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Recap / Law & Order: Criminal Intent S2E3 "Anti Thesis"

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This episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent begins with a retirement party for a Hudson University department chair, Professor Winthrop. Winthrop disparages a fellow professor, Sanders, for being a media hound and even turning his subject matter into a rap video. He is then pestered by a graduate student Mark Bayley, who asks for more time to finish his dissertation. Two female professors, Fellows and Hitchens disparage Bayley. Prof. Sanders is pissed and confronts Winthrop in his office. Sanders then talks to Bayley and promises to grant him more time for his thesis - if he is made the new department chair.

Soon after, the department head and his secretary are found dead in his office.

The detectives investigate the scene and determine that the murder weapon is a gavel - implying that the killer thought he was getting justice by murdering Winthrop. They talk to the secretary’s roommate, who reveals that she was starting and stopping a CD on her Diskman. The detectives don’t find the CD, but they do find the words transcribed. The lyrics of the song point to an older African American man, most likely a professor at Hudson U. Which leads them to Sanders.

Sanders states that he was grading papers all night, but the detectives bust that alibi by noticing one paper with an obvious error that the professor should have caught were he actually grading papers. His assistant though, gives him a stronger alibi. The detectives then look into Mark Bayley, the grader of the paper and notice that his shoes are way too nice compared to the rest of his clothes. They find out from the exclusive store that sells those shoes, that a woman named Hitchens bought them from him.

Goren and Hitchens seem to verbally dance around each other. Hitchens is shown comforting Bayley before going to bed with him. The next day, she gets into a car and kisses Prof. Fellows, who now seems to be a lock for the department chairmanship.

Goren and Eames interrogate Bayley. When confronted with the insults that Hitchens uttered about him to Goren, Bayley appears ready to confess and implicate her too. But he goes into shock and dies.

An autopsy and medical records reveal that Bayley was allergic to peanut products. Medical records also show that he was recently rushed to the ER from a Thai restaurant. When the detectives question the hostess at that restaurant, they find out that he was there with an Australian woman who ordered for him in Thai, so he wouldn’t know the dish had peanuts. Upon further inquiry, the hostess reveals that the Australian woman spoke fluent but low class Thai and claimed to have lived in a town that has a large women’s prison. Detectives find out “Hitchens”’ real name - Nicole Wallace, and find out she had been convicted of aiding a Frenchman who murdered eight tourists to rob them.

The detectives trick Prof. Fellows into firing Hitchens/Wallace, then detain and interrogate her. The professor realizes she’s been played by the cops, re-hires “Hitchens” and sends a lawyer to spring her from detention. The police then discover that the real Prof. Hitchens had embezzled money from a foundation in Sydney. This was why Nicole had fled to the US - because financial crimes aren’t covered in the extradition treaty between the US and Australia.

But the cops discover that Hitchens cleared out her apartment and has fled, leaving a weeping Prof. Fellows.

This episode contains examples of the following tropes

  • Armor-Piercing Question : Nicole tries to rattle Goren by asking when he realized his mother was abnormal. Goren fires back by asking her whether sexual abuse by her father led her to prey on men.
  • Artistic License – Law : Getting terminated while on a work visa doesn’t immediately make your presence in the country illegal. You have a 60 day grace period to find a new job. Also, even a visa overstayer or undocumented migrant has the same legal protections that arrested US citizens have - the right to counsel, right to remain silent, right against detention without charges or a trial.
  • Citizenship Marriage : Of sorts. Nicole has shacked up with Prof. Christine Fellows so that the latter will sponsor her work visa and eventually an Employment based Green Card.
  • Depraved Bisexual : Nicole is involved in at least 9 murders, and sleeps with men and women.
  • Failed a Spot Check : A paper that Prof. Sanders supposedly graded during the time of the murder, attributed a quote to T S Elliot when Sanders himself states later that it was Ezra Pound who stated that quote. This tips the detectives off to the fact that Sanders’ teaching assistant was grading those papers instead of him. Later, they use the same mistake to zero in on Mark Bayley.
  • Kill and Replace : While it isn’t confirmed for sure, it is heavily implied that Nicole Wallace killed Dr. Elizabeth Hitchens and assumed her identity.
  • Malcolm Xerox : Professor Sanders is a textbook example. He takes umbrage at his unorthodox teaching methods being characterized as a “rap video” and even calls the university a “plantation” and the department chair as a “massa”.
  • Manipulative Bitch : Nicole Wallace manipulated Mark Bayley into murdering the head of the department. With him gone and the black professor as the prime suspect, her lover Dr. Fellows has a clear path to take over the department.
  • Meaningful Appearance : Mark Bayley’s classy shoes don’t match his otherwise slovenly clothes and appearance. This tips the detectives off that someone else is buying him stuff, presumably female.
  • Passed-Over Promotion : Sanders was a shoo-in to succeed Winthrop as department chair. Until Winthrop scuttled Sanders’ candidacy as well as his ability to get hired on at any other prestigious university, by raising a stink about the “rap video”.
  • Perfect Poison : Nicole uses Mark Bayley’s peanut oil allergy to kill him - by spiking his nicotine gum. That said, an autopsy immediately identifies peanut oil as the method and Goren zeroes in on Nicole as the culprit.
  • Ridiculous Procrastinator : Mark Bayley has been working on his doctoral thesis for ten years. And he is still nowhere close to being done. This is presumed to be the motive for murdering the Department Head - so a different one will give him yet another extension.
  • The Sociopath : Nicole. Charming, manipulative and homicidal.
  • Spanner in the Works : Nicole had a good thing going, having assumed the identity of Dr. Elizabeth Hitchens from Sydney Australia. Too bad, the real Elizabeth Hitchens had embezzled money and the Sydney police were closing in on her. This forced Nicole to run to the US.
  • Secret Relationship : Between Nicole and Prof. Fellows. Also between Nicole and Bayley.
  • Weaponized Allergy : "Hitchens" ordered Bayley a dish with peanuts, in order to trigger Bayley's allergy.
  • Law And Order Criminal Intent S 1 E 5 Jones
  • Recap/Law & Order: Criminal Intent
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anti thesis law and order

Law & Order: Criminal Intent

Anti-Thesis

Cast & crew.

Reg E. Cathey

Daniel London

Olivia d'Abo

Linda Emond

Peter Gerety

Information

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As Goren and Eames sift through the likely suspects in the murder of a university president and his assistant, they discover that the culprit is a wily adversary who has more than these crimes to hide.

anti thesis law and order

Olivia d'Abo

Opening Narration

Steve Zirnkilton

Cast appearances.

Detective Robert Goren

Vincent D'Onofrio

Detective Alexandra Eames

Kathryn Erbe

Captain James Deakins

Jamey Sheridan

Assistant D.A. Ron Carver

Courtney B. Vance

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Law & Order: Criminal Intent – Season 2, Episode 3

Anti-thesis, where to watch, law & order: criminal intent — season 2, episode 3, more like this, cast & crew.

Vincent D'Onofrio

Detective Robert Goren

Kathryn Erbe

Detective Alexandra Eames

Courtney B. Vance

Jamey Sheridan

Reg E. Cathey

Daniel London

Episode Info

Law & Order: Criminal Intent/Anti-Thesis

Anti-Thesis is the third episode of the second season of Law & Order: Criminal Intent , and the twenty-fifth episode overall.

Starring : Vincent D'Onofrio ( Detective Robert Goren ), Kathryn Erbe ( Detective Alexandra Eames ), Jamey Sheridan ( Captain James Deakins )

and Courtney B. Vance ( ADA Carver )

Guest Stars : Olivia d'Abo (Elizabeth Hitchens / Nicole Wallace), Linda Emond (Dr. Christine Fellowes), Peter Gerety (George Dawkins), Daniel London (Mark Bayley), Reg E. Cathey (Professor Roland Sanders)

and Philip Bosco (Prof. Winthrop)

with Geoffrey Cantor (Ronald Hardin), Craig Chester (Derek), Doug Barron (Hamilton Frisch), Pascale Armand (Valerie Goodman), Jason Furlani (Detective Ponds), Liana Pai (Janey Lin), Tess Lina (Vana), Shauna Hurley (Kate Robbins), Jane Sweet (Female Student), Khaz B. (Male Student)

Plot Overview

Arc advancement, behind the scenes, allusions and references, memorable moments.

  • Episode Stubs
  • Law & Order: Criminal Intent/Episodes

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The 10 Best 'Law & Order: Criminal Intent' Episodes

Take a look back at some of the best episodes from this underrated 'Law & Order' spin-off!

One of the many Law & Order spinoffs , Law & Order: Criminal Intent first premiered in 2001 and ran for ten seasons, ending in 2011 after 195 episodes. For its first six seasons, it aired on NBC, then moved to sister network USA for the duration of its run. Like its predecessor, it was created by Dick Wolf and set in New York City, but Criminal Intent centered around the Major Case Squad, which focused on the most high-profile murders and took a more psychological approach to solving them, including scenes from the killers' perspective.

It initially starred Vincent D'Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe , with a cast that sometimes included Chris Noth , Jeff Goldblum , Saffron Burrows , and Courtney B. Vance . Much like the original show which preceded it, Criminal Intent often featured cases inspired by actual events with some famous faces as guest stars. At its best, the cases are complex and delve into the detectives' personal lives, drawing impressive performances from the cast.

10 "To the Boy in the Blue Knit Cap" (Season 10, Episode 8)

After filing a lawsuit against an online dating company that could damage its reputation, twin brothers are found dead. “To the Boy in the Blue Knit Cap” was Criminal Intent ’s series finale and included a guest appearance from James Van Der Beek .

RELATED: The 10 Best 'Law & Order' Episodes of All Time, Ranked

It was a timely episode that alluded to social-networking sites like Facebook, and it was a fitting sendoff — Detective Goren’s (D'Onofrio) own psychological problems were a running theme throughout the series. After getting help, he proved he could still solve a case.

9 "In the Wee Small Hours" (Season 5, Episodes 6 and 7)

In the two-part “In the Wee Small Hours,” Logan (Noth) and Barek ( Annabella Sciorra ) work with Goren and Eames (Erbe) to find a teenager who went missing while on a school trip. The evidence implicates a judge, who lashes out by digging into the detectives’ pasts. Notably, the cast includes Alexandra Daddario in a very early role.

The episode is thrilling from beginning to end as the case becomes increasingly disturbing and keeps viewers guessing the whole time. Part of what makes it such a solid episode is the detectives — it’s a rare glimpse at everyone working together, highlighting their different personalities.

8 "Badge" (Season 1, Episode 20)

In “Badge,” a city auditor and his family are murdered in what is staged as a murder-suicide after he uncovered a scheme involving police pensions. All evidence points to a group of retired cops who didn’t want the truth to come out. Viola Davis guest stars as one of the corrupt officers.

“Badge” is a classic Criminal Intent episode that showcases Goren and Eames’ different personalities and policing styles and features a fantastic guest star. The episode is an excellent example of Davis’ range and skill as an actor.

7 "To the Bone" (Season 5, Episode 20)

Someone is targeting well-to-do art collectors with a machete in “To the Bone,” and the detectives discover that it’s a group of former foster children who all lived with the same foster mother, played by Whoopi Goldberg .

Goldberg has proven her dramatic skills time and time again, and she’s especially chilling as manipulative criminal foster mom Chelsey, making her one of the most memorable guest stars. Fear the Walking Dead ’ s Colman Domingo also makes an appearance.

6 "Amends" (Season 7, Episode 1)

The lines between personal and professional are blurred in “Amends” when Eames’ late husband’s former partner is killed, leading the detectives to take another look at his murder case, too, and consider the possibility that the man who was convicted of the killing didn’t actually do it.

While many of the best episodes of Criminal Intent center around Goren, this time, Eames is the focus. Erbe delivers one of her best performances of the series, especially as things get tense between the two detectives as Goren becomes convinced an innocent man was blamed for Eames’ husband’s murder.

5 "Anti-Thesis" (Season 2, Episode 3)

When the university president is killed, the detectives single out a few suspects, including Nicole Wallace, who had been working at the university under a different name. “Anti-Thesis” marks the first of a few appearances of Wallace , played by Olivia d’Abo , who would become a recurring character and a nemesis for Goren in particular.

The end of the episode reveals Wallace fled, leaving her fate open-ended — and indeed, she would return not once but a few times throughout the series. It’s no wonder why, as her episodes are always exciting ones fans love.

4 "A Person of Interest" (Season 2, Episode 23)

Nicole Wallace returns for "A Person of Interest," the Season 2 finale. This time, she may be involved in an anthrax terrorist plot, and on top of that, Goren is blamed for a suspect’s suicide.

RELATED: 10 Best Cop Procedurals That Aren't 'Law and Order'

Once again, parts of the plot of “A Person of Interest” mirrored actual events at the time, but its real strength is in the interplay between Goren and Wallace and the ways they toy with each other. Each is determined to bring the other down, and it’s fun to see what it takes for Goren to come out on top.

3 "Grow" (Season 5, Episode 1)

Nicole Wallace is back again. This time, she’s not the suspect, but instead, she has ties to the victim, and the detectives need her help to trap the actual killer. Still, she may have ulterior motives, and her soon-to-be stepdaughter is at risk of becoming the next victim.

As always, the episode keeps viewers on the edge of their seats from start to finish. Nicole Wallace is also great to watch, and this time, it’s not just because of her manipulation and homicidal tendencies — “Grow” shows a softer, more vulnerable side to her, giving her more dimension.

2 "Frame" (Season 7, Episode 22)

In the Season 7 finale “Frame,” Goren’s brother is murdered, and a picture left next to his mother’s grave indicates nemesis Nicole Wallace is back yet again. Not only is she the killer, but she's also manipulating things to toy with Goren.

RELATED: TV’s Best Detective Duos of the 21st Century, Ranked

“Frame” is a fan-favorite that also serves as the end of Nicole’s storyline. But what truly makes it stand out is D’Onofrio. He often delivered memorable performances as Goren, but “Frame” is among his best, as his professional and personal lives collide in a devastating reminder of what’s sometimes at stake in his career.

1 "Endgame" (Season 6, Episode 21)

In the aptly titled “Endgame,” a prisoner leads Goren to his scrapbooks detailing unsolved murders and previously unknown victims, hoping that the information will change his sentence. After Goren finds a picture of his mother among the scrapbooks, he makes a shocking discovery about the killer.

“Endgame” is regarded by some fans as the best episode of the series and is among the highest-rated on IMDb . It’s another spectacular episode for D’Onofrio in particular and guest star Roy Scheider , most famous for his role in Jaws .

KEEP READING: The 25 Best Episodes of 'Law & Order: Special Victims Unit'

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anti thesis law and order

Law & Order: Criminal Intent

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Law & order: criminal intent — the best episode of each season, according to imdb.

Law & Order: Criminal Intent brought fans 10 seasons, but even more than a decade later, fans still show love on IMDb for their favorite episodes.

Since 1990 , Law & Order and its many spinoffs have produced some of the longest-running and most well-loved crime dramas of all time. While most may be familiar with the original Law & Order and the Law & Order: Special Victims Unit spinoff that's still running now in 2022, there are others that have more than earned their attention from the fan base.

Law & Order: Criminal Intent focused on the NYPD's Major Case squad that mainly investigated high-profile cases. Its broad case focus added variety to the episodes season after season, but every season had an episode that viewers and IMDb users appreciated more than the rest which is shown in the user ratings.

"Badge" (2002) - 8.6

Season 1, episode 20.

The first season of Criminal Intent aired in 2002 with actors Vincent D'Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe starring as the featured NYPD detectives. In the season's 20th episode, Viola Davis guest starred in what starts out as an apparent murder-suicide and quickly spirals into something much more insidious.

Related: 10 Best Viola Davis Movies, Ranked By IMDb

Davis' guest appearance packed a heavy punch in the episode titled "Badge" which is really no surprise to anyone familiar with the range of her talent even early on in her career. But while the actress's performance carried throughout the episode, IMDb users also applaud the execution of the investigation by the detectives and the episode's highlighting of their contrasting styles early on in the series run.

"Anti-Thesis" (2002) - 8.7

Season 2, episode 3.

The obvious suspect is never the answer but a shock reveal once the season 2, episode 3 case seemingly comes together reminds fans of the franchise's reputation for producing some of the best TV crime dramas of all time .

"Anti-Thesis" marked a high point for the show's sophomore season with Detective Goren meeting his match in cleverly manipulative villain Nicole Wallace - played by Olivia d'Abo. The episode's ending even had viewers hopeful of a future return of the quick-witted woman who successfully went toe to toe with the unyielding detective and thankfully those hopes were eventually answered.

"But Not Forgotten" (2003) - 8.4

Season 3, episode 4.

The mob, a missing person's case and a confused hitman all tied into the events of 9/11 could've made for a muddled episode, but that surprisingly was not the case for the season 3 episode "But Not Forgotten." As the episode goes on, it may be easy to forget where it all started, but a well-written script helps the audience stay focused.

Viewers will probably agree with the assistant district attorney when he says "I don't know whether to laugh or cry" when reviewing the developing cases details because it does all get a bit confusing. IMDb's users did however take special notice of Alicia Coppola who plays the unsuspecting in-law of the original missing woman who becomes a center point and manages to wrap the well-received episode up with an unforgettable power shift that is actually pretty impressive.

"Want" (2004) - 8.6

Season 4, episode 3.

Neil Patrick Harris didn't need to play more than one role in Law & Order to make his impact. As the shy and lonely serial killer and cannibal John Tagman, he did enough to establish his place in the guest star hall of fame. The killer's actions were truly monstrous, but Harris' portrayal completely changed the dynamic of the character.

The well-known actor had his praises sung for the role and even though viewers knew early on who the killer was, many were more than happy to stick around and watch it all unfold. There are also many similarities between Tagman's story and that of real-life killer Jeffery Dahmer that viewers of Monster: The Jeffery Dahmer Story may notice. However, the uncharacteristic actions of Detective Goren may remain to be the biggest shock of the episode.

"In The Wee Small Hours: Part 1 And 2" (2005) - 8.7

Season 5, episodes 6 and 7.

Criminal Intent added a new element to the series in season 5 when it brought on Chris Noth and Annabella Sciorra, both of which had either previously appeared in the Law & Order franchise or would go on to appear in other spinoffs. As new show leads, they split their time with D'Onofrio and Erbe who were still very much a starring team.

Related: Every Law & Order Series, Ranked by IMDb

The two-part episode showed the different investigative styles of each team as they worked to solve a case that leads them to a sexual predator whose influence knows no bounds and whose counterattacks get personal for everyone on the case. It gets more unsettling as it goes and managed to keep fans on the edge of their seats until the end.

"Endgame" (2007) - 9.1

Season 6, episode 21.

When things get personal , fans know to buckle down for what will probably be some less-than-ethical decision-making. It's a trend that's seen through several of the Law & Order spinoff series, but things are a little different in the emotionally charged season 6 episode "Endgame" when a serial killer on death row reveals information to detective Goren that begins to connect to his family.

Roy Scheider, popularly known for his role as chief Brady in Jaws , volleyed well with detective D'Onofrio who took center stage for the episode. Fans not only enjoyed the urgent pacing of the literal race against time but were sucked in by the high emotion of the story that's end leaves both Goren and fans heavy-hearted.

"Frame" (2008) - 9.0

Season 7, episode 22.

Detective Goren's nemesis Nicole Wallace makes a reappearance in the season 7 finale "Frame." It's also the last appearance of Goren's brother Frank who had been played by Scandal 's Tony Goldwyn for the duration of the series. The episode is definitely one that only fans who understand the characters' history would really be able to understand.

It had been three years since Wallace and Goren had seen each other but the feud was deep and carried on with a new fuel with the help of a few outside players. The hunt becomes another shining performance from D'Onofrio as Goren's life is once again turned completely upside down because of his job. It's a rocky cross between past and present that had fans eager for the series' season 8 return.

"Major Case" (2009) - 8.5

Season 8, episode 14.

Another dynamic change was in store for Criminal Intent fans in season 8 with the addition of Jeff Goldblum as Detective Zack Nichols. In a complete change of pace, detective Nichols and Eames team up to solve the murder of a teenage drug dealer after her body is found in a dumpster.

Related: Reddit's 8 Favorite Jeff Goldblum Performances

Unfortunately for the detectives in this episode, the killer has a lot more insight into the crime-solving world than their usual suspects, leading them on a chase that twists and turns every step of the way. Goldblum's more subdued attitude in his detective role is something very different from what fans had usually seen from Goren, so many were happy with what the team-up between Eames and Nichols brought to the table as well as the intricacies of the case itself.

"Loyalty: Part 1" (2010) - 8.7

Season 9, episode 1.

Goldblum stuck around Criminal Intent for two seasons and started off his second season on the show strong with the first part of a two-part episode titled "Loyalty." In the season opener, Goren and Eames are once again the starring team of the episode but with the addition of Detective Nichols.

Fans were curious to see how all three detectives would fare working together since Eames had worked individually with both Goren and Nichols. However, like in many of Jeff Goldblum's best movies , he proved to be a great team addition. Unfortunately, the team did have to suffer a loss for viewers to see these great performances by the actors, but even that couldn't take away from the start of the series' short ninth season.

"To The Boy In The Blue Knit Cap" (2011) - 8.4

Season 10, episode 8.

Law and Order: Criminal Intent ran for 10 seasons from 2001 to 2011 and the episode that brought it all to an end was "To The Boy In The Blue Knit Cap." Its 10-year run was pretty solid, but the series was far from being one of the longest-running drama shows like its fellow franchise spinoff SVU. Also, Unlike what some may expect from a series finale, the episode remained true to Criminal Intent formatting and was case-focused.

The episode is a good reminder to fans why they fell in love with the series in the first place. It has the Goren and Eames team in the spotlight with few outside distractions. Their chemistry and familiar investigative technique are the heart of the episode up until the very end.

Next: 10 Best Episodes Across The Law And Order Franchise, According To Reddit

The Best Episodes Of Law & Order: Criminal Intent

Robert Goren Questioning Law & Order

In many ways, "Law & Order" is the "Star Trek" of crime shows. After all, both franchises have spanned decades and  birthed several spinoffs . While the original series dealt with cops and lawyers in New York City, each subsequent series focuses on more specialized areas. For instance, "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" deals with crimes of a sexual nature, while "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" focuses on the Major Crimes Unit.

"Criminal Intent" could've easily been a straightforward cop show with run-of-the-mill characters who serve only to provide exposition to keep the plot moving. However, the series is much more interesting than that. This time, there's a detective at the center of the action named Robert Goren, played by Vincent D'Onofrio. He marches to the beat of his own drum and often looks at things differently than his colleagues. He's an eccentric and brilliant mind, but he is dealing with some serious trauma.

Having such an interesting lead certainly helps the series stand out, but its long-running storylines, fascinating villains, and occasionally experimental structure, made it truly original. To honor the series, we're looking at some of the very best episodes the series produced and what made them so good.

Badge: Season 1, Episode 20

The murder of Ron Sherwood and his family at first appears to be the work of an unfaithful husband unable to live with his own infidelity who takes it out on the people he loves. There's evidence that he was having an affair, and the murders occur shortly after his wife confronts him about it, which makes it seem pretty obvious what has happened here. For Detective Goren, however, the details of the crime scene don't add up, and his gut takes him and his partner Detective Eames down a dark road of police corruption.

The episode is full of unexpected twists and plenty of opportunities to watch Goren do what he does best — think way outside the box. However, Viola Davis' performance as a woman who is willing to do anything it takes to provide a better life for her family is both riveting and chilling. We get to see some early signs of Davis' Amanda Waller character from the DCEU in the way she carries herself as an authority figure who will not be condescended to. The episode is also early enough in the show's run that a total newcomer can start watching and see just how good this series can be.

Dead: Season 2, Episode 1

Not every episode of "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" begins as a whodunit. Sometimes it uses the reverse whodunit approach, à la "Columbo,"  and shows us exactly who the murderer is. The mystery then becomes exactly how the detectives are going to piece everything together. It's a fun and suspenseful twist on the usual formula.

The Season 2 episode "Dead" is an excellent example of this. Right at the beginning, we see a mortician strangled to death, and the killer's face is in plain view. The intrigue comes from discovering why this murderer killed him and how Goren and Eames are going to figure it out. Actor Jay O. Sanders does an excellent job of convincing the detectives that he's a perfectly decent family man. If we hadn't seen him commit the murder, we'd probably believe him too.

Coming near the final act of the episode, the moment Goren figures out that Sanders' character is the killer is perfectly understated. Most shows would telegraph this to the audience as overtly as possible, but "Criminal Intent" assumes the people watching are astute enough to pick up on the clue. It's a tense and engaging episode with great guest stars, including Jim Gaffigan as a man in way over his head.

Anti-Thesis: Season 2, Episode 3

Not only is "Anti-Thesis" one of the best episodes of "Law & Order: Criminal Intent," it's also a pivotal one. This episode features the introduction of Nicole Wallace, a character who goes on to serve as a thorn in Goren's side for years to come.

The episode begins as your typical murder investigation. The president of a university is murdered before he can name the next chairman, which puts Goren and Eames on the case. Things become tricky when one of Wallace, a professor from Oxford played by Olivia d'Abo , turns the tables and begins to analyze Goren the same way he analyzes everyone else.

This mutual respect and disdain will carry over to multiple episodes — several of which are on this list — and it always delights. In the grand tradition of Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty, Batman and the Joker , or Clarice Starling and Hannibal Lecter, this is only the beginning of their little dance, and the longer it goes, the more complicated and fascinating it becomes.

Cherry Red: Season 2, Episode 19

The twists in this Season 2 episode start during the cold open. At first, this seems like it's going to be an episode about a young woman who, desperate for money, commits some horrible acts so she can take care of her ailing mother. We see her argue over the value of an heirloom left to her by a deceased neighbor whom she might have killed. Later, she pleads with the facility housing her mother for more time to make a payment. Clearly, this is going to end in her robbing and killing someone. Instead, she winds up dead at the bottom of a flight of stairs.

Things only get more complicated when Goren and Eames discover she had nothing to do with the murder of her neighbor. Discovering who murdered the neighbor, their motivations for doing so, and why the young woman was shoved down the stairs is a thrilling experience. Then, of course, there's the moment where Goren reveals the final shocking twist. Whether you're a fan of the series itself or just like a good mystery, "Cherry Red" is well worth your time.

A Person of Interest: Season 2, Episode 23

One of the common threads through all of these episodes is how many of them shift halfway through. "A Person of Interest," for example, looks like it will be all about Goren and Eames pursuing a scientist who they suspect of being a terrorist intent on spreading anthrax. However, everything changes when the suspect hangs himself in his bathroom. His suicide note blames Goren's intense scrutiny and attacks on his character as the cause for him taking his own life. While the media is happy to blame Goren, he notices the one detail everyone else has ignored: most suicide notes are aimed inward at the victim themselves, not at some outside influence.

Enter Nicole Wallace.

Goren quickly realizes that this whole thing was designed by Wallace to make him look bad and take him down. Once Wallace is part of the narrative, the pacing and intensity pick up. She's so good at evading any evidence that might prove her guilt that the audience pulls their hair out trying to guess how Goren will trick her. When he finally does, it's deeply satisfying. However, it is made abundantly clear that this isn't the last time we'll be seeing Nicole.

If you or anyone you know is having suicidal thoughts, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline​ at​ 1-800-273-TALK (8255)​.

But Not Forgotten: Season 3, Episode 4

Like an earlier entry on this list, "Badge," "But Not Forgotten" is another excellent episode dealing with police corruption. However, that's not all it's about.

A woman named Frieda Merced goes missing after trying to flee from an unseen man. The investigation shows that the man has ties to an incarcerated mobster and that the woman's brother was a professional killer who had been murdered two years previously. Isobel, the spouse of the deceased hitman, played by Alicia Coppola , has since remarried Earl, a dirty cop with a collection of canes played by Terry Serpico . Goren and Eames suspect Earl was involved with the missing woman's disappearance.

When the man the woman was running from winds up dead, the wounds on his head look as though they came from the handle on one of Earl's canes. The couple is questioned, but their stories don't add up. Seeing Goren pit the two against each other is riveting, and the final reveal is completely unexpected.

Want: Season 4, Episode 3

After a young ballerina, who moonlights as an exotic dancer, is murdered following a confrontation outside the club where she works, the man waiting for her outside becomes the main suspect. However, his motivations for wanting to speak with her don't naturally lead to murder. Also, something about how the body had been treated suggests to Goren that this wasn't necessarily done out of anger.

What makes this such a great episode isn't the mystery. It quickly becomes apparent that John, a shy candy maker played by Neil Patrick Harris , is the culprit. What's so fascinating is the vulnerability with which he plays the character and Goren's attempt to understand him. 

The final twist, though shocking, has nothing to do with a last-minute reveal. Instead, it sees Goren turning his back on his partner and superiors to do what he believes is right. It's a moral dilemma that asks the audience to think about what they would have done in his situation, rather than beating them over the head with an obvious message.

Grow: Season 5, Episode 1

The fifth season of "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" got things started with a real doozy of an episode that sees the return of that pesky Nicole Wallace. She has proven herself to be so vile and brilliant that we don't doubt her capacity for evil. When it's revealed that her own daughter died at sea, we can't help but assume she murdered her child. That's just how despicable this person is. Now that she is about to get remarried to a single father, we have to assume that a little girl's life is in danger.

However, there's something different about Nicole this time. She usually provides coy answers to direct questions with a sly smirk, but now she seems vulnerable, genuinely worried that something might happen to the child of the man she's pretending to love. Showing us a side of Nicole that we've never seen before adds yet another level of complexity to her character and is an excellent way of keeping the audience on their toes to the final, surprising moment.

Endgame: Season 6, Episode 21

Another common thread running through most of these episodes is that many of them connect to Goren and Eames directly. We dig into their personal lives in a way that's rare for these kinds of police procedurals. A massive revelation comes in the penultimate episode of Season 6, "Endgame."

Mark Brady, played masterfully by the legendary Roy Scheider , is a serial killer about to be put to death. In hopes of delaying things and controlling his own demise, he uses this time to play a game with Detective Goren. He reveals the locations of his hidden scrapbooks which contain pictures of his victims before he killed them. This also leads them to a few more victims they didn't already know about. The whole game seems pointless until one of the pictures sets off alarm bells in Goren's head.

While this main plot is happening, Goren occasionally visits his sick mother. Looking through pictures, he sees one of her from before he was born. It is distressingly similar to one of the pictures in Brady's collection. It turns out that Brady has a very long history with Goren that he knew nothing about. The truth of that connection shakes him to his very core.

Amends: Season 7, Episode 1

Until now, most of these episodes have been primarily dealing with the character of Goren. In the Season 7 opener, "Amends," we get a look at the private life of Detective Eames (Kathryn Erbe). Years ago, her husband, who was also a cop, was murdered. A man was arrested and put in prison. As far as Eames, and everyone else, was concerned, justice was served. This episode proves, however, that this wasn't the case.

After a cop related to her husband's murder trial is murdered, everyone is out for blood. When these "Law & Order" cops lose one of their own, they become blinded by their need to convict someone. They arrest an innocent man and, as usual, Goren is the only one who thinks they may be going down the wrong path. This puts him at odds with his partner and practically every cop in New York.

Then another witness from her husband's trial is killed with the same weapon as the cop at the beginning of the episode — meaning that they arrested the wrong man. Once they find the real killer, it comes out that the man who killed Eames' husband is still out there too. It's an emotional and gripping story that pushes Eames' character like never before.

Yet another element most of these episodes share is police corruption. Many of the folks assigned to serve and protect in this series aren't as virtuous and honest as they first appear. Exploring how this manifests itself is one of the show's most interesting aspects. It doesn't want to hold your hand and comfort you. Instead, it dwells in the morally murky areas of law enforcement and asks you to make up your own mind.

This is what makes "Last Rites" work so well. It's about a priest coming forward with information regarding a murder. The details are given to him via a deathbed confession. His vow prevents him from giving to revealing who made this confession, but there's enough there for the Major Crimes Unit to get started. This is one of the episodes not to feature Vincent D'Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe as Goren and Eames, and it does suffer a little from their absence. However, the adversarial relationship between Mike Logan and a deeply corrupt assistant district attorney is rich enough to keep you watching and guessing.

Frame: Season 7, Episode 22

Season 7 ends with bombshell after bombshell as Goren's sanity is driven to its breaking point with a puzzle that just doesn't make sense. First, his brother is murdered. His reaction is so intense, and his conviction that his old nemesis Nicole Wallace has something to do with it makes his peers doubt him. Then his mentor Dr. Declan Gage (portrayed by the incredible John Glover ) is attacked, only furthering his suspicions. While everything certainly points to Wallace being the culprit, a major twist halfway through the episode sends everything into a spiral.

In some ways, "Frame" plays out like David Fincher's "Seven" or a really good "Saw" film without the intense gore. Someone has constructed this elaborate puzzle with all of Goren's insecurities and blind spots in mind. At first, it seems like the intent is to break him down and put him out of commission. When the truth comes out and the motive is revealed, we learn that the intention of the killer is shockingly heartfelt.

Law and Order

Olivia d'Abo

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Olivia Jane d'Abo is an English actress who played Nicole Wallace in the Law & Order: Criminal Intent episodes " Anti-Thesis ", " A Person of Interest ", " Great Barrier ", " Grow ", and " Frame ". She appears in the archive footage in the episode " Boots on the Ground ". She also portrayed Wallace's look-alike Madeleine Haynes in the 2013 episode of Jo : "Catacombs".

Her son, Oliver William d'Abo was born on November 11, 1995 in Los Angeles, California.

d'Abo is the daughter of Maggie London, an English model and actress primarily active in the 1960s, and Mike d'Abo, an English singer and member of 1960s musical group "Manfred Mann". She has an older brother, as well as two half-brothers and one half-sister: elder brother Ben, younger half-brother Bruno (from her father's second marriage to Karen Sue Gilbert), and younger sibling twins Ella and Louis (born July 2007) from her father's third marriage to Lisa Weaver. She is the first cousin once removed of her father's cousin Maryam d'Abo, the actress best known for her performance as Kara Milovy in the 1987 James Bond film The Living Daylights . Olivia and Maryam bought a house together in Los Angeles when Olivia was 19 years old.

Her first roles were Princess Jehnna in Conan the Destroyer and Paloma in Bolero . Both were filmed in late 1983 while d'Abo was 14, [1] [2] and released the following summer. She is also well known for the role of Karen Arnold on The Wonder Years (1988–1993; with Dan Lauria , Fred Savage , and Josh Saviano ), Amanda Rogers on Star Trek: The Next Generation (1992) episode "True Q" (opposite Brent Spiner ), Marie Blake on The Single Guy (1995-1997) with ( Jonathan Silverman , Joey Slotnick , and Ming-Na Wen ), Allison Wright on Spin City , and Jane Porter in The Legend of Tarzan (2001-2003). In 1994, she appeared as Charlotte in the film The Last Good Time (with Kevin Corrigan ) and Molly Richardson in the American comedy film Greedy (with Siobhan Fallon , Khandi Alexander , and Austin Pendleton ). In 1995, she appeared as Anna Montgomery in the Disney film The Big Green (with Jay O. Sanders ), Jane in Noah Baumbach's directorial debut film Kicking and Screaming (with Josh Hamilton , Cara Buono , Jason Wiles , and Eric Stoltz ) and as Chris in Live Nude Girls (with Dana Delany and Laila Robins ). She appears as Cherice in the 1997 television film Dad's Week Off (with Henry Winkler ). She also appears as Veronica in the 1998 film The Velocity of Gary (with Vincent D'Onofrio ).

In 2003, she appeared as Emma Wallace in an episode of Alias (with Jennifer Garner , Bradley Cooper , Greg Grunberg , Victor Garber , Lena Olin , and Ron Rifkin ).

In 2014, she appeared as Dierdre in a episode of Psych (with Cary Elwes and Vinnie Jones ).

In 2018, d'Abo played a mother named Sarah, whose young son was kidnapped in The Wrong Son opposite Tammy Blanchard .

In 2019, d'Abo appears as Clarissa in Jane the Virgin (with Gina Rodriguez , Andrea Navedo , and Rita Moreno ).

In 2020, d'Abo appears as a mother named Hayley, whose daughter was kidnapped and sold into sex trafficking in Angie: Lost Girls .

She appears as Linda Craig in the upcoming biographical film Bandit (with Nestor Carbonell ).

In addition to acting, she does animated voices, d'Abo provided the voices of Sonya Blade in Mortal Kombat: Defenders of the Realm (1996); Melanie Walker/Ten in Batman Beyond (1999–2000); Star Sapphire in Justice League (2001); and Morgaine le Fey in Justice League Unlimited (2004); Tak in Invader Zim (2001–2002); Jane Porter in The Legend of Tarzan ; Jedi Master Luminara Unduli in Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008), which she reprised the cameo voice role in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019); Carol Ferris in Green Lantern: First Flight (2009); and Natalia "Natasha" Romanoff/Black Widow in Ultimate Avengers and Ultimate Avengers 2: Rise of the Panther (both 2006).

References [ ]

  • ↑ Associated Press (September 17, 1983) " Names In The News: Schwarzenegger " Daily Times .
  • ↑ Sloan, Robin Adams (August 22, 1983) " The Gossip Column: Bo Derek " Sarasota Herald-Tribune .
  • 1 Amanda Rollins
  • 2 Olivia Benson
  • 3 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
  • Cast & crew
  • User reviews

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Methodists end anti-gay bans, closing 50 years of battles over sexuality for mainline Protestants

FILE - David Meredith, middle, hugs fellow observers after an approval vote at the United Methodist Church General Conference Wednesday, May 1, 2024, in Charlotte, N.C. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

FILE - David Meredith, middle, hugs fellow observers after an approval vote at the United Methodist Church General Conference Wednesday, May 1, 2024, in Charlotte, N.C. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

FILE - The Rev. David Meredith, left, and the Rev. Austin Adkinson sing during a gathering of those in the LGBTQ community and their allies outside the Charlotte Convention Center, in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, May 2, 2024. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Peter Smith, File)

FILE - In this Sunday, March 7, 2004 file photo, Gene Robinson is applauded after his investiture as the Episcopal Church’s bishop of New Hampshire at St. Paul’s Church in Concord, N.H. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Lee Marriner, File)

FILE - Bishop Megan Rohrer speaks to the press before their installation ceremony at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021.When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/John Hefti)

FILE - The Very Rev. Christopher D. Hofer, right and his partner of 17 years, Kerry Brady at Hofer’s parish, the Episcopal Church of St. Jude on Thursday, July 14, 2011 in Wantagh, N.Y., where they plan to wed in August. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)

FILE - The Reverend Dr. Jane Spahr, left, a Presbyterian minister, performs a same-sex marriage for Sherrie Holmes, center, and Sara Taylor, right, at the Marin Civic Center in San Rafael, Calif., Friday, June 20, 2008. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

FILE - Rev. Edwin Bacon, of All Saints Episcopal Church, speaks out during a press conference in support of same sex marriages and in fighting Proposition 8, Sunday, Nov. 9, 2008, in Pasadena, Calif. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Gus Ruelas, File)

FILE - The Rev. Michael Briggs, left, and the Rev. Ken Malcolm, right, hug as they walk after Episcopalians overwhelmingly voted to allow religious weddings for same-sex couples Wednesday, July 1, 2015, in Salt Lake City. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

FILE - Tim Bostic, right, and Tony London hug each other after the Witnessing of the Vow ceremony at Christ & St. Luke’s Episcopal Church for their wedding ceremony on Saturday, May 2, 2015 in Norfolk, Va. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (The’ N. Pham/The Virginian-Pilot via AP, file)

FILE - In this June 19, 2014, file photo, Gary Lyon, left, and Bill Samford celebrate after a vote allowing Presbyterian pastors discretion in marrying same-sex couples at the 221st General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church at Cobo Hall, in Detroit. When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations. The moves sparked joy from progressive delegates, but the UMC faces many of the same challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian and Episcopal denominations that took similar routes, from schisms to friction with international churches to the long-term aging and shrinking of their memberships. (David Guralnick/Detroit News via AP, file)

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — It took just a few days for United Methodist delegates to remove a half-century’s worth of denominational bans on gay clergy and same-sex marriages .

But when asked at a news conference about the lightning speed of the changes, the Rev. Effie McAvoy took a longer view.

“Oh, it didn’t take days, honey,” she said.

It took decades of activism for a change that was “so very healing,” said McAvoy, pastor of Shepherd of the Valley United Methodist Church in Hope, Rhode Island. A member of the Queer Delegate Caucus at last week’s UMC General Conference in Charlotte, she was grateful to be part of the historic moment.

The reversals can be seen as marking the end of a half-century of epic battles and schisms over LGBTQ involvement — not only in the United Methodist Church but in U.S. mainline Protestant denominations overall. Those are the tall-steeple churches in myriad town squares and rural crossroads, traditionally “big-tent” and culturally mainstream congregations — some predating America’s independence.

The nation’s largest Methodist, Presbyterian, Episcopal and Lutheran denominations have all now removed barriers to LGBTQ participation in the pulpit and at the altar. But this comes amid long-term declines in membership and influence.

The Rev. David Meredith, left, and the Rev. Austin Adkinson sing during a gathering of those in the LGBTQ community and their allies outside the Charlotte Convention Center, in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, May 2, 2024. They were celebrating after the General Conference of the United Methodist Church voted to remove the denomination's 52-year-old social teaching that deemed homosexuality "incompatible with Christian teaching." (AP Photo/Peter Smith)

Surely there will be skirmishes to come. Individual congregations, and entire regions across the world, will sort out the implications. Controversies have grown among some conservative evangelical churches and colleges, which largely avoided past battles.

But for mainline Protestants, last week’s General Conference looks like a landmark. It was a relatively quiet coda to what had been an almost annual scene on America’s religious calendar — impassioned showdowns at legislative assemblies of Protestant denominations, marked by protests, political maneuverings and earnest prayers.

Across the decades, there were many cases of ecclesiastical civil disobedience — clergy doing ordinations and marriages that defied church bans, some of whom were tried for heresy or other infractions.

“A part of me still doesn’t believe it,” said the Rev. Frank Schaefer, one of the last United Methodist ministers to face church discipline after presiding at the same-sex wedding of his son. Schaefer was restored to ministry in 2014 by a Methodist appellate panel after a lower tribunal had defrocked him.

“We’ve fought for it so long and hard, and there were so many disappointments along the way,” said Schaefer, now a pastor in California. “Our tears have turned into tears of joy.”

But the UMC faces the same dire challenges as Lutheran, Presbyterian, Episcopal and smaller mainline denominations that took similar routes.

All lost large numbers of congregations in schisms, and they have had to navigate fraught relations with partner churches in Africa and elsewhere.

Retired United Methodist Bishop Will Willimon, a professor at Duke Divinity School, supported greater LGBTQ inclusion in the church — but said bigger issues loom..

“We’re an aging denomination,” he said. “We share that with so many mainline denominations. Unfortunately I don’t see how this vote addresses any of that.”

Willimon said even conservative breakaway groups like the new Global Methodist Church, comprised of many former UMC congregations, face similar challenges with predominately white, aging memberships.

In the U.S., mainline churches have lost millions of members since their peak in the 1960s — some to schism and many to underlying demographics. Their members are aging and don’t have many children, and they struggle to retain the children they do have, said Ryan Burge, associate professor of political science at Eastern Illinois University.

“There is no silver bullet” for reversing mainline decline, said Burge, who studies religious demographics.

The United Methodists counted 5.4 million U.S. members in 2022 — less than half their 1960s peak, and the recent departure of about 7,600 mostly conservative congregations will lower that number further. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)'s 1.1 million membership is barely a quarter its 1960s peak. Other denominations have similar trends.

The mainline battles over LGBTQ issues began heating up in the early 1970s, before those initials were used.

A United Methodist General Conference in 1972 declared homosexual practice “incompatible with Christian teaching.” Other denominations issued similar teachings. Some imposed explicit bans on gay clergy.

An Episcopal bishop was tried and acquitted of heresy in 1996 for ordaining a gay pastor. The 2003 ordination of the first openly gay Episcopal bishop, Gene Robinson, ignited long-simmering controversies.

Conservative and liberal groups formed their own church caucuses for denominational legislative sessions, where Scriptures and slogans flew back and forth between proclamations of Robert’s Rules of Order.

Progressive Presbyterians blocked an entrance to a General Assembly in 2000 and were arrested. As the United Methodists steadily tightened LGBTQ bans, progressives disrupted General Conferences with protests, drums and songs. A conservative United Methodist leader, the Rev. Bill Hinson, roiled the 2004 General Conference in Pittsburgh with a call for denominational divorce — even though his side had won all its legislative battles.

“Why do we go on hurting each other?” asked Hinson. Others quickly tamped down the idea, but it was a foreshadowing.

By the second decade of the 21st century, Presbyterians, Lutherans and Episcopalians had largely dismantled their bans. They navigated major strains with partner churches elsewhere in the world.

Substantial minorities of their U.S. congregations joined more conservative denominations, saying the sexuality debates were symptoms of a deeper theological chasm.

The United Methodist Church is unique because it is international, with many delegates from countries with conservative sexual values and laws. A special legislative session in 2019 reinforced LGBTQ bans.

That result proved short-lived.

U.S. churches increasingly defied the bans and elected more progressive delegates for this year’s gathering. Many churches began disaffiliating under a temporary measure approved in 2019 that let churches keep their properties under favorable conditions.

To Willimon, that process was devastating. Whether the congregation stayed or left, peoples’ relationships were ruptured, he said.

Many churches went independent, but thousands joined the new Global Methodist Church, which pledges to enforce restrictions on LGBTQ clergy and same-sex marriage.

Now attention turns to Africa, where the UMC counts 4.6 million members.

One group of African delegates protested outside the General Conference and said their members would discuss whether to disaffiliate.

“The General Conference did not listen to us,” said the Rev. Jerry Kulah of the conservative group, Africa Initiative, contending the denomination departed from biblical teaching on marriage. “We do not believe we know better than Jesus.”

Bishop John Wesley Yohanna of Nigeria said he would likely leave the denomination after his term ends, though he is staying for now to help heal a rift in the local church. “From the tradition of the church in Africa,” he added, “marriage is between a man and a woman, period.”

But other African delegates are heartened by a plan that expands regional autonomy on such matters. They said African churches will keep the marriage and ordination bans in their region while remaining in the denomination.

“Our decision to stay in the United Methodist Church is not conditioned by what happens in America,” said the Rev. Ande Emmanuel of Southern Nigeria. “God has called us to a church, and the church is not a property of the United States.”

Bishop Eben Nhiwatiwa of Zimbabwe the majority of the African bishops at General Conference agree the regionalization plan respects local cultures.

The United Methodist Church was the last of the major U.S. mainline groups to liberalize its policies on sexuality in part because of its large presence in rural, small-town and Southern areas, where a more conservative sexual ethos prevails, said James Hudnut-Beumler, a professor of American Christian History at Vanderbilt University. He is a Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) minister and co-author of “The Future of Mainline Protestantism.”

“That’s why they’re the last to go,” he said.

And it won’t automatically bring back the more-accepting younger generations who left over the bans, said Hudnut-Beumler, adding that conservative evangelical congregations are not exempt.

“Some conservative megachurch pastor may be thinking to himself, ‘We won this. Look what happened to the Methodists and Presbyterians and Episcopalians,’” said Hudnut-Beumler, “Don’t be so smug.”

AP reporter Holly Meyer contributed from Nashville, Tennessee.

Associated Press religion coverage receives support through the AP’s collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content.

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  1. "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" Anti-Thesis (TV Episode 2002)

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  5. "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" Anti-Thesis (TV Episode 2002)

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COMMENTS

  1. "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" Anti-Thesis (TV Episode 2002)

    Anti-Thesis: Directed by Adam Bernstein. With Vincent D'Onofrio, Kathryn Erbe, Jamey Sheridan, Courtney B. Vance. A university president is killed and the suspects include a professor who wants a chairman position, a grad student, and a lecturer from Oxford.

  2. Anti-Thesis

    The murders of a university president and his assistant leads the detectives to a visiting professor who turns out to be an international criminal. Vincent D'Onofrio as Detective Robert Goren Kathryn Erbe as Detective Alexandra Eames Jamey Sheridan as Captain James Deakins Courtney B. Vance as A.D.A. Ron Carver Olivia d'Abo as Elizabeth Hitchens / Nicole Wallace Linda Emond as Professor ...

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    "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" Anti-Thesis (TV Episode 2002) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. Menu. Movies. ... Law & Order: Criminal Intent - Season Average Ratings a list of 195 titles created 23 Apr 2022

  4. Recap / Law & Order: Criminal Intent S2E3 "Anti Thesis"

    Recap /. Law & Order: Criminal Intent S2E3 "Anti Thesis". This episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent begins with a retirement party for a Hudson University department chair, Professor Winthrop. Winthrop disparages a fellow professor, Sanders, for being a media hound and even turning his subject matter into a rap video.

  5. "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" Anti-Thesis (TV Episode 2002)

    "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" Anti-Thesis (TV Episode 2002) Olivia d'Abo as Elizabeth Hitchens, Nicole Wallace. Menu. ... Law & Order: Criminal Intent - Season Average Ratings a list of 195 titles created 23 Apr 2022 Watched a list of 2553 titles created 20 Jun 2020 ...

  6. Watch Law & Order: Criminal Intent Season 2, Episode 3: Anti-Thesis

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    René Balcer, a ten-year veteran of the original Law & Order series, developed Law & Order: Criminal Intent and served as head writer, executive producer and showrunner for the first five seasons. Warren Leight took over as showrunner and executive producer in seasons six and seven. ... Anti-Thesis A university president is killed and the ...

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    Law & Order: Criminal Intent Anti-Thesis Drama Oct 12, 2002 30 min Peacock Available on Peacock S2 E3: The detectives investigate a bludgeoning death on a college campus. Drama Oct 12, 2002 30 min Peacock ...

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    Episode Guide for Law & Order: Criminal Intent 2x03: Anti-Thesis. Episode summary, trailer and screencaps; guest stars and main cast list; and more.

  10. Law & Order: Criminal Intent

    Anti-Thesis Aired Oct 13, 2002 Crime Drama. Reviews The detectives investigate a bludgeoning death on a college campus. ... Law & Order: Criminal Intent — Season 2, Episode 3

  11. Law & Order: Criminal Intent/Anti-Thesis

    Anti-Thesis is the third episode of the second season of Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and the twenty-fifth episode overall. Starring: Vincent D'Onofrio (Detective Robert Goren), Kathryn Erbe (Detective Alexandra Eames), Jamey Sheridan (Captain James Deakins) and Courtney B. Vance

  12. CI: Goren meets his nemesis Nicole Wallace

    We're talking about Criminal Intent season 2 episode 3 "Anti-Thesis." We're joined by returning guest, from Undisclosed and the Office Hours podcasts, Dr. Marcia Chatelain. This episode takes some of its cues from the real-life squabble between Harvard President Larry Summers and Dr. Cornel West.

  13. 10 Best 'Law & Order: Criminal Intent' Episodes

    "Anti-Thesis" marks the first of a few appearances of Wallace, played by Olivia d'Abo, who would become a recurring character and a nemesis for Goren in particular.

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    'Law and Order: Criminal Intent' is a great show, or it certainly is at its best. Particularly notable for its fascinating lead character Robert Goren, brilliantly played by Vincent D'Onofrio. For me, of the very variable 'Law and Order' franchise, it's one of its best along with the original and prime (so early seasons) 'Special Victims Unit'.

  15. Law & Order: Criminal Intent · Season 2 Episode 3 · Anti-Thesis

    Watch Law & Order: Criminal Intent · Season 2 Episode 3 · Anti-Thesis free starring Vincent D'Onofrio, Kathryn Erbe, Courtney B. Vance and directed by Adam Bernstein.

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    Law & Order: Criminal Intent focused on the NYPD's Major Case squad that mainly investigated high-profile cases. Its broad case focus added variety to the episodes season after season, but every season had an episode that viewers and IMDb users appreciated more than the rest which is shown in the user ratings. ... "Anti-Thesis" marked a high ...

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  18. The Best Episodes Of Law & Order: Criminal Intent

    Anti-Thesis: Season 2, Episode 3. Not only is "Anti-Thesis" one of the best episodes of "Law & Order: Criminal Intent," it's also a pivotal one. This episode features the introduction of Nicole ...

  19. Law & Order: Criminal Intent season 2

    Law & Order: Criminal Intent was renewed a second season in May 2002 and production began in Summer 2002. Show runner/executive producer René Balcer became head writer this season, writing every episode of the season. Peter Jankowski was promoted to executive producer this season; last season Jankowski was a co-executive producer.

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  21. "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" Anti-Thesis (TV Episode 2002)

    Law & Order: Criminal Intent. When the series was created, the character of Robert Goren was modeled after Sherlock Holmes and, to a degree, Alexandra Eames was modeled after Dr. John Watson. The character of Nicole Wallace--a serial killer who is the only criminal to ever be able to match Goren's intelligence--becomes his archenemy.

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    A homeless man is killed, uncovering a massive insurance company scam. S2 E15 - Monster. March 1, 2003. 44min. 16+. A "yuppie" murderer is freed from prison and when his mother is murdered shortly after he is the prime suspect, until Goren (Vincent D'Onofrio) and Eames (Kathryn Erbe) discover a bad cop in the mix.

  23. Methodists end anti-gay bans, closing 50 years of battles over

    4 of 10 | . FILE - Bishop Megan Rohrer speaks to the press before their installation ceremony at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021.When the United Methodist Church removed anti-LGBTQ language from its official rules in recent days, it marked the end of a half-century of debates over LGBTQ inclusion in mainline Protestant denominations.