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Essays About Heroes: 5 Examples And Topic Ideas

Here, we’ll look at examples of essays about heroes and questions that can be used as topics for essays about an imagined or real hero.

A few different images likely come to mind when you hear the word hero. You may imagine Superman flying above the world with his superpower of flight. You may imagine a personal hero, a real person who has made a significant impact on your life for the better. You might think of a true hero as someone who has shown heroic qualities in the public eye, working to help ordinary people through difficult situations.

When writing an essay about your life hero, it’s important to consider the qualities of that person that make them stand out to you. Whether you choose to write an essay about how your mom got you through tough times and became your role model or about a political figure who made a difference in the lives of people in history, it’s key to not just focus on the person’s actions—you’ll also want to focus on the qualities that allowed them to act heroically.

Here, we’ll explore examples of hero essays and potential topics to consider when writing about a hero.

For help with your essays, check out our round-up of the best essay checkers

Examples Of Essays About Heroes

  • 1. These Are The Heroes Of The Coronavirus Pandemic By Ruth Marcus
  • 2. Why Teachers Are My Heroes By Joshua Muskin
  • 3. Martin Luther King Jr.—Civil Rights Activist & Hero By Kathy Weiser-Alexander

4. Steve Prefontaine: The Track Of A Hero By Bill O’Brian

5. forget hamilton, burr is the real hero by carey wallace, topic ideas for essays about heroes, 1. what makes a hero, 2. what are the most important characteristics of heroes in literature, 3. what constitutes a heroic act, 4. is selflessness required for heroism, 1.  these are the heroes of the coronavirus pandemic  by ruth marcus.

Examples of essays about heroes: These Are The Heroes Of The Coronavirus Pandemic By Ruth Marcus

“Is this what they signed up for? There is some danger inherent in the ordinary practice of medicine, but not this much. I confess: I do not know that I would do the same in their circumstances; I am not sure I am so generous or so brave. If my child were graduating from medical school, how would I deal with her being sent, inadequately protected, into an emergency room? If my husband were a physician, would I send him off to the hospital — or let him back into the house in the interim?” Ruth Marcus

Healthcare workers have had no choice but to go above and beyond in recent years. In this essay, Marcus discusses the heroism of those in the healthcare field. He delves into the traits (including selflessness and courage) that make doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers heroes.

2.  Why Teachers Are My Heroes   By Joshua Muskin

“Teachers are my heroes because they accept this responsibility and try extremely hard to do this well even when the conditions in which they work are far from ideal; at least most do. Our jobs as society, education systems, and parents is to do our best to be strong allies to teachers, since their success is essential to ours.” Joshua Muskin

In this essay, Dr. Muskin discusses the many challenges teachers face and what parents, administrators, and education researchers can do to help teachers support students. Muskin explains that most teachers go above and beyond the call of duty to serve their classrooms.

3.  Martin Luther King Jr.—Civil Rights Activist & Hero   By Kathy Weiser-Alexander

“During this nonviolent protest, activists used boycotts, sit-ins, and marches to protest segregation and unfair hiring practices that caught the attention of the entire world. However, his tactics were put to the test when police brutality was used against the marchers, and King was arrested. But, his voice was not silenced, as he wrote his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” to refute his critics.” Kathy Weiser-Alexander

In this essay, Weiser-Alexander details both the traits and the actions of Dr. King before and during the civil rights movement. The author touches on King’s commitment to justice, persistence, and willingness to stand for his beliefs despite difficult circumstances.

“I remember this so vividly because Prefontaine was a hero to me, a hero in a way that no one was before, or really has been since. A British commentator once called him “an athletic Beatle.” If so, his persona was much more Lennon than McCartney. Actually, I thought of him more as Mick Jagger — or ultimately James Dean.” Bill O’Brian

A hero to many in the running world, Prefontaine’s confidence, unique style, and unmatched athletic ability have been heralded for decades. In this essay, O’Brian shares how he, as a distance runner during the era of Pre, related to his struggles and ambition.

“Burr fought against an ugly tide of anti-immigrant sentiment in the young republic, led by Hamilton’s Federalist party, which suggested that anyone without English heritage was a second-class citizen, and even challenged the rights of non-Anglos to hold office. In response, Burr insisted that anyone who contributed to society deserved all the rights of any other citizen, no matter their background.” Carey Wallace

In this essay, Wallace explains why Aaron Burr, the lifelong nemesis of founding father Alexander Hamilton, should be considered a historical hero. This essay exposes someone seen as a villain but much of society with a different take on their history. 

It can be interesting to think about your definition of a hero. When describing what the term hero means to you, you may want to choose a person (or a few people) you look up to as a hero to solidify your point. You might want to include fictional characters (such as those in the Marvel universe) and real-life brave souls, such as police officers and firefighters.

A word of caution: stay away from the cliche opening of describing how the dictionary defines a hero. Instead, lead-in with a personal story about a hero who has affected your life. While talking about a public figure as a hero is acceptable, you may find it easier to write about someone close to you who you feel has displayed heroic qualities. Writing about a family member or friend who has shown up as a heroic main character in your life can be just as exciting as writing about a real or imagined superhero.

From Beowulf to Marvel comics, heroes in literature take on many different traits. When writing an essay on what trait makes a hero come alive in a short story, novel, or comic, choose a few of your favorite heroes and find common themes that they share.

Perhaps your favorite heroes are selfless and are willing to put themselves last in the name of sacrifice for others. Perhaps they’re able to dig deep into the truth, being honest even when it’s hard, for the greater good. There’s no need to list endless heroes to make your point—choosing three or four heroes from literature can be a great way to support your argument about what characteristics define heroism in literature.

When someone is named a hero in real life, we often picture them saving people from a burning building or performing a difficult surgical operation. It can be difficult to pin down exactly what constitutes a heroic act. When writing about what constitutes a heroic act, think about people who go above and beyond, performing feats of courage, honesty, and bravery to support themselves or others. When writing about what constitutes a heroic act, discuss real-life or literary examples of heroes at work.

To many people, being a hero means giving back to others. While giving something away or trading in one’s well-being for others can certainly be seen as a heroic act, many people wonder if selflessness is required for heroism or if a hero can serve the greater good in a way that also supports their happiness. When writing about whether selflessness is required for heroism, choose examples from literature and real-life to support your point.

Tip: If writing an essay sounds like a lot of work, simplify it. Write a simple 5 paragraph essay instead.

If you’re still stuck, check out our available resource of essay writing topics .

high school what is a hero essay

Amanda has an M.S.Ed degree from the University of Pennsylvania in School and Mental Health Counseling and is a National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer. She has experience writing magazine articles, newspaper articles, SEO-friendly web copy, and blog posts.

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Essay on Heroism

Students are often asked to write an essay on Heroism in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Heroism

What is heroism.

Heroism is the act of showing courage or bravery, often in challenging or dangerous situations. It’s about doing the right thing, even if it’s hard or scary. Heroes can be everyday people who stand up for what’s right or help others in need.

Types of Heroes

Heroes come in many forms. Some are famous, like firefighters or soldiers, who risk their lives to protect others. Others are ordinary people, like a friend who stands up to a bully, or a neighbor who helps an elderly person with their groceries.

Qualities of a Hero

Heroes are brave, but they’re also kind. They think about others before themselves, and they’re willing to act even when it’s hard. They’re honest, responsible, and they never give up, no matter how tough things get.

Why Heroism Matters

Heroism is important because it inspires us to be better people. When we see someone act bravely or kindly, it makes us want to do the same. Heroes show us that we all have the power to make a difference in the world.

In conclusion, heroism is about more than just bravery. It’s about kindness, selflessness, and perseverance. We can all be heroes, in our own ways, by standing up for what’s right and helping others when they need it.

250 Words Essay on Heroism

Heroism is the act of showing great courage and strength. It is often linked with people who do brave things to help others, even if it means putting themselves in danger. A hero can be anyone, from a firefighter saving lives to a student standing up against bullying.

There are many types of heroes. Some are famous, like Superman or Wonder Woman, who use their special powers to fight evil. But, real-life heroes do not have superpowers. They are ordinary people who do extraordinary things. Doctors, soldiers, and even our parents can be heroes.

Heroes have many qualities that make them special. They are brave, selfless, and always ready to help others. They don’t think twice before jumping into action, even if it means risking their own safety. They believe in doing what’s right, no matter how hard it is.

Why are Heroes Important?

Heroes are important because they inspire us. When we see someone acting bravely, it encourages us to be brave too. They show us that even in tough times, we can make a difference. Heroes remind us that we all have the power to do good.

In conclusion, heroism is about bravery, selflessness, and doing the right thing. We can all be heroes if we choose to stand up for what’s right, help others, and face our fears. So, let us try to be a hero in our own little ways and make the world a better place.

500 Words Essay on Heroism

Heroism is when a person does something brave, often risking their own safety to help others. It is not about being strong or powerful, but about showing courage and selflessness. A hero is someone who cares more about others than themselves. They are willing to face danger to protect or help someone else.

There are many types of heroes. Some are famous, like firefighters, police officers, or soldiers. These people risk their lives every day to keep us safe. But there are also everyday heroes who may not be as well-known. These could be teachers who inspire their students, doctors who save lives, or even a friend who stands up for someone being bullied.

Heroes have special qualities that make them stand out. They are brave, and not afraid to face danger. They are selfless, thinking of others before themselves. They are also kind, showing compassion and understanding to those in need. But most importantly, heroes are determined. They do not give up, even when things are tough.

Heroes in History

History is full of heroes. People like Martin Luther King Jr., who fought for equal rights, or Malala Yousafzai, who stood up for girls’ education, are examples of heroes. They faced great danger and even risked their lives for what they believed in. Their actions have made the world a better place.

Heroes Around Us

We do not have to look far to find heroes. They are all around us. Maybe it’s a parent who works hard to provide for their family, or a friend who helps you when you’re feeling down. You might even be a hero to someone without knowing it. By showing kindness and courage, we can all be heroes in our own way.

In conclusion, heroism is about more than just being strong or brave. It’s about caring for others, standing up for what is right, and never giving up. Heroes can be anyone, from famous figures to everyday people. And the best part is, we all have the potential to be heroes. So let’s strive to be the best we can be, and maybe one day, we will be someone’s hero.

In this essay, we have learned about the meaning of heroism, the types of heroes, the qualities of a hero, heroes in history, and heroes around us. We have also learned that we all have the potential to be heroes. It is important to remember that heroism is not about being powerful, but about showing courage and selflessness. It is about caring for others and standing up for what is right. So let’s strive to be the best we can be, and maybe one day, we will be someone’s hero.

That’s it! I hope the essay helped you.

If you’re looking for more, here are essays on other interesting topics:

  • Essay on Hide And Seek Game
  • Essay on High School
  • Essay on High School Life Experience

Apart from these, you can look at all the essays by clicking here .

Happy studying!

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Big Ideas Articles & More

What makes a hero, we all have an inner hero, argues philip zimbardo . here's how to find it..

This month, Greater Good features videos of a presentation by Philip Zimbardo, the world-renowned psychologist perhaps best known for his infamous Stanford Prison Experiment. In his talk, Zimbardo discusses the psychology of evil and of heroism, exploring why good people sometimes turn bad and how we can encourage more people to perform heroic acts. In this excerpt from his talk, he zeroes in on his research and educational program designed to foster the “heroic imagination.”

More on Heroism

Watch the video of Philip Zimbardo's Greater Good talk on heroism.

Read his essay on " The Banality of Heroism ," which further explores the conditions that can promote heroism vs. evil.

Read this Greater Good essay on the "psychology of the bystander."

Learn more about Zimbardo's Heroic Imagination Project.

What makes us good? What makes us evil?

Research has uncovered many answers to the second question: Evil can be fostered by dehumanization, diffusion of responsibility, obedience to authority, unjust systems, group pressure, moral disengagement, and anonymity, to name a few.

high school what is a hero essay

But when we ask why people become heroic, research doesn’t yet have an answer. It could be that heroes have more compassion or empathy; maybe there’s a hero gene; maybe it’s because of their levels of oxytocin—research by neuroeconomist Paul Zak has shown that this “love hormone” in the brain increases the likelihood you’ll demonstrate altruism. We don’t know for sure.

I believe that heroism is different than altruism and compassion. For the last five years, my colleagues and I have been exploring the nature and roots of heroism, studying exemplary cases of heroism and surveying thousands of people about their choices to act (or not act) heroically. In that time, we’ve come to define heroism as an activity with several parts.

First, it’s performed in service to others in need—whether that’s a person, group, or community—or in defense of certain ideals. Second, it’s engaged in voluntarily, even in military contexts, as heroism remains an act that goes beyond something required by military duty. Third, a heroic act is one performed with recognition of possible risks and costs, be they to one’s physical health or personal reputation, in which the actor is willing to accept anticipated sacrifice. Finally, it is performed without external gain anticipated at the time of the act.

Simply put, then, the key to heroism is a concern for other people in need—a concern to defend a moral cause, knowing there is a personal risk, done without expectation of reward.

By that definition, then, altruism is heroism light—it doesn’t always involve a serious risk. Compassion is a virtue that may lead to heroism, but we don’t know that it does. We’re just now starting to scientifically distinguish heroism from these other concepts and zero in on what makes a hero.

My work on heroism follows 35 years of research in which I studied the psychology of evil, including my work on the infamous Stanford Prison Experiment . The two lines of research aren’t as different as they might seem; they’re actually two sides of the same coin.

A key insight from research on heroism so far is that the very same situations that inflame the hostile imagination in some people, making them villains, can also instill the heroic imagination in other people, prompting them to perform heroic deeds.

Take the Holocaust. Christians who helped Jews were in the same situation as other civilians who helped imprison or kill Jews, or ignored their suffering. The situation provided the impetus to act heroically or malevolently. Why did some people choose one path or the other?

Another key insight from my research has been that there’s no clear line between good and evil. Instead, the line is permeable; people can cross back and forth between it.

This is an idea wonderfully represented in an illusion by M. C. Escher, at left. When you squint and focus on the white as the figures and the black as the background, you see a world full of angels and tutus dancing around happily. But now focus on the black as the figures and the white as the background: Now it’s a world full of demons.

What Escher’s telling us is that the world is filled with angels and devils, goodness and badness, and these dark and light aspects of human nature are our basic yin and yang. That is, we all are born with the capacity to be anything. Because of our incredible brains, anything that is imaginable becomes possible, anything that becomes possible can get transformed into action, for better or for worse. 

Some people argue humans are born good or born bad; I think that’s nonsense. We are all born with this tremendous capacity to be anything, and we get shaped by our circumstances—by the family or the culture or the time period in which we happen to grow up, which are accidents of birth; whether we grow up in a war zone versus peace; if we grow up in poverty rather than prosperity.

George Bernard Shaw captured this point in the preface to his great play “Major Barbara”: “Every reasonable man and woman is a potential scoundrel and a potential good citizen. What a man is depends upon his character what’s inside. What he does and what we think of what he does depends on upon his circumstances.”

So each of us may possess the capacity to do terrible things. But we also posses an inner hero; if stirred to action, that inner hero is capable of performing tremendous goodness for others.

Another conclusion from my research is that few people do evil and fewer act heroically. Between these extremes in the bell curve of humanity are the masses—the general population who do nothing, who I call the “reluctant heroes”—those who refuse the call to action and, by doing nothing, often implicitly support the perpetrators of evil.

So on this bell curve of humanity, villains and heroes are the outliers. The reluctant heroes are the rest. What we need to discover is how to give a call to service to this general population. How do we make them aware of the evil that exists? How do we prevent them from getting seduced to the dark side?

We don’t yet have a recipe for creating heroes, but we have some clues, based on the stories of some inspiring heroes.

I love the story of a wonderful nine-year-old Chinese boy, who I call a dutiful hero. In 2008, there was a massive earthquake in China’s Szechuan province. The ceiling fell down on a school, killing almost all the kids in it. This kid escaped, and as he was running away he noticed two other kids struggling to get out. He ran back and saved them. He was later asked, “Why did you do that?” He replied, “I was the hall monitor! It was my duty, it was my job to look after my classmates!”

This perfectly illustrates what I call the “heroic imagination,” a focus on one’s duty to help and protect others. For him, it was cultivated by being assigned this role of hall monitor.

Another story: Irena Sendler was a Polish hero, a Catholic woman who saved at least 2,500 Jewish kids who were holed up in the Warsaw ghetto that the Nazis had erected. She was able to convince the parents of these kids to allow her to smuggle them out of the ghetto to safety. To do this, she organized a network.

That is a key principle of heroism: Heroes are most effective not alone but in a network. It’s through forming a network that people have the resources to bring their heroic impulses to life.

What these stories suggest is that every one of us can be a hero. Through my work on heroism, I’ve become even more convinced that acts of heroism don’t just arrive from truly exceptional people but from people placed in the right circumstance, given the necessary tools to transform compassion into heroic action.

Building on these insights, I have helped to start a program designed to learn more of heroism and to create the heroes of tomorrow.

The Heroic Imagination Project (HIP) is amplifying the voice of the world’s quiet heroes, using research and education networks to promote a heroic imagination in everyone, and then empower ordinary people of all ages and nations to engage in extraordinary acts of heroism. We want to democratize the notion of heroism, to emphasize that most heroes are ordinary people; it’s the act that’s extraordinary.

There are already a lot of great heroes projects out there, such as the Giraffe Heroes Project . The HIP is unique in that it’s the only one encouraging research into heroism, because there’s very little.

Here are a few key insights from research we’ve done surveying 4,000 Americans from across the country. Each of these statements is valid after controlling for all demographic variables, such as education and socioeconomic status.

Heroes surround us. One in five—20 percent—qualify as heroes, based on the definition of heroism I provide above. Seventy-two percent report helping another person in a dangerous emergency. Sixteen percent report whistle blowing on an injustice. Six percent report sacrificing for a non-relative or stranger. Fifteen percent report defying an unjust authority. And not one of these people has been formally recognized as a hero.

Opportunity matters. Most acts of heroism occur in urban areas, where there are more people and more people in need. You’re not going to be a hero if you live in the suburbs. No shit happens in the suburbs!

Education matters. The more educated you are, the more likely you are to be a hero, I think because you are more aware of situations.

Volunteering matters. One third of all the sample who were heroes also had volunteered significantly, up to 59 hours a week.

Gender matters. Males reported performing acts of heroism more than females. I think this is because women tend not to regard a lot of their heroic actions as heroic. It’s just what they think they’re supposed to do for their family or a friend.

Race matters. Blacks were eight times more likely than whites to qualify as heroes. We think that’s in part due to the rate of opportunity. (In our next survey, we’re going to track responses by area code to see if in fact these heroes are coming from inner cities.

Personal history matters. Having survived a disaster or personal trauma makes you three times more likely to be a hero and a volunteer.

Based on these insights into heroism, we’ve put together a toolkit for potential heroes, especially young heroes in training, who already have opportunities to act heroically when they’re kids, such as by opposing bullying.

A first step is to take the “hero pledge,” a public declaration on our website that says you’re willing to be a hero in waiting. It’s a pledge “to act when confronted with a situation where I feel something is wrong,” “to develop my heroic abilities,” and “to believe in the heroic capacities within myself and others, so I can build and refine them.”

You can also take our four-week “Hero Challenge” mini-course online to help you develop your heroic muscles. The challenge may not require you to do anything heroic, but it’s training you to be heroic. And we offer more rigorous, research-based education and training programs for middle and high schools, corporations, and the millitary that make people aware of the social factors that produce passivity, inspire them to take positive civic action, and encourage the skills needed to consistently translate heroic impulses into action.

We’re also in the process of creating an Encyclopedia of Heroes, a collection of hero stories from all over the world. Not just all the classic ones and fictional ones, but ones that people from around the world are going to send in, so they can nominate ordinary heroes with a picture and a story. It will be searchable, so you can find heroes by age, gender, city and country. These are the unsung, quiet heroes—they do their own thing, put themselves in danger, defend a moral cause, help someone in need. And we want to highlight them. We want them to be inspirational to other people just like them.

Essentially, we’re trying to build the social habits of heroes, to build a focus on the other, shifting away from the “me” and toward the “we.” As the poet John Donne wrote: “No man [or woman] is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; … any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

So every person is part of humanity. Each person’s pulse is part of humanity’s heartbeat. Heroes circulate the life force of goodness in our veins. And what the world needs now is more heroes—you. It’s time to take action against evil.

About the Author

Philip Zimbardo

Philip Zimbardo

Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D. , is a professor emeritus of psychology at Stanford University, a professor at Palo Alto University, a two-time past president of the Western Psychological Association, and a past president of the American Psychological Association. He is also the author of the best-selling book The Lucifer Effect and the president of the Heroic Imagination Project .

You May Also Enjoy

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Very nice information. In this world this is the very difficult question that what makes people good or evil. This post has helped a lot to understand the difference. Actually in my point of it depends upon the individual that what he/she thinks. If he/she thinks negative all the time them they became evil and thinking vice versa makes them good.

Andrew | 2:31 am, January 19, 2011 | Link

I really like reading this article because there are many individuals in the world that are heroes but are not recognized.  Heroes that have help humanity progress and prosper have fought with the greatest weapons which are love, respect, sincerity, and peace.  The governments that have had the greatest fear of seeing people free have always use war for colonization, genocide, and false treaties.  However, love is much stronger than war, and thanks to the modern forms of communication and exchange of information, more people are united for peace and do not support or participate in colonization or human genocide.  Since the start of humanity most people have use peace to progress, few have participated in war and few are participating. May peace prevail on earth!

Victor | 7:48 pm, January 29, 2011 | Link

A son raising up against an evil father. A brother standing up to a bully attacking his sibling. A stranger rallying to the side of a woman being assaulted in the street.

My sons are my strength. My reason to help others, that they may find the help they need in their lives.

pops | 9:39 am, February 3, 2011 | Link

Of course religion and eduction has a big impact on a child. But once a child is trying to live a good life (earning good karma or call it whatever you want) good things will happen to that child and he or she will recognize this.

So I think you can definitely change from evil to good.. maybe you _can be changed_ from good to evil.

Massud Hosseini | 7:28 am, September 17, 2011 | Link

Actually in my point of it depends upon the individual that what he/she thinks

asalah | 9:41 pm, September 24, 2011 | Link

“Research has uncovered many answers to the second question: Evil can be fostered by dehumanization, diffusion of responsibility, obedience to authority, unjust systems, group pressure, moral disengagement, and anonymity, to name a few.”  <—What I find amazing about this statement is that anything is being branded “evil” at all.  Well, maybe not.  Relativism seems to be something that’s employed when convenient, disregarded when it’s not.

Kukri | 6:58 pm, November 6, 2011 | Link

This is a very comprehensive discussion on heroism. Victor makes a great point in his comment about how most heroes go unnoticed by the vast majority of people. I think that lack of notoriety is part of what it means to be a hero: doing that which is unexpected without the need for a pat on the back. quotes for facebook status

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When a sniper’s bullet hits one soldier and misses the person next to him, that alone does not make the wounded soldier more heroic.

brokesteves | 6:10 am, April 24, 2012 | Link

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The Big List of Essay Topics for High School (120+ Ideas!)

Ideas to inspire every young writer!

What one class should all high schools students be required to take and pass in order to graduate?

High school students generally do a lot of writing, learning to use language clearly, concisely, and persuasively. When it’s time to choose an essay topic, though, it’s easy to come up blank. If that’s the case, check out this huge round-up of essay topics for high school. You’ll find choices for every subject and writing style.

  • Argumentative Essay Topics
  • Cause-and-Effect Essay Topics
  • Compare-Contrast Essay Topics
  • Descriptive Essay Topics
  • Expository and Informative Essay Topics
  • Humorous Essay Topics

Literary Essay Topics

  • Narrative and Personal Essay Topics
  • Personal Essay Topics
  • Persuasive Essay Topics

Research Essay Topics

Argumentative essay topics for high school.

When writing an argumentative essay, remember to do the research and lay out the facts clearly. Your goal is not necessarily to persuade someone to agree with you, but to encourage your reader to accept your point of view as valid. Here are some possible argumentative topics to try. ( Here are 100 more compelling argumentative essay topics. )

  • The most important challenge our country is currently facing is … (e.g., immigration, gun control, economy)
  • The government should provide free internet access for every citizen.
  • All drugs should be legalized, regulated, and taxed.
  • Vaping is less harmful than smoking tobacco.
  • The best country in the world is …
  • Parents should be punished for their minor children’s crimes.
  • Should all students have the ability to attend college for free?
  • Should physical education be part of the standard high school curriculum?

Should physical education be part of the standard high school curriculum?

WeAreTeachers

  • Schools should require recommended vaccines for all students, with very limited exceptions.
  • Is it acceptable to use animals for experiments and research?
  • Does social media do more harm than good?
  • Capital punishment does/does not deter crime.
  • What one class should all high schools students be required to take and pass in order to graduate?
  • Do we really learn anything from history, or does it just repeat itself over and over?
  • Are men and women treated equally?

Cause-and-Effect Essay Topics for High School

A cause-and-effect essay is a type of argumentative essay. Your goal is to show how one specific thing directly influences another specific thing. You’ll likely need to do some research to make your point. Here are some ideas for cause-and-effect essays. ( Get a big list of 100 cause-and-effect essay topics here. )

  • Humans are causing accelerated climate change.
  • Fast-food restaurants have made human health worse over the decades.
  • What caused World War II? (Choose any conflict for this one.)
  • Describe the effects social media has on young adults.

Describe the effects social media has on young adults.

  • How does playing sports affect people?
  • What are the effects of loving to read?
  • Being an only/oldest/youngest/middle child makes you …
  • What effect does violence in movies or video games have on kids?
  • Traveling to new places opens people’s minds to new ideas.
  • Racism is caused by …

Compare-Contrast Essay Topics for High School

As the name indicates, in compare-and-contrast essays, writers show the similarities and differences between two things. They combine descriptive writing with analysis, making connections and showing dissimilarities. The following ideas work well for compare-contrast essays. ( Find 80+ compare-contrast essay topics for all ages here. )

  • Public and private schools
  • Capitalism vs. communism
  • Monarchy or democracy
  • Dogs vs. cats as pets

Dogs vs. cats as pets

  • Paper books or e-books
  • Two political candidates in a current race
  • Going to college vs. starting work full-time
  • Working your way through college as you go or taking out student loans
  • iPhone or Android
  • Instagram vs. Twitter (or choose any other two social media platforms)

Descriptive Essay Topics for High School

Bring on the adjectives! Descriptive writing is all about creating a rich picture for the reader. Take readers on a journey to far-off places, help them understand an experience, or introduce them to a new person. Remember: Show, don’t tell. These topics make excellent descriptive essays.

  • Who is the funniest person you know?
  • What is your happiest memory?
  • Tell about the most inspirational person in your life.
  • Write about your favorite place.
  • When you were little, what was your favorite thing to do?
  • Choose a piece of art or music and explain how it makes you feel.
  • What is your earliest memory?

What is your earliest memory?

  • What’s the best/worst vacation you’ve ever taken?
  • Describe your favorite pet.
  • What is the most important item in the world to you?
  • Give a tour of your bedroom (or another favorite room in your home).
  • Describe yourself to someone who has never met you.
  • Lay out your perfect day from start to finish.
  • Explain what it’s like to move to a new town or start a new school.
  • Tell what it would be like to live on the moon.

Expository and Informative Essay Topics for High School

Expository essays set out clear explanations of a particular topic. You might be defining a word or phrase or explaining how something works. Expository or informative essays are based on facts, and while you might explore different points of view, you won’t necessarily say which one is “better” or “right.” Remember: Expository essays educate the reader. Here are some expository and informative essay topics to explore. ( See 70+ expository and informative essay topics here. )

  • What makes a good leader?
  • Explain why a given school subject (math, history, science, etc.) is important for students to learn.
  • What is the “glass ceiling” and how does it affect society?
  • Describe how the internet changed the world.
  • What does it mean to be a good teacher?

What does it mean to be a good teacher?

  • Explain how we could colonize the moon or another planet.
  • Discuss why mental health is just as important as physical health.
  • Describe a healthy lifestyle for a teenager.
  • Choose an American president and explain how their time in office affected the country.
  • What does “financial responsibility” mean?

Humorous Essay Topics for High School

Humorous essays can take on any form, like narrative, persuasive, or expository. You might employ sarcasm or satire, or simply tell a story about a funny person or event. Even though these essay topics are lighthearted, they still take some skill to tackle well. Give these ideas a try.

  • What would happen if cats (or any other animal) ruled the world?
  • What do newborn babies wish their parents knew?
  • Explain the best ways to be annoying on social media.
  • Invent a wacky new sport, explain the rules, and describe a game or match.

Explain why it's important to eat dessert first.

  • Imagine a discussion between two historic figures from very different times, like Cleopatra and Queen Elizabeth I.
  • Retell a familiar story in tweets or other social media posts.
  • Describe present-day Earth from an alien’s point of view.
  • Choose a fictional character and explain why they should be the next president.
  • Describe a day when kids are in charge of everything, at school and at home.

Literary essays analyze a piece of writing, like a book or a play. In high school, students usually write literary essays about the works they study in class. These literary essay topic ideas focus on books students often read in high school, but many of them can be tweaked to fit other works as well.

  • Discuss the portrayal of women in Shakespeare’s Othello .
  • Explore the symbolism used in The Scarlet Letter .
  • Explain the importance of dreams in Of Mice and Men .
  • Compare and contrast the romantic relationships in Pride and Prejudice .

Analyze the role of the witches in Macbeth.

  • Dissect the allegory of Animal Farm and its relation to contemporary events.
  • Interpret the author’s take on society and class structure in The Great Gatsby .
  • Explore the relationship between Hamlet and Ophelia.
  • Discuss whether Shakespeare’s portrayal of young love in Romeo and Juliet is accurate.
  • Explain the imagery used in Beowulf .

Narrative and Personal Essay Topics for High School

Think of a narrative essay like telling a story. Use some of the same techniques that you would for a descriptive essay, but be sure you have a beginning, middle, and end. A narrative essay doesn’t necessarily need to be personal, but they often are. Take inspiration from these narrative and personal essay topics.

  • Describe a performance or sporting event you took part in.
  • Explain the process of cooking and eating your favorite meal.
  • Write about meeting your best friend for the first time and how your relationship developed.
  • Tell about learning to ride a bike or drive a car.
  • Describe a time in your life when you’ve been scared.

Write about a time when you or someone you know displayed courage.

  • Share the most embarrassing thing that ever happened to you.
  • Tell about a time when you overcame a big challenge.
  • Tell the story of how you learned an important life lesson.
  • Describe a time when you or someone you know experienced prejudice or oppression.
  • Explain a family tradition, how it developed, and its importance today.
  • What is your favorite holiday? How does your family celebrate it?
  • Retell a familiar story from the point of view of a different character.
  • Describe a time when you had to make a difficult decision.
  • Tell about your proudest moment.

Persuasive Essay Topics for High School

Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative , but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader. It’s important to know your audience, so you can anticipate any counterarguments they might make and try to overcome them. Try these topics to persuade someone to come around to your point of view. ( Discover 60 more intriguing persuasive essay topics here. )

  • Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?
  • Everyone should be vegetarian or vegan.
  • What animal makes the best pet?
  • Visit an animal shelter, choose an animal that needs a home, and write an essay persuading someone to adopt that animal.
  • Who is the world’s best athlete, present or past?
  • Should little kids be allowed to play competitive sports?
  • Are professional athletes/musicians/actors overpaid?
  • The best music genre is …

What is one book that everyone should be required to read?

  • Is democracy the best form of government?
  • Is capitalism the best form of economy?
  • Students should/should not be able to use their phones during the school day.
  • Should schools have dress codes?
  • If I could change one school rule, it would be …
  • Is year-round school a good idea?

A research essay is a classic high school assignment. These papers require deep research into primary source documents, with lots of supporting facts and evidence that’s properly cited. Research essays can be in any of the styles shown above. Here are some possible topics, across a variety of subjects.

  • Which country’s style of government is best for the people who live there?
  • Choose a country and analyze its development from founding to present day.
  • Describe the causes and effects of a specific war.
  • Formulate an ideal economic plan for our country.
  • What scientific discovery has had the biggest impact on life today?

Tell the story of the development of artificial intelligence so far, and describe its impacts along the way.

  • Analyze the way mental health is viewed and treated in this country.
  • Explore the ways systemic racism impacts people in all walks of life.
  • Defend the importance of teaching music and the arts in public schools.
  • Choose one animal from the endangered species list, and propose a realistic plan to protect it.

What are some of your favorite essay topics for high school? Come share your prompts on the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, check out the ultimate guide to student writing contests .

We Are Teachers

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100 Thought-Provoking Argumentative Writing Prompts for Kids and Teens

Practice making well-reasoned arguments using research and facts. Continue Reading

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How to Write Any High School Essay

Last Updated: March 22, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Emily Listmann, MA and by wikiHow staff writer, Hunter Rising . Emily Listmann is a private tutor in San Carlos, California. She has worked as a Social Studies Teacher, Curriculum Coordinator, and an SAT Prep Teacher. She received her MA in Education from the Stanford Graduate School of Education in 2014. There are 14 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 561,850 times.

Writing an essay is an important basic skill that you will need to succeed in high school and college. While essays will vary depending on your teacher and the assignment, most essays will follow the same basic structure. By supporting your thesis with information in your body paragraphs, you can successfully write an essay for any course!

Writing Help

high school what is a hero essay

Planning Your Essay

Step 1 Determine the type of essay you need to write.

  • Expository essays uses arguments to investigate and explain a topic.
  • Persuasive essays try to convince the readers to believe or accept your specific point of view
  • Narrative essays tell about a real-life personal experience.
  • Descriptive essays are used to communicate deeper meaning through the use of descriptive words and sensory details.

Step 2 Do preliminary research on your essay’s topic.

  • Look through books or use search engines online to look at the broad topic before narrowing your ideas down into something more concise.

Step 3 Create an arguable thesis statement

  • For example, the statement “Elephants are used to perform in circuses” does not offer an arguable point. Instead, you may try something like “Elephants should not be kept in the circus since they are mistreated.” This allows you to find supporting arguments or for others to argue against it.
  • Keep in mind that some essay writing will not require an argument, such as a narrative essay. Instead, you might focus on a pivotal point in the story as your main claim.

Step 4 Find reliable sources...

  • Talk to your school’s librarian for direction on specific books or databases you could use to find your information.
  • Many schools offer access to online databases like EBSCO or JSTOR where you can find reliable information.
  • Wikipedia is a great starting place for your research, but it can be edited by anyone in the world. Instead, look at the article’s references to find the sites where the information really came from.
  • Use Google Scholar if you want to find peer-reviewed scholarly articles for your sources.
  • Make sure to consider the author’s credibility when reviewing sources. If a source does not include the author’s name, then it might not be a good option.

Step 5 Make an outline...

  • Outlines will vary in size or length depending on how long your essay needs to be. Longer essays will have more body paragraphs to support your arguments.

Starting an Essay

Step 1 Hook the readers with a relevant fact, quote, or question for the first sentence.

  • Make sure your quotes or information are accurate and not an exaggeration of the truth, or else readers will question your validity throughout the rest of your essay.

Step 2 Introduce your thesis in one sentence.

  • For example, “Because global warming is causing the polar ice caps to melt, we need to eliminate our reliance on fossil fuels within the next 5 years.” Or, “Since flavored tobacco appeals mainly to children and teens, it should be illegal for tobacco manufacturers to sell these products.”
  • The thesis is usually the last or second to last sentence in your introduction.

Step 3 Provide a sentence that’s a mini-outline for the topics that your essay covers.

  • Use the main topics of your body paragraphs as an idea of what to include in your mini-outline.

Step 4 Keep the introduction between 4-5 sentences.

Writing the Body Paragraphs

Step 1 Start each paragraph with a topic sentence.

  • Think of your topic sentences as mini-theses so your paragraphs only argue a specific point.

Step 2 Include evidence and quotes from your research and cite your sources.

  • Many high school essays are written in MLA or APA style. Ask your teacher what format they want you to follow if it’s not specified.

Step 3 Provide your own analysis of the evidence you find.

  • Unless you’re writing a personal essay, avoid the use of “I” statements since this could make your essay look less professional.

Step 4 Use transitional phrases between each of your body paragraphs.

  • For example, if your body paragraphs discuss similar points in a different way, you can use phrases like “in the same way,” “similarly,” and “just as” to start other body paragraphs.
  • If you are posing different points, try phrases like “in spite of,” “in contrast,” or “however” to transition.

Concluding Your Essay

Step 1 Restate your thesis and summarize your arguments briefly.

  • For example, if your thesis was, “The cell phone is the most important invention in the past 30 years,” then you may restate the thesis in your conclusion like, “Due to the ability to communicate anywhere in the world and access information easily, the cell phone is a pivotal invention in human history.”
  • If you’re only writing a 1-page paper, restating your main ideas isn’t necessary.

Step 2 Discuss why the subject of your paper is relevant moving forward.

  • For example, if you write an essay discussing the themes of a book, think about how the themes are affecting people’s lives today.

Step 3 End the paragraph with a lasting thought that ties into your introduction.

  • Try to pick the same type of closing sentence as you used as your attention getter.

Step 4 Include a Works...

  • Including a Works Cited page shows that the information you provided isn’t all your own and allows the reader to visit the sources to see the raw information for themselves.
  • Avoid using online citation machines since they may be outdated.

Revising the Paper

Step 1 Determine if your point comes across clearly through your arguments.

  • Have a peer or parent read through your essay to see if they understand what point you’re trying to make.

Step 2 Check the flow of your essay between paragraphs.

  • For example, if your essay discusses the history of an event, make sure your sentences flow in a chronological way in the order the events happened.

Step 3 Rewrite or remove any sections that go off-topic.

  • If you cut parts out of your essay, make sure to reread it to see if it affects the flow of how it reads.

Step 4 Read through your essay for punctuation or spelling errors.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Allow ample time to layout your essay before you get started writing. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • If you have writer's block , take a break for a few minutes. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 2
  • Check the rubric provided by your teacher and compare your essay to it. This helps you gauge what you need to include or change. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 1

high school what is a hero essay

  • Avoid using plagiarism since this could result in academic consequences. Thanks Helpful 5 Not Helpful 1

You Might Also Like

Plan an Essay Using a Mind Map

  • ↑ https://www.grammarly.com/blog/types-of-essays/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/thesis-statements/
  • ↑ https://guides.libs.uga.edu/reliability
  • ↑ https://facultyweb.ivcc.edu/rrambo/eng1001/outline.htm
  • ↑ https://examples.yourdictionary.com/20-compelling-hook-examples-for-essays.html
  • ↑ https://wts.indiana.edu/writing-guides/how-to-write-a-thesis-statement.html
  • ↑ https://guidetogrammar.org/grammar/five_par.htm
  • ↑ https://learning.hccs.edu/faculty/jason.laviolette/persuasive-essay-outline
  • ↑ https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/paragraphs/topicsentences
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/transitions/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/ending-essay-conclusions
  • ↑ https://libguides.newcastle.edu.au/how-to-write-an-essay/conclusion
  • ↑ https://pitt.libguides.com/citationhelp
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/revising-drafts/

About This Article

Emily Listmann, MA

Writing good essays is an important skill to have in high school, and you can write a good one by planning it out and organizing it well. Before you start, do some research on your topic so you can come up with a strong, specific thesis statement, which is essentially the main argument of your essay. For instance, your thesis might be something like, “Elephants should not be kept in the circus because they are mistreated.” Once you have your thesis, outline the paragraphs for your essay. You should have an introduction that includes your thesis, at least 3 body paragraphs that explain your main points, and a conclusion paragraph. Start each body paragraph with a topic sentence that states the main point of the paragraph. As you write your main points, make sure to include evidence and quotes from your research to back it up. To learn how to revise your paper, read more from our Writing co-author! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Del City honors Bob Kalsu, late Vietnam War hero & OU football star, with statue unveiling

high school what is a hero essay

DEL CITY — The Del City High School football team will start a new tradition next season. Before every home game, the Eagles will gather around a statue in front of their stadium. A statue, which was unveiled Friday, of Del City alum Bob Kalsu . 

Coach Robert Jones said he wants his team to embody the characteristics of Kalsu. 

“The commitment, the discipline, the effort and the pride,” Jones said. “The toughness that he showed as a man.” 

Bob Kalsu, like the statue depicting him, was larger than life . To his family and friends, his coaches and teammates and the Army brothers he fought alongside in Vietnam, where Kalsu was killed in action. Kalsu, a former Sooner offensive lineman who starred as a rookie for the Buffalo Bills, was the only active NFL player to die in the Vietnam War. 

Hundreds who knew Kalsu, knew someone close to him or simply knew of his courage packed a plaza Friday in front of the Del City High School football stadium that bears Kalsu’s name. They gathered for the unveiling of a statue — of a grinning Kalsu in his No. 77 jersey — but more so, to share stories. To laugh and to cry. 

Bob Kalsu’s widow, Jan, spoke last. She was accompanied by her and Bob’s son, Bob Jr., and their daughter, Jill — neither of whom were old enough to remember their father, gone at the age of 25. More than 60 Kalsu family members were in attendance. 

Retired Navy captain John Keilty, who leads Del City's Jr. Naval ROTC, emceed and helped organize the event. Steve Coleman, a former Del City teammate of Kalsu’s, was among the speakers. As was Barry Switzer, Kalsu’s offensive line coach at OU before Switzer became head coach. 

“Bob Kalsu was the best player we had,” Switzer said. 

Kalsu was a football star who could’ve gotten a deferment from fighting in Vietnam had he sought one. 

“He didn’t have to go,” Switzer said, “but he did.” 

Coleman and Switzer knew Kalsu as a teammate and player, a friend on the football field. Mike Renner knew Kalsu as his buddy in battle. 

Renner, who traveled to the ceremony from his home in Iowa, left the crowd with nary a dry eye as he told of the Bob Kalsu he knew. 

“I’ve never seen an officer so caring about his men and so unselfish as he was,” Renner said of Lt. Kalsu. 

Renner remembers having to carry rounds of ammo up a hill. Each round was 97 pounds, and Kalsu could carry three at a time. 

“I appreciate why the Buffalo Bills drafted him,” Renner said, drawing laughs. 

On July 1, 1970, Kalsu and Co. endured heavy enemy artillery fire at Firebase Ripcord in the A Shau Valley. 

“He continued to lead his team,” Renner said. 

Kalsu always led his team. 

When Kalsu was killed, Renner asked his sergeant first class what they were going to do with Kalsu gone. 

“I just don’t know, Renner,” he was told. “I just don’t know.” 

More than 50 years after Kalsu’s death, Renner has never forgotten the impression Kalsu left on him and so many others. 

Renner closed his remarks by addressing Kalsu’s children, Jill and Bob Jr., who have children of their own now. 

“Jill and Bobby,” Renner said. “You have your dad’s smile. Don’t ever lose it.” 

The same smile emblazoned on the statue, never to be forgotten.

Joe Mussatto is a sports columnist for The Oklahoman. Have a story idea for Joe? Email him at  [email protected] . Support Joe's work and that of other Oklahoman journalists by purchasing a  digital subscription today at subscribe.oklahoman.com .

The Kalsu file

  • Born: April 13, 1945
  • Died: July 21, 1970
  • High school: Del City
  • College: Oklahoma
  • Wife: Jan Kalsu
  • Children: Daughter, Jill Kalsu; son, James Robert Kalsu Jr.
  • Notable: Awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart for his Army service during the Vietnam War. ... Earned first-team All-American honors as an offensive lineman with the Sooners in 1967. ... Selected by the Buffalo Bills in the eighth round of the 1968 NFL Draft.

Unsung North Dakota State transfer leads Alabama past North Carolina and into the Elite 8

high school what is a hero essay

LOS ANGELES – Alabama basketball coach Nate Oats looked down at a box score.

His fourth-seeded Crimson Tide had just upset No. 1 seed North Carolina in the Sweet 16, and next to the name of Alabama forward Grant Nelson were statistics as startling as the game’s outcome.

He had 24 points, 12 rounds and five blocked shots Thursday night during an epic NCAA Tournament performance at Crypto.com Arena.

“I couldn't be happier for Grant,” Oats said. “But did I expect 24, 12 and five?”

Another question begged to be asked. Who is Grant Nelson?

FOLLOW THE MADNESS: NCAA basketball bracket, scores, schedules, teams and more.

Until Thursday, he was a guy who'd scored six points in the first two games of the NCAA Tournament. Now he's Alabama's Sweet 16 hero, the 6-11 senior who put the Crimson Tide on his lanky shoulders.

“I'm from a small town, Devils Lake,’’ Nelson said. “Shout-out to all those guys. ...

“Really grew up with everything I could ask for. Playing basketball at the park every day. Had a good high school team.  We didn't go very far many years, but, I mean, they got me to North Dakota State where I stayed three years and entered the (transfer) portal."

Last year he was First Team All-Summit League. Now he's headed to the Elite Eight with the coach who lured him to Alabama. 

“I liked Coach Oats a little bit,'' he said with a grin, "and I gave Alabama a chance and I think it's paying off.’’

Grant Nelson golfs -- sort of

So who is Grant Nelson?

“We're both bad golfers trying to get better,’’ offered Oats, sitting next to Nelson during the postgame press conference. “We've golfed a little bit.  He's trying to teach me how to drive.  Neither one of us are very good.’’

Recently, Nelson was playing basketball about as well as he apparently plays golf.

He's started all 35 games for the Crimson Tide and was the team's third-leading scorer with 11.8 points per game and leading rebounder with 5.6 per game. But during the NCAA Tournament, he managed only three points in Alabama's 109-96 victory over No. 12 seed Charleston and three points in Alabama's 72-61 victory over No. 11 seed Grand Canyon .

But on Thursday, matched up against North Carolina’s 6-11 standout Armando Bacot, Nelson delivered the game of his life.

“I thought he could be this good,’’ Oats said. “Do I say, I thought he would be this good going into the game today?  No because he had been struggling, but I knew what he was capable of when we got him ... 

“He's 6'11", can handle it on pick-and-rolls.  He shot the one 3 when we took the lead (against North Carolina) and that thing was all net.  He's been shooting it really well the last -- we had voluntary shooting two nights ago.’’

Three guys went. Yes, the kid from North Dakota was one of them.

On Thursday, he was 6-for-9 from the floor, made both of his 3-pointer attempts and was 10-for-13 from the free throw line.

The dramatic finish

Who is Grant Nelson?

This is who: The guy stepped to the free throw line with less than a second left. With Alabama clinging to a two-point lead and a chance to seal the victory.

He missed both free throws.

Did he sulk?

Get distracted?

Leave things up to fate?

After the second missed free throw, the ball ended up in the hands of North Carolina’s Harrison Ingram, who tried to heave a miracle, game-winning shot. But it was blocked.

By Nelson, of course. He wore a huge grin as the Alabama faithful roared their delight.

“We've been working for this all season,’’ he said. “But this wasn't our end goal.’’

The Crimson Tide are one victory away from reaching the Final Four for the first time in school history.

For Grant Nelson, the next golf outing with coach Oats can wait.

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    Read his essay on "The Banality of Heroism," which further explores the conditions that can promote heroism vs. evil. ... Heroes surround us. ... training you to be heroic. And we offer more rigorous, research-based education and training programs for middle and high schools, corporations, and the millitary that make people aware of the social ...

  10. 77 My Hero Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

    My Hero: Bob Marley. One of the things I admire the most about him is the possession of skills and the right attitude to influence positive change in society. Mythological and Modern-Day Heroes. Myths and other forms of literature were the tools that the community used to pass the deeds of the heroes from one generation to the other.

  11. Unsung Heroes: Encouraging Students to Appreciate Those Who Fought for

    From the opening of the "Unsung Heroes" essay by Howard Zinn. A high school student recently confronted me: "I read in your book A People's History of the United States about the massacres of Indians, the long history of racism, the persistence of poverty in the richest country in the world, the senseless wars.How can I keep from being thoroughly alienated and depressed?"

  12. What is a Hero Essay

    A hero is someone who upholds moral principles both when others are watching and when they are not. A hero needs to be morally upright, loyal, and compassionate. A hero must set an example for everyone around them. A true hero will make the ultimate sacrifice for the sake of others. The hall monitor at my school serves as my everyday hero.

  13. Hero essay

    Hero are people how go out and hurt themselves just to save people. In conclusion heros are people who are intelligent, selfless, ande resuresful. Heroes are everyday people just trying to make a difference in the world. batman, mlk, malcolm X , superman, maya angelou people show that you don't need some flashy power to be a hero.

  14. 120+ Fascinating Essay Topics for High School Students

    The following ideas work well for compare-contrast essays. ( Find 80+ compare-contrast essay topics for all ages here.) Public and private schools. Capitalism vs. communism. Monarchy or democracy. Dogs vs. cats as pets. WeAreTeachers. Paper books or e-books. Two political candidates in a current race.

  15. How to Write Any High School Essay (with Pictures)

    1. Hook the readers with a relevant fact, quote, or question for the first sentence. An attention getter draws readers into your essay. Use a shocking statistic or a hypothetical question to get the reader thinking on your subject. Make sure not to use an attention getter unrelated to the topic of your essay.

  16. Characteristics Of A Hero Essay

    What is a Hero? Essay What is a Hero? There are many types of heroes (such as the ones in comic books, myths, movies, or even just everyday life heroes) but all of them have perseverance when they're going through a conflict. Heroes are role models and they're people that we look up too. They all have unique and

  17. Why My Mother Is My Hero: [Essay Example], 516 words

    My Hero Essay Example. Everyone has someone they look up to and want to be just like one day and everyone has a vision of a true hero. My mother is my hero, whom I want to write an essay about. My mom is my favorite person in the world because she is always there when I need her the most and I don't know where I would be today without her.

  18. Student Essay

    In its national essay contest for high school students, StageofLife.com, a writing resource for teens, discovered that "My Mom" is the number one answer given when teens were asked the question, "Who is your Hero?" 2,500+ high school and college students visited the writing contest page, and hundreds of students submitted essays ...

  19. Heroism: What Is a Hero, Where Do We Find Heroes? How Do We Choose

    by Sara Armstrong, Ph.D. The MY HERO Project has published a book called MY HERO: Extraordinary People on the Heroes Who Inspire Them, in which some 40 men and women whom most of us would consider heroes in some fashion write about their heroes. This lesson plan provides ways to use the book and its stories in the classroom.

  20. 5 Common Types of High School Essays (With Examples)

    I could see the horizon again. 2. Narrative Essay. A narrative high school essay is similar to a descriptive essay but focuses more on the story description rather than object description. The story can be about a personal experience that the writer has had, an event, a story, an incident.

  21. 50 Great Essay Topics for High School Students (Updated)

    Changes over the past decade. Stereotype changes in history. Exploration of healthcare. College education costs. Keeping exotic animals in captivity for personal use. The ethics of keeping wild animals in zoos. Selling a piece of art as an NFT. Implementing school uniforms in public schools in America. So get to it and use these essay topics ...

  22. Former Washington state high school teacher, McKenna Kindred, avoids

    McKenna Kindred, 25, who taught at Central Valley High School in Spokane Valley, Wash, pleaded guilty Thursday to amended charges of second-degree sexual misconduct with a minor and communication ...

  23. Whittier High School dedicates building to WWII hero turned art teacher

    The high school recently announced the Fine Arts building on campus is being dedicated in his honor. "It's a big surprise," said Nakamura. Nakamura went on to work at Rio Hondo College as their ...

  24. High school football player accused of beating teen to death at party

    Talan Renner, the Arizona high school football player accused of beating 16-year-old Preston Lord to death at a Halloween party last year was allegedly hidden away by his family after the attack ...

  25. Heroes Essay Heroes Essay

    Heroes Essay Heroes Essay The question remains: who is worthy to be called a hero? I have seen many people who deserve the title of a hero for many bold actions. Sure, they do not wear legendary costumes, drive bat-mobiles or possess superhuman abilities. Of course, there is much more to a hero than just what is visible to the eye.

  26. Garber grad Logan Hugo is Eastern Michigan hero in walk-off win over

    The 2021 Essexville Garber graduate delivered in walk-off fashion, lifting the Eagles to a fist-pumping 5-4 victory over Central Michigan University in their Mid-American Conference showdown ...

  27. Del City honors Bob Kalsu, war hero and OU star, with statue unveiling

    0:56. DEL CITY — The Del City High School football team will start a new tradition next season. Before every home game, the Eagles will gather around a statue in front of their stadium. A statue, which was unveiled Friday, of Del City alum Bob Kalsu . Coach Robert Jones said he wants his team to embody the characteristics of Kalsu.

  28. Who is Grant Nelson? Alabama's Sweet 16 hero has people wondering

    Until Thursday, he was a guy who'd scored six points in the first two games of the NCAA Tournament. Now he's Alabama's Sweet 16 hero, the 6-11 senior who put the Crimson Tide on his lanky ...

  29. Essay On Hero Essay On Hero

    Characteristics of a Hero Essay Characteristics of a Hero "A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself" (Campbell 1). When we think of heroes most of us think of movie stars or professional athletes, but it's not always about your popularity or talent it can also be about how you help society.

  30. Who is Jack Gohlke? Oakland's March Madness hero is from Pewaukee

    Gohlke, a 6-foot-3 guard, is from Pewaukee and played at Pewaukee High School. A fun fact from his time in high school: Gohlke was a senior on the Pewaukee team that handed former Whitnall star ...