Interest or similar. The internal call for a "short fuse" limited submission will provide specific instructions. In some rare circumstances, a sponsor's timeline may be so short that it precludes an internal review altogether, and an applicant may be approved to submit to the sponsor on a "first come, first serve" basis.

Unless otherwise stated in an internal call, internal application materials must be submitted by 5:00 PM ET on the noted due date. If you experience technical issues with InfoReady, please email Limited Submissions immediately,  during regular business hours, and with your application materials attached.  We strongly recommend that applicants login and submit early!

After Internal Review and Selection

  • Applicants are promptly notified of the internal review outcome. 
  • The selected candidate works with their unit research administrator(s) and assigned Grant & Contract Officer (GCO) to prepare and submit a full proposal (or concept paper, nomination packet, etc.) to the sponsor, according to each sponsor's specific instructions and guidelines. Note: Materials submitted for the internal review/selection process are usually not the same as what a funder requires.

Where do I find information about limited submissions and Cornell's internal competitions?

Internal competitions for limited submissions are regularly announced via a weekly digest email, on this website, and on Cornell's web-based internal competition platform . Other limited submission opportunities (e.g., calls for "short fuse" limited submissions) are announced in the weekly digest and on this website, but are not typically listed on InfoReady.

To receive timely communications about limited submission opportunities, subscribe to the CU-RES-ADMIN-L listserv here . 

I want to resubmit to a sponsor's limited submission funding opportunity. Do I need to get approval from Cornell to do so?

If you submitted to a sponsor's previous cycle for a limited submission program but were declined funding and would like to resubmit, you must contact OVPRI Limited Submissions before reapplying.

Resubmissions almost always count against Cornell's submission limit. Even if a funder's program officer encourages you to resubmit, you must get approval from Cornell before doing so. If there is an active internal competition for the funder's current submission cycle, you will need to participate in the internal competition.

The internal submission deadline has passed and I'm interested in applying to the funding opportunity. Who should I contact?

If you missed an internal submission deadline, you are welcome to contact Limited Submissions to learn if the opportunity is still "open" (i.e., if there are application slots available). If the submission slot(s) was not already filled, you may still be able to apply to the funding opportunity. In these situations, approvals to submit to the funder are typically granted on a first-come, first-served basis.

What should I do if I was selected to be a Cornell candidate but decide not to submit?

If a selected candidate decides not to submit to the sponsor, they must notify OVPRI Limited Submissions as soon as possible. Internal competitions are highly competitive and, where possible, we want to allow another applicant to be selected to submit.

What should I do if a limited submission opportunity is not posted here or to the Cornell InfoReady website?

If faculty, students, or staff become aware of a limited submission opportunity that is not currently listed on this webpage or the Cornell InfoReady website , they should notify Limited Submissions before anything is submitted to the sponsor. 

We do our best to identify and announce limited submission opportunities, but cannot guarantee that we find them all.  If there is any question about submission limits for a solicitation, please contact us.

Where can I get help using the InfoReady competition platform?

Email Cornell Limited Submissions if you need help or experience technical issues with the InfoReady application platform.

We strongly recommend logging into the system early so any potential technical issues can be addressed before the submission deadline.  If you have technical issues when submitting your application, reach out to us immediately and during regular business hours with your application materials attached.

I am an investigator from Weill Cornell Medicine. How do I apply to limited submission competitions?

Weill Cornell Medicine has its own internal competitions for limited submission funding opportunities. If you are an investigator from WCM, contact Florencia Marcucci in the Office of the Research Dean. Do not apply to competitions listed on this website or InfoReady.

Recurring Programs List

Downloadable list of recurring limited submission programs .

Announcements (updated May 8, 2024)

  • DOC National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) CHIPS Digital Twin Manufacturing USA Institute (2024-NIST-CHIPS-MFGUSA-01) : Senior leadership is coordinating Cornell's participation in this funding opportunity. The previously announced expedited internal competition has been closed.
  • USDA NIFA FY24 Research Facilities Act Program (USDA-NIFA-OP-01055) : Institutions may submit one application, and a Cornell application is being prepared. There will not be an internal competition.
  • NSF Innovation Corps Hubs Program (I-Corps Hubs) NSF 24-532 : Cornell is not eligible to participate as a partner or subawardee in another institution's I-Corps Hub proposal.
  • NIH Limited Competition: Basic Instrumentation Grant (BIG) Program (S10 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) PAR-22-081 : Due to NIH restrictions on S10 awards, Cornell is not eligible to apply for the June 2024 submission cycle under this solicitation.

Current Internal Competitions

Unless otherwise noted in a competition announcement, internal applications are due at 5:00pm on the deadline..

Note to Weill Cornell Medicine investigators: If you are interested in a limited submission funding opportunity, please contact Florencia Marcucci,  [email protected] , in the WCM Office of the Research Dean. WCM has separate internal competitions.

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Early career faculty research funding, cornell university research excellence scholars (cures), pi research assistance while postdocs and research associates are on parental leave, pre-award research operations (pro), additional things to consider when preparing a proposal, find my gco (grant & contract officer), sample proposal library.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Non-Academic Research Internships for Graduate Students in Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies (Hydrogen INTERN) Supplemental Funding Opportunity

May 6, 2024

Dear Colleague:

Fostering the growth of a globally competitive and diverse research workforce and advancing the scientific and innovation skills of U.S. students are strategic objectives of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Supporting the development of a skilled workforce in energy efficiency and renewable energy is a strategic objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NSF and DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) have established a partnership to support internship and training opportunities to meet these strategic objectives with a focus on hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. A new generation of skilled workforce is needed to drive research and development of hydrogen production, delivery, infrastructure, storage, fuel cells, and multiple end uses across transportation, industrial, and stationary power applications. For more information on DOE-EERE's priorities for hydrogen energy research, please see the DOE's Hydrogen Program Areas and the U.S. National Clean Hydrogen Strategy Roadmap .

This Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) describes this unique partnership with DOE EERE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (HFTO) and is aligned with and conforms with the NSF INTERN opportunity described in the Dear Colleague Letter: Non-Academic Research Internships for Graduate Students (INTERN) Supplemental Funding Opportunity . This DCL is referred to as the Hydrogen INTERN DCL.

SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

NSF will consider supplemental funding requests in the broad area of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies that enable PIs (or Co-PIs) to request supplemental support of up to $55,000 and six months for graduate students supported on active NSF grants with the following goals:

  • To provide graduate students with the opportunity to augment their research assistantships or NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) fellowships with research internship activities and training opportunities that will complement their academic research training.
  • To allow graduate students to pursue new activities aimed at acquiring professional development experience that will enhance their preparation for multiple career pathways after graduation.
  • To encourage the participation of the full spectrum of diverse talent in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITIES SUPPORTED

The PI/co-PI of an active NSF award may request supplemental funding for one or more graduate students to gain knowledge, skills, training, and experiences in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and their application areas.

Internship hosts include, but are not limited to:

  • Private sector companies, laboratories, or industry research and development groups.
  • Start-up businesses such as, but not limited to, those funded through the NSF's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs.
  • Department of Energy Laboratories, other government agencies (all levels), and National Laboratories.
  • Museums, science centers, and other informal learning settings that educate the public.
  • Policy think-tanks.
  • Non-profit organizations.

Prior to submission, PIs are encouraged to discuss possible INTERN supplements with the cognizant NSF Program Director Points of Contact listed in this DCL to ensure the proposed internship and its topic are a good fit for this DCL. It is expected that the graduate student and the PI on the NSF grant will work together to identify experiences that add the most educational value for the graduate student through activities that are not already available at the student's academic institution. Further, it is expected that the internship will be research-focused and will be on-site at the host organization unless a specific exception to this is granted by the cognizant Program Director due to extenuating circumstances.

ELIGIBILITY

To be eligible for this opportunity, graduate students must have completed at least one academic year in their graduate program (master's or doctoral) prior to commencement of the proposed INTERN activity and be making satisfactory progress toward completion of their degree.

SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING REQUEST PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS

Information about requesting supplemental support is contained in the NSF PAPPG ), Chapter VI.E.5. In addition to the PAPPG requirements for supplemental support, the following materials must be included.

  • A two-page summary that describes the internship
  • A one-page personal statement from the graduate student describing career goals, accomplishments, and how the activity will better prepare the individual to enter the workforce.
  • Research summary to include contribution(s) to research discipline
  • Institution(s)
  • Year of study (1st year, 2nd year, etc.)
  • Completed coursework
  • Employment and volunteer/outreach history
  • Publications (accepted only)
  • Other information relevant to the proposed internship
  • A letter of collaboration from an authorized official at the host organization that describes the internship opportunity and mentoring the student will experience during the internship. The letter should include a statement confirming that neither the graduate student nor the PI has a financial interest in the organization hosting the internship.
  • An endorsement letter from the PI that confirms that the student meets the eligibility requirements specified in this DCL. The letter must describe how the proposed internship activity will contribute to the student's graduate education experience and how it may impact time to degree.
  • The NSF recipient and Host Organization must agree in advance as to how intellectual property (IP) rights will be handled. A signed agreement on IP (including publication and patent rights) must be submitted either as a supplementary document or, via email to the cognizant Program Director after submission of the supplementary funding request and prior to the award of the supplemental funding. NSF is responsible neither for the agreement reached nor the IP information exchanged between the NSF recipient and Host Organization.
  • A budget and budget justification.

SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING AMOUNT

The total amount of funding requested must not exceed $55,000 per student per six-month period. NSF plans to fund up to approximately 10 or more supplements in each fiscal year starting with FY 2024, depending on availability of funds.

ALLOWABLE COSTS UNDER THIS DCL

Funds may be used to support travel, tuition and fees, health insurance, additional stipend, and temporary relocation costs for the graduate student. Additional stipends are not allowed for GRFP fellows "on tenure" (currently receiving a GRFP stipend), but a stipend will be considered for fellows "on reserve" (not currently receiving a GRFP stipend) equal to the monthly rate of the GRFP stipend. Up to $2,500 may be used for the PI or the graduate research fellow's advisor to travel to work with the host organization in co-mentoring the student during the internship. Up to $2,500 may be used for materials and supplies to support the student during the internship. Travel costs must be allocated in the budget request for the graduate student to travel once to Washington DC, to present the outcomes of the INTERN project at the DOE's Annual Merit Review meeting. The recipient is permitted to request indirect costs in accordance with their approved/negotiated indirect cost rate. The total requested budget cannot exceed the limits listed under the "Supplement funding amount" section above. Note: Spousal and dependent travel are not supported.

PERIOD OF SUPPORT

The supplement funding will provide up to six months of support for an internship. Up to two supplemental funding requests may be submitted on a grant per student. This would allow the student up to two internship periods of up to six months each (i.e., a maximum of 12 months per student).

Supplemental funding requests may be submitted at any time with a target date of June 15 for Fiscal Year 2024 and April 15 for future Fiscal Years.

SUBMISSION & REVIEW

Requests for supplemental funding must be submitted electronically via Research.gov. A PI or co-PI on an NSF award must contact his/her cognizant program director prior to submission. GRFP INTERN supplement requests are submitted by the GRFP PI, not by the GRFP fellow or the fellow's research advisor. Requests for supplemental funding submitted in response to this DCL will be reviewed internally by NSF Program Officers. All supplements are subject to (a) the availability of funds, and (b) merit review of the supplemental funding request.

SPECIAL AWARD CONDITION

Intellectual Property Rights: Internships under this DCL are considered equivalent to traineeships. The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or writings that might result from its traineeship awards. However, trainees should be aware that NSF, another Federal agency, or some private party may acquire such rights through other support for particular research. Also, trainees should note their obligation to include an Acknowledgment and Disclaimer in any publication.

POLICY OR CODE ADDRESSING HARASSMENT

Recipients are required to have a policy or code of conduct that addresses sexual harassment, other forms of harassment, and sexual assault. The recipient should work with the Host Organization to ensure that the Host Organization also has a policy or code of conduct that addresses sexual harassment, other forms of harassment, and sexual assault including reporting and complaint procedures and to confirm that such policy both covers and protects INTERN students interacting with the Host Organization. The recipient should also coordinate with the Host Organization to provide orientation to graduate students to cover expectations of behavior to ensure a safe and respectful environment, and to review the recipient and host organization's policy or code of conduct addressing sexual harassment, other forms of harassment, and sexual assault, including reporting and complaint procedures. For additional information, see the NSF policies at https://new.nsf.gov/stopping-harassment .

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how to find research grant opportunities

Introducing Mission: a pilot responsive mode funding opportunity

how to find research grant opportunities

Director of Research, Strategy and Innovation, Arts and Humanities Research Council

how to find research grant opportunities

Associate Pro-Vice-Chancellor for the Research Environment and Postgraduate Research, University of Liverpool

As part of our responsive mode transformation, we’re piloting a new responsive mode funding opportunity with a transformative team approach at its heart.

Looking to the future

Here at the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), we’re always thinking about the future. It underpins everything from our funding opportunities to strategic thinking on long-term trends, challenges and opportunities for our sector. It is driven by the central theme that the arts and humanities help us understand who we are as humans and the world around us.

We know we’re not alone in this. Each year we fund hundreds of exciting projects, of all shapes and sizes, covering an array of disciplines, topics and approaches. The golden thread running through all of them is the desire to move the arts and humanities forward. These projects innovate, expand our horizons, deepen our knowledge and develop our people.

Responsive mode changes

Creating the right conditions for forward-thinking applications has been a key focus for us, particularly in the context of the recent changes we’ve made to our responsive mode offer. A year ago, I wrote a blog introducing two new funding opportunities, Curiosity and Catalyst . Today, I’m pleased to be introducing another.

Mission is a pilot large grants funding opportunity. It aims to transform arts and humanities research agendas, research leadership and research teams, at scale, through a pilot approach to team convening.

To bring Mission to life, we’ve partnered with the Thrive project and I’m delighted to be sharing the rest of this blog with Professor Georgina Endfield, who is leading the project. We want to share a little more about Thrive and about Mission, as we ask our community to join us in exploring our new approach.

What is Thrive?

Thrive is a two-year project funded through the Research England Development Fund. The project is led by the University of Liverpool and is being run in partnership with AHRC and Advance HE. Our key goal is to define and develop an approach for team-based research.

The foundation for the work is the drive for more inclusive team-led research approaches across the sector. It’ll build on existing ‘team science’ and radical collaboration approaches, and the ambition is to provide an alternative to the traditional principal investigator-led model.

One of our core aims has been to identify the steps that need to be taken to increase the diversity of leadership voices in research, including technical and professional services colleagues, early and mid-career academics and under-represented groups. This is with a view to exploring how the combination of whole team expertise might lead to better research, while fostering a more positive research culture.

A team-convening approach

The Thrive project seeks to better understand what changes may be needed to existing systems and processes to support this approach. Since autumn 2023, we’ve carried out broad engagement through a series of workshops and events to gain insights and feedback from a range of stakeholders across the sector on the challenges and opportunities presented by team-led working.

These findings have helped to shape a team-convening approach that enables a shift in emphasis away from the traditional principal investigator-led model of research to a more inclusive, teams-led approach. Many of our stakeholders from across the research community were on board from the beginning and attended multiple engagement sessions. Their invaluable input helped to develop and refine the approach and its principles at each stage.

Team convening is underpinned by five key principles for teams to follow:

  • emphasising and enabling collective capability
  • shared leadership
  • inclusive governance
  • team development
  • reflexive practice

What is Mission?

Mission provides us with an opportunity to match the team-convening approach the Thrive project has co-developed with a real funding opportunity.

It furthers our commitment to inclusion and to taking a people-centred approach that broadens the diversity of whom and what we fund. This has underpinned our approach to all our new responsive mode funding opportunities.

It will fund team-led projects between £2,000,000 and £3,000,000 for up to four years.

What we’re looking for

We’re looking for bold, impactful projects that convene expertise from across the research ecosystem to advance ambitious arts and humanities led research agendas. We want these projects to come from inclusive and collaborative teams with diverse membership, great ideas and a real desire to meaningfully explore and engage with the team-convening approach.

Consistent with our wider approach to responsive mode opportunities, we’re looking to applicants to tell us what you need. We want applicants to define the research agenda that they will advance, the team that’ll be brought together and why they need a Mission award.

We anticipate making two to three awards. We will be adopting a two-stage approach to assessment. To start with we will only be asking for outline applications with no financial information required. We’re looking for genuine outline applications that demonstrate potential and engagement with the approach but may not have all the answers at this stage. Following this outline stage, applications shortlisted by assessment will be invited to submit a full stage application. At that point, there will be support to enable applicants to develop the next level of detail.

Taking a pilot approach

We want to be bold and ambitious; Mission will require us all to work in new ways. It’s the largest amount of funding we’ve offered through our responsive mode opportunities. We’re encouraging you to work in ways that might feel very new and different. There are system, process, policy and assessment challenges that we are working through and will need to continue to explore as the opportunity develops.

We’re therefore taking a pilot approach with the aim of learning as we go and then taking those insights, understanding what went well and what went less well for all of us, and using that information to inform our next steps.

AHRC partnered with Thrive because we want to understand the challenges and opportunities of working with a team-convening approach through a tangible funding opportunity. Through the process of exploration, we hope we can set a course for the future of not only the arts and humanities, but also the way research is done across the wider research and innovation sector.

Mission will go live on the UK Research and Innovation funding finder in the week commencing 13 May 2024. If you’d like to find out more, we’re also offering online applicant webinars on the following dates:

Webinar one: 23 May 2024 at 11:00am to 12:00pm UK time

Register for the webinar on 23 May

Webinar two: 30 May 2024 at 12:00pm to 1:00pm UK time

Register for the webinar on 30 May

Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about how to join the webinar via Zoom.

Top image:  Credit: Andy Hermawan on Unsplash

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The Innovator’s Quarterly: Handheld Skin Cancer Evaluation Tool Based on BU Research Receives FDA Clearance

April 2024 | news from bu industry engagement and technology development.

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In this issue…

  • A product from DermaSensor Inc., based on technology for skin cancer detection developed by BU spectroscopy researcher Irving Bigio, recently received FDA clearance .
  • BU engineers Ji-Xin Cheng and Selim Ünlü are developing breakthrough microscopy technologies to help scientists visualize their samples more accurately, with two provisional patents filed and two companies interested in commercialization to date.
  • Speaking of microscopes, BU engineer Lei Tian is attracting funding from foundations and industry partners to develop petite, lightweight microscope designs empowered by special miniaturized lenses that enable powerful imaging despite their compact size.
  • The Amazon Research Awards program seeks to fund machine learning research related to information security. Applications are due by Tuesday, May 7.
  • On Tuesday, May 7, the BU community is invited to the presentation of the BU Innovator of the Year Award to Dr. Thomas Bifano, professor of mechanical engineering and director of the BU Photonics Center.

Handheld Skin Cancer Evaluation Tool Based on BU Research Receives FDA Clearance

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Photo courtesy of DermaSensor

BU Inventor Lei Tian Combines Cutting-Edge Microscopes with Deep Learning Algorithms

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Photo by Kelly Pena

BU Engineers Make Significant Advancements in the Field of Vibrational Imaging

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Photo by Logan Moreno Gutierrez on Unsplash

Boston University Ignition Awards Accelerate Promising, Commercially Viable Research

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Photo by Adele Bertschy

Funding Opportunity

Ai for information security call for proposals.

The Amazon Research Awards program seeks to fund machine learning research related to information security on the following topics:

  • Threat, intrusion, and anomaly detection for cloud security
  • Generative AI and foundation models for information security
  • Graph modeling and anomaly detection on graphs
  • Learning with limited/noisy labels and weakly supervised learning
  • ML for malware analysis and detection
  • Finding security vulnerabilities using ML
  • Causal inference for information security
  • Zero/one-shot learning for information security
  • Reinforcement learning for information security
  • Protecting and preserving data privacy in the cloud
  • Securing generative AI and foundation models

Mark Your Calendar

On tuesday, may 7, join us for talks from bu innovators and presentation of the 2023 innovator of the year award.

how to find research grant opportunities

Take Action

Expert advice, programs, and resources to support research collaboration and commercialization at bu.

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Patents, Licensing, and Starting a Company

The BU Technology Development website is your portal for one-on-one support, resources, and mentorship to help launch your commercialization efforts, from guidance on pitching your idea to investors to applying for a Small Business Innovation Research grant.

Support for Engaging with Industry

Industry Engagement offers individualized consultation and assistance to BU researchers interested in partnering with industry to advance their research and deepen their impact, as well as dynamic, curated lists of external industry funding opportunities , powered by Pivot-RP.

Meet the Team

We can help advance your goals. get to know a few of our experts below or contact us to get started..

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TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

Nevena dimova, director, life sciences business development.

What I do: I help faculty identify what aspects of their ideas are patentable so they can advance their research to market.

Ask me about: Baking, my European origins, and help with patents and licensing.

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Mark simes, director, life sciences.

What I do: I work closely with researchers in the life sciences, across all campuses, to help identify and develop collaborative relationships with industry partners in their mutual areas of interest.

Ask me about: Skiing, the Boston dining scene, and opportunities for collaborating with industry in the life sciences.

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Limited Submission Opportunity: V Foundation 2024 V Scholar Cancer Research Grant

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May 8, 2024, 1:12 PM

Applications due May 15

This is a joint competition for VU and VUMC investigators. All investigators should follow these instructions .

Vanderbilt (VU and VUMC, collaboratively) may nominate up to two candidates for the V Foundation V Scholar Award program.

The V Foundation aims to “achieve victory over cancer” in part by funding cancer research grants. The V Scholar Award supports early career faculty in cancer research by funding either laboratory-based fundamental research or translational research projects.

This call is specifically for adult cancer research. Research on ANY adult cancer type will be funded in this call. This year the V Foundation has a special interest and funding for colorectal cancer and welcomes proposals in this area, but this is not required. Areas not included in this scope are epidemiology, behavioral science and health services research. The foundation especially encourages applications from minority racial or ethnic groups underrepresented in science, including Blacks or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos (non-European), American Indians, Alaskan Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders.

This $600,000 grant is paid in three annual installments of $200,000 and does not cover indirect costs .

Eligibility

This call for applications is specifically for adult cancer research focused on laboratory-based fundamental research or translational research.  Additionally, by May 29 , 2024, all of the following must apply:

  • Have been appointed to their first full-time, tenure-track, assistant professor position within the last 5 years , and not yet been promoted to associate professor.
  • Clinical scientists are eligible if their Department can demonstrate that it will fully support the research applicant (e.g., dedicated lab space, start-up funds, dedicated research time).
  • Applicants must have at least 2 years post-doctoral (MD or PhD) fellowship training. For MDs, a minimum of one year is acceptable if only one year is required for the specialty.
  • Applicants must be either US Citizens or permanent legal residents in the US.
  • have accepted or received notification of an R01 award by the nomination due date.
  • have accepted or received award notification of any peer-reviewed, non-mentored single grant that totals or exceeds $750K in total direct funding at any point in their professional career. This calculation should exclude indirect costs.
  • NOTE: The V Scholar award is intended to support research to leverage these larger awards; so, the nominee should not have already received such awards.

View the 2024 V Scholar Eligibility: Are They Eligible handout for additional guidance.

Internal Application Process

Anyone interested in being considered as Vanderbilt’s nominee must submit the following (in a single PDF) to [email protected] by 5 p.m. on May 15, 2024.

  • Brief (2 page maximum) research plan including summary budget;
  • Consult [email protected] for further guidance.
  • If the nature of the research is bench to bedside with patient contact, briefly describe how patient advocacy/communication will be incorporated into your training.
  • If the nature of the research is basic and/or translational science, briefly describe how will science communication with diverse audiences be incorporated into your training.
  • NIH Biosketch or 5-page CV;
  • Please fill out the Grant Awards table and any “Notes and Remarks.”
  • Other information and signatures not required for the internal selection process.

Submissions should reference “2024 V Scholar Award” in the subject line of the email.  Note that the selected candidate will need to prepare a brief nomination form and draft a VICC Director letter of recommendation by May 22.

Please contact us at [email protected] if you have any questions about the program, foundation, or internal review process.

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Limited Submission Opportunity: 2024 V Foundation Pediatric Cancer Research Awards

Limited Submission Opportunity: 2024 V Foundation Pediatric Cancer Research Awards

Limited Submission Opportunity: 2024 V Foundation Women Scientists Innovation Award for Cancer Research

Limited Submission Opportunity: 2024 V Foundation Women Scientists Innovation Award for Cancer Research

Limited Submission Opportunity: 2024 Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation Grants

Limited Submission Opportunity: 2024 Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation Grants

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How to Write an RFP for Grants – Everything You Need to Know

Kasia Kowalska

Updated: May 09, 2024

Published: May 08, 2024

Beth Goldowitz, who’s been managing nonprofit organizations for the past 20 years, says that when “managed correctly, grants can keep organizations afloat. They’re stable and predictable, a revenue stream that the organization can count on for the duration of a contract.”

rpf grant preparation

But do you know how long it takes to write a single grant application?

Over 30 hours, and considering that grant writers usually get paid between $25 and $100 per hour, depending on their experience, it’s a significant cost. That’s why it’s so important for nonprofits to decide which grants to pick.

Your organization can make it much easier for applicants to assess if they’re the right fit for your project. It all comes down to getting your RFP for grants right, including adding the right sections and asking the right questions.

Before I dive deeper into the subject, let’s answer the question: what is an RFP for grants?

What is an RFP for grants?

The challenges of writing an rfp for grants, the anatomy of an rfp for grants, how to write an rfp for grants, best practices for writing an rfp for grants, rfp for grants resources.

Download Now: Free RFP Templates

An RFP for grants, or Request for Proposals, is a document issued by grantors such as foundations and government agencies encouraging nonprofit organizations to submit proposals for funding.

Essentially, RFPs offer nonprofits an opportunity to secure funding for various initiatives, irrespective of whether they relate to education, healthcare, or environmental causes.

Each RFP is tailored to achieve a specific goal, so submitted proposals must be in line with the objectives outlined in the RFP.

how to find research grant opportunities

Free RFP Templates

Fill out the form to get these templates.

  • One-Pager RFP
  • Longer In-Depth RFP
  • Designed PDF RFP

You're all set!

Click this link to access this resource at any time.

I have spoken to a few people working at nonprofits to find out what challenges they came across, either while creating their own RFPs or preparing RFP proposals. Here are the most common obstacles.

Lack of Sufficient Information About the Procurement Process

The quality of your procurement process will impact the quality of the applications you receive. If you don’t share enough information about it, like the timeline, budget, selection criteria, etc., then two things might happen:

  • You will receive applications that aren’t the right fit for the project.
  • A lot of applicants who are the right fit won’t take part in the process as they’ll feel discouraged by the lack of clarity.

The more detailed and logical your procurement process is, the higher the chances of receiving high-quality proposals.

RFP Grants Failing to Communicate the Vision Clearly

This is an RFP grant challenge that has come up the most frequently.

Gauri Manglik, CEO and co-founder of Instrumentl , says that “many organizations struggle to articulate what specific issues they are trying to address and how the grant they offer will drive impact.”

What often happens is that RFP grant writers take a scattered approach instead of having a cohesive strategic framework. As a result, it’s hard for founders who give out grants to evaluate the proposal’s purpose and potential.

Manglik adds that “the most effective RFPs have a sharply defined focus outlining the goals, target population, and theory of change for proposed activities.”

Not Understanding the Legal Implications of the Grant

Grants often come with terms and conditions that must be followed to stay compliant. Failing to do so might result in penalties or even in grants being revoked.

These terms and conditions should be clear and easy to understand to minimize the risk of breaching them.

Jonathan Feniak, general counsel at LLC Attorney , says, “When writing RFP grant proposals, it’s crucial to understand the legal implications of the grant and factor any liabilities into your plan.

If any IP is developed with grant funding, you must specify ownership rights to avoid potential conflicts with donors later.”

Feniak also notes that proposals should clearly outline your expectations, and you must agree on whether the charity or the investor owns its rights.

“Generally, it’s best to consult your legal team throughout the RFP writing process to manage the risks and clearly outline IP ownership,” adds Feniak.

Ensuring clarity and specificity in the language used.

It’s vital to use a language that is not only clear but also specific so it’s easier for potential bidders to understand what’s expected of them. This applies to the requirements, objectives, and expectations of the project.

Kimberly Wall, co-founder of BibleKeeper , says, “The challenge lies in articulating the project’s goals, objectives, and expected outcomes clearly using words that are not really overwhelming the potential applicants with unnecessary details.”

Using the right language will eliminate confusion among nonprofits and make sure that their proposals accurately correspond to the needs of the RFP issuer.

RFPs for grants come in two forms: concise, short tables, where information is filled out in bullet points, and longer ones, which cover each section in detail.

The former aims to give a high-level overview, while the latter is where applicants take a deep dive into their proposal.

So, there isn’t such a thing as an “ideal” length for an RFP. These types of documents can take up multiple pages and usually function as downloadable PDFs.

If you’re wondering what elements grantors should include, then here’s an RFP structure we recommend at HubSpot.

RFP: [Project Name]

Proposal Due By: [Date]

[Organization Name]

In addition to the name, this section could also feature a short overview of your mission. Don’t include a long history of your organization. Instead, use this space to provide a bit of context on what it does and its target market.

Project Overview

A brief introduction to the project itself to let nonprofits know right away if it’s something worth bidding on — no longer than 1-2 paragraphs.

Project Goals

This section identifies what you hope to accomplish through assigning funds to relevant organizations. Specify what you’ll see as a “win” so everyone is on the same page.

Scope of Work

A description of the project and a scope of work — either detailed, if it’s a long RFP, or bullet points if it’s short.

Current Roadblocks and Barriers to Success

In this section, mention any potential constraints that could either disqualify certain candidates or increase the operational complexity of meeting goals.

Evaluation Metrics and Criteria

Here, you outline how you’re going to choose grantees. There are different approaches — some companies use simple “yes” or “no” evaluations to check if a proposal meets the project objectives.

Other organizations use percentages to score more important criteria higher than others.

Submission Requirements

Exact guidelines bidders must adhere to.

Project Due By

If there is a specific project delivery date, mention it in the RFP. This will help you filter out applicants who can’t guarantee completing it within the required timeline.

Here, you should include the target budget. Specify if this budget will be distributed among multiple organizations or assigned to a single grantee.

General Conditions of Contract

This could include information like:

  • Applicant’s legal status.
  • Your stance on subcontracting.
  • Indemnification, insurance, and liabilities.

Some templates also suggest asking questions that you expect bidders to answer — these can serve as a way to further check their alignment with your mission.

So, now that you know what goes into an RFP, let’s learn how to write them. Below, I’ll describe the steps you should take when tackling this paperwork.

In each section, I’ll work through the steps, as I build a mock RFP for sustainability nonprofits.

My sample organization, Earthly Partners, is looking to fund sustainability projects based in the Southwestern United States. Let's get started.

How to Write an RFP for Grants

1. Identify the objectives.

In this step, I want to list all the key information, like goals, timeline, budget, and applicant profile.

As you gather these, you’ll likely come across some informational gaps or considerations that require expert knowledge, like legal considerations and grantor/grantee obligations.

This is an important preliminary stage, which should end with a complete list of information you’ll need to evaluate bidders.

Testing It Out

So, what does my organization, Earthly Partners, want to accomplish? We want to focus on fighting climate change in the South West, particularly through drought relief and community advocacy.

We are able to provide grants of up to $50,000 to each nonprofit.

2. Write an introduction.

Now, I want to provide a bit of information about the organization and the area we focus on. I may also include my organization’s values, current challenges, and the problems we would like to address.

Here is an example of an intro to Earthly Partners’ RFP. Here, we highlight the mission that we focus on and a little bit about our mock organization’s history.

Earthly Partners is pleased to announce the availability of grant funding to support projects that align with our mission of environmental conservation and advocacy.

Established in 2010, Earthly Partners has been dedicated to promoting eco-friendly practices, water conservation, and community empowerment. We recognize the importance of fostering innovative solutions and collaborations within our community, and through this grant opportunity, we aim to support projects that demonstrate creativity, sustainability, and significant impact.

We are most interested in projects focused on community advocacy for climate policies and drought relief.

3. Provide a project description.

This section should serve as a high-level overview. Potential applicants will look at it to quickly assess whether they can propose a relevant project within the required timeline and available budget.

Here’s my project description for my mock sustainability nonprofit:

Grant Purpose: The purpose of this Request for Proposals (RFP) is to solicit proposals for projects that address environmental conservation, climate change mitigation, or sustainable development.

We seek proposals that offer innovative approaches, foster community engagement, and contribute to the long-term sustainability and resilience of ecosystems and communities.

Grant Details:

  • Total Funding Available: $50,000
  • Grant Duration: 12 months
  • Grant Amount: Grants may range from $2,500 to $10,000
  • Eligibility: Nonprofit organizations and community groups operating within the Greater Metropolitan Area are eligible to apply.
  • Application Deadline: July 31, 2024.

4. List clear requirements.

Here, I can specify what exactly I need to know about the proposal. That includes asking the applicants for the project description and how it will help fulfill the goals of your grant.

Continuing with the sustainability grant project from above, this section could look like the following:

Proposal Guidelines:

Applicants are invited to submit proposals that address the following key components.

  • Project Description: Provide a detailed description of the proposed project, including its objectives, activities, target population, and anticipated outcomes.
  • Project Impact: Clearly articulate the potential impact of the project on the environment or the local community. Describe how the project will contribute to positive change and address identified environmental or social needs.
  • Innovation and Creativity: Highlight any innovative approaches or strategies proposed to address the identified environmental or social challenge. We encourage applicants to think creatively and propose solutions that may be outside traditional approaches.
  • Sustainability: Demonstrate the project’s sustainability beyond the grant period. Describe plans for ongoing funding, partnerships, and stakeholder engagement to ensure the long-term success of the project.
  • Roadblocks to Success: Identify potential challenges or roadblocks that the project may face and describe strategies to overcome them. Consider factors such as regulatory hurdles, community resistance, funding constraints, or technical limitations.
  • Budget and Timeline: Provide a detailed budget that outlines how grant funds will be used. Include a project timeline with key milestones and deliverables.

5. Include a submission deadline.

Here, I want to call out the deadline for submissions and explain my preferred way of submitting proposals.

For Earthly Partners, I want to have proposals by the end of July. I call that out, along with my preferred submission format, below.

Submission Instructions:

Please submit your proposal electronically to [email address] no later than July 31, 2024. Proposals should be submitted in PDF format and include the organization's name, contact information, and the title of the proposed project in the subject line.

​​​​6. Be clear on the evaluation factors.

It’s important to explain all the elements your organization will pay attention to while evaluating applications.

Applicants who do not meet your criteria will likely withdraw from submitting their proposal if they don’t see they’re a good fit. This, in turn, will help you pre-qualify organizations and shorten the selection process.

For Earthly Partners, I want to explain how we plan to evaluate applicants and give an overview of next steps. This allows me to explain what projects are likely to receive funding and the timeline for these evaluations.

Evaluation Process:

Proposals will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • Alignment with Earthly Partner’s mission and grant objectives.
  • Clarity and feasibility of the project proposal.
  • Potential impact and sustainability of the project.
  • Innovation and creativity of proposed approaches.
  • Budget justification and cost-effectiveness.

Notification:

Applicants will be notified of funding decisions by August 31, 2024. Successful applicants will receive further instructions regarding grant agreements, reporting requirements, and funding disbursement.

7. Proofread and edit the document.

I use the editing process to make sure that all the necessary elements are included in my RFP and that the instructions are easy to follow.

Failing to use easy-to-understand language might result in low-quality submissions. It’s a good idea to ask a few of your colleagues for feedback to ensure you’ve not missed any important details.

Here are a few considerations to take into account while preparing your RFP.

best practices rfp

Dedicate time to selecting the right eligibility and application criteria.

This is, arguably, the single most important section of your RFP — perhaps even more important than “budget,” as NGOs will want to quickly assess their eligibility.

Esther Strauss, co-founder of Step by Step Business , agrees:

“Given the diversity of causes we support, from education to environmental conservation, finding a grant that provides the necessary funding and also aligns with our goals can be like searching for a needle in a haystack.”

Strauss says that, whenever applying for a grant herself, she needs to know if her organization can genuinely meet the grantor’s requirements while staying true to the organization’s objectives and values.

The need to get the application “right” can also extend to selecting the right application format or method. “The pressure to get it right is immense, as these grants can significantly impact our ability to serve our community,” she adds.

So, how can you make it easier for applicants to assess if they’re the right fit and avoid application mistakes?

Include clear information like:

  • Only bidders who meet at least X out of Y criteria will be considered.
  • Proposals must be sent in [FORMAT] by [DEADLINE]. Applications sent in through other channels will not be considered.
  • Application needs to include a proposed schedule.
  • Proposals must be shorter than [NUMBER] pages. Failure to comply with this guideline will result in an automatic rejection.

For a real-life example, you can also look at this RFP proposal from the U.N. , which keeps the requirement descriptions clear and concise.

As you can see, the quality of the proposals and organization fit lies largely in your hands.

grant examples

Image Source

Simplify negotiations by including key contract terms.

Earlier, I’ve mentioned that many RFP grant writers struggle with translating legal requirements in the RFP.

Wayne Tung of Sendero wrote a great piece on this subject, encouraging RFP publishers to give it the same level of attention as requirements and scope.

“Many people do not include contract term requirements, such as legal and commercial terms, in RFPs. This results in prolonged negotiations,” or even failed grants, he says.

Featuring the main contract terms in the RFP shows respect for both parties — you as the project operator and the organizations seeking funding.

Sometimes, fewer questions are better.

I spent quite some time going through Reddit threads popular among the RFP community, and one of the most interesting points I’ve seen was about question-fit.

One Redditor, roger_the_virus , blatantly says grantors should avoid “useless questions that won’t provide helpful answers. I do my best to make sure we’re not asking for a bunch of information we don’t need and won’t do anything with.”

That said, when it comes to questions, don’t automatically discredit applicants who can’t answer all of them. Offer organizations that have pitched a fitting project and budget the opportunity to ask follow-up questions.

This will prevent them from submitting answers with low informational value, i.e., responses that are vague or unrelated to your query.

Speaking of supplementary questions, this leads to the next point.

Provide clear contact information.

The larger your organization, the less likely it is that there will only be one person responsible for proposal reception and answering questions from applicants.

However, even if it’s an entire office, you should provide contact information with the relevant communication method — either walk-ins between a specific time, like Monday to Friday, email address, or phone number.

Bear in mind that many nonprofits apply to RFPs ongoingly and will only do so if they see that the grantor can help with applicant requests. Here’s an opinion on Reddit from an RFP proposal writer, which garnered multiple upvotes:

“I won’t respond to an RFP unless they commit to giving me their time for detailed discovery and a chance for them to read me the RFP requirements line by line and why they’re important.”

what is an rfp for grants; insights from Reddit

Disclose any potential blockers.

Finally, be transparent about any potential roadblocks winning bidders might come across.

When applying for grants, NGOs need to know if they have the means to complete the project and if there are any other issues, like conflict of interest.

For example, say your organization wishes to assign funds to boost literacy rates in remote rural areas. One of the prerequisites could be having established relationships within target communities.

Such an approach will help preselect applicants, particularly those who don’t have the operational capacity to navigate around any potential constraints.

Here are three resources that might come in handy while drafting an RFP for grants.

1. Candid’s Foundation Directory

Candid’s Foundation Directory shares essential information to help you make smart and strategic funding requests. These resources and tools give you access to funding opportunities that go beyond RFPs.

It includes a list of foundations, including their profiles, funding priorities, application procedures, and contact information.

RFP writers can go through the proposals that have been published already and use them as inspiration to create their own.

2. Free RFP Templates From HubSpot

HubSpot’s Free RFP templates are a great starter kit and will help you draft your request in no time.

This resource gives you two RFP versions — a shorter one and a longer one. Both documents are fully customizable, allowing you to easily add your company name and logo.

You can download them in PDF or turn them into a Microsoft Word or Google Docs file.

These templates include all the crucial elements of an RFP, such as:

  • Company name and background.
  • Project goals.
  • Expected project timeline.
  • Submission requirements.
  • Evaluation criteria.
  • Potential roadblocks.

Each section comes with a quick explainer to help you get the contents right.

offers-Apr-29-2024-10-23-29-4539-PM

Download HubSpot’s RFP Templates for Free

3. Reddit – RFP Subreddits

Unsurprisingly, Reddit is one of the best places to learn from RFP experts as well as understand the applicant’s perspective.

I especially recommend following the RFP subreddit and navigating into more intricate conversations and topics from there.

While many of the discussions cover not only grants but also commercial projects, the advice is universal.

It also goes without saying that you shouldn’t just lurk around the corner — if there’s a challenge you’ve come across while drafting your RFP, this is the community you should ask for advice.

Getting Your RFP for Grants Right

Writing the RFP is the first — and arguably — most important step in the entire grant process. How so? It’s up to you as the grantor to select the right questions and criteria and explain the purpose of the project.

Remember, the more information you provide potential applicants, the easier it will be for them to assess if they fit the grant objectives. And this, in turn, will lead to a higher quality of proposals.

While there isn’t a one-size-fits-all template for each project, there are certain must-have sections to include. So, refer to this article to get a head start next time you need to create an RFP for grants.

rfp templates

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IMAGES

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  1. Lock

    Candid maintains a comprehensive database on U.S. and global grant-makers and their funding opportunities. It also operates research, education, and training programs designed to advance knowledge of philanthropy at every level. Candid's Funding Information Network facilitates access to grant resources and publications to under-resourced entities and populations.

  2. NIH Grants & Funding website

    Find Grant Funding. NIH offers funding for many types of grants, contracts, and even programs that help repay loans for researchers. ... Access reports, data, and analyses of NIH research activities, including information on NIH expenditures and the results of NIH-supported research. How to Apply Find Grant Funding Funded Research (RePORT) Open ...

  3. Research Grants and Research Funding

    General. Grants.gov: Though backed by the Department of Health & Human Services, Grants.gov provides a valuable resource for searching for fellowships, grants, and other funding opportunities across multiple disciplines.; Foundation Center: One of the largest databases of philanthropy in the United States contains information from more than 550 institutions eager to donate their money to ...

  4. Funding at NSF

    The U.S. National Science Foundation offers hundreds of funding opportunities — including grants, cooperative agreements and fellowships — that support research and education across science and engineering. Learn how to apply for NSF funding by visiting the links below.

  5. Grants & Funding

    Grants & Funding. The National Institutes of Health is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world. In fiscal year 2022, NIH invested most of its $45 billion appropriations in research seeking to enhance life, and to reduce illness and disability. NIH-funded research has led to breakthroughs and new treatments helping people ...

  6. Funding Search

    Funding search automatically boosts results where a word or phrase is found in the title, including the program abbreviation, over matches found elsewhere in the record. 2. Filter searches. Filters allow you to narrow results by matching specific attributes of funding opportunities. By default, no filters are applied.

  7. Funding

    Interested in exploring opportunities at NIH for research and development contract funding? Learn the basics of how contracts differ from grants, how you can find solicitations and submit your proposal, how they are submitted and evaluated, and more. ... Learn how diversity supports our mission, find opportunities to participate in diversity ...

  8. About Grants

    About Grants. Did you know that NIH is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world, investing more than $32 billion a year to enhance life, and reduce illness and disability? NIH funded research has led to breakthroughs and new treatments, helping people live longer, healthier lives, and building the research foundation that ...

  9. Where to Search for Funding

    Grants.gov - Grants.gov lists all current discretionary funding opportunities from 26 agencies of the United States government, including the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and many others -- in other words, all the most important public funders of research in the United States.

  10. Tips and Tools for Finding and Applying for Research Grants

    Tips for finding and applying for grants. 1. Consider the large, well-known sources of funding. Large, well-known funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, can be good starting points in your search for grant funding opportunities. These funding sources are usually free to access and provide an ...

  11. The Ultimate Guide to Researching and Identifying Grant Opportunities

    February 24, 2023. samyqueen. The Ultimate Guide to Researching and Identifying Grant Opportunities for your nonprofit. As a nonprofit organization, securing funding through grants can make all the difference in achieving your mission and goals. However, with the abundance of grant opportunities available, it can be overwhelming to navigate and ...

  12. Nonprofit Grants: A Guide to the Basics of Grant Research

    Foundation Grant Research. At its most basic, grant prospect research essentially consists of two major practices: researching various foundations' grant cycles and giving histories, and managing your organization's applications for each foundation. The former is an exercise in Web research—identifying a list of foundations that might ...

  13. Grants

    The Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC) uses grants and cooperative agreements to fund research and non-research public health programs that advance the agency's public health mission domestically and abroad to keep Americans safe and healthy where they work, live and play. This site provides information about financial ...

  14. Grant Opportunities

    Grant opportunities. The foundation awards the majority of its grants to U.S. 501 (c) (3) organizations and other tax-exempt organizations identified by our staff. (Tax status definitions) (Glossary of terms) Request for proposals (RFP): We are a nonprofit fighting poverty, disease, and inequity around the world.

  15. Research Funding Opportunities

    NCI Funding Opportunities by Research Topic. AI research is supported by a wide variety of grant and contract programs across NCI. Research projects in basic cancer biology are supported and coordinated through the Division of Cancer Biology (DCB). Behavioral research in cancer prevention and control is supported by the Division of Cancer ...

  16. Find Grants for Nonprofits

    Find grants to fund nonprofits with. Foundation Directory. Candid's Foundation Directory gives you access to the information you need to be smart and strategic with your funding requests. The tools available on Foundation Directory allow you to tap funding opportunities beyond open Requests for Proposals (RFPS) that make up less than 1% of ...

  17. Research Opportunities

    Funding opportunities are located throughout the DBRW website. The ones below represent just a snapshot of opportunities that are specific to the promotion, advancement, and retention of women in biomedical research careers. You are encouraged to contact your Institute or Center (IC) to find information on current opportunities.

  18. 7 Tips and Tricks to Make Grant Research Easy

    4. Establish a network. If your business is looking at local or community grants, check in with past winners and applicants and ask about their experience applying for grants. You'll likely ...

  19. Nursing Research Grants

    Open grant opportunities and recent awards are listed below. As additional research grant opportunities open, notice will be posted to this webpage. Nursing Research Grant Opportunities: If you would like to receive direct notice of new grant opportunities, please fill out this form and you will be added to the email distribution list to ...

  20. Funding Opportunities

    Funding Opportunities. FAS Research Development is dedicated to helping faculty find grant and fellowship funding to support their research and scholarship. The team provides assistance for research projects, equipment acquisition, conference participation, travel expenses, sabbatical support, exhibitions, digital projects, publications, and ...

  21. Sample Grant Applications Serve as Exemplary Guides

    NIH's grant application process can be onerous, and it helps to have access to successful sample applications. NIAID shares sample applications—posted with permission from grant recipients—to provide examples of good grantsmanship and successful approaches to presenting a Research Strategy and Specific Aims.

  22. FUNDING AND RESEARCH

    Grants are available for fundamental and applied research in biomedical informatics and data science. Areas of research interest include: representation, organization and retrieval of biomedical and biological data and images; enhancement of human intellectual capacities through virtual reality, dynamic modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning; medical decision-making ...

  23. Limited Submissions Funding Opportunities

    Sponsors (including federal, state, foundation, nonprofit, and industry) sometimes limit the number of nominations or proposals (or concept papers, pre-proposals, letters of intent, etc.) that an organization may submit to a particular program/funding opportunity. This information can usually be found in the "Eligibility" section of a funding opportunity announcement.

  24. SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

    supplemental funding opportunity NSF will consider supplemental funding requests in the broad area of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies that enable PIs (or Co-PIs) to request supplemental support of up to $55,000 and six months for graduate students supported on active NSF grants with the following goals:

  25. Targeted Needs

    The Research and Large Center Development Office has gathered information to help researchers and scholars find funding opportunities to meet a number of commonly targeted needs: Early Career researchers and scholars. Resources for finding funding specifically for early career researchers and scholars, particularly those in tenure-track positions

  26. Introducing Mission: a pilot responsive mode funding opportunity

    A year ago, I wrote a blog introducing two new funding opportunities, Curiosity and Catalyst. Today, I'm pleased to be introducing another. Mission is a pilot large grants funding opportunity. It aims to transform arts and humanities research agendas, research leadership and research teams, at scale, through a pilot approach to team convening.

  27. The Innovator's Quarterly The latest innovations and industry

    Funding Opportunity AI for Information Security Call for Proposals. The Amazon Research Awards program seeks to fund machine learning research related to information security on the following topics:. Threat, intrusion, and anomaly detection for cloud security; Generative AI and foundation models for information security

  28. Limited Submission Opportunity: V Foundation 2024 V Scholar Cancer

    The V Scholar Award supports early career faculty in cancer research by funding either laboratory-based fundamental research or translational research projects. This call is specifically for adult ...

  29. How to Write an RFP for Grants

    Data-backed business trends, research insights, and industry analyses for business builders, delivered weekly. The Lead News, insights, and operator wisdom to keep marketing leaders ahead of the curve. ... These resources and tools give you access to funding opportunities that go beyond RFPs. It includes a list of foundations, including their ...